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Facebook's Graph Search: Kiss Your Privacy Goodbye

timothy posted about a year ago | from the no-longer-in-relationship-with-privacy dept.

Privacy 245

Nerval's Lobster writes "Software developer Jeff Cogswell is back with an extensive under-the-hood breakdown of Facebook's Graph Search, trying to see if peoples' privacy concerns about the social network's search engine are entirely justified. His conclusion? 'Some of the news articles I've read talk about how Graph Search will start small and slowly grow as it accumulates more information. This is wrong—Graph Search has been accumulating information since the day Facebook opened and the first connections were made in the internal graph structure,' he writes. 'People were nervous about Google storing their history, but it pales in comparison to the information Facebook already has on you, me, and roughly a billion other people.' There's much more at the link, including a handy breakdown of graph theory."

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245 comments

Yeah, right (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42822905)

You kissed your privacy goodbye when you signed up for a social network.

Re:Yeah, right (5, Informative)

game kid (805301) | about a year ago | (#42822947)

As soon as you saw (not clicked!) the Like button, for that matter.

Re:Yeah, right (4, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#42823011)

As soon as I wrote that I was CEO of Shell Oil, owner of the US Treasury and as a imigrant from Jupiter, I lost all privacy. It is they who are cursed, not I.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823161)

This! What good is info if most of it is fake? It's Facebook's loss, not mine.

Re:Yeah, right (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823289)

Never heard of data aggregation?

Are you friends with any on facebook, for example? They can extrapolate things about you from even that.

Re:Yeah, right (4, Informative)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about a year ago | (#42823687)

Yeah, as much info I have in there is fake, I can't convince my friends who grew up with facebook in college to fake everything. They know things, I show up in pictures, I get invited to events, ect. The fake stuff makes it more difficult, but not impossible. Its like a single DES encryption. Just really there to deter those with out the motivation to crack.

Re:Yeah, right (4, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#42823825)

Exactly.

Fake all you want to, they still have you nailed.

People who doubt this should RTFA.

Re:Yeah, right (1)

SerpentMage (13390) | about a year ago | (#42823841)

This is why I left facebook in November. I mean delete account facebook, not deactivate facebook. Granted they might have old data kicking around, though it is out of date. I realised that the power of facebook is its ability to extrapolate you on your friends. You can't give in fake info based on what you like, events that you are tagged in, etc, etc. That is very very dangerous IMO...

Re:Yeah, right (2)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#42823319)

I'd imagine that's a false assumption and most it is very real. Remember they're data mining, not sampling.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823017)

I'm not even on facebook!

And I'm scr****ed.

Re:Yeah, right (3, Funny)

TwineLogic (1679802) | about a year ago | (#42823095)

This is why the only Like buttons I see are hosted on the web site I am viewing:

$ cat /etc/hosts
[...]
127.0.0.30 outbrain.com
127.0.0.30 facebook.com

Re:Yeah, right (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823255)

HOSTS is an awesome method for blocking sites like Facebook, shame it doesn't handle wildcarded domains last time I checked.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823389)

curse you, you've raised APK!

I'm outtahere...

Re:Yeah, right (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823511)

That's why you should run your own recursive DNS resolver and override entire zones. I recommend Unbound [unbound.net] . It runs on Windows too.

Re:Yeah, right (4, Informative)

DarkOx (621550) | about a year ago | (#42823827)

Not its not an awesome method.

You're right it does not support wildcards so putting www.facebook.com in there does nothing top stop, the java script on every other site out there from posting to trackyourass.facebook.com

I makes things point to a resource that won't answer so unless you take additional steps like running a httpd that will generate a 404, so it can make things dirt slow.

Lots of pages are designed (badly) and need images to exist or the layout breaks, or is messed up otherwise.

So no your hosts file is not an awesome method. A proxy like privoxy for example though there are other good ones starts to come closer to something that might be a decent solution. It could at least serve dummy images, use regular expressions to strip posts, and gets inside iframes to .*facebook.(com|net); .*fbcdn.com and others. etc.

Really people STOP using your hosts file. Its like the worst possible answer.

Re:Yeah, right (3)

X0563511 (793323) | about a year ago | (#42823611)

Don't forget facebook.net and fb.net! (probably fb.com too).

Not to mention anything that goes through EC2 or akamai.

(not so perfect a solution these days, is my point)

Re:Yeah, right (2)

Gr8Apes (679165) | about a year ago | (#42824075)

You need a lot more than that to properly block facebook and company. What you're really wanting is a whitelist proxy. I'm about to add one to my network for other reasons.

Re:Yeah, right (5, Informative)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#42823157)

Exactly.

My use of facebook is as follows:

Register account, to keep someone else from using my name (it happens, I've had internet stalkers for over a decade that have done things like register domains, show up at my door, etc).

Disable everything that it's possible to disable. Set to notify me by email of private messages, just in case. Disable ability to tag me in photos, post on my wall, etc, etc.

Put up a user photo on account that says "I DO NOT USE FB. SEND ME AN EMAIL AT >email addy".

Never touch Facebook again.

Re:Yeah, right (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823347)

I'd rather not use FB at ALL.

Facebook shouldn't be allowing registered users to tag non-registered users anyhow. it should be a dialog box of registered users under that name, if you are not registered you ain't tagged, simple.

Re:Yeah, right (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | about a year ago | (#42823399)

But then Facebook couldn't collect information about unregistered users!

Re:Yeah, right (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823481)

Facebook may soon have to retract the ability to tag non-registered users if Europe's laws get passed.

Re:Yeah, right (3, Interesting)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year ago | (#42823705)

Exactly.

My use of facebook is as follows:

Register account, to keep someone else from using my name (it happens, I've had internet stalkers for over a decade that have done things like register domains, show up at my door, etc).

Disable everything that it's possible to disable. Set to notify me by email of private messages, just in case. Disable ability to tag me in photos, post on my wall, etc, etc.

Put up a user photo on account that says "I DO NOT USE FB. SEND ME AN EMAIL AT >email addy".

Never touch Facebook again.

How does this keep your mythical decade long stalkers from setting up a Facebook profile with your name? My name is not all that common, but there are dozens of people on Facebook with my name -- including 1 in the same town as me.

If you never touch Facebook again, how will you know about your stalkers profile? And what would he do with this fake profile anyway?

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42824057)

FYI you can't disable people tagging you in pictures, only them showing up on your wall

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823159)

I don't understand why people think this is some horrible thing out of their power. Just don't use facebook. There are plenty of other avenues to communicate with people that don't involve stomping on your privacy. Literally the only way facebook can exist is by documenting every nuance it can about you.

Re:Yeah, right (2)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#42823335)

The funny thing is it doesn't document anything you don't let it. One can argue that the privacy settings should be adjusted by default to protect you... but you're getting a free account on a social network, what do you expect, a parade in your honor & some $?

Re:Yeah, right (4, Insightful)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | about a year ago | (#42823405)

The funny thing is it doesn't document anything you don't let it. One can argue that the privacy settings should be adjusted by default to protect you... but you're getting a free account on a social network, what do you expect, a parade in your honor & some $?

Nope, I'd expect to pay for the "free" account with my private information. This is why I don't use Facebook, and is also gp's point. Just because they're bartering for your information rather than charging you dollars does not mean it's free.

Re:Yeah, right (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about a year ago | (#42823927)

No, that's not a funny thing. It documents everything. The privacy settings control the flow of information from you to other people, it doesn't control what facebook sees, collects, and uses*.

Theoreticaly some settings do specifically address what Facebook does with your info, but I don't trust them to not do it. Plus, there isn't a way to tell facebook to not use your information in a way they haven't created a privacy setting for. There really good at asking for forgiveness, rather than permission to do new things to you.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

pootypeople (212497) | about a year ago | (#42823377)

How is it "stomping on your privacy" to share data you have agreed to share? If people are naive enough to believe Facebook was setup solely for peoples' enjoyment, that's their own damn fault. If you share things online you're uncomfortable with other people knowing about that's your own problem. Expecting Facebook to make your privacy their business is silly.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823223)

Or your friends kissed your privacy goodbye when they signed up for a social network and decided to talk about you on there. Or, you know, on the internet in general.
I don't have a facebook account, yet I can safely assume that facebook knows at least 3 of my real life friends, how old I am, where I went to school, where I work, my relationship status, what I look like, and a recent ailment - just from material posted to facebook (that I can see - who knows what else is on there that I can't see unless I sign up/'friend' a bunch of people) alone. Couple that information with some general internet sleuthing and a profile of 'me' could easily be built. All without me signing up for a social network.

Re:Yeah, right (3, Interesting)

kheldan (1460303) | about a year ago | (#42823271)

Every day that I read a news story about how more and more of people's privacy on Facebook is being violated as they monetize that data more and more, the happier I am that I bailed out when I did.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823273)

This is so stupid. I use Facebook weekly, to keep in touch with a few relatives and real-life friends.
I've never used the "Share" function; it never made any sense to me. If I want to include a link in a post, I paste it.
I've certainly never done what TFA talks about; sharing something inappropriate then changing my mind and deleting it.
I really don't know what invasions of privacy I'm supposed to fear here.

Re:Yeah, right (1)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#42823925)

This is so stupid. I use Facebook weekly, to keep in touch with a few relatives and real-life friends.
I've never used the "Share" function; it never made any sense to me. If I want to include a link in a post, I paste it.
I've certainly never done what TFA talks about; sharing something inappropriate then changing my mind and deleting it.
I really don't know what invasions of privacy I'm supposed to fear here.

Go back and re-read TFA.
If changing your mind and deleting something you posted is all you got out of the article you have TOTALLY missed the point.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823401)

You kissed your privacy goodbye when you existed as a living human being with physical properties in a universe where such properties are observable by other physical human beings capable of logical inference.

FTFY

So? (2)

tgibbs (83782) | about a year ago | (#42823637)

The anonymous ship sailed a long time ago for pretty much anybody who has ever done anything public under their own name. I could be easily googled well before FB came along. That doesn't particularly bother me; I don't have any mortal enemies that I'm hiding from, and I'd like any old friends to be able to find me if they want to do so. The rules haven't changed: if you really want to be private for some reason, don't do anything public (and anything on the internet is public) under your real name--for that matter, you might want to consider changing your name to something generic with 100,000 Google hits that aren't you.

Re:So? (2)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about a year ago | (#42823801)

More to the point, privacy is an illusion we create to hide us from ourselves. If you really want "privacy" then go hide in a cave all by yourself. If you want to keep secrets, don't tell anyone else. The moment you tell someone something you've lost control of that information. The internet just makes it easier to lose control of information.

Re:Yeah, right (2)

kwerle (39371) | about a year ago | (#42823789)

No, you kissed your privacy goodbye when you started interacting with others.

Your friends all submitted their email accounts so that facebook could mine them for friends. You are connected to all your friends' accounts on facebook (though not visibly to the outside), and they can mine your address for associations and know to a great degree who you are, what you like, etc - because they know who your friends are and what they like.

Re:Yeah, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42824033)

Heh... That depends on what you're doing on it. I don't bother with putitng everything up on Faceplant, for example.

I'm kind of amazed that people didn't figure that one out on their own- it's not like it's rocket science, yanno...

I was under the impression... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42822923)

the minute you logged into FB you had to kiss your privacy goodbye?

What does FaceBook have? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42822927)

What does FaceBook have on me? It has my email address. It has my cell number. Other than that it contains a lot of innocuous posts that I couldn't care less who read.

Re:What does FaceBook have? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823463)

What does FaceBook have on me? It has my email address. It has my cell number. Other than that it contains a lot of innocuous posts that I couldn't care less who read.

They have your ip-address that, I'm sure, can be connected to you.
They have lots of data about your internet-activities.
Privacy doesn't necessarily mean that other facebook-users can or can't see what's on your page, more dangerous is the fact that Zuckerberg has all kinds of intel on you based on whatever you do on the internet.
And you are not the one who decides whether you have something to hide or not.

Re:What does FaceBook have? (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#42824077)

And if you're using anything resembling a standard browser for Facebook and other things, they know everywhere you go on the web...and associate it with your real name.

Garbage in, garbage out (5, Funny)

tipo159 (1151047) | about a year ago | (#42822997)

I have been peppering my FB check-ins with places that I have been to, noting events that never took place, mixed in with real check-ins. I have set my "Lives in" city to somewhere different every day this year. Unless you know me, good luck figuring out what on my FB page is real and what isn't.

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (5, Funny)

Stele (9443) | about a year ago | (#42823143)

Sounds like you have a lot of free time on your hands. Like most Facebook users.

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823147)

And the reality is that no one gives two craps about you or your updates. Hope t gives you a warm feeling that you are "sticking it to the man".

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823179)

i'm sure FB keeps IP logs, and I'm sure that's enough to figure out what is true and what isn't based on your location. You sound far too complacent to be capable outsmarting FB anyway

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (2)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year ago | (#42823519)

he could route it through tor then their ip records would be less than useless

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823685)

Doesn't that trigger all the account protection flags that are set up?

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#42824115)

I'd be shocked if you could log into Facebook through Tor, it's being treated as the Internet's leper colony these days, half the sites out there blacklist all exit node IPs.

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (5, Informative)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#42823247)

I have been peppering my FB check-ins with places that I have been to, noting events that never took place, mixed in with real check-ins. I have set my "Lives in" city to somewhere different every day this year. Unless you know me, good luck figuring out what on my FB page is real and what isn't.

The thing about Graph search, is your friends know you, and they, (presumably), are not engaged in such useless attempts at deception. So regardless of what YOU say or do, Facebook will not be fooled. They will know exactly who you are and where you are, just by mining your friends, your IP address, etc. (I mean, seriously, you can't have imagined this would really work, did you)?

Even if you never signed up for facebook, you are likely already in their database.

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823483)

I have a thumbdrive that I keep on me most of the time with login info for about 250 fake accounts I log into from time to time on whatever device I'm near. Some of these accounts are friends with my real friends and some of which are only friends with 'each other'. A few of my friends also have fake accounts (though just one or two) so I think it'd be quite difficult to determine which accounts are real and which are fake. I don't really care about obfuscating my own tracks entirely, but I do hope that at some point in the future enough people create enough bs accounts to undermine the credibility of facebook's entire data set - effectively, if advertisers don't trust FB they won't pay as much for their services. That said, the number of pageviews isn't affected with this strategy so I'm probably wasting my time. It's still fun though.

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (1)

houghi (78078) | about a year ago | (#42823575)

Your name, most likely.

I don't HAVE a facebook page. Good luck finding out what on my FB is real and what isn't.

Re:Garbage in, garbage out (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823673)

No identifiable social network history is probably worse than a bad one already. What do you have to hide... so let's put you on a list.

I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823007)

I don't use my real name.
No one I work with is a "friend".
No one from my hometown is a "friend".
All of my info like birthdates, schools, etc, is bogus.
I have hundreds of friends from underground subcultures, none with any official, family, or business connections.
The majority of my hundreds of friends have bogus info, like me.
My spouse and family are not marked as such on FB.
There are no pictures of me that are not heavily obscured.

So... FB may have info on Me, as "somebody", some entity, but if there really is almost no connection to a real person, I'm not very concerned.

If you want your info private, don't put it on the Internet. It's as simple as that.

Re:I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823215)

Dear anonymous coward,

we already know who you are. You're an Internet retard who has way too much time on his hands. We're found and logged millions of posts in your name and we speculate you have more than 391 computers and an internet connection of more than 800Mbps to be able to post on so many websites at once.

Signed,
Anonymous Coward

Re:I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (4, Informative)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#42823301)

Too bad. They know exactly who you really are, and your current, (and probably all past) addresses. Your spouse and family log in from the same public facing IP addresses, you all visit the same restaurants together with your portable devices. Your friends have your pictures, and facial recognition will peg you.

You are fooling no one but yourself.

Re:I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823775)

Ha ha ha ha!
i have NO FRIENDS, i have NO "FAMILY LOG", i do not go to restaurants and i carry no portable devices.

i am working on REMOVING THE FACE too.

you will never get me, suckers.

Re:I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (1)

PRMan (959735) | about a year ago | (#42823881)

He's on Slashdot. He's doesn't have friends or family IRL....

Re:I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823935)

Actually, I do none of this. I've got cyanogen on my phone and the data and GPS and course locational stuff is turned off unless I'm actually using it. It is certainly off in restaurants, because I'm not one of the douchbags who constantly checks his phone in social situations. No friends have ever posted pics of me or tagged me. Just like fingerprints, facial recognition can't work without a point of reference anyway.

Take off the tinfoil hat. It's not as hard as you think to hide in obscurity. I actually work in the realm of security in some sense too, so I'm not totally dense when it comes to the subject. If the technology, means, and data simply doesn't exist to track information, it can't happen magically.

Re:I actually doubt FB can tell who I am. (4, Informative)

roscocoltran (1014187) | about a year ago | (#42823701)

Check how unique your browser is:
http://panopticlick.eff.org/
This will show you that logged in FB or not, your browser signs your unique presence for you. No really, you don't even need to have an account on FB to be known by FB. Now add the data collected by other sites and I'm quite sure that FB could automatically fill in your first name field and last name field for you during the account creation.

Yay, more content for Dice Holding's Slashdot.org! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823091)

Be sure and spend lots of time posting something insightful since all this whole submission is meant to do is generate hits from search engines!

Re:Yay, more content for Dice Holding's Slashdot.o (2)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#42823233)

Be sure and spend lots of time posting something insightful since all this whole submission is meant to do is generate hits from search engines!

You can opt out of it completely (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823185)

More FUD from some spud who pulls his pud in the mud with his faggot bud.

So what (2)

Kimomaru (2579489) | about a year ago | (#42823199)

Why on Earth would anyone post anything of value on Facebook? A few years ago whent the stories of Facebook's security and privacy concerns began to surface - THIS wasn't a clue? I honestly don't understand how this is news. People who didn't care about it years ago aren't going to care about their privacy now, and those who DO care fall into two categories; 1) They don't use Facebook at all 2) When they do, they post bogus information or omit information entirely because they don't trust the network. Soooooo, how is any of this news again?!

Re:So what (3, Informative)

DarkOx (621550) | about a year ago | (#42823443)

I don't think its their own posts most folks are worried about, or object to Facebook using,referencing,indexing etc.

All but the dumbest among us (seems there are lots of really dumb folks though) know not to put anything on Facebook we'd be upset about someone reprinting on a billboard next to the interstate with attribution.

The issue is really all the other photos people post and tag, the fact they can tag you when you don't even have an account. The fact that they are using facial recognition and what really are some pretty smart algorithms to know when someone mentions John Smith, just exactly which one they are talking about. Coupled with the location information attached to much of these things as meta data Facebook likely has a better idea of where you are at this very moment than many of our intelligence agency do and probably could figure it out faster too. That is what people have problems with.

Now this search feature is going to make the last part more and more available to well anyone who happens to be interested and is willing to endure viewing an ad for "attractive singles in their area".

Re:So what (1)

Kimomaru (2579489) | about a year ago | (#42823583)

Yeah, I agree. It's a mess because, realistically, this is the only way FB can make money when they provide a "free" product. Personally, I think FB is a "tie-over" platform until someone does it properly, a system will eventually come along that's instead incentivised to protect user privacy.

Re:So what (1)

scottbomb (1290580) | about a year ago | (#42823897)

I also really couldn't care less. Thanks to the news media, people are way too paranoid about their personal information. If you don't go around giving out your SSN or bank account numbers, what difference does it make? I suppose if you're posting semi-nude pictures of yourself acting like a fool then you may want to reconsider what kinds of things you put on FB.

Do not enter your real name on a social network. (5, Informative)

Zombie Ryushu (803103) | about a year ago | (#42823205)

Do not enter your real name on a social network, use a Psuedonym, call yourself something else like you would on IRC, AIM, YIM, etc. Only friend people who you know on their Psuedonym. People. Quit. Putting. Your. Real. Name. On. Accounts.

Re:Do not enter your real name on a social network (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823253)

And make sure your pseudonym is used by other people too. Otherwise its an even more unique identifier.

Re:Do not enter your real name on a social network (5, Insightful)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year ago | (#42823279)

Yes people let us live in fear. Fear the bogeyman. Hide your truth. Isn't it obvious this is the path to a brighter future.

Re:Do not enter your real name on a social network (1, Troll)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year ago | (#42823771)

Yes people let us live in fear. Fear the bogeyman. Hide your truth. Isn't it obvious this is the path to a brighter future.

Interestingly enough, I just did a global birth certificate search, and besides not finding one for a "Barrack Obama" in the US or any protectorate or territory thereof (which we all knew anyway), I did find one listing an official name of "Jmc23". Just "Jmc23". Parents listed as "Run Dmc" and "J-Lo".

Re:Do not enter your real name on a social network (1)

Sir_Eptishous (873977) | about a year ago | (#42823857)

Are you saying that fear is the path to a brighter future?
OR
living in a dystopian FB/"We know what you think before you think it" future?

FRAUD ALERT !! FRAUD ALERT !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823387)

That's MINIMUM number of colors !! You pretend to know your shit, but do you only pretend to eat it ?? You don't know FB at all !!

"For example, it can be used to determine the maximum number of colors needed ..."

time to declare war? (5, Insightful)

dave69 (2786111) | about a year ago | (#42823413)

If a foreign government agency had spent years gathering data, and was mining it for undisclosed (possibly nefarious) purposes, It would be known as a dangerous spy network, would be subjected to infiltration/corruption and possible attack. I completely fail to understand why people tell FB anything about themselves ever, and don't request immediate deletion of all the data held about them. When governments try and spy on someone, they get all upset about it, when FB does it, and freely allows the data to be sold to the highest bidder/anyone who cares to look, people think its really cool and useful. what does it take for people to say enough is enough? Is it too late now, since the data is already gathered? why do I fail to see the upside of FB and its data gathering ilk?

Because..... (4, Insightful)

gelfling (6534) | about a year ago | (#42823451)

People who post pictures of themself drunk, passed out pants round their ankles in the street are concerned with privacy.

I was searching for pictures of their pets! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823497)

As long as Facebook doesn't publish which Friends-of-Friends' pictures I browsed for 20 minutes, I'll be fine...

graph is a fucking nightmare (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823531)

God, I can be such a creep.
graph is a FUCKING NIGHTMARE for privacy.

Background: I've signed up for this dating site..
I see a profile of someone who interests me, and being a nerd, I can figure out their last name, and find their facebook page..

The really scary part? I plug into facebook graph
Friends of "Interesting girl name" who are friends of my friends

I got hits.. Two results

J, D, S and R - friends of mine, and known to me, have a facebook friend who happen to be down as a friend of this person....
One of the four is friends with both search results.

do I exist? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823539)

I have never had a FB account, real or fake. Although I have several friends that do, and they sometimes discuss things about me. I wonder how much FB know about me?

You do not have a Facebook Page (3)

AndrewStephens (815287) | about a year ago | (#42823723)

I wrote this a while ago but I will continue to post it as long as stupid people exist: You Do Not Have A Facebook Page! [sandfly.net.nz] . Facebook has a page on you.

I signed up to Facebook and occasionally update Facebook's page on me, I find the service quite useful for keeping in touch with people, but I am under no illusions as to why Facebook provides this service. Anyone who uses Facebook with anything they expect to keep private has seriously misunderstood their relationship with the company.

let's not kid ourselves... (0)

alienzed (732782) | about a year ago | (#42823731)

privacy = dishonesty That isn't to say that all dishonesty is necessarily negative, but I challenge anyone to think of a single instance of "privacy" that isn't also "dishonest" if you assume that withholding the truth is also being dishonest. Sure, there are plenty of things that are none of anybody's business, but the indisputable fact is that we can't know what isn't anybody else's business, unless we know what it is first. I for one welcome our future computerized overlord that will decide what is and what isn't anybody's business without humans having to get involved. After all, those automatic toilet flushing devices have been watching you go for years now! What was this about? Privacy on Facebook? Who the hell publishes something on a public site design for sharing information and expects that information not to be shared. It's like people eat like pigs, never exercise and cry about being fat and out of shape. STFU.

Re:let's not kid ourselves... (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about a year ago | (#42823819)

but I challenge anyone to think of a single instance of "privacy" that isn't also "dishonest" if you assume that withholding the truth is also being dishonest.

I challenge anyone who can think of a single instance of when the sun didn't come up in the west, assuming that "west" means "the direction the sun comes up in".

Re:let's not kid ourselves... (1)

pla (258480) | about a year ago | (#42823837)

[...] if you assume that withholding the truth is also being dishonest

9/10... Well played, sir!

Re:let's not kid ourselves... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42823937)

so please post the amount of cash/valuables you have at home, and your work hours.

Re:let's not kid ourselves... (1)

vux984 (928602) | about a year ago | (#42824015)

That isn't to say that all dishonesty is necessarily negative, but I challenge anyone to think of a single instance of "privacy" that isn't also "dishonest" if you assume that withholding the truth is also being dishonest.

Why would I ever accept such an idiotic assumption.

By your line of reasoning wearing underwear counts as "dishonest". Having your blinds closed is "dishonest". Peeing behind the bush instead of in front of it where i can see you is "dishonest". Keeping your bank PIN code a secret is "dishonest". Stubbing your toe and thinking "ouch" without saying it is "dishonest".

GIVE ME A FUCKING BREAK.

Only a complete idiot would categorize any of that as dishonesty. Sure we can all agree that not telling your girlfriend that you banged the neighbor should count as dishonest as you've breached the implicit agreement that is likely in effect to be mutually faithful and then concealed this fact, but simply electing not to volunteer an estimate of how many ounces you urinated this morning is not "dishonesty" by any reasonable stretch.

Don't use your real information, unless... (1)

concealment (2447304) | about a year ago | (#42823791)

There is only one time when you use real information: when you're paying for a service and it has a vested interest in keeping your information off the open internet.

Otherwise, it's time to fill in the B.S. Think of your best friend as a child, and a common object around the house. Those terms are your first name and last respectively.

- Dave Paperweight

Yawn. (1)

pla (258480) | about a year ago | (#42823821)

0.0.0.0 connect.facebook.com
0.0.0.0 graph.facebook.com


Or, just run Ghostery, which scrubs the whole lot of 'em. Anyone browsing the modern internet without at least an adblocker and a tracker/analytics blocker pretty much deserve what they get.

Why Should I Care? (1)

Githaron (2462596) | about a year ago | (#42823967)

From my understanding, this new feature still pays attention to your privacy settings. If you don't have your privacy settings set right, that is your fault. If you don't think Facebook gives you enough control in its privacy settings, don't use Facebook. If you have a public Facebook profile with sensitive private information on it, you are an idiot and big companies have been aggravating your data for a while now.

People just don't understand how info propagates (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about a year ago | (#42824061)

At first, I thought FaceBook users were a bunch of popularity whores looking for scores of friends and their own reality TV fix. Now, I simply think users just don't make the connection to a bunch of online connections and how quickly and easily their activity propagates to each other.

The real problem (5, Insightful)

Sir_Eptishous (873977) | about a year ago | (#42824109)

The real problem, As I see it, is that in the not too distant future:
everyone in the US will essentially be forced to have a Social Network account to be able to function in modern society.

More and more I see all manner of business and government entities handing responsibility over to FB for all sorts of things. It's actually quite disgusting, but not surprising given the (d)evolution of our database driven society. A centralized system of user accounts that almost everything done digitally can use?

When I first saw the subtle changes taking place with FB, things like not being able to contact my local PBS television station unless I used FB , or not being able to enter a contest to see one of my favorite bands unless I used FB I knew it would be only a matter of time until everyone will be forced to have an account.

Currently I don't have one, and never have. However I am part of a group that has an account, and my name and image are located there, so I'm "in the system" as it were.

Once everyone is forced to have an account, then the next step will be for society in general to force those with accounts to update those accounts. There will come a time when via our smartphones those accounts will be updated automatically.
It's almost at that point now:

Who you've talked to.
What you said.
Where you went.
What you bought.
What you listened to.
What you read.
What you think.

Disgusting, reprehensible, wrong
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