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307 comments

No, it shouldn't (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852123)

Should Bastille day be a national holiday?

Re:No, it shouldn't (2, Insightful)

osu-neko (2604) | about a year ago | (#42852159)

Should Bastille day be a national holiday?

In countries that contain the Bastille, yes. Does the first new moon of the year fail to occur in some nation?

Re:No, it shouldn't (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#42852201)

Should Bastille day be a national holiday?

In countries that contain the Bastille, yes. Does the first new moon of the year fail to occur in some nation?

In that case, we should also celebrate the first full moon of the year. I'd personally also go for the first waxing moon of the year and for the first waning moon of the year.

Re:No, it shouldn't (3, Funny)

Richy_T (111409) | about a year ago | (#42852381)

I would further like to suggest that we should then celebrate the first day of the month following the start of the lunar year, But let's not stop there, keep it up and we can get the whole year off. Except that I tend to work in industries that don't recognize most federal holidays. That's just for those lazy government workers.

In fact, forget mandatory holidays anyway, just give me more paid time off that I can take on my own schedule.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852237)

Is it relevant to anything besides astrology?

I see no reason to have a statutory holiday dedicated to worshipping the moon.

Re:No, it shouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852603)

Is it relevant to anything besides astrology?

Well, there's astronomy, biology, human physiology, and history, of course. Probably more I haven't thought of in the few seconds I've devoted to it.

I see no reason to have a statutory holiday dedicated to worshipping the moon.

Well, you don't seem to see very clearly, so that's excusable.

Nobody is proposing "worshipping the moon"; you are confusing this with those other federal holidays, that specifically promote a single religion (and a particularly nasty one, that institutionalizes misogyny and child abuse) above all others (in direct defiance of the US Constitution). What's being proposed is a yearly party.

It's a good idea, for economic reasons mostly. But American racism and jingoistic nationalism will probably rule it out.

Re:No, it shouldn't (0)

Luckyo (1726890) | about a year ago | (#42852443)

The argument likely aims at the fact that storming of Bastille was the event that launched chain that resulted in creation of modern democracy, modern Western power structures and Napoleon Code.

As a result, it can be argued that any modern Western democracy should celebrate the day Bastille was stormed. I would personally counter argue that while it was the event generally associated with start of French Revolution, it wasn't the cause or even the main event. As a result, it should stay mainly a French holiday. Other nations may consider having their independence day or similar national holiday to also celebrate the creation of modern society. Which is done in many countries already.

Re:No, it shouldn't (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852589)

The argument likely aims at the fact that storming of Bastille was the event that launched chain that resulted in creation of modern democracy, modern Western power structures and Napoleon Code.

The storming of the Bastille happened years after the American Revolution, and unlike the American Revolution, which resulted in (relatively) liberal democracy right away, the French Revolution resulted in the Reign of Terror (hardly a model for democracy), and the re-establishment of monarchy several times (Napoleonic and Bourbon kings and emperors). In fact, the French Revolution scared a lot of other countries from liberalizing and becoming more democratic (see Edmund Burke's writings, for instance)

Also, the Napoleonic Code also has nothing to do with the common law practiced in the US (outside of Louisiana and Puerto Rico to some extent) or other Anglophone liberal democracies.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#42852937)

storming of Bastille ... resulted in creation of modern democracy

America was already a democracy when the Bastille was stormed. It would make more sense for the French to celebrate July 4th.

modern Western power structures

Is that a good thing?

and Napoleon Code.

Except for Louisiana, American law isn't based on the Napoleonic Code [wikipedia.org], and Louisiana has long been the worst governed and most corrupt state in the country.

Re:No, it shouldn't (2)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about a year ago | (#42853121)

The argument likely aims at the fact that storming of Bastille was the event that launched chain that resulted in creation of modern democracy, modern Western power structures and Napoleon Code.

14 July 1789 was the event that launched the chainn that resulted in creation of modern democracy?

Seems to me that 4 July 1776 was a bit earlier, and perhaps even helped to inspire the French.

Or we could step back a year to 19 April 1775, when the Battles of Lexington and Concord were fought...a battle in the US that kicked off a revolution perhaps being a better parallel with a battle in France that kicked off a revolution....

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year ago | (#42852645)

Should Bastille day be a national holiday?

In countries that contain the Bastille, yes. Does the first new moon of the year fail to occur in some nation?

In counties that contain a large jail like the Bastille one might notice a momentous jailbreak, no?

Re:No, it shouldn't (2, Interesting)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#42852233)

All holidays should be abolished. At least at the federal level anyway. Celebrating a "holiday" simply because it's the first day of a new year? We should have stopped that nonsense long ago.

Re:No, it shouldn't (4, Insightful)

Ol Biscuitbarrel (1859702) | about a year ago | (#42852315)

In medieval times [medieval.net] the calendar was packed with holidays, about one per week IIRC. Seems like that would've been a good way to blow off some steam, eh? Most of these are only historical curios now. I'd be for bringing those back, or secular equivalents, rather. Starting with Festivus, of course. Feats of Strength!

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

russotto (537200) | about a year ago | (#42853085)

Medieval holidays were a little different than holidays nowadays. You didn't get time off work for them (dawn till dusk and a bit more, 7 days a week). Instead, you weren't supposed to have sex or any other sort of fun, and instead spend more time praying.

Re:No, it shouldn't (5, Interesting)

LordLucless (582312) | about a year ago | (#42852383)

Yeah. You know what else is useless? Weekends. What's up with that crap. I mean, abolish them, and we could work 7 days a week. Woot!

Re:No, it shouldn't (3, Interesting)

craigminah (1885846) | about a year ago | (#42852515)

Russia tried something like that where people worked 5 days on and 1 day off. This allowed factories to run 24/7 or at least until they broke. The mechanical failures was part of the reason Russia went to a kooky sub-7 day week and shortly after that they went to a normal 7-day week. People and machines need time for scheduled maintenance/beer.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852649)

So maintenance was on the "days off"? Did the maintenance guys work 2 on 5 off in that case? Most 24 hour operations that require scheduled maintenance schedule the maintenance for shift change, or have redundant equipment. Giving your maintenance crew a weekend to "rest" the machinery doesn't work.

Re:No, it shouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852763)

You do know some manufacturers in the United States have been running for years with 12 hour shifts 7 days on 2 days off right? It's so they can have three overlapping sets of three overlapping shifts that never stop, holidays or no. It is for 'critical' stuff like APC's or welding steam pipe matrix for power plants.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

Libertarian001 (453712) | about a year ago | (#42853103)

At Intel it's 4 crews working 12 hour shifts: 4 on, 3 off, 3 on, 4 off. Most of our PMs were run-based, not time-based.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

artor3 (1344997) | about a year ago | (#42852433)

Yeah, fun is irrational. We should all be good little automatons, just like our owners wish.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

noobermin (1950642) | about a year ago | (#42852543)

Do you ever take a day off, or do you work year round? Nonetheless, for arbitrary reasons or not, some people actually enjoy holidays. I, personally, am somewhat fond of CNY since I have a bunch of friends who celebrate it, although I don't I do agree that we should celebrate it since it doesn't carry a lot of historical or cultural significance in the US.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

overshoot (39700) | about a year ago | (#42852829)

All holidays should be abolished. At least at the federal level anyway.

Sounds like a plan -- that way, we can get more work out of everyone and make them take their holidays out of their ten days of vacation a year.

Of course, that does make it a bit difficult to schedule coverage for the office when you can't be sure how many people will be available to cover and, conversely, whether there will be demand for services from the ones who are there. Kind of like Wall Street during the major Jewish holidays: not a legal holiday, but don't bother trying to call your brokerage.

Re:No, it shouldn't (1)

echucker (570962) | about a year ago | (#42852973)

Well, may as well keep it a holiday in the US, since a good portion of the country will be hung over, still drinking, or watching football.

Re:No, it shouldn't (0)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year ago | (#42853113)

You clearly are not a federal employee. I work all holidays, and make double time as a function of my AFGE (American Federation of Government Employees, AFL-CIO) union contract. I'll take the money.

By the way, before you start spouting about unions, I make a *living* wage with *reasonable* medical benefits. Just because YOU work in a Shit Hole doesn't mean you have to. It's YOUR choice to accept shity work compensation.

Re:No, it shouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852285)

This isn't the best example because the Americans owe a lot to the French for their independence.

Nope! (1)

mschaffer (97223) | about a year ago | (#42852809)

Not enough Frenchies in San Francisco.
I do hear that it is a holiday in France there. After all, they have millions of Frenchies there. They seem to act like they run the place,

Re:Frenchies in San Francisco (1)

billstewart (78916) | about a year ago | (#42853149)

Come down to Palo Alto for World Music Day in the summer; there's always a large French music jam.

And there is a French consulate in SF, and a reasonable choice of French cocktails at the bar around the corner.

How bizarre... (1, Insightful)

osu-neko (2604) | about a year ago | (#42852147)

"... but this was largely a response to demographic reality rather than political pressure."

Since when did politicians respond to reality? Reality doesn't vote. You get elected by responding to what people believe. I guess this must be once of those rare cases of congruence between the two...

Re:How bizarre... (1)

Austerity Empowers (669817) | about a year ago | (#42852455)

I assume that schools in San Fran get their funding by Average Daily Attendance (ADA) mechanisms. Also given the heavy asian population there, it stands to reason that a lot of children are kept home. This means that opening school on that day isn't very profitable. So it makes sense to keep them closed in favor of a day in which kids will likely attend and get the school money.

I think that's "demographic reality" in the sense that politicians understand it.

Re:How bizarre... (2)

paiute (550198) | about a year ago | (#42852963)

I assume that schools in San Fran get their funding by Average Daily Attendance (ADA) mechanisms. Also given the heavy asian population there, it stands to reason that a lot of children are kept home. This means that opening school on that day isn't very profitable. So it makes sense to keep them closed in favor of a day in which kids will likely attend and get the school money.

I think that's "demographic reality" in the sense that politicians understand it.

Some high schools in certain states close for a week on the opening of deer hunting season.

Why not ... (4, Insightful)

prasadsurve (665770) | about a year ago | (#42852171)

start celebrating Mexican holidays as well? They outnumber the Chinese in US.
Lets not start going on that slippery slope.

Re:Why not ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852223)

In California, Ceasar Chavez day is already a holiday for most school districts. Don't get President's day off (A real-life, bona-fide, National Holiday), but we get Ceasar Chavez day off.

Re:Why not ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852333)

while were at it i want the day off for my christian name like it used to be done in the old country. It would just be me and other people with the same first name.

Re:Why not ... (1)

Martin Blank (154261) | about a year ago | (#42852369)

Cesar Chavez Day is not a Mexican holiday, and is observed in Arizona and Texas as well as California. He was born in Arizona and is remembered for improving life for migrant workers while generally opposing illegal immigration (though this latter part seems to be lost in the current debate).

Re:Why not ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852453)

No, but it's a Holiday for the Mexican people (living in the US).

Yes, yes, it's for farm laborers, but guess who were the farm laborers for the time frames we're talking about? I'll give you two guesses.

Re:Why not ... (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852723)

The workers were largely Americans. We get Martin Luther King Day too. Or was he a secret Kenyan too, so we should pretend he never existed? Is it easier to ignore the problem if you ignore those who worked on the solution?

Re:Why not ... (0)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852685)

Caesar Chavez was a US-born American who did his work in the USA. So what's your issue with that day? Racist much?

Re:Why not ... (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#42852729)

In California, Ceasar Chavez day is already a holiday for most school districts.

Since Cesar Chavez [wikipedia.org] was a native-born American citizen, and most Mexicans have never heard of him, I am not sure what your point is.

Re:Why not ... (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852495)

It is not a Chinese holiday, any more than celebrating the Julian New Year would be celebrating a Roman holiday. The lunar calendar is universially recognized, even if not followed. The holiday is not Chinese, as many countries celebrate it.

And yes, growing up in Texas, we celebrated Cinco de Mayo, even if we didn't officially close on those days.

Next you'll be asserting that we shouldn't celebrate Easter or Christmas because they are religious, and forcing people, by law, to observe a religious holiday should be illegal. How will that go over?

Instead, the holidays have traditionally followed the wishes of the people, and yes, that means that Juneteenth is celebrated world-wide now (not universally, but with some wide-spread observation), even if it was originally a Texas-only holiday with no significance outside the US at the time it was created.

Re:Why not ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852561)

and forcing people, by law, to observe a religious holiday

Who's forced to observe a holiday?

Re:Why not ... (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852739)

I am, when I'm required by law to act differently on the religious holiday in question. I can't work the same or shop the same on that day. I'm "observing" it in that I can't not observe it when the law forces me to act differently.

Re:Why not ... (1)

Waffle Iron (339739) | about a year ago | (#42852879)

Who's forced to observe a holiday?

Anybody who tries going to the DMV to get their driver's license renewed on December 25th will find that they've instead been forced to observe a religious holiday.

Re:Why not ... (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about a year ago | (#42852705)

"And yes, growing up in Texas, we celebrated Cinco de Mayo, even if we didn't officially close on those days."

I think you have your head stuck in Texas. Because:

1. BFD. People near the northern borders recognize Cinco de Mayo, too. But that's a far cry from making it a Federal holiday.

2. I doubt it's as "international" as you say. I used to live in Texas. Including summer. And I never heard of Juneteenth until just now. I had to look it up on Wikipedia.

Re:Why not ... (1)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#42852813)

And yes, growing up in Texas, we celebrated Cinco de Mayo

Nitpick: Cinco de Mayo [wikipedia.org] is not a Mexican holiday. It commemorates a rather obscure event in Mexico's history, and most Mexicans do not celebrate it, and have probably never even heard of it. It is celebrated in the USA much more so than in Mexico, and is really more of an American "Chicano Pride" holiday than a Mexican one.

Re:Why not ... (1)

paiute (550198) | about a year ago | (#42853021)

It is not a Chinese holiday, any more than celebrating the Julian New Year would be celebrating a Roman holiday. The lunar calendar is universially recognized, even if not followed. The holiday is not Chinese, as many countries celebrate it.

Quick Google: Vietnam celebrates the same day, Laos, Cambodia and Thailand do not

Since the Dems sold us to China (-1, Flamebait)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#42852173)

Why not celebrate their holidays?

Re:Since the Dems sold us to China (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year ago | (#42852703)

WTF? Like, the other party hasn't been actively selling off bits and pieces all along? Get real!

Re:Since the Dems sold us to China (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852779)

A goth faggot, Linux zealot, and a partisan asshole. That's a Troller's Trifecta!

Re:Since the Dems sold us to China (1)

akozakie (633875) | about a year ago | (#42852851)

Indeed. I've wondered for a long time why the holiday system is fixed almost everywhere in the world. Sure, it's easy to manage, but seriously, in a mixed society it makes no sense! National holidays are ok, but mandating religious ones is simply stupid. Just legalize a set of religious calendars with a preset number of holidays. This number should be fixed. If there's more in a given religion - have the church choose. If there's less - fix the ones that exist and have the employee choose any other days to fill the limit. These days are free for that person, period. If you have an atheist, just let him choose whatever. Just make that calendar fixed for an employee, unless he changes religion.

Now have the employer decide how to proceed. Keep the business running on a given holiday with reduced mancount, close it and let the employees who should be working on that day take overtime on different days instead... There are many ways to solve this. Any such elastic system is better than the current one. The end result will be that in any given place the locally dominant religion will practically set the holidays when everything closes, while minorities can have theirs without problems. And smaller bussinesses can be built by minorities to offer services during holidays - $$$profit$$$!

I have a colleague in my team with a different religion than the rest (and most of our country). He has to "waste" vacation days for his holidays, at the same time he gets to sit at home on days which are not special for him in any way. He seems used to it, but I find it unfair.

do not want (5, Funny)

wickerprints (1094741) | about a year ago | (#42852181)

Having to observe both American *and* Chinese holidays is a bit too much. Mid-Autumn festival, Thanksgiving, Christmas, the solar New Year, and the lunar New Year--and for each one I'm expected to go home and spend time with the parents. If the lunar new year becomes a federal holiday, there goes my last excuse!

Re:do not want (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852583)

WHat about Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashanah, Sukkot?

Ridiculous (4, Interesting)

cupantae (1304123) | about a year ago | (#42852241)

Well, we know the answer is no [wikipedia.org].

The way it should go is exactly the way it will go: if the Chinese population in a given area is large enough that the inhabitants cannot ignore the celebration, they will recognise it. That area can be a county, state or country.

Re:Ridiculous (-1, Offtopic)

kupofatu (2837653) | about a year ago | (#42852629)

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Re:Ridiculous (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852911)

Once again I find your ideas intriguing, and wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

PS) Did you tell Phyllis I said, "Hello!"?

No. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year ago | (#42852259)

Please. No.

I like paid days off as much as the next guy, but seriously, we are not in China.

Slippery slope, blah, blah, blah...

Re:No. (1)

Maow (620678) | about a year ago | (#42852909)

Please. No.

I like paid days off as much as the next guy, but seriously, we are not in China.

Slippery slope, blah, blah, blah...

We're not in Palestine / Bethlehem / where-ever, but Christmas & Easter are among our biggest sets of holidays.

Also, Chinese New Year is celebrated in a lot more countries than just China.

Another angle is, we need a break in the dark, dreary months between Xmas / New Year and ... Easter.

A strike against Chinese New Year is that it's not on a constant day, but floats around the calendar.

Also, since all the factories in China are closed for a week, a fair number of westerners whose work is liaising with these manufacturers haven't got a lot to do around this time of year...

Re:No. (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about a year ago | (#42853001)

Another angle is, we need a break in the dark, dreary months between Xmas / New Year and ... Easter.

Then maybe you should do what we do down here - Mardi Gras ftw!

Which is day after tomorrow, so tomorrow and Tuesday will be a nearly nonstop party....

Re:No. (1)

Maow (620678) | about a year ago | (#42853047)

Another angle is, we need a break in the dark, dreary months between Xmas / New Year and ... Easter.

Then maybe you should do what we do down here - Mardi Gras ftw!

Which is day after tomorrow, so tomorrow and Tuesday will be a nearly nonstop party....

Mardi Gras sounds like a blast!

It's also based on Lent, a religious holiday, from my understanding. But never-the-less, sounds freaking great. Enjoy!

It will be... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852273)

When China becomes number 1 and the US begins its long slide down the ranks, becoming the lapdog of China. Its coming guys. The smart ones are learning to speak their language now.

Should the Chinese New Year Be a Federal Holiday? (1)

John Hasler (414242) | about a year ago | (#42852275)

Of course. All those Chinese hackers trying to break into US Federal systems should be able to spend the holiday with their families.

It is a federal holiday (4, Informative)

sunderland56 (621843) | about a year ago | (#42852303)

Shouldn't your question be "should it be a federal holiday in the USA"? It is already in China.

Re:It is a federal holiday (1)

LordLucless (582312) | about a year ago | (#42852377)

No its not; China isn't officially a federation, therefore it doesn't have a federal government, or federal holidays.

Re:It is a federal holiday (1)

corbettw (214229) | about a year ago | (#42852797)

If this were slashdot.cn your observation would have merit. But it's not, so it doesn't.

What about Ramadan (1)

mark_reh (2015546) | about a year ago | (#42852305)

and Diwali?

Re:What about Ramadan (1)

PrimaryConsult (1546585) | about a year ago | (#42852445)

They are mentioned in the article actually...

Really I think these are what "floater" holidays are designed for. For example Christmas should actually be converted to a floater holiday. For non-Christians it's basically a paid weekday off with little value since you can't get anything done because most places are closed. Come up with a set number, say 5, and make it federal law that all employers offer 5 "floater" holidays for religious observance. The law could require that they can be used like vacation days but if coinciding with a religious holiday the time off must be approved.

Now the hairy part is schools. You have people of all different faiths who need to take different days off. For that, they should group the holidays, and students should be able to select from the Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Chinese, etc group. Make those days "light" days. It is certainly do-able, my grade school and high school both had scheduled half-days in which half the classes were simply ignored, and the other half (since they would get "ahead" of the cancelled sections) simply had educational films and other things which were interesting but not required.

Re:What about Ramadan (1)

bsane (148894) | about a year ago | (#42852677)

For non-Christians it's basically a paid weekday off with little value since you can't get anything done because most places are closed

Christmas is/was/has become (take your pick) a secular holiday for most people.

Re:What about Ramadan (1)

richtopia (924742) | about a year ago | (#42852715)

Floater holidays would have the same issue with the days between Christmas and New Year - You don't have the time off, but unofficially you are expected to take it off. I know that it isn't true in all cases, but I have seen a number of cases where you just cannot do any work on those days because no one is in the office. An even more extreme case is the Friday after Thanksgiving, when security had the day off so engineering couldn't enter the building.

Re:What about Ramadan (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852889)

But floaters don't work once a certain level of observation is reached. Floaters work when 10% or less take it. But at 90% observation, you either have to refuse to allow people to observe it, or you have a store with no managers, a call center with no service reps. You are closed, even if 10% of the people show up. Floaters work for the 10% holidays, religious and ethnic ones that aren't the mainstream US/Christian ones. Most places I've worked have given Good Friday off (or at least officially closed at noon). Let the businesses figure it out, they'll work in the best interests of the employees, right?

No fed holidays would be better (0)

matthelm007 (1392603) | about a year ago | (#42852331)

Why should any Federal employee get any Holidays? I've never seen one that wasn't on holiday all year round.

Slippery Slope (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852365)

.. A very merry unholiday to me! To you! A very merry unholiday to me! To You!...

I for one look forward to the day when we have 14 holidays every month for reasons of "cultural sensitivity".

If I owed (4, Funny)

Swampash (1131503) | about a year ago | (#42852405)

a loanshark an inconceivably large sum of money, and was only able to go about my business and you know, exist, because of the loanshark's continuing goodwill... I'd probably go out of my way to wish him happy birthday when it rolled around.

Just saying.

Why not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852411)

We already owe the Chinese 1.2 Trillion. Might as well throw 'em a bone.

No, it shouldn't. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852477)

If you're going to make a federal and/or national holiday for Chinese New Year, you better include Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kipor in that as well too. Otherwise, I think that Chinese New Year, Christmas, Rosh Hashanah & Yom Kipor, should be all work days for the country. Why should I be docked vacation or PTO because I happen to observe my own religion's most important holiday yet the gentleman of east-Asian decent next to me gets a free day off for CNY?

Re:No, it shouldn't. (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#42852925)

It's not "Chinese New Year" It's "Lunar New Year". That the Chinese celebrate it more than Americans is cultural, but there are other places than China that celebrate it. Much like another I pointed out elsewhere. Juneteenth was originally a Texas-only holiday, but it's celebrated elsewhere around the world now.

Why should I be docked vacation or PTO because I happen to observe my own religion's most important holiday yet the gentleman of east-Asian decent next to me gets a free day off for CNY?

If you are docked vacation pay for holidays, you need to call your employment rights board for your location. I think you are lying to prove a point, but it only shows that you are a liar, and you know your position is so weak that you must lie to support it.

troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852533)

flamebait article is flamebait

USA!!1 USA!1! USA1!! USA!!1 USA1!!

Also 19 September (1)

Alain Williams (2972) | about a year ago | (#42852563)

The Pastafarian holiday International Talk Like a Pirate day: 19 September [rationalwiki.org], to not do so would be religious discrimination.

Re:Also 19 September (2)

Alain Williams (2972) | about a year ago | (#42852647)

Oh, lordy me ... I was also forgetting May 4th -- International Star Wars day, the Jedi attacking me I don't want. You see: once we start having holidays for some groups, we have to have them for all of them!

Why National? (4, Insightful)

Dave Emami (237460) | about a year ago | (#42852581)

Emphasis mine:

In 1994, San Francisco decided to close public schools on Lunar New Year, but this was largely a response to demographic reality rather than political pressure.

Which is as it should be, and an indicator that federalism is working just fine, thank you very much. In an area where lots of people want to take the same day off, it's off. Otherwise, it's not. Heck, we could make Nooruz (Persian New Year) a national holiday, but I doubt there's a demand for that anywhere except in certain parts of Los Angeles. It would be nice for the various Slavic and Greek enclaves around the US if their New Year (based on the Julian rather than Gregorian calendar) was a national holiday. We could make Rosh Hashanah a national holiday, along with at least half a dozen different New Year days from India (it depends on the region). Etc. Etc. Etc.

It's one thing to be respectful of minority groups, and for everyone to have the same legal rights regardless of ethnicity, religion, etc. That's as it should be. But it's an entirely-different thing to bend over backwards pretending that there are no minorities. I wouldn't expect to get Christmas off if I lived in China, nor would it be any kind of insult or malign discrimination on China's part if I didn't.

How is this "Science"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852595)

This is the sort of topic I would expect to be listed as "Idle". It would make more sense if the proposal was to make, say, Isaac Newton's birthday a federal holiday. Actually that's not a bad idea! Hang on a sec...

There. I've gone back in time and instituted it retroactively. There were some political issues, so officially the holiday is named for somebody else (whose birthday actually isn't even in the same month), but from now on Isaac Newton's birthday is a federal holiday (and a state holiday in all fifty states).

More holidays! (0)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#42852641)

Just another holiday for government workers to sit on their ass while the rest of us actually driving the economy go in.

It hurts to hear because it's true.

As soon as everyone is hung over... (4, Insightful)

flibbidyfloo (451053) | about a year ago | (#42852791)

As soon as the night before is used as an excuse to get drunk by a large portion of the populace, who are then too hung over to go to work on the holiday, it will become an official American day off. New Year's day isn't a holiday because anyone is celebrating the start of a new year.

Do it for all nationalities. (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year ago | (#42852905)

If you are going to do it for Chinese. :P

Re:Do it for all nationalities. (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | about a year ago | (#42853115)

You want all nationalities to celebrate Chinese New Year? Well....let's see. Big dinner of good food with family. Gift exchanges. Fireworks. Colorful dances. OK, this works for me. Oops! Gotta go buy some moon cakes. See Ya!

Should the Start of Chinese New Year Be a Federal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42852971)

Yes, for China.

No, America should celebrate Apollo day, Jul 20 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42853131)

No, if America is to celebrate a luna related holiday, it should be July 20, in memory of putting people on the moon on July 20, 1969 under Apollo 11. It was done with the Saturn V rocket, a superior design to the SLS.

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