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LibreOffice 4 Released

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the whole-numbers-is-best-numbers dept.

Software 249

Titus Andronicus writes "LibreOffice 4.0.0 has been released. Some of the changes are for developers: an improved API, a new graphics stack, migrating German code comments to English, and moving from Apache 2.0 to LGPLv3 & MPLv2. Some user-facing changes are: better interoperability with other software, some functional & UI improvements, and some performance gains."

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249 comments

But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1, Troll)

Archeopteryx (4648) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820943)

I think the issue that needs to be faced is that it seems likely that Java is dead. As such, it seems unlikely to me that the interpreter will be maintained for much longer.

What are the options for a project like LibreOffice?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820963)

Until Java can be exorcised, this project is a non-starter.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821121)

Goddamn idiot mods can't handle the truth! The fact is, java must go. It's a toy 'language' to teach little kids about computers. It was never meant to do real computational work. For that you need assembly, or straight up binary.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821179)

Are you really that stupid?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (3, Insightful)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821337)

...or straight up binary.

Unless you're keying the bits with a set of telegraph keys attached to your CPU's data bus, it's cheating!

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

kdemetter (965669) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822837)

Ezekiel 23:20

ancient porn ?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (0)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821699)

Goddam idiot AC, Java is all over the bloody in the enterprise. You'll find Tomcat, for instance, in all sorts of enterprise websites and intranets. You may call Java a "toy' language but it has substantial penetration. The fact that you even say something like that indicates what an ignorant useless pile of dog crap you are.

Go back to coding in VB6, asswipe.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821939)

Goddam idiot AC,

Dude, did you actually read the original post?

It was never meant to do real computational work. For that you need assembly, or straight up binary.

If that's not an obvious (and actually quite amusing) troll, then I don't know what is.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822243)

He does not understand. He's too busy to contemplate it while cramming 3D printout of Stallman's dick up his ass. Like the rest of you freetards.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822371)

Go back to coding in VB6, asswipe.

False dichotomy alert!

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822433)

It was a joke you fucking idiotic waste of a cumshot.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

denvergeek (1184943) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822743)

Can a brother get a "whoosh"?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822513)

Unless you're etching things with a magnetized needle directly onto a metal disk, you're not programming!

...yes, uphill both ways, in three feet of snow.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Insightful)

armanox (826486) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820981)

Evidence please? Java is alive, kicking and screaming. Java 8 is coming down the turnpike. Java isn't going away anytime soon.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (0, Troll)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821099)

Yep, malware authors are loving it. It's become quite the easy way to exploit 10s of millions of computers.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Funny)

armanox (826486) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821137)

write once, infect anywhere?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821603)

man shut the fuck up you unfunny nerdy douchebag.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (5, Informative)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821209)

Admitting that you don't understand the difference between a plugin and Java itself brings you closer to actually knowing what you talk about.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (0)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821233)

I don't confuse the two. Your misunderstanding seems to purely be an issue on your end.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821483)

Then show us a virus that took advantage of Java.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (2)

medv4380 (1604309) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821151)

Did someone up and rewrite it all to Java, because last I heard it's mostly in C++. Java's just used for optional things.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

shitzu (931108) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822113)

But last time i checked, LibreOffice still complained about missing java runtime (on my OSX) although i have switched it off in LibreOffice prefs.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

armanox (826486) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822347)

Java is optional in modern LO/OO (I seem to remember Star Office being enirely in Java ~2001). I was making a remark at the OP about Java in general.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (5, Informative)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821081)

OpenOffice/LibreOffice is like 90+% C++. The Java bits are mostly irrelevant.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Informative)

colfer (619105) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821325)

And you do not need the JRE to run LibreOffice.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (5, Informative)

swillden (191260) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822061)

OpenOffice/LibreOffice is like 90+% C++. The Java bits are mostly irrelevant.

To be precise, as computed by sloccount [dwheeler.com] , libreoffice-4.0.0.3.tar.xz contains:

cpp: 3990644 (87.04%)
java: 400958 (8.75%)
ansic: 91036 (1.99%)
perl: 42456 (0.93%)
python: 17392 (0.38%)
sh: 17256 (0.38%)
yacc: 8228 (0.18%)
cs: 6648 (0.15%)
asm: 3269 (0.07%)
objc: 2602 (0.06%)
lex: 2030 (0.04%)
awk: 907 (0.02%)
pascal: 800 (0.02%)
csh: 235 (0.01%)
lisp: 115 (0.00%)
php: 104 (0.00%)
sed: 7 (0.00%)

However, as Desler said, the Java bits are actually optional.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Funny)

seyfarth (323827) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822671)

Why didn't they write a little Fortran, Cobol and D to round the number of languages to an even twenty?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822527)

OpenOffice/LibreOffice is mostly irrelevant.

FTFY.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (2, Interesting)

cognoscentus (1628459) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821097)

Not seen any evidence of this, other than the lack of security updates for browser-plugin based vulnerabilities on Oracle's part. Out of curiosity, if you mean server side Java as well as client-side java, could you cite references? This is not to doubt there are big issues with the JVM, and the seeming sloth of response of Oracle to some of them - I'm just wondering what the vast amount of server-side infrastructure would do if the JVM were to be EOLed. In terms of relatively high performance, managed platforms, given Microsoft's flight from CLR, what are the alternatives? And why does Oracle seem so indifferent?

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821323)

Java isn't going anywhere - not forward, and not away either. It's here to stay and for last 5 years it has not introduced anything new significant - nothing wrong with that - there is nothing wrong with a stable language (it's something C++ people don't seem to get).

Oracle isn't the only JVM vendor. Oracle isn't going to EOL Java anytime because their whole business stands on Java - if you installed anything since Oracle 8i, you'd understand why Oracle bought Sun, and why Java isn't going to have any problem surviving.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

ADRA (37398) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821541)

The last 5 years introduced 2 enterprise Java standards enhancements which were in fact very big deals. The JVM and the language itself are getting rather slow, but its not the job of a language to constantly adapt to a changing world. That's why Java has thousands of potentially competing libraries that sit on top of the base implementation. The same could be said for C/C++, or most other languages. The innovation will come from the communities driving them.

Does Java have a vibrant development community? IMHO yes, there are a lot of paid and independent projects that really make programming for the platform easier and more effective.

Oh, dear God! C++ guy here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822313)

Java isn't going anywhere - not forward, and not away either. It's here to stay and for last 5 years it has not introduced anything new significant - nothing wrong with that - there is nothing wrong with a stable language (it's something C++ people don't seem to get).

Yes, yes, YES!

C++ WAS awesome up till '98. After that, it went downhill and became this pig of a language - not that it was trim to start with. It was a wonderful way for us C guys to OOP without having to deal with very very UGLY preprocessors (see IBM's SOM: it DID work quite well; see OS/2 Warp Workplace Shell)

Anyway, now in 2013 when I'm doing NEW development I think what I'm doing.

System programming - C; unless I have to mod a C++ program and this involves heavy drinking.

Implementing an algorithm that doesn't need to hit metal - Python.

Java just doesn't factor for me anymore. Python has the libraries to do the grunt work (or the work that I'm not qualified for; like Stats; awesome graphics: NumPy, etc ...) for me. C is great because there's nothing I hate more than looking up processor instructions from the manufacturer and frankly, I think compiler designers are so good at optimizing programs that I really think that compiling a C program through their stuff is better than my assembly.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Interesting)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821167)

"I think the issue that needs to be faced is that it seems likely that Java is dead."

Well, you had better tell that to Google since it is the core language for all Android apps. You seem to be confusing a few vulnerabilities in Oracle's Java Runtime Environment with the entire Java software ecosystem. In general, Linux systems running Libre Office tend to not even use Oracles JRE. Java isn't going anywhere.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Informative)

DickBreath (207180) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821279)

I think the vulnerabilities are mostly confined to the browser plug in. Not the entire Java runtime.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (2)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821367)

I think that you are correct. I know that the way I said it nobody can say I misinformed anyone. I stated it that way I did to avoid the case where I might be more explicit and then have misinformed someone.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822125)

The browser plug-in is just a way to use the JRE with a default security policy. The security bugs only matter if there is a security policy being enforced because otherwise the program could already execute arbitrary code (Java programs are programs, after all). It's just that Java applets are by far the most common/visible use of security policies in Java, so security bugs in the JRE are mostly useful for applets. (I assume the security policies do get used for code other than applets, but I am simply not familiar enough with the ecosystem to know of any examples.)

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

samkass (174571) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821313)

It also trades back and forth with C as the single most popular programming language in the world, on which huge amounts of server software is written-- almost twice as popular as C++, which is what most of LibreOffice is actually written in and three times more popular than C#, its biggest competitor in the bytecode-on-virtual-machine environment.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (4, Insightful)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821383)

Java is dead?

Last time I checked, enterprise shops are still hiring more Java developers than any other kind. There are a lot of reasons I don't care for Java, but I would never in a million years say Java is dead.

Re:But what if Java is the next WAIS? (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822247)

In twenty years, it will be the COBOL of the time... except of course COBOL will probably still be around then too.

Damn! (5, Funny)

Skiron (735617) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820985)

I just pre-paid £140.00 for MS Office on Gnu/Linux! :(

Re:Damn! (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821193)

Do you mean that you bought Crossover, which allows you to run Office along with many other Windows programs, or did Microsoft suddenly start supporting Linux?

Re:Damn! (4, Informative)

devjoe (88696) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821349)

He refers to this story [extremetech.com] , though we've only heard that MS plans to release Office on Linux, not that you can already pre-order it.

Re:Damn! (1)

Skiron (735617) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821441)

Yes, I guess he's new here - I was joking of course

Re:Damn! (1)

chthon (580889) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821833)

+1 Funny, Please!

Re:Damn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822509)

Why are masturbatory comments like this not frowned upon?

Minor Annoyance (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820991)

I know it's just a minor inconvenience, but I wish open source projects would Osborne [wikipedia.org] themselves on their download pages when they know a new release is imminent so I wouldn't have to download projects that I don't keep close track of twice in two days.

That said, thanks for the awesome software!

Re:Minor Annoyance (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821275)

For future reference, if you googled Libre Office Release Schedule you could have saved yourself some trouble. Substitute any other project with admittedly varying results. e.g. Mageia 3 Release Schedule [google.com] .

UI "Improvements" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821005)

Those personas are just a way to try to postpone a real UI improvement. And they really need it!

Hopefully they fixed the broken xlsx (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821079)

In regards to themes

MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (5, Funny)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821093)

For the sake of order on this sadly degenerating News for Nerds site, please add your post to this parent if the essence of your "thinking" is one of the following:

= LibreOffice is not MS Office, therefore it's crap.
= LibreOffice uses Java, which everyone know is not as fast and portable as .NET.
= LibreOffice lacks MS Office proprietary features and misfeatures, therefore it disappoints me terribly.
= LibreOffice doesn't read or write the constantly mutating, rubbish file formats of MS Office the way only MS Office can.
= LibreOffice isn't backed by a large corporation that Only Wants The Best For Me.
= LibreOffice is bloated, and I insist on the lean responsiveness and stability of MS Office!
= LibreOffice doesn't have ribbons to help me not find features that I used to use.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (4, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821115)

Libreoffice uses very little Java at this point. That's one of the things that's changed since they forked from OO.org.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (2)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821215)

It didn't use it much before that point either. It's always been predominately a C++ codebase. It was just mostly ancient and crappily-written C++. Java was only needed for the HSQLDB, accessibility/assistive features and some of the wizards. The vast majority of its users can get away without those features.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821361)

"It was just mostly ancient and crappily-written C++."

Mod parent up, please!

This is the reason neither OO or LO will go anywhere anytime soon. Instead of translating comments, they should have spent some time cleaning up that crap.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (5, Informative)

Enderandrew (866215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821427)

That started happening as soon as they forked.

Sun made it really hard to get some changes made upstream, and some developers were unwilling to hand over copyright on their code contributions. So OpenOffice stagnated for many years.

There was a cleaner, more feature-rich version called go-oo (which many Linux distros shipped, without really telling anyone they were getting the fork). That fork because the basis of LibreOffice. Once they weren't tied to staying close to the OpenOffice base, they started cleaning cruft like mad.

In case you didn't notice, they added a bunch of new features, while the size of the installer dropped from 200 MB to 183 MB in this latest release.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (1)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821423)

The resulting code base is rather different from the original one, as several million lines of code have been added and removed, by adding new features, solving bugs and regressions, adopting state of the art C++ constructs, replacing tools, getting rid of deprecated methods and obsoleted libraries, and translating twenty five thousand lines of comments from German to English.

RTFA

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (1)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822285)

Yes, I read that. And? How does that change the fact that OO.org used ancient and crappily-written C++?

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (2)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821227)

How dare you use facts on slashdot! ;)

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (2)

fermion (181285) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821347)

LibreOffice doesn't read or write the constantly mutating, rubbish file formats of MS Office the way only MS Office can.

While it may not write the file formats developed by the marketing teams to encourage users to upgrade, it certainly reads them quite well, and often more reliable than MS. Not in the sense that it 100% present the random formatting exactly as MS would, but in that it will, in my experience, read 100% of the files and present the text in relatively accurate manner.

In my experience, MS office will not, mostly because one does not always have the most up to date version of MS office, and one does not always have the most up to date filter.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (1, Insightful)

Silentknyght (1042778) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821479)

= LibreOffice doesn't read or write the constantly mutating, rubbish file formats of MS Office the way only MS Office can.

While I recognize it's perhaps not a fair judge of LibreOffice, life isn't fair. I use LibreOffice and like it, and can handle the quirks when using non-native documents. But when even faced with "it's free vs. it costs you money", even ridiculously frugal people like my father WILL NOT SWITCH. His primary concern is his clients are able to read & use the documents he provides--and that conversely, he's able to read & use the documents his clients provide--without any hassle whatsoever. Let's face it, perfect interoperability with zero hassle is a big seller these days; look at Apple.

Only some people will comprise on price vs functionality. But nearly EVERYONE will switch to Libreoffice when they can save big on price without any compromise on functionality.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (4, Insightful)

mspohr (589790) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821847)

I have had better luck with LibreOffice being able to read old/odd MS Office formats better than MS Office itself.
MS often breaks compatibility with itself to force upgrades.
YMMV

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (1, Informative)

Knuckles (8964) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822131)

It's a good helper for old MS Office files when MS Office itself chokes on it. But if your daily work involves exchanging current MS Office files with co-workers and customers, with all involved parties editing the documents, you absolutely have neither time nor will to constantly deal with even minor issues. And like it or not, that's the reality for a lot of office workers.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821917)

If your customers need to be able to veiw your documents properly and consistently couldn't you just save the documents as a pdf which will display properly everywhere?

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (1)

snadrus (930168) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822739)

Look at Apple? No iOS Flash, Little attempt at interoperability outside their walls. No competing apps.
There isn't a "no hassle" file format except maybe a Google docs link (as it adjusts for various browsers).

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821947)

What about the ods documents that LibreOffice can no longer open due to updates that MS Office has no problem with? I'm sorry to say but this has happened to me and OpenOffice and LibreOffice keep saying the file is corrupt/not repairable and crash constantly... MS Office... works just fine. These open source alternatives are getting better but they are by no means fully competitive if you're serious about Office Suites. They do have some pro's but they aren't there yet but I do believe they will be. After all, once something is introduced and built up it is more robust, they still need some features since the program looks like it was designed by a programmer and how it outputs charts and conditional formatting is just the same... Classic programmer syndrome = no UI skills.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822217)

For the sake of order on this sadly degenerating News for Nerds site, please add your post to this parent if the essence of your "thinking" is one of the following:

= LibreOffice is not MS Office, therefore it's crap.
= LibreOffice uses Java, which everyone know is not as fast and portable as .NET.
= LibreOffice lacks MS Office proprietary features and misfeatures, therefore it disappoints me terribly.
= LibreOffice doesn't read or write the constantly mutating, rubbish file formats of MS Office the way only MS Office can.
= LibreOffice isn't backed by a large corporation that Only Wants The Best For Me.
= LibreOffice is bloated, and I insist on the lean responsiveness and stability of MS Office!
= LibreOffice doesn't have ribbons to help me not find features that I used to use.

Done on one.

Re:MS Office mewlers and shills, queue here! (2)

clong83 (1468431) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822699)

Fair points, all. I have no problem with using LibreOffice myself, I find it works as good or better than Office for most things.

However, the lack of interoperability with MS Office is a major sticking point. You may be correct that this is mainly because of the multitude of crappy and proprietary file formats that MS puts out, but as a practical matter, MS Office is what most people use. When I have a client or my boss that asks me to send them a few power point slides, or someone sends me some powerpoint slides, I simply can't use LibreOffice, as much as I would like that. And I can't simply tell clients and authority types that "You're doing it wrong. Use this other software that I use!" I have to pull up Office in wine, or reboot. It sucks, but that's where it's at.

So, it may not really be LibreOffice's fault, but it's still a problem. Even for people who would like to use it.

Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (1)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821149)

I'm having a hard time understanding the difference between GPL and MPLv2 - can anyone help explain, or link me to a resource that's more helpful than the ones I've found?

Re:Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (1)

danhuby (759002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821231)

GPL: the whole of a derived work, even new components, must remain under the GPL
MPL: only the code files licensed under the MPL must remain under the MPL

Re:Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (1)

danhuby (759002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821261)

And for completion:

BSD/MIT: all derived works can be relicensed as proprietary

Re:Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (2)

mister_playboy (1474163) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822447)

And for a shot at starting a "my license is freer than your license flame war":

BSD/MIT

Fixed for completion's sake. :p

Re:Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (1)

samkass (174571) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821267)

I'm having a hard time understanding the difference between GPL and MPLv2 - can anyone help explain, or link me to a resource that's more helpful than the ones I've found?

Also note that LGPL is very different from GPL...

Re:Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822007)

LGPLv3 is not actually very different from GPLv3. It was rewritten as GPLv3 + some extra permissions. It is compatible with Apache 2.0, but it is not compatible with GPLv2 or LGPLv2.

Re:Difference between GPL and MPLv2? (1)

cozziewozzie (344246) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821599)

Essentially, MPLv2 is like the LGPL, except it only applies to the same file.

If you modify a file under MPLv2, you have to release the source code to your modifications. If you add your modifications in a separate file and combine the two, then you don't have to release your code.

With LGPL, you would have to release the source code in both cases, since both are derivative works.

Pre-fork OO (3, Informative)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821191)

I have been using the last pre-fork version of OO. It works fine and mostly does what I want.

Is there any good reason to switch to the latest Libre?

Re:Pre-fork OO (4, Insightful)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821525)

I've found it to be more stable and support the Microsoft formats with less errors (for the few times I'm forced to use them). It also seems a LOT more responsive and 4.0 is supposed to be even more so. At this point there's really no reason not to.

Why this dilution? (2, Insightful)

trifish (826353) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821225)

OpenOffice is under Apache Foundation now and it is proper FOSS. This activity only dilutes the efforts to develop a FOSS alternative to MS Office. End it. Don't be childish. Thanks.

Re:Why this dilution? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821301)

Consensus is with libreoffice, openoffice being flossed, was flossed w/o a community. LibreOffice was forked when Oracle cocked up.

Re:Why this dilution? (5, Informative)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821341)

Oracle tossed OpenOffice to the Apache Foundation after LibreOffice took-off in terms of features, bugfixes and mind-share.

OpenOffice is about 2 years behind thanks to Oracle.

Re:Why this dilution? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822593)

Look on the bright side: LibreOffice is about 2 years ahead, thanks to Oracle!

Re:Why this dilution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821407)

They fucked up and lost the community that loved them. We've moved on and we're not going back.

Re:Why this dilution? (1)

gQuigs (913879) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821433)

LibreOffice is the office suite with the momentum at this point. So I agree in part, except it it is the Apache Foundation that should stop and let the organization created specifically for this purpose, The Document Foundation, to develop the premier FLOSS office suite.

Oracle had OpenOffice frozen in place for over a year. You can't just freeze a project and expect the community will just sit there doing nothing for that long of a time.

On another note, I find the LibreOffice name much better. Although part of that might be remembering when OpenOffice was called OpenOffice.org.

Re:Why this dilution? (4, Insightful)

jfengel (409917) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821435)

Has there been any significant work on OpenOffice since the split?

I'm not crazy about having efforts diluted, but if they have to pick one and go forward with it, are there any advantages to going with OpenOffice rather than LibreOffice, aside from the less dreadful name?

Re:Why this dilution? (1)

Ded Bob (67043) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821873)

I am pleased with OpenOffice (v3.4.1). I have not seen any need to try LibreOffice personally. My take is that both are developing new features.

Regarding new features in OpenOffice, https://blogs.apache.org/OOo/entry/merging_lotus_symphony_allegro_moderato [apache.org] talks about what is being merged into OpenOffice from IBM's Lotus Symphony. As long as IBM continues to develop Lotus Symphony, I think that OpenOffice will benefit earlier than LibreOffice as IBM tends to do a lot with the Apache foundation. I say earlier since LibreOffice can always get the code from OpenOffice.

Re:Why this dilution? (3, Informative)

robmv (855035) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821989)

I am a Java developer, love the JVM, but if you think merging the Lotus Symphony code base with OpenOffice will be a good thing, you never used Symphony. Symphony is the Eclipse platform with added plug-ins that add old OpenOffice code to it. If an office suite is already a big program, running a big JVM process with OpenOffice inside is an awful monster. In the other hand LibreOffice is removing Java dependencies where it shouldn't be used, like the embedded database and some wizards and using it for what is a good tool, Java APIs for automation and access to core LibreOffice functionality from Java programs

Re:Why this dilution? (1)

steelfood (895457) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822083)

Open Office is more or less playing catch up right now to LibreOffice.

And it kills me that such a good product has such a ridiculous name. It's a complete embarassment to say out loud. /rant

Re:Why this dilution? (1)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822627)

And it kills me that such a good product has such a ridiculous name. It's a complete embarassment to say out loud. /rant

Hey, I didn't realize that they finally renamed OpenOffice, getting rid of the idiotic ".org" at the end of the name. Naming a piece of software after a website made it sound far stupider than "LibreOffice" ever did.

Re:Why this dilution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821741)

Yes the apache foundation should end their version.

Re:Why this dilution? (2)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822129)

Once there was StarOffice, owned by Star Division.

Star Division was bought by Sun and the bits they owned were open sourced as OpenOffice. It was then renamed OpenOffice.org once they noticed someone else owned the OpenOffice trademark.

For years, Sun contributed 80% of the new code. Novell contributed about 10% and sulked that they weren't recognised as much as they felt they should be.

Novell started go-oo.org, containing their own patches to OpenOffice.org, including several things that were of dubious legality (e.g. implementing Microsoft patents that Microsoft guaranteed that they would not sue Novell for, but didn't extend this guarantee to anyone else).

Sun bought Oracle and most of the OpenOffice developers left (some voluntarily, others not) and found new employment.

Novell saw this as an opportunity to become the dominant players and pushed the LibreOffice brand for OO.o plus their patches. Lots of people fell for this and LibreOffice started to gain a lot more traction.

Most of the work in both forks is now by ex-Sun people. The code is horrible in both, although both teams are slowly trying to fix it.

Re:Why this dilution? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822397)

Please don't think that forks are childish. Forks are a part of freedom, and not just software freedom. Consider any and all institutions that fork; they do so because they can. An inherent part of freedom is that people will inevitably do what you don't want them to do. If we are to be true to freedom, we must understand this. If we insist that no one forks, we need less freedom, and more dictatorial control. I would prefer the former, and that is just me, but please do not consider that childish. I apologize for taking your comment a little out of context.

"migrating German code comments to English" (1)

Dystopian Rebel (714995) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821297)

Great, now I will know what the function with the following comment does:

"Gott vergib mir, das ist eine schreckliche Hack!"

Re:"migrating German code comments to English" (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821667)

Great, now I will know what the function with the following comment does:

"Gott vergib mir, das ist eine schreckliche Hack!"

And, as we already know, this should speed up builds because your US-made compiler won't have to consult the German dictionary all the time to find out what all the texts actually mean.

Re:"migrating German code comments to English" (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822215)

posting AC since I don't have a /. account.

in fact, not "code-comments" in LibreOffice were german. Rather it were "germanisms" in the code itself. I can't remember specifics ATM, but it was naming of variables and functions that "looked akward" to native english speakers.

I'm not aiming for informative modpoints, although appreciated :)
I know the specifics because I speak english & german and considered attacking this bug 1-2 semesters ago.

Re:"migrating German code comments to English" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822511)

Ein Volk, Ein Reich, Ein Führer.

Re:"migrating German code comments to English" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822683)

"Gott vergib mir, das ist ein schrecklicheR Hack!"

There, FTFY. I never understood why English natives believe that all Geman nouns are female? When you think of a hack, does it appear like a woman to you? Please answer.

Sounds good... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821841)

But does it support LaTeX ?

Some nice stuff, but compatibility still lags (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822011)

I was a long-time OOo supporter but I grew disillusioned with it over time. For years, we have been promised that flawless compatibility with Microsoft Office was "just around the corner". Alas, it never materialized. I looked at LO4 today and still many Microsoft Office files don't look quite right.

<Cue the OpenOffice defenders ...> But you shouldn't be using those tainted Microsoft formats anyway </Cue;> In a perfect world, yes. On planet Earth however, everyone works with the Microsoft file formats.

At some point, I had to grudgingly accept that. And that's where Libre still doesn't cut it. I have moved on to Softmaker Freeoffice which offers near-perfect compatibility. Still not perfect, but the gap is considerably smaller than with Libre. And the developer team listens to its customers. That's a refreshing change of attitude after years of hearing "You have the source. Fix it yourself".

-xyzzy

Re:Some nice stuff, but compatibility still lags (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822753)

Weird, this page [freeoffice.com] says this:

SoftMaker FreeOffice is a free version of SoftMaker Office. The most important differences are listed below.

SoftMaker Office Standard 2012 adds, among others, the following features:

        Spell checking using high-quality commercial dictionaries in 20 languages
        Synonym dictionaries (thesauri) in eight languages
        Seamless import and export of the modern Microsoft formats DOCX, XLSX, and PPTX
        Documents are presented in tabs, just like in a web browser.
        The extended sidebar gives you a bird's eye view over your document and its stylesheets.
        Free technical support by SoftMaker
        Additional features such as a style manager, printing of envelopes and labels, macros, mailmerge, cross references, and figure captions

I think the volunteers shouldn't have slept in (1)

mrmaster (535266) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822073)

I just upgraded a few machines to 3.6.x of whatever was on the site this morning. If they all are going to sleep in could they have at least put a message on the downloads page?!

Grammar Check (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42822241)

What is the point of having a "grammar" check if it is going to treat the phrase "This here grammar check don't work none" as if it were the Queen's English?

Re:Grammar Check (3, Insightful)

Skiron (735617) | about a year and a half ago | (#42822817)

Grammar checking is always fuzzy in a computer algorithm. And because people do not understand grammar (especially in pure English) they rely on word processor nonsense.

That is why it is always crap, and perhaps also explains why (especially young) people cannot do correct grammar (i,e, correct grammar is a bit hard to learn, like it takes work - but letting the computer do it [wrongly] is easy).

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