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Google Gives 15,000 Raspberry Pis To UK Schools

Soulskill posted about 2 years ago | from the sowing-seeds-of-education dept.

Education 159

Grench writes "Search giant Google is providing funding to the Raspberry Pi Foundation to give 15,000 new Raspberry Pi Model B computers to schools all around the United Kingdom. Google Giving's partnership with the Raspberry Pi Foundation is a significant investment in UK IT education; it is hoped this will help turn around the decline in UK schoolkids going on to study IT in colleges or universities. The Foundation said, 'CoderDojo, Code Club, Computing at Schools, Generating Genius, Teach First and OCR will each be helping us identify those kids, and will also be helping us work with them. ... Grants like this show us that companies like Google aren’t prepared to wait for government or someone else to fix the problems we’re all discussing, but want to help tackle them themselves.' 15,000 Model B units at $35 each would run $525,000."

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Mmm .... Pi (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734409)

I like Pi

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734447)

I guess its cheaper than paying taxes, if G paid their taxes the gov could give every kid a brand new laptop.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 years ago | (#42734461)

I guess its cheaper than paying taxes, if G paid their taxes the gov could give every kid a brand new laptop.

$500K is a lot cheaper than Google's tax liability, methinks.

Raspberry or Pork? Raspberry (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734625)

I guess its cheaper than paying taxes, if G paid their taxes the gov could give every kid a brand new laptop.

$500K is a lot cheaper than Google's tax liability, methinks.

How cynical. I prefer money being spent this way as opposed to it going to taxes that gets spent on god knows what.

Re:Raspberry or Pork? Raspberry (2)

nadaou (535365) | about 2 years ago | (#42734885)

> How cynical. I prefer money being spent this way as opposed to
> it going to taxes that gets spent on god knows what.

irony of the week award here -- we have a winner!

Re:Raspberry or Pork? Raspberry (2)

tlambert (566799) | about 2 years ago | (#42735149)

We could have bought 35 cluster bombs at $13,941 each, if this weren't being wasted on education this way.

Honestly, this was initiated by a group at Google UK, and had nothing to do with taxes.

$4,100,000,000 taxes paid last year, 50% of profit (-1, Troll)

raymorris (2726007) | about 2 years ago | (#42734877)

About half of Google's profit goes to income taxes, 62% to taxes in general. Last year, Google Inc. paid about $2,600,000,000 in income taxes on their profit. Then when those same profits went to the owners (stockholders), the stockholders paid another $1,500,000 in taxes on that same money. So about half the profit goes to income taxes. It doesn't stop there, of course. A stockholder who had a $1,000 share of the profit gets $500 after income taxes and they then use that money to buy gas, for example. If they buy gas, they pay another 12% gas tax, so they only get 88 cents worth of gas for every $2 originally earned. Maybe they paid their mortgage with the money. Property tax is about 27% of the mortgage payment on a house, so for every $100 in earnings, they can pay $37 of mortgage. The other $63 goes to taxes. I guess you think a total tax rate of 63% is too low. Here's the deal. I've invested time and money to open businesses and hire people for the last twenty years. To open a business, I have to invest (risk) money for an office, equipment, salaries for the first three-six months, marketing, etc. I risked that money hiring people to develop something in hopes of making a profit. Do you think I'm going to put my life savings at risk in hopes of getting 37% of the profit, if there is any, while paying 63% to Washington bureaucrats? How about when it's almost guaranteed I can't make a profit because Obama says we have to get the insurance that covers aromatherapy and crap, at a cost of $800 / month per employee? Hell no. I'm in the process of shutting down my businesses. That's what the current 63% total tax rate gets you - businesses shut down, people out of work. See also "California".

Re:$4,100,000,000 taxes paid last year, 50% of pro (3, Insightful)

ahabswhale (1189519) | about 2 years ago | (#42735109)

I have my own business and I pay nothing close to this 63% tax rate that you mention and I cannot imagine how you can even get there. If you're paying anywhere near that, then you need a new fucking accountant because your current one is stealing from you. FYI...in the US, over half of all companies pay no taxes (other than their payroll tax).

Re:$4,100,000,000 taxes paid last year, 50% of pro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735311)

I'm in the process of shutting down my businesses. That's what the current 63% total tax rate gets you - businesses shut down, people out of work.

Plenty of businesses are doing fine, so I suspect the problem is not with the taxes, but rather with you. For some reason, you have failed where others have succeeded. Don't worry, you're in good company. Lots of business owners fail.

I am also a small business owner, and I have no problems with the taxes I pay. It would be difficult for me to run my business without a functioning government. I appreciate that the government provides me with a pool of educated and healthy employees, provides a transportation network that allows me and my goods to travel efficiently and safely, protects me and my money from criminals, and generally provides me with a clean, safe place to live and do business. They even provide me with a safety net so that if my business does fail, I won't die of starvation.

Re:$4,100,000,000 taxes paid last year, 50% of pro (2)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 years ago | (#42735335)

yeah, right 'obama is making poor businesses pay for health care of its employees'.

you know, the things our grandfathers fought for (unions in the midst of horrible working conditions) have been forgotton.

business has gotton nearly a free ride for DECADES. now, we are trying to do what's right for people and you assholes complain about money. the business SHOULD take care of its people. we are not animals! at least we strive not to be.

consider this a payment on a bill that went unpaid for a very long time. it 'hurts' but it hurts more when you are put out on the street if/when you get badly sick and the insurance co's cancel you.

business == freeloaders. and now, the bill is overdue. PAY UP and shut the fuck up.

Re:$4,100,000,000 taxes paid last year, 50% of pro (2)

Lincolnshire Poacher (1205798) | about 2 years ago | (#42735495)

I'm in the process of shutting down my businesses. That's what the current 63% total tax rate gets you

Umm, corporation tax only applies to *profits*. That is, money your business couldn't find a way to spend. Excess cash. Surplus.

If you are really in the position of paying 63% corporation tax then CONGRATULATIONS you are running a profitable business. Next year, try ploughing additional funds into R&D or more staff so that you don't have so much net revenue.

Re:$4,100,000,000 taxes paid last year, 50% of pro (1)

dominux (731134) | about 2 years ago | (#42735881)

woosh, as the point goes straight past you. You appear to have done all your calculations in dollars. The problem with Google's tax affairs is that they do lots of business in the UK in pounds and pay very very little corporation tax because they use a double irish arrangement to wriggle out of tax on profit. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Irish_arrangement [wikipedia.org]

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734571)

Google does pay their taxes, so this is either a fractional or complete write-off against those tax liabilities. What everyone is pissed about is that Google, like every major company, knows how to not pay more than they're required to.

Yes, that means someone actually has to change some tax law if they want more money from Google et al.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734685)

Google pays assloads of taxes, they just pay them to the place they're incorporated in. Either change the laws or STFU, you wouldn't pay more taxes than you're required to, so why should they?

Re:Mmm .... Pi (1)

TheGoodNamesWereGone (1844118) | about 2 years ago | (#42734757)

Mod up

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734865)

I can't change the laws.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 years ago | (#42735339)

social responsibility mean anything to you?

guess not.

GIMME MINE AND FARK YOU.

yeah, I got your number.

Off-topic (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735061)

if G paid their taxes the gov

The fact that you post it in a belief that your supporting your favourite mega corporation is a little sad, I assume you are posting AC because Apple and Microsoft are equally good [if not better] at avoiding paying tax.

The reality all companies over 100 employees avoid paying any tax, pretending that its *unique* to Google or *new* f**king sickens me, as the problem is the system needs to be fixed.

Re:Off-topic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735185)

You are sad and sickened? You should take a day off and go smell some kittens!

Re:Off-topic (2)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about 2 years ago | (#42735357)

the diff is: MS and apple never EVER claimed to 'do no evil'.

one could argue that avoiding social responsibility (and making huge profits on the backs of others) *is* being evil.

we all know that corps are whores. they'll do anything for a buck and not think twice. fine. but when you cry 'we are not evil!' you had better mean it.

and they clearly are just paying lip service.

apple and MS are not dishonest in this regard. they are not ashamed of their profit-based mentality. but google tries to have it both ways. that's their fail.

Not an excuse (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735715)

Apple and Microsoft do not get a free pass, and have four times the money off-shore, simply because Google has irrelevant informal corporate motto does not justify your bile.

*All* Corporations should pay tax, and that includes Google, your post is a reflection on yourself not Google.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734609)

The R-Pi has reliability issues, especially with it's USB I/O and quirky power supply requirements. There's going to be a lot of frustrated school kids if they try to use the R-Pi for any length of time.

A much more impressive gift would've been 15,000 Cubieboards.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (1)

TheGoodNamesWereGone (1844118) | about 2 years ago | (#42734785)

I was thinking along the same lines. Kudos and attaboys to Google for doing this, but what this gift unintentionally did was cause the schools to need to buy I/O devices for those machines. Why not 15000 OLPCs, which are 'complete'?

Re:Mmm .... Pi (2)

julesh (229690) | about 2 years ago | (#42735235)

I was thinking along the same lines. Kudos and attaboys to Google for doing this, but what this gift unintentionally did was cause the schools to need to buy I/O devices for those machines. Why not 15000 OLPCs, which are 'complete'?

Because OLPCs have a different focus. OLPC is intended as a general purpose learning tool, while RPi is intended specifically to teach electronics & computer science. Presumably goolgle wanted the latter outcome rather than the former.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734871)

The Pi's really aren't problematic. They're cheap enough and there's LOTS of people working with them. I don't think it's a problem.

Re:Mmm .... Pi (2)

Viceice (462967) | about 2 years ago | (#42734881)

You're looking at it the wrong way. The device works, but like most things man made, it has shortcomings. Imagine the learning experience the kids will have in overcoming these limitations.

What if the next version of the R-Pi contains a fix to these problems developed by a bunch of kids in one of those schools? Wouldn't that be cool?

Re:Mmm .... Pi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735501)

1300 cubieboards have shipped so far. Good luck buying 15 never mind 15000 of those things.

Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (3, Insightful)

Just Brew It! (636086) | about 2 years ago | (#42734493)

I don't see this accomplishing much though. If they're given to teachers for classroom use, most of the teachers aren't going to know what the fuck to do with them, and they'll sit forgotten at the back of desk drawers and supply cabinets for 20 years. If they're given directly to students, we'll see a flood of 14,950 of 'em hitting eBay before you can say "Hey, cool -- these are actually worth real money!" and "I don't know what happened to it, the dog must've dragged it off and buried it!"

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (2, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 2 years ago | (#42734679)

When I was in highschool, schools were filled with Macs. Worthless in the realworld, in the buisness world... you know, where you could actually get a job. My senior year physics teacher brought the first PC into the school. Then, those of us that knew PCs came out of the woodwork. The entire school was converted to PC's in less than 2 years.

If even 5% of these make it into the hands of students that give a shit, it's going to make a world of difference in their lives. In my graduating class of 400, I'd guess than 3 or 4 of us knew shit about a computer. That's less than 1% and my generation created what we now call the internet. All of us with our own small parts. That's was going on here... giving people the opportunity to be a small part of something much bigger. What will come after the internet? I don't know... but it wont get created by people with iPhones and Windows Metro. You've got to give them the tools, and let them loose.

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (1)

Just Brew It! (636086) | about 2 years ago | (#42734747)

I sincerely hope I am proven wrong, and that those 50 that don't end up on eBay do make a difference.

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (1)

nadaou (535365) | about 2 years ago | (#42734873)

man, you people are all so negative an synical. it's like.. a bummer

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (1)

Just Brew It! (636086) | about 2 years ago | (#42734901)

Seeing the state of public education in the US first-hand will do that to you. Is the UK any better?

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (1)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about 2 years ago | (#42735687)

It must be as we know to put 'u' in colour, honour etc. You lot can't even spell 'aluminium' correctly.

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (1)

ais523 (1172701) | about 2 years ago | (#42735821)

Yes, but not by as much as you'd like, and it's been getting slowly worse over time for a while now.

The government - whichever party is in charge - has attempted to attribute the steady increase in grades to students being better-taught / cleverer, but are failing to hide the main causes of that, which are that the courses are being simplified and the grade boundaries adjusted so that you get higher grades for the same quality of work from the students. Most of this is subjective, but as an objective example, the year after I completed my Mathematics A-level (exam taken at approximately 18 years old, and the usual qualification used to obtain entrance to university), they pretty much directly removed 1/6 of the syllabus. (Precisely what happened: you had to take 6 exams, 3 of which were compulsory and 3 of which you could choose from a set. They changed the course to have 4 compulsory exams, which together covered the same material as the previous 3 compulsory exams, and requiring the choice of 2 of the optional exams. This lets you drop one of the optional exams, reducing the syllabus you have to cover, while still getting the same qualification.)

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734979)

> Whining about Macs

Are you serious you fucking tard? Back then the whole publishing industry was using Mac not to mention post-production studios. Other than that everything was UNIX. I guess you were expecting to get a job with your l33t Doom skillz?

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735657)

Publishing was a lucky mistake. By the time QuarkXPress made it to Windows and was superior to the Apple version all Graphic designers were belong to a disfunctional computer company.

Read the fucking article ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734793)

"If they're given directly to students, we'll see a flood of 14,950 of 'em hitting eBay", Just Brew It!

I don't know about where you went to school, but most kids are desperately curious about the insides of electronic gizmos. And the teachers are going to get fucking professional help with the fucking devices ...

"To help ensure teachers and children get the best out of the devices, Google and Raspberry Pi are working with six educational partners, including Code Club, Computing at School, Generating Genius and Coderdojo. They will distribute the devices to schools around the UK".

Kind of the Point (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42734977)

I don't see this accomplishing much though. If they're given to teachers for classroom use, most of the teachers aren't going to know what the fuck to do with them

The pi was invented to solve the problem of students leaving without computer science skills [only office skills], part of the problem is solved by the raspberry pi, cheap hackable equipment....if the teachers are not capable of teaching as you claim...that is a different problem.

Re:Kind of the Point (1)

hughbar (579555) | about 2 years ago | (#42735661)

Agree, but that's the 'big' digital divide problem, not hardware/software, everywhere has been flooded with that, but teaching is problem, maintenance of an inventory of equipment is a problem. I live in the East End of London and have seen expensive grant-funded computer suites lying useless because no-one much knows about firewalls, anti-virus, teaching people about phishing, drive-by all the 'elementary' things for the geek-minded. Then when they 'work' there's no cash for teaching and limited access [one hour a week was quoted by a kid who came to one of our drop-ins].

Teaching and maintenance is more labour intensive and expensive than just giving away a load of stuff to get a little positive publicity. Also, we in the UK are not very keen on Google at the moment, another specialist in fiscal dumping, like Starbucks and Amazon.

Teaching is different? (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735755)

Teaching and maintenance is more labour intensive and expensive

I'm sorry, your wishy washy excuses may work in some circles, but for everyone else in the computing industry [every industry] constant retraining, and reactions to current trends is essential. I cannot remember the last time in my life I wasn't in some form of retaining or other.

As for popularity being a factor. I'm sorry, cutting your nose of to spite your children is a disgrace. As I say everywhere corporations need to pay tax, scapegoating a few corporations, especially when worse offenders like Microsoft and Apple is morally questionable.

Re:Teaching is different? (1)

HuguesT (84078) | about 2 years ago | (#42736157)

Constant retraining in one's field is relatively easy. It would take most developers only a little effort to learn a new programming language, or the latest trend in web-oriented methodologies. Now you may agree that if one moved developers into management, going them to do an MBA is going to require massive efforts and not inconsequential investment from their company. Yet moving a developer into management without this massive retraining is not unlikely to result in a disaster.

Now the teachers in elementary and high schools' expertise is in education, not computer science. This is a massively different field for most people. For a start, even elementary logic does not apply very well to most students. Try to organize a class according to some mathematical principle and watch what happens. We are not talking about a little retraining here.

Re:Kudos to Google for their geeky naivete (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735523)

From the Raspberry Pi website

We’re going to be working with Google and six UK educational partners to find the kids who we think will benefit from having their very own Raspberry Pi. CoderDojo, Code Club, Computing at Schools, Generating Genius, Teach First and OCR will each be helping us identify those kids, and will also be helping us work with them. You’ll already have seen the Raspberry Pi teaching materials from Computing at Schools; OCR will also be creating 15,000 free teaching and learning packs to go with the Raspberry Pis

Google's Philanthropy program is PR genius (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734515)

They get amazing PR from the geek press for contributing spare change in Larry and Sergei's coin jar, and they don't even have to open source their code except for some stray "neat hacks" that have zero business relevance. "Summer of Code" was another example.

What about the USA (1)

espiesp (1251084) | about 2 years ago | (#42734545)

Google, where are the Raspberry Pi for the kids in the United States???

Re:What about the USA (1)

ChrisSlicks (2727947) | about 2 years ago | (#42734595)

They didn't feel guilty enough about their US tax evasion since "all the cool kids do it".

Re:What about the USA (1)

webminer (1619915) | about 2 years ago | (#42734797)

Why not kids in Asia, Africa or any other continent? Obviously, Google does not generate their revenue from US alone. They might be 'US-based' or whatever that means, but the people who work there are from tens of countries around the world and their products are consumed by people around the world. I understand you are American and obviously want to know why your fellow citizens are not benefiting from this. But this is not a zero-sum game. Every bit, anywhere in the world helps!

Re:What about the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734945)

Why not kids in Asia, Africa or any other continent?

The kids with free R-Pi's will need parents wealthy enough to buy all the add-ons to make it useable. England is a good choice. The average IQ of Africa is too low to expect anything 'interesting' to be invented there.

Re:What about the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42736123)

You are an elitist jerk for making that statement. When given the technology, kids in Africa do amizing things with it. Your racist, ignorant comment can only be forgiven if you live your life in a bubble. May your ilk die out, and soon.

Use a better ARM SoC (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734817)

The Broadcom chip in the Raspberry Pi is based on an antique ARM11 and it has a severely broken USB controller in the device which can't be fixed. Google is doing the US kids a favor by *not* buying this flaky board for them.

In all likelihood Google is planning something for US school kids as well, but since Google is technically competent, it'll probably be based on a modern ARM like a Cortex-A8, A9 or A15, with a USB that works properly, and probably tied to their Android ecosystem. It would be very strategic.

You keep posting this, but you're wrong (2)

tlambert (566799) | about 2 years ago | (#42735219)

The USB problem is not intrinsic to the chip, it's intrinsic to the board design with a loopback on the power rail. Because of this it wasn't possible to do high speed USB because you couldn't raise the voltage out of the PMU with the other rail effectively holding it to the lower voltage.

You can ECN it yourself, if you have a microscope soldering station and know how to manually solder BGA devices, or you can just damn well by the new revision of the board instead, it's not like they cost that much. I know this because I ECN'ed mine with a microscope soldering station.

Either way, this has been discussed in pretty deep detail in the Raspberry Pi forums, along with the fact that weren't going to change the board design during the production run where the board problem was first root-caused.

Maybe if it was a US initiative. (3, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42734963)

Google, where are the Raspberry Pi for the kids in the United States???

Maybe because the Raspberry Pi is...an UK project started at the University of Cambridge to solve a UK problem. Computing becoming less about computer science...and more about web design and office.

Its not a bias thing. The UK is not getting Google Fiber. ;)

Re:Maybe if it was a US initiative. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735099)

How is plugging a bunch of peripherals into an antiquated ARM board "about computer science"? If that's computer science then your average sweatshop peon must be Alan Turing.

From the website. (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735125)

How is plugging a bunch of peripherals into an antiquated ARM board "about computer science"? If that's computer science then your average sweatshop peon must be Alan Turing.

From the About us on the raspberry pi website. http://www.raspberrypi.org/about [raspberrypi.org]

"The idea behind a tiny and cheap computer for kids came in 2006, when Eben Upton and his colleagues at the University of Cambridge’s Computer Laboratory, including Rob Mullins, Jack Lang and Alan Mycroft, became concerned about the year-on-year decline in the numbers and skills levels of the A Level students applying to read Computer Science in each academic year. From a situation in the 1990s where most of the kids applying were coming to interview as experienced hobbyist programmers, the landscape in the 2000s was very different; a typical applicant might only have done a little web design.

Something had changed the way kids were interacting with computers. A number of problems were identified: the colonisation of the ICT curriculum with lessons on using Word and Excel, or writing webpages; the end of the dot-com boom; and the rise of the home PC and games console to replace the Amigas, BBC Micros, Spectrum ZX and Commodore 64 machines that people of an earlier generation learned to program on."

Re:Maybe if it was a US initiative. (1)

Arashi256 (1804688) | about 2 years ago | (#42735781)

Because it makes a small Linux machine extremely affordable for those who otherwise might not have access to it, you dumb shit.

The boards are built in the UK (2)

tlambert (566799) | about 2 years ago | (#42735229)

Which mens that there are no additional import/export issues, if they are sold and distributed in the UK.

If you are in some other location in the world, design your own damn board, or just manufacture the Raspberry Pi boards locally from the UK circuit diagrams and get your local equivalent of UL and FCC certifications, and money might materialize for your local schools as well ... or not. This happened in the UK because some UK Googlers were excited enough about it to push up their management chain. You;d also need to get Googlers in your country interested to the same degree, or find some other company you can convince to fund it.

Re:What about the USA (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 2 years ago | (#42735627)

Isn't R-pi a UK company? That could be a factor. Shuffling £ from one british org to another and all the money stays in the country.

Re:What about the USA (1)

Isaac Remuant (1891806) | about 2 years ago | (#42735649)

I'd prefer Google to focus on third world countries before any of those... I might be biased though, considering I'm living in one. :P

I gave my teachers (2)

ozduo (2043408) | about 2 years ago | (#42734605)

plenty of raspberry's in my time, they gave me caning's. No you can't see the scars: pervert!

Re:I gave my teachers (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 2 years ago | (#42735545)

plenty of raspberry ' s in my time, they gave me caning ' s.

I'm assuming it was mainly English teachers.

How about Pi Pis (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734639)

Wasn't there just a story about Google giving out pi million dollars? Maybe they should give pi million Pis to schools next? Or e million Pis? Or...

Children report being dissastified. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734653)

They wanted Blueberry Pie.

Except the high school kids, they wanted Apple Pie for some reason.

Re:Children report being dissastified. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735009)

They wanted Blueberry Pie.

Except the high school kids, they wanted Apple Pie for some reason.

I think you mean Cherry Pie.

if microsoft or apple did this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734699)

all you fairies would be whining all day.

if anybody actually wanted one of those raspberry turds they could just buy one...

...but they didn't (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735023)

all you fairies would be whining all day.

if anybody actually wanted one of those raspberry turds they could just buy one...

Ignoring your anger issues, They have given *cheap* *open* *hackable* devices, to build platform independent computer *science* skills, which can only be considered wonderful. If they had given out [locked] Chromebooks [or Google Docs] to lock children into their ecosystem, I'd be looking at this the same as the whole Discounted *cough* Apple/Microsoft products for schools we have seen for years, like crack.

Re:...but they didn't (1)

tlambert (566799) | about 2 years ago | (#42735251)

Ignoring your anger issues, They have given *cheap* *open* *hackable* devices, to build platform independent computer *science* skills, which can only be considered wonderful. If they had given out [locked] Chromebooks [or Google Docs] to lock children into their ecosystem, I'd be looking at this the same as the whole Discounted *cough* Apple/Microsoft products for schools we have seen for years, like crack.

There's a switch in all Chromebooks to unlock them. There's a boot warning screen when booting unlocked devices, and a delay while the things actually unlock on first boot after the switch is flipped, but after that, they are fully unlocked. You'll get the boot warning screen each time, but you can hit a key to get around that, or just wait the 30 seconds - either way: the thing's fully unlocked.

One of the OS's that can run on a Raspberry Pi is ChromeOS, sans the hardware key escrow, since a TPM would have made the things non-exportable to 5 countries who restrict their citizens from using strong cryptography (Russia, China, Uzbekistan, etc.).

Why? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734721)

I have one question: why?

They could have easily invested in a dozen existing programs, or made their own. They could have gotten everyone a wicked deal on second-generation laptops or something. Hell, Google could have setup a giant VM farm on their end ("in the cloud") and given everyone free access to their own tiny private networks running whatever it is you're studying about (Exchange, Active Directory, etc). They've certainly got the hardware and the resources to do something like that if they wanted to.

No, no, let's not do anything useful like that.

Let's send them a giant shipment of FIFTEEN THOUSAND antiquated ARM based boards that require even more additional hardware to do anything with (monitor, keyboard, mouse, SD card, GPIO breakout board, etc). Yes, yes, I'm sure after the kiddies have dealt with the horrors of trying to configure their own distribution of Linux on the Pi and trying to get X.org to operate in a semi-accelerated way- they'll totally want to get into Information Technologies even more then before.

I don't get it. Once again, I see the Raspberry Pi being physically shoehorned into a situation that doesn't call for them, or a situation where a problem was created specifically so the Pi could fix it. I don't understand the obsession with this device. The hardware is crap, the software required to drive the hardware is crap. Why does anyone want these and why are people doing their damnedest to push them on everyone?

IMHO; a laptop (even a second or third or forth generation unit- anything like a Core Duo or Core 2 Duo) would be infinitely more useful to these kinds of kids then a friggin' Pi. Give the Pi to the kid in electrical engineering who might actually know what to do with the GPIOs and turn it into a semi-useful project.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734819)

The Raspberry Pi is considered cool by the geek community. It's also reasonably cheap. So buying a bunch of them and giving to people their target market (for the "campaign") cares about is probably a cheap PR move thought out by some marketer to test the waters. Chances are it won't give them much PR, but it doesn't even cost a million and has no chance of backfiring.

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

DeathElk (883654) | about 2 years ago | (#42735013)

Why the fuck would anybody be "studying" about Exchange or Active Directory? This is intended to lay the groundwork for interest in REAL computing.

Re:Why? (1)

isorox (205688) | about 2 years ago | (#42736061)

Why the fuck would anybody be "studying" about Exchange or Active Directory? This is intended to lay the groundwork for interest in REAL computing.

OP is an obvious troll pretending to be a shill pretending to be a troll

RTFA that's whole point, not more cubicle drones (4, Insightful)

raymorris (2726007) | about 2 years ago | (#42735037)

running whatever it is you're studying about (Exchange, Active Directory, etc).

RTFA. The point of the thing is that the young generation knows how to RUN software, but who is going to design quantum CPUs in 2030, or invent the next revolution like the Internet? You don't learn to build new technologies by practicing being an MS cubicle drone running Exchange.

Hell, with the prodicts you mentioned you're not even ALLOWED to try to figure out how they work. That's called reverse engineering and it's against the license. The whole point of the Pi is to first learn how things work, then use that knowledge to build entirely new and better things.

Re:RTFA that's whole point, not more cubicle drone (4, Insightful)

julesh (229690) | about 2 years ago | (#42735273)

Hell, with the prodicts you mentioned you're not even ALLOWED to try to figure out how they work. That's called reverse engineering and it's against the license.

Here in the UK, the right to reverse engineer is legally mandated by statute, so they can't take it away with license terms.

It is not an infringement of copyright for a lawful user of a copy of a computer program to observe, study or test the functioning of the program in order to determine the ideas and principles which underlie any element of the program if he does so while performing any of the acts of loading, displaying, running, transmitting or storing the program which he is entitled to do.

and

Article 6
Decompilation
1. The authorisation of the rightholder shall not be required
where reproduction of the code and translation of its form
within the meaning of points (a) and (b) of Article 4(1) are
indispensable to obtain the information necessary to achieve
the interoperability of an independently created computer
program with other programs, provided that the following
conditions are met:
(a) those acts are performed by the licensee or by another
person having a right to use a copy of a program, or on
their behalf by a person authorised to do so;
(b) the information necessary to achieve interoperability has not
previously been readily available to the persons referred to
in point (a); and
(c) those acts are confined to the parts of the original program
which are necessary in order to achieve interoperability.

are both parts of our statutes.

Re:RTFA that's whole point, not more cubicle drone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735623)

AH, but if you break the license, are you still a "a lawful user"? Also the right to reverse engineer is ONLY applicable to devices you own. If you have a device the is tied in with a license that states that the device is the property of the issuer of the license while the license is active (as with some cable boxes) you are not the legal owner and as such can NOT legally reverse engineer the device. As always, there are law to make sure you comply with almost anything ppl with resources wants.

Re:RTFA that's whole point, not more cubicle drone (2)

MrNemesis (587188) | about 2 years ago | (#42735797)

AH, but if you break the license, are you still a "a lawful user"?

Yes. The whole point of statute, and the ensuing statutory rights, is that the rights they confer upon you can't be negated by a license, EULA, or even a contract signed in blood. The UK has a fairly good history of customer-friendly policies in this regard, frequently to the annoyance of foreign companies.

http://whatconsumer.co.uk/what-are-my-statutory-rights/ [whatconsumer.co.uk]

It gets a bit more nebulous as you describe the "rented device and service" scenario, but I don't believe that's been tested in the UK courts yet. There's certainly a lot of people who've hardhacked things like their Sky+ boxes to do things like add extra storage and migrating recordings off the box are common, and so far there's been no legal repercussions TTBOMK.

No user serviceable parts inside--NOT! (2)

dido (9125) | about 2 years ago | (#42735375)

I'm currently reading Vernor Vinge's Rainbows End, and one of the chapters is entitled "No User Serviceable Parts Inside." That's something that you see a lot in today's electronics (and even software), and it is extremely frustrating for a would-be tinkerer who wants to learn how things work, the way I was when I was a kid. About thirty years ago an aunt of mine got me a C-64, and it was on such a platform that I first learned how to program, first in BASIC, and then later 6502 machine language (by peeks and pokes off a photocopied reference manual and manual relative branch offset calculations, lots of fun!). Until the Raspberry Pi, there existed no cheap system where hacking even close to like what I used to do as a kid was possible. That's what the vision of the Pi is supposed to be about as I understand it. It is intended not to hold the user's hand so much, but to teach them how things work. This is something for those kids that, were they kids 30 years ago, would have taught themselves 6502 machine language from photocopied references and soldered together some TTL circuitry and plugged that into a printer port.

Re:No user serviceable parts inside--NOT! (1)

ais523 (1172701) | about 2 years ago | (#42735835)

This still worked 10 years ago. Admittedly, 6502-based computers were quite rare by then, but also very cheap because most people considered them junk. (And my machine code reference manual was a book, rather than photocopied.)

The putting hand-soldered circuitry into the printer ports came later for me, with Windows (back then I hadn't more than vaguely heard of Linux) and an RS232 port. That's still possible nowadays, although you probably need to get a USB to RS232 convertor (i.e. an RS232 port that's driven over USB) in order to get a computer with the appropriate ports.

I hate google. They killed youtube. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42734739)

They killed Youtube. No amount of PR campaigns will win me back after killing the last free voice people like us had.

Wow off topic again (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735079)

They killed Youtube. No amount of PR campaigns will win me back after killing the last free voice people like us had.

Their is still a website where you can look up all the gems of yesteryear :) http://stupid-youtube-comments.blogspot.co.uk/ [blogspot.co.uk]

I leave this quote from the The Guardian in 2009 described users' comments on YouTube as:

"Juvenile, aggressive, misspelled, sexist, homophobic, swinging from raging at the contents of a video to providing a pointlessly detailed description followed by a LOL, YouTube comments are a hotbed of infantile debate and unashamed ignorance – with the occasional burst of wit shining through" ...ironically though your posting this AC :)

Re:I hate google. They killed youtube. (2)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about 2 years ago | (#42735337)

They killed Youtube. No amount of PR campaigns will win me back after killing the last free voice people like us had.

Look on the bright side, you can still troll /.

Re:I hate google. They killed youtube. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735655)

No amount of PR campaigns will win me back after killing the last free voice people like us had.

Well you could run your own website...

Which means another .... (1)

i-reek (1140437) | about 2 years ago | (#42734759)

delay for anybody wanting to purchase a Raspberry Pi for personal use.

Google gives 15,000 Raspberry Pi to schools (2)

hcs_$reboot (1536101) | about 2 years ago | (#42734839)

To be precise, Google gave 15,708 Raspberry Pi. That's ten thousands pi / 2. Yes Google likes pi! [redorbit.com] .

Balance in education (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735005)

It's good to see big companies like google donating all these resources to kids. It's great the kids are getting more support but I don't think their fundamental education should be changed/catered to align with google's view/vision of the future (or just, Microsoft/Oracle/Cisco.... any tech giant). It's good to have CS and Math background but it's also important for kids to not just follow the market demand but also pursue what really interest them

Google gives 15,000 Raspberry Pi to schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735039)

maybe if Google woud pay their f***ing taxes as they should, the schools could afford the Pi's for themselves....

Poor returns (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735093)

maybe if Google woud pay their f***ing taxes as they should, the schools could afford the Pi's for themselves....

They would be better catching up with Apple or Microsoft for Tax avoidence as they have more money squirreled offshore http://www.businessinsider.com/tax-loophole-congress-google-apple-microsoft-2012-12 [businessinsider.com] four times as much as Google.

I suspect your being a little disingenuous. :)

Re:Google gives 15,000 Raspberry Pi to schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735297)

Pretty sure any money Google paid to the government for schools would go the same place all the other money for schools has gone: political pockets, political cronies pockets, bureaucratic pockets, union pockets, pension funds, and administrative pockets (in that order). If even half the money California collected for education actually got to the schools themselves, kids would not need to share desks or buy their own big red pencils. There is a reason anyone who can afford to sends their kids to private schools instead.

Why only the Pi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735173)

And in one swoop all other manufacturers of hobby board was put out of buissness. "Free" can really hurt the economy and "ecosystem" quite a lot if it is done wrong...

Seriously? (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 years ago | (#42735243)

And in one swoop all other manufacturers of hobby board was put out of buissness. "Free" can really hurt the economy and "ecosystem" quite a lot if it is done wrong...

...or start a trend, devices like the raspberry pi, are nothing new, but right now, because [not in spite of] the success of the raspberry pi there is a whole host of new boards out there, and in reality like every other market companies have to compete on there own merits, personally the raspberry pi does not interest me. It does not have enough memory or processing power or sata, and I am far from being the only one.

Ahhh that's why delivery was delayed (1)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about 2 years ago | (#42735221)

I was wondering why there was such a wait for deliveries. Now we know, Google bought tens of thousands of them and distributed them to people who'll use them as door jams.

Re: Ahhh that's why delivery was delayed (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735319)

raspberry door jams, you mean.

How about taxes? (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about 2 years ago | (#42735493)

Keep your hardware. If they paid the amount of tax it'd benefit the schools a lot more.

Re:How about taxes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735531)

They do pay their taxes. That's why the do business in places with less tax.

Shilling for Broadcom (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735805)

I like the sentiment but too bad they picked the PI which is basically a PR program from Broadcom to sell their highly proprietary SoC. These guys are all into "open source" when it gets them photo ops and press with smiling multi-cultural children but as soon as you want to fork and do your own thing with it they send the lawyers.

Re:Shilling for Broadcom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735815)

Yeah. You actually have to sign an NDA just to look at the datasheet from Broadcom! This is about as open as the CIA's budget.

Re:Shilling for Broadcom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 years ago | (#42735827)

The Olimexino is similar, almost as cheap and truly open:
https://www.olimex.com/Products/OLinuXino/

Donations never replace real funding. (1)

Ouilsen (1459391) | about 2 years ago | (#42735919)

Great. 500000$ are maybe 20 teachers (without infrastructure) for 1 year. It is indeed great that Google donates money to schools and I do not want to belittle that fact. However phrases like these leave me baffled:

  Google aren't prepared to wait for government or someone else to fix the problems...

Not Google, nor any other private company or entity is going to fix the education system. That is the whole point of having public schools. Without the state committing to education you are screwed. There is not a single example in history where a private education system succeeded in the long run.

Re:Donations never replace real funding. (2)

backwardMechanic (959818) | about 2 years ago | (#42736037)

I think Eton might disagree with you. Maybe you're a geologist or something, but it's been running since 1440 - that's quite a long run. I'm not saying I like it, but it clearly works.

Ridiculous (1, Funny)

gweihir (88907) | about 2 years ago | (#42736101)

What's that, Google running out of money? This sum is so low for the search giant that is comes close to being an insult.

OFFS! (1)

pbjones (315127) | about 2 years ago | (#42736111)

there will be 14,000 in the rubbish bin within a week. Sorry, I just can't imagine 15,000 kids interested in a device that requires serious interaction. I know it sound like trolling, but they will be used in some contrived 'computer hardware and programming' course which will actually appeal to 1% of the people that participate.

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