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Wall Street Journal Hit By Chinese Hackers, Too

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the join-the-party dept.

China 92

wiredmikey writes "The Wall Street Journal said Thursday its computers were hit by Chinese hackers, the latest U.S. media organization citing an effort to spy on its journalists covering China. The Journal made the announcement a day after The New York Times said hackers, possibly connected to China's military, had infiltrated its computers in response to its expose of the vast wealth amassed by a top leader's family. The Journal said in a news article that the attacks were 'for the apparent purpose of monitoring the newspaper's China coverage' and suggest that Chinese spying on U.S. media 'has become a widespread phenomenon.'"

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I choose not to believe this. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756809)

Otherwise, I might come to develop a controversial or uncomfortable opinion (even to me!)

I only believe in one thing ... (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757095)

... that if WSJ was really hacked, it was hacked from the inside --- after all, routing the hack to some servers in Ukraine or China doesn't take much effort at all.

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757345)

Exactly, it's idiotic for them to claim they knew who did it. Unless they found some Chinese Ninja hiding in their telco closest, they have no clue who hacked them. It's just as likely to be the US Government as the Chinese.

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757511)

Ninjas were from Japan.

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757545)

they would also be pretty bad ninjas if you found them

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758405)

Chinese ninjas > Japanese ninjas. Or so it seems ....

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (1)

jadv (1437949) | about a year and a half ago | (#42760863)

Here in Brazil, Toshiba once launched a marketing campaign with the slogan: "Our Japanese are better than everyone else's." One variation of that publicity showed the Little Grasshopper asking Master Po: "Master, why are Toshiba's Japanese better than ours?" And Master Po replied, "Simple, you idiot: Because we are Chinese, not Japanese!"

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about a year and a half ago | (#42761271)

Since we've never discovered the Chinese ninjas, they must be far superior to the Japanese variety!

Re:I only believe in one thing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758719)

whats ignorant are people who assume all evidence is based on IPs or IPs alone.

The Onion also "hacked by Chinese" (1)

billstewart (78916) | about a year and a half ago | (#42764663)

The Onion, America's Finest News Source, reports [theonion.com] that it's cooperating with the Chinese government by giving them its employees' passwords. So it's not just the NYT and WSJ.

If the US government wanted to be proactive (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756843)

...they could have set up the newspaper as a honeypot.

Re:If the US government wanted to be proactive (1, Funny)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757039)

You mean like NPR?

Re:If the US government wanted to be proactive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42764467)

No, that's a pot of honey.

Re:If the US government wanted to be proactive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757043)

Never assume malicious intent when incompetence is just as easily an alternative.

Re:If the US government wanted to be proactive (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758385)

Never assume malicious intent when incompetence is just as easily an alternative.

Since this seems to be a recurring pattern with the Chinese, it seems to me an instructive way of dealing with the problem might be to "reverse" the Great Firewall so no-one in China can make a connection to the outside world at all. And maybe consider letting them back in when they learn to behave.

Re:If the US government wanted to be proactive (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757369)

...they could have set up the newspaper as a honeypot.

well, only in China you have to be a military hacker to read wall street journal.

they're probably interested in sources though. should just give them bullshit sources.

Just turn yourself in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757557)

What do you think would happen to anyone you 'gave' them? Do you think they'd be treated as well as Bradley Manning, or would you expect something more along the lines of a suite at a Mongolian grill styled version of Gitmo...

Think man! Where were you educated, in the states?

News Corp. Subsidiary Complains About Hacking (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756857)

in other news, Pot was reported to have complained about Kettle's excessively dark color.

Interconnectivity is both opportunity and danger. (3, Interesting)

Sheetrock (152993) | about a year and a half ago | (#42756871)

The news of the earlier hack got me thinking about the unique risk/reward of ubiquitous communication and the challenge of computer security to keep pace. Certainly some say the pace of technological innovation is no longer in step with yesterday's, but that almost begs the question. It's truly ironic that modern computing becomes physically smaller as its footprint on our lives looms ever larger with each new year, yet no one disputes that, lately, electronic progress rests solely within the social stratum these days.

We should ask ourselves, however, the rather basic question of whether this seismic shift in the nature of the changes in technology brings with it an impedimentary effect on our lives, or indeed to wonder to the degree technology has ever been pedimentary when it comes right down to it. Yes, it's certainly got its foot in the door, but as with feet and doors it's not always possible to know at the moment of impact whether said foot represents opportunity, doom, or a casualty of a society overeager to shut the door to change.

Certainly the last thing anyone wants is a race to the bottom. Ah, but that's not entirely accurate when one considers the vested interest shoemakers have in most modern day footraces. It suggests that, moving forward, the most important thing to do when evaluating new technology in 2013 may very well be to first identify the shoemakers for that technology. Ask yourself: if I'm already wearing five pairs of socks, do I even need shoes at this point? Odds are, you don't.

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (0)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year and a half ago | (#42756919)

Dr. Spock is the baby doctor famous from the 60s and 70s.

Mr. Spock is the one who has stardates.

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (1)

RoknrolZombie (2504888) | about a year and a half ago | (#42756957)

Not to mention that the quote is from Yoda, and not Mr. Spock...but I guess that's picking nits when the entire sig has to be a joke :p

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757013)

Cum not. Do or cum not, there is no try.
-Dr. MonkeySpunk, stardate anytime.

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (1)

Lije Baley (88936) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757017)

HUZZAH! Trolling sig wins again!

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (1)

WWJohnBrowningDo (2792397) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758541)

Woosh!

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (1)

Genda (560240) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758827)

Was that the Enterprise whooshing by???

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42760339)

Starfleet must have been run by idiots.

Who would be so dumb as to have a Vulcan that can't get a PhD get such a high position on a starship? It's not as if there is a dearth of Vulcans with doctorates.

Spock should have been given a red shirt.

Re:Interconnectivity is both opportunity and dange (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758737)

You've somewhat hit the nail on the head with your subject line. As it turns out, the more democratic western countries are the ones most as risk of some sort of major cyber-based disaster because there quite simply is no separation from of our networks from the world-- not that I agreed with it, but this is in part what SOPA was about. Countries like China or Iran or Cuba that can just cut off access from the outside world are at a supreme advantage.

That said, the long-term solution is that our critical infrastructure (private and public) needs to be taken off of the internet and we need to build a national red network. The problem is the cost and logistics of that would be astounding, however I like to put it in terms of building a national highway system as a means of easing unemployment and boosting the economy, and in this case it would also provide us a fair degree of extra protection, but it will never get done because of the costs

I know a lot of people see it as fear-mongering, but we really do have a significant and real threat of a crippling cyber attack. (many of those same people arent really qualified to speak on computers, despite what their X years as a sysadmin and tech support makes them think)

Same as the old boss. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756877)

Anyone else surprised that China is run by a corrupt dictatorship? Anyone else surprised that the the ruling members amass vast wealth?
Does it happen here? Sure. But at least we can vote the bush family out every once in a while.

The Chinese people aren't' dumb. They know the ruling party is on the take. They see the special privlage, the fancy cars, the vast fortunes. What sucks is the attitude. They either want to ignore it, pretend it's OK as if it's their lot in life to be shit on, or they lust to be one of the powerful so they can step on everyone else.

The Chinese traditional lust for conformity and saving face is ultimately what enslaves them.

Re:Same as the old boss. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756949)

They also want big, American penis.

Re:Same as the old boss. (1)

Genda (560240) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758873)

Oh yeah, Because Gawd knows, there aren't enough Chinese running around on the planet...

Re:Same as the old boss. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757837)

"They either want to ignore it, pretend it's OK as if it's their lot in life to be shit on, or they lust to be one of the powerful so they can step on everyone else."

      You do know you just described everyone in every country on the planet. That's including, err especially Americans.

ID:celle
cap:nonsense

Re:Same as the old boss. (1)

Genda (560240) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758859)

And that's why America's yearning to each and every one be unique in exactly the same way, make them superior to your average Chinese person.

Fud (2, Informative)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about a year and a half ago | (#42756907)

China’s Ministry of National Defense said, “Chinese laws prohibit any action including hacking that damages Internet security.” It added that “to accuse the Chinese military of launching cyberattacks without solid proof is unprofessional and baseless.”

Couldn't agree more. There's no evidence, just accusations without any basis. Yet another example of the US media making sensationalist claims which deride the leadership of China and rail public opinion against them.

Personally, if I were a government looking to contend with another government, my best weapon would be a false flag faceless cyber attack against a large news media organisation which could be widely publicised and blamed on my enemy without any evidence. That would not only rail public opinion against the 'other' government, but justify my expanded spending on 'Cyber Security'.

If I was really lucky, the unemployed US computer geeks on /. might evren pick up the story and start attacking (morally and perhaps directly) the Chinese authorities. Not only would 'Cyber Security' become even more of a well known issue, but controlling the internet (ie. SOPA) could be put back on the cards AND my opponent would be under attack without me having to raise a finger or accept any blame.

'Cyber Security' is the new 'Terrorism'. Take the red pill.

Re:Fud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756959)

Nice troll but you were a little too obvious!

Re:Fud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756995)

Meh, a war with china would be way more interesting than a war with the middle east. I'm up for it.

Re:Fud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757133)

History repeats. The war was lost years ago, when a sitting U.S. President took campaign donation in the form of paper bags of money from a delegate of the PRC. The USian leaders, and news organizations follow the path to wealth, without regard to the good of the subjects. There is no need to fire shots when you can bribe the gate keepers to let the horde in. The Mongols did this with the Great Wall of China. Now it has come full circle, and the Chinese are bribing our gate keepers with easy cash, and perhapes a nice apartment in Beijing.

It is funny that USians who support good old fashioned family values support a war against religious fundumentalists who believe in traditional families, while the wild and crazy feminists left wants peace with a group of religious fundumentalists who want to make women follow 6 steps behind the man. In the meantime our children are getting an education that would label them an imbecile in any other coutry, and NFL plays on and on...

Re:Fud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757015)

Hey there shill poster. Go back to your PRC handler.

Chinese law doesn't apply to ruling members of the party.

Re:Fud (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757847)

Chinese law doesn't apply to ruling members of the party.

It does if enough other Party members say that it does.

In other words, it's not much different from how such things work out in the US.

Re:Fud (0)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757081)

The cockheads running China are perfectly capable of railing public opinion against themselves.

That's what you get when you put a bunch of hand-flapping aspie psychopaths in charge of such a big country.

Re:Fud (2)

Stuntmonkey (557875) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757105)

Couldn't agree more. There's no evidence, just accusations without any basis.

I know you're trolling here, but there's a broader point people should understand.

There are strong disincentives for any organization to report hacking attempts on their systems. Factors at play are: (a) nobody likes to admit they have weak security, (b) nobody wants to go public with evidence that would reveal details about their internal systems, and (c) there is usually little or nothing positive to be gained from such an accusation. (What would the WSJ have to gain by giving the Chinese a bad name?) All of this means that these attacks are vastly under-reported, and when companies do report it is usually genuine.

Re:Fud (2)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757211)

What would the WSJ have to gain by giving the Chinese a bad name?

Wider readership? Front page of /.? 'Proof' that their expose on Chinese officials was right? Carrying favour with the US 'Cyber Security' peeps / government .. and probably about 2000 other things .. it all depends how carefully you look at the situation

All of this means that these attacks are vastly under-reported, and when companies do report it is usually genuine

I didn't say that the attack wasn't genuine, and have no doubt that they're vastly under-reported. But you've also got to look at the context of the attack and the relevance to the current position of the organisation. This wasn't a random attack .. that's very key here. Reporting the attack is a response to the direct nature of the attack (ie. taking the moral highground) as well as a defence against the attack continuing.

Re:Fud (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757865)

When I consider seriously the possibility that the Wall Street Journal feels the need to spam Slashdot in order to increase readership, I get the feeling I've lived too long.

Which is obvious nonsense. :)

Re:Fud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758815)

Exactly, plus this: http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/01/28/1921206/officials-warn-cyber-war-on-the-us-has-begun

"us officials" issued an explicit warning just two days ago about their urgent need for one more false flag whatever operation.

I was precisely expecting such news to happen soon.

Bullshit, bullshit everywhere.

At least that's a good thing some believe that crap because they will be the one paying with their fake dollar money. Sodomy is less painfull when you agree to bend.

And when you're done nuking china don't forget to forge one more Platinum coin between two hamburgers America.

I wonder (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42756943)

Why we just don't unplug china...

global internet. not yours. bye now.

Re:I wonder (2)

FrankSchwab (675585) | about a year and a half ago | (#42756999)

Because that would also inhibit all the internet spying that everyone else is doing to the Chinese.

Proof it - proof it was chinese hackers (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757031)

yet another great American false flag operation no doubt.

Sensationalist journalism is all this is go back to CNN or Fox where this type of nonsense belongs.

Re:Proof it - proof it was chinese hackers (0)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757061)

Have the guts to show your name and face, 50 Cent Army

Hypocrites (1)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757055)

They rant and rave and get all butthurt about the embassy bombing in Belgrade.

But somehow, criminal hacking on Western media is somehow nowhere near as bad.

They are the worst hypocrites.

Re:Hypocrites (1)

GrahamJ (241784) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757143)

The Chinese government are certainly hypocrites, and liars as well, but personally I don't think hacking is as bad as bombing.

Re:Hypocrites (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757171)

They are the worst hypocrites.

Yeah those bastards! Good thing they didn't damage any of our centrifuges, but instead only went after the plc's that are used to operate the citizens!

WTF!? (1)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757087)

So if I understand correctly, headlines of the NY Times and the WSJ
tomorrow will read "US does not spy on China"?

Re:WTF!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758201)

In Soviet America you hack China.

Quantity has a quality all its own (4, Interesting)

The Archon V2.0 (782634) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757103)

China has more people of above-average intelligence than America has people. How much of an army of moderately-clever hackers could they put together if they wanted?

Re:Quantity has a quality all its own (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757265)

I suppose it depends on where the average lies....

Re:Quantity has a quality all its own (1)

dkf (304284) | about a year and a half ago | (#42759725)

I suppose it depends on where the average lies....

Big population in both cases, and intelligence is a complex attribute that depends on many variables, so assume bell-curve distributions in both cases. That puts the average at about 50%, and since China has more than twice the population of the US, you'd expect just from mathematics to have "China has more people of above-average intelligence than America has people." be true. There could be some skewing, but the population-level differences between people are fairly small (much smaller than individual-level differences) and wouldn't overcome the massive difference in populations.

In other words, wave your prejudice around all you want you fool: basic math still wins.

Re:Quantity has a quality all its own (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42759275)

Not sure about that. But they should have more smart people than us based upon numeric advantages. And the average Chinese is much smarter than the average Indian, so it will be China and not India that kicks our asses.

Re:Quantity has a quality all its own (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42759813)

That's a lot of potential readers. Quickly, increase the Chinese targeted add content in the WSJ and NYT! They are clearly interested.

Wikileaks? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757283)

Couldn't happen to a better bunch of Blame America First types. I wonder if they'll be expecting any assistance from the NSA or DOD now that they've discovered that hostility is not unique to Anglo Saxon males.

Hey China: dump it all on Wikileaks, please. Let us see what got selectively not reported.

Yes, more government propaganda. (4, Insightful)

7-Vodka (195504) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757287)

Re:Yes, more government propaganda. (1)

ediron2 (246908) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758435)

Anyone else read that second url and think it ended 'cybermen'?

I say welcome to the party, pal! (0)

lexsird (1208192) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757319)

Chinese hacking you? You don't say? They have been messing with us for as long as I can remember. They will ding your firewall so many times that it stops being amusing and starts to give one a nasty attitude. Let's couple that with how they will hack your MMO accounts, rip off your items, sell them to venders if they have to so that they can farm gold. The way they disrespect us by messing with our gaming culture to me is rude. We don't go messing with their entertainment, or messing with their computers. To me it shows how disrespectful, and antagonistic they are.

I think we should hammer them for it. They are way overdue for retribution of the nastiest sort in my opinion.

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757465)

What doesn't kill us makes us stronger, said Fred, and of course the truth of the matter is that there will always be innovative attacks that require cutting-edge defenses. Hail our new IT Overlords.

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42764415)

What doesn't kill us makes us stronger, said Fred

Tell that to someone with severe brain damage from an Afghan IED, in his wheelchair in the nursing home, drooling, unable to do anything about the fly pestering him. Sorry, when I was in college I thought highly of Neitche, but the older I get the less insightful and the more retarded he sounds.

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757469)

Chinese hacking you? You don't say? They have been messing with us for as long as I can remember. They will ding your firewall so many times that it stops being amusing and starts to give one a nasty attitude. Let's couple that with how they will hack your MMO accounts, rip off your items, sell them to venders if they have to so that they can farm gold. The way they disrespect us by messing with our gaming culture to me is rude. We don't go messing with their entertainment, or messing with their computers. To me it shows how disrespectful, and antagonistic they are.

I think we should hammer them for it. They are way overdue for retribution of the nastiest sort in my opinion.

Did you really just advocate a declaration of war against China because your purples were disenchanted?

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757995)

"Did you really just advocate a declaration of war against China"

        I think he did. Just nuk'em as it solves several world problems.
              1. Gets rid of a potential threat.
              2. Solves world population problem.(especially if we accidentally wipe the middle east including india in the process)
              3. Solves resource depletion problem.
              4. Gives the US a chance to get rid of all those old nukes instead of shelling out to decommission them. (cuts maintenance costs as well)
              5. Makes rest of the world stand at attention and get in line.
              6. Solves outsourcing jobs problem.
      Considering the US already said a cyberattack is an act of war, what are we waiting for?

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42760295)

They have ICBMs, too, you know.

u MAD?

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (1)

lexsird (1208192) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758277)

It would appear so on the surface, but let's delve a bit deeper. I see a poster below had given some reasons as well. Let me add mine. China, I believe has be subversively engaging us in trade wars. Our debt to them is not what I would call an act of kindness. I am talking about the flooding of our markets with goods produced at a labor cost that drives American industry into the dirt, taking along with it our economy. I feel one needs to equate these acts of damage to that of warfare, because one doesn't need bombs and guns to destroy or subjugate a nation.

Now I can understand the grand struggle between nations and cultures. China is a very old nation, and perhaps hails the oldest of civilizations on the planet. It pains me greatly that our intellects aren't sharing, and helping each other thrive as good friends and neighbors. What disappoints me most is these personal attacks upon the personage of our country. These "cyber attacks" aren't something new. They antagonistic and exploitative in nature. I am a great admirer of Asian culture in general with its social structures, its respect for elders, and its well defined sense of honor.

What I am not appreciative of is the disrespect show to us as a people; I can understand the struggle between the authorities and the powers that be. But these attacks are done so with impunity, they are winked at and possibly patriotic to them. I don't believe that these are so much done by the State as much as they are by lesser entities, factions, individuals. Their State has been accused of backing this or at least with the "Great Firewall of China", they should know about it.

This to me, shows a contempt for us all, from head to toe from China. I do not think that they have an iota of respect for us, because if they did, they wouldn't insult our culture on a personal level. (Blowing up my Purples for puny amounts of Gold, I would knock your teeth out with my fist if you did that near me IRL.) That is a cultural insult, and it's coming from a culture that understands respect and honor, yet blatantly saying "FUCK YOU" with their continuous, and growing more bolder actions of aggression in this realm that they seem to think they can act from with impunity.

I'm not advocating we carpet bomb them all to hell with thermal nukes, but I am saying we need to "Fuck them up!" Something to the equivalent of knocking someone flat on their ass when they are doing offensive actions that compel any normal person to react. I think if we don't, they will perceive it as weakness, and it will encourage them to be bolder and more aggressive towards us to what ends, it's anyone's guess. We need a well thought out, appropriate response, that brings about in the long run, peace and enlightenment for all. I learned as a child that sometimes you have to knock someone's block off, and you would be amazed at how agreeable and down right friendly and cooperative they can be afterwards.

Re:I say welcome to the party, pal! (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757941)

Get back to us when you're old enough to drive.

Boring (2)

some old guy (674482) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757433)

Oh my stars, another corrupt police state caught doing unsavory things. The government of a rising world power is profiteering! The shock, the horror of it all!

Come on people, governments and corporations do bad things to each other all the time as a matter of course. The only limit is capability. Shame and ethics mean nothing in the world of global capital and paid-for governments.

As long as there is no serious interruption of the money flow, it is all just business as usual. Nuclear deterrence doesn't prevent big conflicts, business considerations do. The little wars are either carefully contrived distractions or planned business opportunities.

Can we please stop acting surprised or indignant? Can we drop the naivety and faux indignation?

There is nothing, repeat: nothing, we common folk can do about it in any meaningful way. Activists get jailed or executed, and dangerous rebellions get violently crushed. Whistle-blowers are eliminated or discredited as paranoid. Realists are ridiculed as delusional. Big Brother has won. Deal with it.

Unless and until the whole rotten global finance system comes crashing down from its own weight, better for us to just snuggle up in our cubicles, play some WoW, and enjoy our tiny crumb of the big pie.

Honestly, do you, or a hundred thousand of you, think you can make any more than an inconvenient dent in the global money machine?
The petty details of government and corporate skullduggery that make it into the news are insignificant in scale and inadequate in perspective.

Resistance is futile. Enjoy our brave new world.

Chinese DMZ (1)

RedHackTea (2779623) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757587)

Maybe... create a DMZ with the DMZ being tons of Chinese propaganda, using a Chinese-based Linux OS as the server, and have the default language/locale be Chinese. Then create a fake semi-difficult/easy server behind the DMZ set up similarly. Finally, your true server is behind all of this. That way when they login they think they're accidentally attacking a Chinese comrade server or it has already been hacked!

Re:Chinese DMZ (1)

RedHackTea (2779623) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757631)

I also had a friend in the past prevent/ban all Chinese IPs. If it's drastic enough, just chop off the head. Chinese hackers can still hack you by spoofing their IP or by tunneling with a proxy server, but this will at least lower the amount of non-Government attacks (due to the Great Firewall and advanced genetic algorithms preventing more holes in the Great Firewall).

Re:Chinese DMZ (1)

EETech1 (1179269) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758005)

The only problem is the newspapers are probably hoping to get email from China that contains juicy tidbits to splash on their pages. They were probably hacked by China tricking them with emails that were fakes of the same types of emails that China was looking for by hacking them.

Makes it hard to know if you should open some random email from China or not! The rest of us (should) know better, but the news has a certain urge to open them.

Proxies from China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757691)

You mean, proxies from Chinese IP's, don't you?
WTF is with all this bullshit on tech sites?

They are worried No Coal for China (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757711)

They're just worried that the US won't ship them our coal or Canada's oil.

Maybe we should cease providing naval, air, and land military protection for China's resource extraction industries worldwide?

I'm down with that.

You spy. We let you die.

Fair trade.

technical details? Facts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42757743)

this really sounds, or should I say smells, of propoganda.

China seems like a great choice for the "next big thing" in a common enemy to gather everyone around to distract us all from being wage slaves.

this can't go on forever, something has got to give.

Re:technical details? Facts? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758077)

"this can't go on forever, something has got to give."

        Wipe our own government and start over from scratch. Just make sure we kill those bastards along with all their friends in business and family as an example to the next bunch.

the fallout (2)

slashmydots (2189826) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757861)

They're going to have to rename the Streissand Effect to the Wen Jiabao Effect because this is bigger. Did they really think they could get away with this? There's going to probably be 24/7 news coverage, an entire 60 minutes episode on what a jackass him and his crooked family are, entire websites dedicated to this, and probably 100 stories about him in each of the newspapers this affected. I'd put that jackass on the cover for a week straight if I owned that paper.

This is Great News! (4, Insightful)

badford (874035) | about a year and a half ago | (#42757873)

Perhaps now, someone in the ivory tower will see how vulnerable we really are.

This is not a 'china is bad' story but rather a 'US Corporate Security Sucks' story and it should be.

There will always be baddies trying to get in. We need to be the best in the world at stopping them.

Right now, I am sad to report, we are not.

APTs vs Linux? (1)

Maow (620678) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758013)

These Advanced Persistent Threats are quite frightening, but would having users run Linux desktops not mitigate it if not negate it completely?

After all, opening a PDF wouldn't likely execute any code, attachments would have to have the extra step of making them *executable* before they'd run, regardless of the extension (i.e. nekkidboobs.jpg.exe would simply not work)

I can't help but think that it would force the attackers to target another vector; one much more difficult, i.e. holes in web-facing server scripts.

Anyone able to shed some light on APTs and Linux?

Re:APTs vs Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758217)

Whether you're using evince or acrobat a maliciously crafter PDF can still cause code to get executed via the same methods as on windows, is. Buffer overflows et. al. There's just fewer eyes looking at Linux right now.

And what's to stop malicious code from playing with things in your .local/ like .bashrc? The system wouldn't be pwned but you could be running an APT with your priveleges (ie. read all your files) the entire time you're logged in and not know it.

Re:APTs vs Linux? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758849)

And what's to stop malicious code from playing with things in your .local/ like .bashrc? The system wouldn't be pwned but you could be running an APT with your priveleges (ie. read all your files) the entire time you're logged in and not know it.

And all of this is thinking too much like your personal box and not so much like what a company network looks like. We're talking about domain joined machines where more often than not the user is not an administrator. Meaning that they have to pop the administrator/system account akin to how you'd have to pop root on a linux box. Re the OP; it never ceases to amaze me how many people think the whole windows world is still running everything as admin and that mac/linux/et al dont have to worry about it because they're not root.

anyways, you're more or less spot on and said the same thing I did to him.

Re:APTs vs Linux? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758803)

These Advanced Persistent Threats are quite frightening, but would having users run Linux desktops not mitigate it if not negate it completely?

A good way to test this and figure it out for yourself is to go grab a bunch of old exploits for MS office and then test them on open office et al and realize that they're vulnerable and have been for *years* to bugs that were fixed in MSFTs code looong ago. With a second payload and a method for handling offset differences and stuff it would be *TRIVIAL* to make an exploit work for both platforms.

After all, opening a PDF wouldn't likely execute any code, attachments would have to have the extra step of making them *executable* before they'd run, regardless of the extension (i.e. nekkidboobs.jpg.exe would simply not work)

No. This is not how things work, if they did by the same rationale they wouldnt work on windows et al. Just like open-office et al, run some of the adobe acrobat exploits over the various unix pdf tools and again realize that tons of them still work there. The fact that the PDF itself is executable is irrelevant, it's exploiting a bug in your *reader*, so say you do like a 'xpdf exploit.pdf' the bug, and where the injected code is executed is in xpdf. In other words, your entire sentence was sorta nonsense.

I can't help but think that it would force the attackers to target another vector; one much more difficult, i.e. holes in web-facing server scripts. .... You can of course sit down and try to reverse some MSFT binaries and find bugs (especially ones not relating to client side-- most all of the network facing services are C# or C++/CLI (c++ that's compiled into a .net assembly essentially) and then do the same across the FOSS/OSS world, you'd quickly realize however the bar for finding and exploiting bugs on the FOSS/OSS world is way easier. It's not a matter of effort for them, it's a matter of what platform do you use and then exploiting it. Also, they do plenty of the other attack vector stuff, inclusive of web spider's that automate the search for SQL injections, breaking into third party servers simply because you visit them often and it gives them an entry point if/when you kick them out of the network, et cetera.

So, the short answer is no: everything has bugs, everything can be exploited. You can switch platforms, but they'll just switch exploits. A much better approach than trying to convince all 10 million employees to never click on anything, (which still doesnt cover the 'oh they broke into CNN to get to you when your employees read CNN' vector) or trying futile things like switching OSs (which of course also has a huge cost associated with it) is to limit the damage that can be done from any one work-station that gets compromised and limit the amount of time they can compromise any given box.

This is pretty easily (albeit also expensive) accomplished by reconfiguring the network so that every workstation is strictly firewalled off from every other one and then enforcing an auto-wipe of the computers every day or two with persistent data stored elsewhere (moving your primary defensive focus into a more centralized area thats easier to defend). The first thing these attackers do basically everytime they land on a box is grab all of the files/email/etc on the drive-- but then immediately go after the domain controller and passwords-- this, this is where the real damage occurs and the spread of the infection versus trying to stop it from ever occurring in the first place is a much better method for handling it.

(full-disclosure: in another life i was a reverse engineer for the .gov doing incident response on exactly these cases and have a fair amount of first hand knowledge about them)

Chinese Takeover with Free Trade Zones (1)

PythonM (2184020) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758441)

Source : http://www.batr.org/negotium/013013.html [batr.org]

The long-term goal of Communist Red Chinese is to take over the wealth creation resources of the planet. The quasi merger between the authoritarian Maoists and the global capitalists plays out as a sorry act in the Beijing Red Theater. The performance designed to distract and confuse really has the destruction of Western economies as the climax. The sell out of the West, under the skilled dirty hands of Herr Heinz Henry A. Kissinger, is entering the final stages of a planned implosion. Now that the de-industrialization of America as described in the article, Free Trade Created the Chinese Model, has taken placed, the theft of our natural assets is the next to go. The Chinese exploits the use of U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones. A depiction of the function and working of such Foreign-Trade Zones follows:

"Other countries around the world have Free Trade Zones that are often confused with the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones program. While there are similarities, the FTZ program is very different from other countries' Free Trade Zone. In a number of "free trade zones" in other countries – particularly those in developing countries – the sole benefit is the avoidance of internal customs duties on products that are re-exported from the Free Trade Zone. Often, the goods are not even allowed to be sold in the country where the Free Trade Zone exists. You often here these zones referred to as "Export Processing Zones". The U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones program not only allows the sale and importation of merchandise to the U.S. Commerce, but in many cases enables companies to reduce or eliminate duties on products manufactured for domestic consumption. This relief from inverted-tariff benefit is one of the key distinctions between the U.S. Foreign-Trade Zones program and other countries Free Trade Zone programs. Generally Free Trade Zones offer significantly less opportunity for benefits and tariff savings. As previously mentioned, in many cases you must actually export all the merchandise you bring into a Free Trade Zone (if it is a Export Processing Zone. In other cases, importation is allowed, but not manufacturing of merchandise. Under the U.S. FTZ program, companies can obtain FTZ benefits such as, duty exemption on re-exports, duty elimination on waste, scrap, and yield loss, duty exemption on damaged, or nonconforming items, reduction in merchandise processing fees (MPF) and brokerage fees through weekly entry, cash flow savings, and relief from ad valorem tax, and the previously described relief from inverted tariffs."

Watch the video, Chinese Move Into Foreign Trade Zones On American Land, for an informative discussion on the effects that allow wholesale entry of Red Chinese companies to operate on American soil.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=w2rmuKHlU3A [youtube.com]

A previous Jerome Corsi’s Red Alert is available on the WND report, CHINA INVADES U.S. WITH 'FREE-TRADE ZONES' which documents an additional twist to the economic treason that the political class is foisting on our country. "A plan being pushed by the Chinese Central Bank would set up "development zones" in the United States that would allow China to "establish Chinese-owned businesses and bring in its citizens to the U.S. to work." Under the plan, some of the $1.17 trillion that the U.S. owes China would be converted from debt to "equity". As a result, "China would own U.S. businesses, U.S. infrastructure and U.S. high-value land, all with a U.S. government guarantee against loss." Does all of this sound far-fetched? Well, it isn’t. In fact, the economic colonization of America is already far more advanced than most Americans would dare to imagine."

Another Dr. Corsi assertion is outlined in the Market Daily News article; Does China Plan To Establish Chinese Cities And Special Economic Zones All Over America?

"A key argument of Corsi’s book, "America for Sale: Fighting the New World Order, Surviving a Global Depression, and Preserving USA Sovereignty," is that China will not long continue to subsidize the Obama administration’s trillion-dollar annual federal budget deficits without demanding U.S. assets in return." This same news account goes on to document many examples on auctioning off American assets to the Chinese Triad consortium of collectivists. Take the time to review the dirty deeds that passes under the rubric of Free Trade.

The terminal game is as simple as it is devious. China poised to play debt card – for U.S. land states the obvious: "The basic idea is to turn Asian savings, China’s in particular, into real business interests rather than let them be used to support U.S. over-consumption."

Chinese cash reserves used to acquire real assets relies upon the "Interoperability Principle", the ability of diverse systems and organizations to work together. What a way to collaborate for the systematic economic liquidation of domestic property. A country that is debt ridden beyond servicing the obligation is already insolvent. What the Beijing regime is confirming is that U.S. Treasury Bonds are paper promises of default.

The People's Republic of China wants to own the business enterprises and not the liabilities of the Dollar. The complicity of the banksters that plot the convergence of the world economy under their monitory manipulation clearly understands that fiat currencies are not real assets. Their partnership with the imperial communists is shaping the model for the American continent.

Stripping of real property as a national resource is a key component in the shakedown and impoverishment of the United States. Financing the national debt has a much higher price than paying the interest.

Turning over operative control of the importation ports is not enough for the "Chinese Diaspora". They want physical possession of the title. Do not be surprised when the money centered banks pass on their ample portfolio of foreclosed property into a Chinese holding company in lieu of T-Bills.

The Foreign-Trade Zones are sentry outposts for the orderly transfer of wealth to the globalist cabal. This process has the full blessing of the criminal political class that masquerades as lawful public officials. America has been sold out to a foreign power that is the brainchild of our domestic traitors.

Re:Chinese Takeover with Free Trade Zones (2)

Miamicanes (730264) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758821)

> Under the plan, some of the $1.17 trillion that the U.S. owes China would be converted from debt to "equity".

And right there, that's how you know the entire "plan" is pure bullshit. The US doesn't "owe" China anything besides some quantity of $100 (or larger, should the Fed choose to print them) bills -- hundred-dollar bills the Fed can print at will, in any quantity necessary -- once the bonds purchased by Chinese investors (or its government) reach maturity. Period.

US debt is dollar-denominated. US Treasury bonds say right on them that they're payable upon maturity for some quantity of dollars, and the Fed can print as many as it needs to. It's literally impossible for the US to default on its debt absent intentional sabotage by grandstanding elected officials.

The whole act of printing bonds & pretending they're a loan of some kind is theater whose purpose is to keep the amount of dollars growing, while simultaneously limiting the total dollars in active circulation, by encouraging investors to keep reinvesting matured bonds in new bonds.

So, what's to stop China from cashing in on them and collecting its mountain of $100 (or larger) bills? The logistics of trying to move around a hundred billion $100 bills (or 100 million $100,000 bills) and figure out what to DO with them, and the instant collapse in value they'd see that made 90% of their investment worthless if they tried to dump even a small fraction of them too quickly.

It's the same reason why guys who have millions of Bitcoins can't turn them into millions of dollars overnight -- there's a limit to the number of Bitcoins the market can absorb in any given day, and if the market were flooded with them, the amount people would pay for them would plummet quickly. Even if they tried to go on a real estate buying spree, spending even a hundred billion dollars on tangible goods & real estate is HARD.

Things like a 747 might be a few hundred million dollars, but there are only so many 747s available to buy in any given year. If you went to Boeing and said, "I'd like to buy a thousand 787 Dreamliners next year, with remote controls so I can have them take off, then crash them into the desert for my personal entertainment", they'd laugh at you. Well... ok, at this point, they'd probably be delighted to sell you a dozen or two, but their annual production capacity is finite. To get as many as you want, you'd literally have to build a dozen (or more) new factories for them.

Ditto for skyscrapers. To really invest hundreds of billions of dollars in skyscrapers, they'd have to start brand new companies to acquire land, pay people to build them, and find enough places that would even allow them to build them in the first place. And after a certain point, they're going to run out of small towns who'll say yes to almost anything, and the zoning department is going to start saying 'no, you can't build another 90 story building... there's already 37 buildings with 80 or more stories under construction in downtown [Macon/Cedar Rapids/Ocala/Modesto/Youngstown/Reno], and frankly, it's a good thing 89% of those buildings are going to be vacant, because we don't actually *have* the city infrastructure to handle even a fraction of the people who could theoretically live and/or work in the buildings we've already approved, anyway. Now, if you're interested in building our city a subway system, and rebuilding the interstate as a double-deck 24-lane highway with braided ramps at your expense to gain additional development rights...."

Investing billions of dollars in companies by buying stock is even harder than buying goods and skyscrapers. Warren Buffet has written about this problem quite often. When you have THAT MUCH money to invest, there really aren't very many companies that are big enough, with enough shares of sufficiently-expensive stock that's not over-valued, for you to buy enough stock to be worth your time and effort before the share price begins to skyrocket and make it too expensive to be a good investment. That's actually part of the reason why Chinese companies are increasingly whispering about offering to build privately-owned (by them) high-speed railroads in the US... it's one of the few virgin industries in the US where you really, truly CAN start a brand new company from scratch, capitalized with insane amounts of cash, and spend money like there's no tomorrow & still end up with a long-term investment that might pay off someday -- all without creating inflation in the process and destroying the value of your own investment.

The point is, there's lots of scaremongering about China going on right now, none of which stands up to even casual scrutiny the moment you take off the ideological blinders and quit looking for lame excuses to be paranoid about life in general. Chinese ownership of US debt is ultimately a GOOD thing for the US, because the construction of new, expensive infrastructure on American soil is just about they only thing they'll actually be ABLE to spend their cashed-in bonds on, should they choose to do so someday. If the Chinese "invade" America, it won't be as a military... it'll be as wealthy immigrants (or at least resident investors) with more money than they know what to do with.

There's also another possibility... (1)

Miamicanes (730264) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758537)

> the attacks were 'for the apparent purpose of monitoring the newspaper's China coverage'

Errrrrr... if the main activity of the "attacks" was to scrape articles about China and send them to servers in China (or somewhere else), did it occur to anybody that maybe... just MAYBE... the motive of the hacker(s) might have been to obtain copies of articles that they can't reliably read via normal means courtesy of the Great Firewall of China (or they don't feel like paying for, or they literally CAN'T pay for because the subscription system rejects them and won't allow them to subscribe or pay by some means readily available to them)?

Seriously. In case anybody hasn't noticed, there's been an upswing lately in seemingly-pointless (to Americans) content-aggregation sites that do little more than scrape content from American sites that have a habit of getting randomly blocked by Chinese ISPs (like Wikipedia, XDA-Developers.com, and StackOverflow.com) or sit behind paywalls (like WSJ), then regurgitate it... with ads stripped out, and more importantly, no NEW ads inserted)? Inevitably, from some domain whose name vaguely resembles some plausible combination of English words, but appears to be nonsensical (making up an example, something like "blueteapot.org")?

Remember, when you're ~12-20 years old, just about anything that someone in a position of authority says you aren't allowed to have/read/do instantly becomes your #1 goal in life to obtain. Chinese adults might be largely indifferent to the Great Firewall, but nerdy Chinese teenagers hate it with a passion the moment they find out the real reason why sites mysteriously quit working for no obvious reason... especially when they're trying to finish their Java programming homework, and discover that some idiot decided to block StackOverflow this week.

Of course, it *could* also just be that some powerful/wealthy Chinese official got pissed off about something the WSJ wrote, and paid a bunch of hackers to get revenge for him, but when I see an "attack" whose main consequence is the scraping and republishing of content likely to be of interest to people in China, my first thought is, "sigh... the things those poor guys have to do to get around the Great Firewall..."

NSA? (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758661)

Since this is the second news paper that got seriously pwned, I wonder why they had to hire private help to figure all this out. Isn't this exactly why the USA pays oodles of tax money to the NSA for? Are we going to get a TSA equivalent for the Internet to prevent this happening in the future?

Re:NSA? (2)

oodaloop (1229816) | about a year and a half ago | (#42759519)

NSA does have that mission. Cybercom doesn't even have that mission. No govt entity has the mission to protect civilian cyber infrastructure. And when Cybercom has tried to get companies to beef up their security, they pushed back. Do you really want the govt to come in and tell you how to set up your networks, passwords, etc in your company?

Just on time ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758731)

Considering this 2 days ago:
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/01/28/1921206/officials-warn-cyber-war-on-the-us-has-begun

I can't help but to think this is perfectly timed bullshit.

Now vote my military budget you damn rednecks or they gunna took all of our them jobs !!!

Srsly muricah', take a rope and hang. For the love of everyone else on earth.

Couldn't have happened to nicer people ... (1)

jandersen (462034) | about a year and a half ago | (#42758757)

Isn't WSJ owned by Rupert Murdoch, famous spy-master? They certainly know how to recognise hacking if anyone does.

...possibly connected to China's military...

I call FUD on this one. To me it seems just as valid to suggest that they were "possibly connected to [Israel|Iraq|North Korea|...]'s military". Spoofing IP addresses or using a hacked computer in another country are some of the oldest tricks in the book; even I can do that. And so is lying in newpaper articles; of course, the Murdochs would never do that.

Re:Couldn't have happened to nicer people ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758923)

...possibly connected to China's military...

I call FUD on this one. To me it seems just as valid to suggest that they were "possibly connected to [Israel|Iraq|North Korea|...]'s military".

And rightly so. Possibly/might/may/could/etc are always FUD. From How to Get Ahead in Advertising:

Businessman on Train: [reading a newspaper] I see the police have made another lightning raid. Paddington drug orgy.
Priest on Train: [Irish accent] I suppose young girls was involved?
Businessman on Train: One discovered naked in a kitchen. Breasts smeared with peanut butter. "The police took away a bag containing 15 grams of cannibis resin. It may also have contained a quantity of heroin."
Denis Dimbleby Bagley: Or a pork pie.
Businessman on Train: I beg your pardon?
Denis Dimbleby Bagley: I said the bag may also have contained a pork pie.
Businessman on Train: I hardly see how a pork pie's got anything to do with it.
Denis Dimbleby Bagley: All right then, what about a large turnip? It may also have contained a big turnip.
Priest on Train: The bag was full of drugs.
Denis Dimbleby Bagley: Nonsense.
Priest on Train: The bag was full of drugs, it says so!
Denis Dimbleby Bagley: The bag could have been full of anything. Pork pies, turnips, oven parts. It's the oldest trick in the book.
Priest on Train: What book?
Denis Dimbleby Bagley: The distortion of truth by association book. The word is "may". You all believe heroin was in the bag because cannibis resin was in the bag. The bag may have contained heroin, but the chances are 100 to 1 certain that it didn't.

Wall Street Journal editor to his journalists: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42758987)

Crap! The New York Times got hacked by Chinese and now their selling tons of newspapers with the story. Quick, email some usernames and passwords to contacts@military.gov.cn so we can get hacked too and write a story about it.

Not to mention the Onion. (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about a year and a half ago | (#42761245)

Seems they've been monitoring that pretty closely.

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