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Russian Search Engine Yandex Beats Bing

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the but-it-doesn't-sound-verby dept.

Microsoft 88

judgecorp writes "The Russian search engine Yandex has beaten Microsoft in the search engine rankings, taking fourth place behind Google, China's Baidu and Yahoo, according to ComScore. The result won't be encouraging for Microsoft, which will also be disappointed to see Bing behind its partner Yahoo."

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Oops (4, Informative)

Smivs (1197859) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842415)

The slide into oblivion continues apace.

Re:Oops (4, Funny)

hawkinspeter (831501) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842443)

So, if BING stands for "But It's Not Google", what does YANDEX stand for?

Re:Oops (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842471)

"Yet Another Needless Discovery EXercise"?

Re:Oops (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842481)

Going by what most people use the internet: Yeah ! spANDEX !

Re:Oops (4, Informative)

Kostic (2754035) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842499)

It has a cross-language meaning. In Russian, Rndex means Index and in English it stands for "Yet Another Indexer". At least, that's what hippies at the Wikipedia wrote.

Re:Oops (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842565)

They're not hippies - they're libertarian cracked pots

Re:Oops (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842797)

It gets harder to tell them apart every year.

Re:Oops (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843975)

No surprise -- some of my best libertarian friends are also still unconformed hippies.

Another distinction (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843171)

Libertarians wish to crack open the State. Hippies are only too happy to break out the pot.

Re:Oops (4, Informative)

temcat (873475) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843201)

"Rndex" (with the Cyrillic "Ya" going first) is not a word in Russian. "Indeks" is. So "Yandex" is an invented word.

Re:Oops (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843363)

Ya is the word for I in Russian, so it becomes I Ndex.

Re:Oops (2)

temcat (873475) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843643)

This is correct, but "Ya" and "ndex" together are not a word.

Re:Oops (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842501)

Yet Another NonGoogle Directory Expendable

Re:Oops-near miss (3, Interesting)

foobsr (693224) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842649)

Wikipedia sometimes helps: "The name initially stood for "Yet Another iNDEXer". The Russian word "" ("Ya") corresponds to the English personal pronoun "I", making "ndex" a bilingual pun on "index". ...".

A pun indeed.

CC.

Re:Oops (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843037)

no, Bing = Bing Is Not Good

Re:Oops (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42847151)

Ballmer is not good.

Re:Oops (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843561)

R means I in Russian. The closest analogy would be RINDEX or iINDEX. So they took off one i and ended up with RNDEX which is spelled YANDEX in translit (YA is to get R typed).

Re:Oops (1)

rtb61 (674572) | about a year and a half ago | (#42848491)

BING, Ballmer Is New God, now if you don't think Uncle Fester doesn't have the ego to force renaming of MSN Search (logical branding extension now crippled by branding fragmentation) to feed his own personal ego, then you have missed all of his crazy assed monkey dances http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_0iqfOKLqVc [youtube.com] (beer is for drinkin not for thinking and Uncle Fester whiskey is even worse).

Re:Oops (1)

elementai (1650215) | about a year and a half ago | (#42852841)

From their own site http://company.yandex.ru/about/pages/yandex.xml [yandex.ru] "yandex — yet another indexer". There's another variant, one can translate first letter from "index" word "i" -> "I" (pronoun) -> "Ya" (pronoun).

Re:Oops (3, Funny)

flyneye (84093) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842641)

Yeah, I remember Alta Vista being the stuff back when you could throw 14,400 modems at dinosaurs to distract them and make a clean getaway.

Re:Oops (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843557)

That is a lot of modems to use as a distraction.

Re:Oops (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a year and a half ago | (#42844295)

A baudy lot they are too.

Re:Oops (1)

transporter_ii (986545) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842747)

They do have one thing going for them that Open Source and free markets do not, money to pay -- buy off? (See Dell) -- people to use their products. Slide yes, but they will go down much more slowly than most of us on here will care to admit or like.

 

Re:Oops (1)

rutafalu (2837245) | about a year and a half ago | (#42846155)

http://www.cloud65.com/ [cloud65.com] my best friend's step-aunt makes $74/hour on the laptop. She has been out of work for six months but last month her pay was $12690 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Read more on this site

Decentralized Web Services (1)

Faisal Rehman (2424374) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842437)

We need free decentralized web services to save ourselves from getting scroogled.

Re:Decentralized Web Services (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42848873)

I admit, without tone I cannot tell if this is sarcasm, astroturfing, or genuine belief.

Someone has to do it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842447)

In Soviet Russia, engine searches you!

mail.yandex.com - free! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842469)

don't forget to sign up for a free e-mail account with them.

Re:mail.yandex.com - free! (1)

RockDoctor (15477) | about a year and a half ago | (#42856889)

Why should I? I've had one from MAIL.RU for years. Helps cut down on the spam. Yandex and mail.ru cross-advertise so heavily that I assume they're the same company.

What search-engine rankings? (-1, Troll)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842483)

They ended up higher on Google's search results?

Well surprise! News at 11, search engine demotes major competitor in its results lists.

Re:What search-engine rankings? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842505)

They are only measuring popularity, not how good the search engine is.
The real test is how well an engine finds your specific type of porn.

Re:What search-engine rankings? (3, Insightful)

ilguido (1704434) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842527)

Where does it say that they measured Google search results? RTFA or at least their about page [comscore.com] before defending poor little M$.

Not a worry for MS (1)

MrDoh! (71235) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842487)

Great, now we're going to get 'Yandexerised' adverts in Russian to go with the 'Scroogled' ads we see. More than anything, it shows that the first product Microsoft needs to fix, is their spell checker. Not a major problem, they'll just keep throwing money at it till their competitors get bored/they patent how the other search engines work and sue them to shut them down/give users an option to use any search engine, but with a huge 'are you sure?' Clippy until you go back to Bing.

Re: Not a worry for MS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843141)

What's an ad?

Re: Not a worry for MS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42844549)

What's an ad?

AD in russian is Hell

Even more hilarious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842515)

Even more hilarious that Microsoft even PAID for people to use their search engine for a while, still not used.

HELP IS ON THE WAY DEAR! HELP IS ON THE WAY! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842525)

Microsoft Kinect Spy System

THIS ARTICLE IS BEING SCRUBBED FROM THE NET. THE SITE IT WAS ORIGINALLY POSTED TO YANKED THE PLUG ON THEIR WHOLE SITE!!! COPY/PASTE THIS ARTICLE AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE TO DISCUSSION FORUMS, BLOGS, FACEBOOK, TWITTER, AND ARCHIVE AND MIRROR THIS DOCUMENT SO IT DOES NOT VANISH FOREVER!

"So you just got the Kinect/Xbox360 gaming system and you're having fun, hanging out in your underwear, plopped down in your favorite lounge chair, and playing games with your buddies. Yeah, it's great to have a microphone and camera in your game system so you can "Kinect" to your pals while you play, but did you read that Terms of Service Agreement that came with your Kinect thingy? No? Here, let me point out an important part of that service agreement.

        If you accept the agreement, you "expressly authorize and consent to us accessing or disclosing information about you, including the content of your communications, in order to: (a) comply with the law or respond to lawful requests or legal process; (b) protect the rights or property of Microsoft, our partners, or our customers, including the enforcement of our agreements or policies governing your use of the Service; or (c) act on a good faith belief that such access or disclosure is necessary to protect the personal safety of Microsoft employees, customers, or the public."

Did you catch that? Here, let me print the important part in really big letters.

"If you accept the agreement, you expressly authorize and consent to us accessing or disclosing information about you, including the content of your communications⦠on a good faith belief that such access or disclosure is necessary to protect the personal safety of Microsoft employees, customers, or the public."

OK, is that clear enough for ya? When you use the Kinect system, you agree to allow Microsoft (and any branch of law enforcement or government they care to share information with) to use your Kinect system to spy on you. Maybe run that facial recognition software to check you out, listen to your conversations, and keep track of who you are communicating with.

I know this is probably old news to some, but I thought I would mention it because it pertains to almost all of these home game systems that are interactive. You have to remember, the camera and microphone contained in your game system have the ability to be hacked by anyone the game company gives that ability to, and that includes government snoops and law enforcement agents.

Hey, it's MICROSOFT. What did you expect?

And the same concerns apply to all interactive game systems. Just something to think about if you're having a "Naked Wii party" or doing something illegal while you're gaming with your buddies. Or maybe you say something suspicious and it triggers the DHS software to start tracking your every word. Hey, this is not paranoia. It's spelled out for you, right there in that Service Agreement. Read it! Here's one more part of the agreement you should be aware of.

        "You should not expect any level of privacy concerning your use of the live communication features (for example, voice chat, video and communications in live-hosted gameplay sessions) offered through the Service."

Did you catch it that time? YOU SHOULD NOT EXPECT ANY LEVEL OF PRIVACY concerning your voice chat and video features on your Kinect box."

###

"Listen up, you ignorant sheep. Your government is spending more money than ever to spy on its own citizens. That's YOU, my friend. And if you're one of these people who say, "Well I ain't ever done nothing wrong so why should I worry about it?' - you are dead wrong. Our civil liberties are being taken away faster than you can spit. The NSA is working away on its new "First Intelligence Community Comprehensive National Cyber-security Initiative Data Center' to keep track of every last one of us. This thing will be the size of 17 football stadiums. One million square feet, all to be filled with more technology and data storage than you could imagine. And 30,000 spy drones are set to be launched over America which can each stay aloft for about 28 hours, traveling 300 miles per hour. WHY? Why do we want these things in our skies?

The military is now taking a keen interest in the Microsoft Kinect Spy System, the fastest selling electronic device in history. Conveniently self-installed in over 18 million homes, this seemingly innocent game system, armed with facial recognition programming and real-time recording of both sound and video, will be used by our own government to spy on and record us in our own homes.

And it doesn't stop there. Other game systems such as Nintendo's WWII are also being turned into government-controlled spy systems. WHY?

That's the real question. WHY?!!! Why is our own government spending billions and billions of dollars to spy on its own people? To keep us safe? Do you really believe that?"

Microsoft's Kinect System is Watching You
Published on Apr 5, 2012 by TheAlexJonesChannel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkYgC-AvPGM [youtube.com]

###

Big Brother alert: Microsoft wants to know how many friends you've got in your living room

- http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/technology/micwright/100008237/big-brother-alert-microsoft-wants-to-know-how-many-friends-youve-got-in-your-living-room/ [telegraph.co.uk]

By Mic Wright Gadgets Last updated: November 9th, 2012

- http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/technology/author/micwright/ [telegraph.co.uk]

"One of Microsoft's latest patent applications[1] is a humdinger. It proposes to turn the Kinect camera into a snitch for movie studios, reporting back just how many friends you've got in your living room and what they're watching. Think that sounds alarmist? Here's what it actually says: "The users consuming the content on a display device are monitored so that if the number of user-views licensed is exceeded, remedial action may be taken." It's that blatant â" a system to spy on private viewing habits.

If put into practice, Microsoft's plan could mean that the film you're watching suddenly stops playing if it detects that you've got more people squashed on to the sofa than the licence allows. You'd then be prompted to buy a more expensive licence to keep watching. It's as if Big Brother had built 1984's Telescreen not to monitor the population but to ensure no one was pirating the Two Minutes Hate.

In all likelihood, Microsoft will struggle to actually apply this patent in the real world. While copyright holders would be delighted, customers would be turned off by such a draconian system. But that's what's interesting about this application and patent applications in general: they often reveal what companies would do if they could get away with it. The black and white drawings and blandly technical language can cover immoral, scary and downright evil ideas.

There was an even more striking example from Apple earlier this year[2]. In September, it was granted a patent for "Apparatus and methods for enforcement of policies upon a wireless device", i.e. a system allowing companies or governments to remotely disable mobile phones and tablets in a particular area.

While Apple mentions benign examples such as preventing phone calls from disturbing concerts or ensuring devices are switched off on planes, it also states: "Covert police or government operations may require complete "blackout" conditions." That's exactly the kind of feature certain governments would love to use to suppress pictures and videos. The patent Apple put its stamp on is a handy form of censorship regardless of whether it will ever apply it.

Last year, Google's chairman, Eric Schmidt, said that the company would hold off from creating a facial recognition service because it would be "crossing the creepy line". Still, Google has filed for and been granted extensive patents in the area and, as its Project Glass augmented reality goggles move forward, who knows when the "creepy line" will shift?"

[1] http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=%2220120278904%22.PGNR.&OS=DN/20120278904&RS=DN/20120278904 [uspto.gov]

[2] http://www.zdnet.com/apple-patent-could-remotely-disable-protesters-phone-cameras-7000003640/ [zdnet.com]

(C) Copyright of Telegraph Media Group Limited 2012

###

"People are aware that Windows has bad security but they are underestimating the problem because they are thinking about third parties. What about security against Microsoft? Every non-free program is a âjust trust me program'. âTrust me, we're a big corporation. Big corporations would never mistreat anybody, would we?' Of course they would! They do all the time, that's what they are known for. So basically you mustn't trust a non free programme."

"There are three kinds: those that spy on the user, those that restrict the user, and back doors. Windows has all three. Microsoft can install software changes without asking permission. Flash Player has malicious features, as do most mobile phones."

"Digital handcuffs are the most common malicious features. They restrict what you can do with the data in your own computer. Apple certainly has the digital handcuffs that are the tightest in history. The i-things, well, people found two spy features and Apple says it removed them and there might be more""

From:

Richard Stallman: 'Apple has tightest digital handcuffs in history'
www.newint.org/features/web-exclusive/2012/12/05/richard-stallman-interview/

###

Nobody Seems To Notice and Nobody Seems To Care - Government & Stealth Malware

In Response To Slashdot Article: Former Pentagon Analyst: China Has Backdoors To 80% of Telecoms 87

How many rootkits does the US[2] use officially or unofficially?

How much of the free but proprietary software in the US spies on you?

Which software would that be?

Visit any of the top freeware sites in the US, count the number of thousands or millions of downloads of free but proprietary software, much of it works, again on a proprietary Operating System, with files stored or in transit.

How many free but proprietary programs have you downloaded and scanned entire hard drives, flash drives, and other media? Do you realize you are giving these types of proprietary programs complete access to all of your computer's files on the basis of faith alone?

If you are an atheist, the comparison is that you believe in code you cannot see to detect and contain malware on the basis of faith! So you do believe in something invisible to you, don't you?

I'm now going to touch on a subject most anti-malware, commercial or free, developers will DELETE on most of their forums or mailing lists:

APT malware infecting and remaining in BIOS, on PCI and AGP devices, in firmware, your router (many routers are forced to place backdoors in their firmware for their government) your NIC, and many other devices.

Where are the commercial or free anti-malware organizations and individual's products which hash and compare in the cloud and scan for malware for these vectors? If you post on mailing lists or forums of most anti-malware organizations about this threat, one of the following actions will apply: your post will be deleted and/or moved to a hard to find or 'deleted/junk posts' forum section, someone or a team of individuals will mock you in various forms 'tin foil hat', 'conspiracy nut', and my favorite, 'where is the proof of these infections?' One only needs to search Google for these threats and they will open your malware world view to a much larger arena of malware on devices not scanned/supported by the scanners from these freeware sites. This point assumed you're using the proprietary Microsoft Windows OS. Now, let's move on to Linux.

The rootkit scanners for Linux are few and poor. If you're lucky, you'll know how to use chkrootkit (but you can use strings and other tools for analysis) and show the strings of binaries on your installation, but the results are dependent on your capability of deciphering the output and performing further analysis with various tools or in an environment such as Remnux Linux. None of these free scanners scan the earlier mentioned areas of your PC, either! Nor do they detect many of the hundreds of trojans and rootkits easily available on popular websites and the dark/deep web.

Compromised defenders of Linux will look down their nose at you (unless they are into reverse engineering malware/bad binaries, Google for this and Linux and begin a valuable education!) and respond with a similar tone, if they don't call you a noob or point to verifying/downloading packages in a signed repo/original/secure source or checking hashes, they will jump to conspiracy type labels, ignore you, lock and/or shuffle the thread, or otherwise lead you astray from learning how to examine bad binaries. The world of Linux is funny in this way, and I've been a part of it for many years. The majority of Linux users, like the Windows users, will go out of their way to lead you and say anything other than pointing you to information readily available on detailed binary file analysis.

Don't let them get you down, the information is plenty and out there, some from some well known publishers of Linux/Unix books. Search, learn, and share the information on detecting and picking through bad binaries. But this still will not touch the void of the APT malware described above which will survive any wipe of r/w media. I'm convinced, on both *nix and Windows, these pieces of APT malware are government in origin. Maybe not from the US, but most of the 'curious' malware I've come across in poisoned binaries, were written by someone with a good knowledge in English, some, I found, functioned similar to the now well known Flame malware. From my experience, either many forum/mailing list mods and malware developers/defenders are 'on the take', compromised themselves, and/or working for a government entity.

Search enough, and you'll arrive at some lone individuals who cry out their system is compromised and nothing in their attempts can shake it of some 'strange infection'. These posts receive the same behavior as I said above, but often they are lone posts which receive no answer at all, AT ALL! While other posts are quickly and kindly replied to and the 'strange infection' posts are left to age and end up in a lost pile of old threads.

If you're persistent, the usual challenge is to, "prove it or STFU" and if the thread is not attacked or locked/shuffled and you're lucky to reference some actual data, they will usually attack or ridicule you and further drive the discussion away from actual proof of APT infections.

The market is ripe for an ambitious company or individual to begin demanding companies and organizations who release firmware and design hardware to release signed and hashed packages and pour this information into the cloud, so everyone's BIOS is checked, all firmware on routers, NICs, and other devices are checked, and malware identified and knowledge reported and shared openly.

But even this will do nothing to stop backdoored firmware (often on commercial routers and other networked devices of real importance for government use - which again opens the possibility of hackers discovering these backdoors) people continue to use instead of refusing to buy hardware with proprietary firmware/software.

Many people will say, "the only safe computer is the one disconnected from any network, wireless, wired, LAN, internet, intranet" but I have seen and you can search yourself for and read about satellite, RF, temperature, TEMPEST (is it illegal in your part of the world to SHIELD your system against some of these APT attacks, especially TEMPEST? And no, it's not simply a CRT issue), power line and many other attacks which can and do strike computers which have no active network connection, some which have never had any network connection. Some individuals have complained they receive APT attacks throughout their disconnected systems and they are ridiculed and labeled as a nutter. The information exists, some people have gone so far as to scream from the rooftops online about it, but they are nutters who must have some serious problems and this technology with our systems could not be possible.

I believe most modern computer hardware is more powerful than many of us imagine, and a lot of these systems swept from above via satellite and other attacks. Some exploits take advantage of packet radio and some of your proprietary hardware. Some exploits piggyback and unless you really know what you're doing, and even then... you won't notice it.

Back to the Windows users, a lot of them will dismiss any strange activity to, "that's just Windows!" and ignore it or format again and again only to see the same APT infected activity continue. Using older versions of sysinternals, I've observed very bizarre behavior on a few non networked systems, a mysterious chat program running which doesn't exist on the system, all communication methods monitored (bluetooth, your hard/software modems, and more), disk mirroring software running[1], scans running on different but specific file types, command line versions of popular Windows freeware installed on the system rather than the use of the graphical component, and more.

[1] In one anonymous post on pastebin, claiming to be from an intel org, it blasted the group Anonymous, with a bunch of threats and information, including that their systems are all mirrored in some remote location anyway.

[2] Or other government, US used in this case due to the article source and speculation vs. China. This is not to defend China, which is one messed up hell hole on several levels and we all need to push for human rights and freedom for China's people. For other, freer countries, however, the concentration camps exist but you wouldn't notice them, they originate from media, mostly your TV, and you don't even know it. As George Carlin railed about "Our Owners", "nobody seems to notice and nobody seems to care".

[3] http://www.stallman.org/ [stallman.org]

Try this yourself on a wide variety of internet forums and mailing lists, push for malware scanners to scan more than files, but firmware/BIOS. See what happens, I can guarantee it won't be pleasant, especially with APT cases.

So scan away, or blissfully ignore it, but we need more people like RMS[3] in the world. Such individuals tend to be eccentric but their words ring true and clear about electronics and freedom.

I believe we're mostly pwned, whether we would like to admit it or not, blind and pwned, yet fiercely holding to misinformation, often due to lack of self discovery and education, and "nobody seems to notice and nobody seems to care".

(Remotely Attacking Network Cards)
http://theinvisiblethings.blogspot.com/2010/04/remotely-attacking-network-cards-or-why.html [blogspot.com]

(Persistent BIOS Infection)
http://www.phrack.org/issues.html?issue=66&id=7#article [phrack.org]

(BIOS --> Vbootkit code(from CD,PXE etc.) --> MBR --> NT Boot sector --> Windows Boot manager --> Windows Loader --> Vista Kernel)
http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/442/2 [securityfocus.com]

(The ROMOS project)
http://web.archive.org/web/20100111040625/http://rayer.ic.cz/romos/romose.htm [archive.org]

Secure boot is Microsoft's attempt to maintain computer OS market share as their influences is being stripped away by the likes of Google (Android) and Apple (iOS). With HTML5 on the way, we will have WEB based applications that rival desktop versions, and run on ANY device. The OS is just a layer to get to where the real work gets done, information exchange.

AND the worst part is, secure boot doesn't actually fix the problem it pretends it solves. It can't. This is the whole DRM of DVD's and BluRay all over again. Look at how well that is working out.

DRM is broken by design."
- linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=2985953&cid=40681007

"Richard Stallman has finally spoken out on this subject. He notes that 'if the user doesn't control the keys, then it's a kind of shackle, and that would be true no matter what system it is.' He says, 'Microsoft demands that ARM computers sold for Windows 8 be set up so that the user cannot change the keys; in other words, turn it into restricted boot.' Stallman adds that 'this is not a security feature. This is abuse of the users. I think it ought to be illegal.'""
- linux.slashdot.org/story/12/07/17/2326253/richard-stallman-speaks-about-uefi

I'm concerned about new rootkits which target PCI devices, such as the graphics card and the optical drives, also, BIOS. Where are the malware scanners which scan PCI devices and BIOS for mismatches? All firmware, BIOS and on PCI devices should be checksummed and saved to match with others in the cloud, and archived when the computer is first used, backing up signed firmware.

When do you recall seeing signed router firmware upgrades with any type of checksum to check against? Same for PCI devices and optical drives and BIOS.

Some have begun with BIOS security:

http://www.biosbits.org/ [biosbits.org]

Some BIOS has write protection in its configuration, a lot of newer computers don't.

###

CIA Head: We Will Spy On Americans Through Electrical Appliances
Global information surveillance grid being constructed; willing Americans embrace gadgets used to spy on them
http://www.prisonplanet.com/cia-head-we-will-spy-on-americans-through-electrical-appliances.html [prisonplanet.com]

###

Comparing the unique pattern of the frequencies on an audio recording with a database that has been logging these changes for 24 hours a day, 365 days a year provides a digital watermark: a date and time stamp on the recording.
Philip Harrison, from JP French Associates, another forensic audio laboratory that has been logging the hum for several years, says: "Even if [the hum] is picked up at a very low level that you cannot hear, we can extract this information." It is a technique known as Electric Network Frequency (ENF) analysis, and it is helping forensic scientists to separate genuine, unedited recordings from those that have been tampered with."
- http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20629671 [bbc.co.uk]
- http://cryptogon.com/?p=32789 [cryptogon.com]

###

"I'd worry about a Tempest virus that polled a personal computer's
CD-ROM drive to pulse the motor as a signalling method:

* Modern high-speed CD-ROM drive motors are both acoustically and
electrically noisy, giving you two attack methods for the price of one;

* Laptop computer users without CRTs, and the PC users that can afford
large LCD screens instead of CRTs, often have CD-ROM drives;

* Users are getting quite used to sitting patiently while their
CD-ROM drives grind away for no visibly obvious reason (but
that's quite enough about the widespread installs of software from
Microsoft CD-ROMs that prompted Kuhn's investigation in the first place.)"

http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/19.60.html#subj9 [ncl.ac.uk]

###

"I'd worry about a Tempest virus that polled a personal computer' personal computer' CD-ROM drive"

Yes and the hard drive and in some PC's the cooling fans as well are under CPU control.

You can also do it with PC's where the CPU does not control the fan, but the hardware has a simple thermal sensor to control it's speed. You do this by simply having a process that uses power expensive instructions in tight loops, thus raising the CPU temprature (it's one of the side channels I was considering a long time ago when thinking about how the temp inside the case changed various things including the CPU clock XTAL frequency).

The change in sound side channel is one of the first identified problems with Quantum Key Distribution. Basicaly the bod who came up with the idea whilst first testing the idea could tell the state of "Alice's polarizer" simply by the amount of noise it made...

The CD-ROM motor idea I'd heard befor but could not remember where till I followed your link.

Dr Lloyd Wood has worked with the UK's Surrey Uni, the European Space Agency and Americas NASA and one or two other places as part of his work for Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. He has been involved with CLEO (Cisco router in Low Earth Orbit) and other work on what's being called "The Space Internet".

Of interest is his work on Delay and Disruption Tolerant Networks (DTN). It's not been said "publicaly" as far as I'm aware but the work has aspects that are important to anonymity networks such as TOR.

You can read more on Dr Wood's DTN work etc at,

Lloyd Wood - Delay-Tolerant Networking work
http://personal.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/L.Wood/dtn/ [surrey.ac.uk]

The UK occupies an odd position in the "Space Race" it is the only nation who having put a satellite into space then stopped further space rocket development (the Black Knight launch platform was considerably safer and more economic than the then US and CCCP systems). The UK has however continued in the Space Game and is perhaps the leading designers of payloads for scientific and industrial satellites (it probably is on military sats as well but nobody who knows for sure is telling ;-)

Clive Robinson
Schneier on Security: Information-Age Law Enforcement Techniques
http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2012/12/interesting_win.html#c1049823 [schneier.com]

###

Schneier has covered it before: power line fluctuations (differences on the wire in keys pressed).

Thereâ(TM)s thermal attacks against cpus and temp, also:

ENF (google it)

A treat (ENF Collector in Java):

sourceforge dot net fwdslash projects fwdslash nfienfcollector

No single antimalware scanner exists which offers the ability to scan (mostly proprietary) firmware on AGP/PCI devices (sound cards, graphics cards, usb novelty devices excluding thumb drives), BIOS/CMOS.

If you boot into ultimate boot cd you can use an archane text interface to dump BIOS/CMOS and examine/checksum.

The real attacks which survive disk formats and wipes target your PCI devices and any firmware which may be altered/overwritten with something special. It is not enough to scan your hard drive(s) and thumb drives, the real dangers with teeth infect your hardware devices.

When is the last time you:

Audited your sound card for malware?
Audited your graphics card for malware?
Audited your network card for malware?

Google for:

* AGP and PCI rootkit(s)
* Network card rootkit(s)
* BIOS/CMOS rootkit(s)

Our modern PC hardware is capable of much more than many can imagine.

Do you:

        Know your routerâ(TM)s firmware may easily be replaced on a hackerâ(TM)s whim?
        Shield all cables against leakage and attacks
        Still use an old CRT monitor and beg for TEMPEST attacks?
        Use TEMPEST resistant fonts in all of your applications including your OS?
        Know whether or not your wired keyboard has keypresses encrypted as they pass to your PC from the keyboard?
        Use your PC on the grid and expose yourself to possible keypress attacks?
        Know your network card is VERY exploitable when plugged into the net and attacked by a hard core blackhat or any vicious geek with the know how?
        Sarch out informative papers on these subjects and educate your friends and family about these attacks?
        Contact antimalware companies and urge them to protect against many or all these attacks?

Do you trust your neighbors? Are they all really stupid when it comes to computing or is there a geek or two without a conscience looking to exploit these areas?

The overlooked threat are the potential civilian rogues stationed around you, especially in large apartment blocks who feed on unsecured wifi to do their dirty work.

With the recent news of Russian spies, whether or not this news was real or a psyop, educate yourself on the present threats which all antimalware scanners fail to protect against and remove any smug mask you may wear, be it Linux or OpenBSD, or the proprietary Windows and Mac OS you feel are properly secured and not vulnerable to any outside attacks because you either donâ(TM)t need an antivirus scanner (all are inept to serious attacks) or use one or several (many being proprietary mystery machines sending data to and from your machine for many reasons, one is to share your information with a group or set database to help aid in threats), the threats often come in mysterious ways.

Maybe the ancients had it right: stone tablets and their own unique language(s) rooted in symbolism.

###

âoeDisconnect your PC from the internet and donâ(TM)t add anything you didnâ(TM)t create yourself. It worked for the NOC list machine in Mission Impossibleâ

The room/structure was likely heavily shielded, whereas most civvies donâ(TM)t shield their house and computer rooms. There is more than meets the eye to modern hardware.

Google:

subversion hack:
tagmeme(dot)com/subhack/

network card rootkits and trojans
pci rootkits
packet radio
xmit âoefm fingerprintingâ software
âoespecific emitter identificationâ
forums(dot)qrz(dot)com

how many malware scanners scan bios/cmos and pci/agp cards for malware? zero, even the rootkit scanners. have you checksummed/dumped your bios/cmos and firmware for all your pci/agp devices and usb devices, esp vanity usb devices in and outside the realm of common usb devices (thumbdrives, external hdds, printers),

Unless your computer room is shielded properly, the computers may still be attacked and used, Iâ(TM)ve personally inspected computers with no network connection running mysterious code in the background which task manager for windows and the eqiv for *nix does not find, and this didnâ(TM)t find it all.

Inspect your windows boot partition in *nix with hexdump and look for proxy packages mentioned along with command line burning programs and other oddities. Computers are more vulnerable than most would expect.

You can bet all of the malware scanners today, unless they are developed by some lone indy coder in a remote country, employ whitelisting of certain malware and none of them scan HARDWARE devices apart from the common usb devices.

Your network cards, sound cards, cd/dvd drives, graphics cards, all are capable of carrying malware to survive disk formatting/wiping.

Boot from a Linux live cd and use hexdump to examine your windows (and *nix) boot sectors to potentially discover interesting modifications by an unknown party.

###

Wha? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842793)

Seen this before... how is someone able to get such a long post to avoid being hidden by "read the rest of this comment"?

Re:NO HELP IS ON THE WAY, NONE! (1)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about a year and a half ago | (#42847239)

Yawn, ignoring the obvious, it's this part that is of real concern and what your missing:

"The rootkit scanners for Linux are few and poor. If you're lucky, you'll know how to use
chkrootkit (but you can use strings and other tools for analysis) and show the strings of
binaries on your installation, but the results are dependent on your capability of deciphering
the output and performing further analysis with various tools or in an environment such as Remnux Linux.
None of these free scanners scan the earlier mentioned areas of your PC, either!
Nor do they detect many of the hundreds of trojans and rootkits easily available on popular
websites and the dark/deep web."

The loss of this site: http://vx.netlux.org/ [netlux.org] was a loss to everybody.

A place one could download the latest malware to see what it would do, now we have
malware businesses who might now mention a malware's name but little else.
Very very few people can find much of malware in use now.

Rootkits? I'm sure many are running them now; unless one can have access to sites
like http://vx.netlux.org/ [netlux.org] to have even a little chance of finding out or even knowing.

(my pet peevee)
Here, ever play Angry BIrds? read their Privacy policy
http://www.rovio.com/Privacy [rovio.com]
and think of how long you've been playing it.

Cue 'em up (3, Funny)

cellocgw (617879) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842551)

The "BazINGa" and "badaBING" jokes that is.

In Soviet Russia, the Yandex Bings you?

Re:Cue 'em up (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843259)

I'll bite.
In Soviet Russia, Searches are Performed by You!

As it seems, Amazing Spiderman (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842575)

...didn't help Bing that much

Re:As it seems, Amazing Spiderman (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843123)

Maybe they should ramp up the blatant obviousness of Microsoft product placement in Hawaii 5-0?

It's actually pretty good here too. (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842591)

I use the Turkish version of Yandex (yandex.com.tr).

It is awesome when it comes to local stuff or very specific topics. Like when online shopping, you just search for the model number of the tv you want to buy and it finds where it's cheapest. You search for a movie, allow it to use your locaiton and "BAM" you get the nearest showtime at the closest place with ticket prices.

Re:It's actually pretty good here too. (2)

icebike (68054) | about a year and a half ago | (#42844093)

My tests show the same thing.

I actually think it is simply scraping Google, because there is no sign of yandex in my web server logs, but newly added pages can be found via searchs on yandex, and the only crawler that appears in the log was Google.

Re:It's actually pretty good here too. (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about a year and a half ago | (#42846909)

Yandex has their own browser, which is basically a rebranded version of Chrome - so, instead of sending your history to Google, it sends it to Yandex. I don't know what its UA string is, but I wouldn't be surprised if it presented itself simply as Chrome, for the sake of compatibility with all the browser detection scripts out there.

Re:It's actually pretty good here too. (2)

Cyberax (705495) | about a year and a half ago | (#42847035)

If your website is not in Russian (Ukrainian, Kazakh, Uzbek) language then it'll be put on the 'back burner' by Yandex. It will be indexed, someday, probably, maybe.

And that's fine, Yandex specializes in Russian and other xUSSR languages searches - it works significantly better than Google for them. It also knows about public transportation routes, movie theater schedules, etc. There are also Yandex Maps with much better routing info for Russia and Ukraine (and no info at all for the rest of the world) - and they can even be used _offline_ on Androids/iPhones.http://search.slashdot.org/story/13/02/09/0749257/russian-search-engine-yandex-beats-bing#

In short, Yandex is a great example of a local company that knows its market and makes products tailored specifically for it. And it can beat global companies that merely do a localized version of their global offering.

Re:It's actually pretty good here too. (1)

lothos (10657) | about a year and a half ago | (#42848543)

Yandex shows up in my logs as "Yandex bot".

This is pretty silly. (4, Interesting)

argStyopa (232550) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842627)

This isn't a ranking of performance, it's a ranking of 'number of searches', which (for whatever it's actually worth, which is probably ad revenue only) can easily be gamed.

"Microsoft still attracted 268.6 million unique searchers in December, and Yandex just 74.4 million, which suggests that Yandex aficionados tend to use their search engine more intensively." ...which both points to MS's success in jamming it down people's throats as the 'first search' in any MS device (for chrissakes in Win7 google isn't even OFFERED as one of the search options - you have to download an extension to IE to set google as the default search, lol), AND likewise suggests that the Yandex results are in fact being gamed somehow.

The Chinese results are simple, it's in CHINESE, which has billions of native users.
Google dominates the english speaking world, and I guess Yandex gets the Russians.

Re:This is pretty silly. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842885)

This isn't a ranking of performance, it's a ranking of 'number of searches', which (for whatever it's actually worth, which is probably ad revenue only) can easily be gamed.

"Microsoft still attracted 268.6 million unique searchers in December, and Yandex just 74.4 million, which suggests that Yandex aficionados tend to use their search engine more intensively." ...which both points to MS's success in jamming it down people's throats as the 'first search' in any MS device (for chrissakes in Win7 google isn't even OFFERED as one of the search options - you have to download an extension to IE to set google as the default search, lol), AND likewise suggests that the Yandex results are in fact being gamed somehow.

The Chinese results are simple, it's in CHINESE, which has billions of native users.
Google dominates the english speaking world, and I guess Yandex gets the Russians.

I wonder how much the various search APIs and policies influence that. A lot of the major "SEO" companies with their "own" search engines really just use Bing. (shock horror SEOMoz tell porkies).

Google caps automated search at 100 per day, you can buy more, but not for all the index. Bing has no such restrictions. Yahoo has limited restrictions. I don't know about Yandex or Baidu (but Baidu certainly scan my servers agressively).

Re:This is pretty silly. (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843281)

I hate that "feature" at work where we get bing as a default. I have to load the Google search page every time I want to do a search. The reason bing is fourth is because it sucks. Even the non geeks at work don't use bing.

Re:This is pretty silly. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42844609)

So since Google is winning they're gaming the system? They're playing the man in the middle with referer strings [wikipedia.org] ? I suppose they could do that with Chrome such that when you visit Bing in chrome it could change the string to Google when you click a link in search results. I really doubt they could do it secretly... that shit is really easy to sniff out. And that does nothing for the other two thirds of the market (Google can't modify IE source last I checked and Firefox has way to many "activists" for privacy to let their source be corrupted that way).

Explain the gaming technique. Details please.

Re:This is pretty silly. (1)

epSos-de (2741969) | about a year and a half ago | (#42850639)

Or maybe, becasue Yandex lets you search for the stuff that is blocked on all other search engines. Go try it yourself.

I use Bing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842637)

I've been using Bing for a long time and I'm satisfied with its performance. Anti-American Google can go to hell.

Re:I use Bing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842825)

I've been using Bing for a long time and I'm satisfied with its performance. Anti-American Google can go to hell.

buuuuttttttttt, you also like being anally fist fucked

"bing" is such a fucking stupid name (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842835)

i know they picked it because it's easy to say in chinese as opposed to "gao gao le" or whatever but as nice as it might sound in mandarin it sounds dumb as shit in english...

At least Bing properly obeys robots.txt (1)

archen (447353) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842873)

“Yandex. We’ll find everything”

Not a surprising quote considering their obnoxious web crawler behavior.

Yandex / Bing is just a waste of bandwidth (1, Insightful)

xiando (770382) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842879)

Good for Yandex that they are "taking forth place", but the truth is that they might as well not exist. Anyone who have a website with 10k+ daily visitors will confirm that absoltely nobody is visiting with a referer string from Yandex or Bing. Nobody. They might as well not exist. Another side to this is that Yandex and Bing and other worthless things like 360spider and JikeSpider and Sogou all waste a whole lot of bandwidth, way more bandwidth than users account for on smaller sites. All this bandwidth and CPU wasted on spiders and absolutely no results to show for it (except spam-bots from China and Russia). It's tempting just to put -j DROP on Yandex and Bing and the trest of them. I don't do it, but I am very tempted.

Re:Yandex / Bing is just a waste of bandwidth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842925)

Surely you must be a russian/ex-USSR based web hoster? I mean, even your nickname shows that!

Seriously, Yandex's great - better than Google, IMO - for local searches, with stuff like looking up people in Russian social nets and places on local maps. Google sucks at those, but is better on global searches, that's why I use Yandex when searching in Russian and Google when searching for everything else.

I guess you'd see something like that with Baidu too - OMG nobody comes anywhere from there!!! Except for all the chinese websites.

Re:Yandex / Bing is just a waste of bandwidth (1)

temcat (873475) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843217)

His nickname doesn't look very Russian to me. More like Chinese.

Re:Yandex / Bing is just a waste of bandwidth (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about a year and a half ago | (#42845805)

Good for Yandex that they are "taking forth place", but the truth is that they might as well not exist. Anyone who have a website with 10k+ daily visitors will confirm that absoltely nobody is visiting with a referer string from Yandex or Bing. Nobody. They might as well not exist. Another side to this is that Yandex and Bing and other worthless things like 360spider and JikeSpider and Sogou all waste a whole lot of bandwidth, way more bandwidth than users account for on smaller sites. All this bandwidth and CPU wasted on spiders and absolutely no results to show for it (except spam-bots from China and Russia). It's tempting just to put -j DROP on Yandex and Bing and the trest of them. I don't do it, but I am very tempted.

People don't tend to visit sites from Yandex because they don't have to... Yandex provides the information from the site in-line. People who search on Yandex spend less time clicking through web pages, because the infomation they want shows up immediately (at least for answers to common questions like "where can I buy the cheapest X").

Of course, this means that site owners may want to drop yandex bots for other reasons....

Re:Yandex / Bing is just a waste of bandwidth (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about a year and a half ago | (#42846931)

Yandex provides much better results for people searching in Russian, or for results specific to Russia.

(or rather, it's pretty much the case for the entire ex-USSR, and possibly some Eastern European countries)

Just because it's irrelevant for you personally doesn't mean that it's "useless". Russia alone has 40 million Internet users - more than any other European country. To many of those people, Google is far more useless.

Re:Yandex / Bing is just a waste of bandwidth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42849373)

Yandex though is not beholding to the USA government's fairly lax laws on privacy.

Google bit the dust today as I switched over, even email and 10GB of cloud space. But most of all without Uncle Sam getting his rocks off by looking at my porn searches.

Porn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42842909)

I hope bing doesn't die. It's the only major search engine good at finding tons and tons of porn. It's actually so good at finding porn by the performers names I don't have a usual porn site anymore.

Re:Porn (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843423)

www.ashemaletube.com

A good source of desktop wallpapers (0)

aapold (753705) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842935)

that's pretty much how I view Bing. I use the various Bing's Best themes, using their RSS feeds. Or just strip out the images I like (mostly landscapes) and add them to desktop slideshow theme (I have to do this when at places that do not allow RSS).

complementary engine (2)

e**(i pi)-1 (462311) | about a year and a half ago | (#42842999)

yandex is a nice complementary alternative. Google and Bing often lead to the same first entries. yandex seems not to update frequently their index so that it refers more to established sites and less to news sites. And it also does not put you into the search bubble.

Re:complementary engine (1)

OutputLogic (1566511) | about a year and a half ago | (#42848367)

Yandex is, perhaps, a complementary alternative for English speakers. For Russian speakers, like me, it's preferred search engine. It has much higher quality of search results then everything else. Also, image and map searches are much better.

Who do you trust? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843063)

Do you trust google? MS? Anything from Russia?

It all seems like a bunch of wolves greeting your search needs with open arms.

Doesn't anyone realize how dangerous it is to give any of these amoral entities the ability to create a detailed profiles on us?

Now I know the pain of Cassandra.

Science! (1)

xyourfacekillerx (939258) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843107)

Screenshots comparing Bing search results with Google search results. Who will be the first to find the complete lyrics for the late post-goth rock band The Altar? Hint: Album is "Prozac anthems". No cheat: no songmeanings, JUST SEARCH ENGINES. To quantify: The number of false links. The number of correct links and the frequency they occur in the first five pages of search results. The number of search results per page. The total number of search results in five pages. etc. etc. The liklihood of either search engine getting it right in the first two page results. To qualify: Each data set corresponds to the search criteria, e.g. with quotes, without quotes, with certain lyrics entered, without certain lyrics entered, with certain song names, etc.. This is science people, let's go!

/Can't find shit with either search engine, really. Can you believe how hard it is to find As I Lay Dying lyrics?

Umm... But Yahoo uses bing for the back-end (1)

R_Harrold (669587) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843317)

So, doesn't that give Bing 7.4% or something along those lines, since Yahoo just front-ends the bing search engine? (Or did I miss something in the past couple of years of drinking the cool-aid)

Re:Umm... But Yahoo uses bing for the back-end (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843431)

So, doesn't that give Bing 7.4% or something along those lines, since Yahoo just front-ends the bing search engine? (Or did I miss something in the past couple of years of drinking the cool-aid)

It means that the user front-end adds significant value for the users who use Yahoo.

Re:Umm... But Yahoo uses bing for the back-end (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843517)

Insincere apology for commenting on my own comment goes here.

Examples of popular things on Yahoo's front page:

Yahoo finance

Weather

Popular news stories

OMG! <-- I know, you hate it, I hate it, but it's still popular.

Flikr

Yahoo mail (a lot of people have accounts)

That's surprising (2)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843417)

Not that Yandex beats Bing. Obviously the main Russian-oriented search engine is going to be a major player, there being 155 million native Russian speakers.

What's surprising to me is that Bing is SO far behind Yahoo given that Windows computers come configured to use Bing until you change the default search engine in Internet Explorer. They have half the rate of usage of Yahoo, despite copying much of Google's bare style. To me, Yahoo's search pages are inordinately cluttered with ads and junk compared to Google's or Bing's. But I guess if you like the bare style you use Google and if you like the clutter you use Yahoo. Bing needs to find a third option if they're going to be competitive with either of the main English-language oriented search engines.

Yandex is pretty cool, actually. (2, Interesting)

vovick (1397387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843621)

Although I seldom use their search engine [yandex.ru] directly since they focus more on searches in Russian, I can confirm that it works very well. They also have, among other things, better maintained and more detailed maps [google.com] of ex-soviet countres with better traffic jam and accident tracking [yandex.ru] , an EXTREMELY convenient product search [yandex.ru] that lets you specify an insane amount of properties and features to pick the most fitting item that exists on the market and then find a good rated and cheap place to buy it, a great multilingual online dictionary [yandex.ru] and a convenient online storage service [yandex.com] which has existed far longer than Google Drive. Their web pages have a simple, consistent and concise design, their ads are few and non-intrusive, and, on top of all this, the company has an almost cult standing among many tech students for its high wages and free CS and data mining school [yandex.ru] where they teach interested people in-depth data mining, artificial intelligence, algorithms and many other related and not-so-much things.

Why do I mention all this? First, to confirm that they are popular for a very good reason and, second, because most of their services use Internet data mining techniques to gather results, so if you live in CIS [slashdot.org] , chances are you are hooked anyway and you generate many internet searches indirectly even if you don't use their search feature. Unless Google pays as much attention to foreign countries as it does to the U.S. and keeps expanding its services, it should not be surprising to see sound local competition in some countries.

Do You Know What The Meaning Of The Word 'Bing' Is (3, Informative)

szyzyg (7313) | about a year and a half ago | (#42843671)

In Britain a 'Bing' is a spoil heap, it's a pile of dirt taken from mining and discarded.
i.e. it's all the worthless crap left behind after you've taken the good stuff out.

Re:Do You Know What The Meaning Of The Word 'Bing' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42844469)

Yes, but Microsoft is trying to force it into usage as a verb, to mimic Google.

As a verb of course it is a new word, and means "to spoil; to deposit a worthless pile of steaming turd; to smear another's faeces on your skin in an attempt to mimic their scent."

Eg. "I wanted search results that look suspiciously like Google's, so I Bung it."

Re:Do You Know What The Meaning Of The Word 'Bing' (1)

hresult (902522) | about a year and a half ago | (#42846703)

Microsoft marketing is the worst you can find, Bing as a product name is not exception.

Re:Do You Know What The Meaning Of The Word 'Bing' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42846773)

I bungw hole piles of results not five minutes ago.

Bing is piece of crap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843765)

Bing is piece of crap forced on uses by add-ons and crapware in every application in windows 8.
Microsoft is dead.

Bing users - the tax system attracts tax payers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42843809)

"Microsoft still attracted 268.6 million unique searchers in December"

It's like saying the tax system attracts tax payers...

Microsoft forces Bing on users by adding this crap to every application in windows 8 and their shitty phones. They even make too-easy-to-click "looking glass" button so that users go to Bing by accident.
This is pathetic.

Scroogled (1)

Vladius (2577555) | about a year and a half ago | (#42844707)

Don't say this to Microsoft, they'll probably blame Google for it. All I know is what their TV commercials tell me....

Re:Scroogled (1)

floatpt (2622967) | about a year and a half ago | (#42848893)

HAHA Scroogled. Thats clever. Unfortunately there's an even worse one for Microsoft: Microsoft.

Even trusty 'find' beat Bing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42844881)

UNIX

Snicker snicker ;)

This is a family-friendly website... (1)

hey! (33014) | about a year and a half ago | (#42845007)

Keep your posts about Bing-beating to yourself, you perv.

How is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42848501)

The Russian search engine Yandex has beaten Microsoft in the search engine rankings, taking fourth place behind Google, China's Baidu and Yahoo, according to ComScore.

How is this news? mickeysoft tried to 'have something with our name on it in that space', and screwed the pooch with an also-ran uninspired offering, once again. They actually managed to kill Netscape with Internet Exploder, but then sat and did nothing with Exploder till Firefox started eating their lunch. All of a sudden they had to reassemble the Exploder team (disbanded and unneeded for more than 7 years) when they wanted to make a new version of Internet Exploder that didn't have nearly so many bugs. They are being beaten because they just don't care.

RE: Yandex beats Bing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42851071)

Of course, Bing powers Yahoo Search, so it's sort of meaningless to say that Yahoo "beats" Bing.

And obviously this is worldwide search share, where Bing is noticeably weak (which is definitely a bad thing). In the US, I'm sure Bing is beating Yandex handily.

No DMCA Notices (1)

enter to exit (1049190) | about a year and a half ago | (#42853655)

When looking for a hard to find file, torrents by their nature aren't always the best route. Yandex, unlike google doesn't remove results because of a DMCA takedown request.
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