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Mark Shuttleworth Addresses Ubuntu Privacy Issues

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the lets-have-a-look dept.

Privacy 279

sfcrazy writes "Mark Shuttleworth has for the first time talked about the privacy issues in Ubuntu Dash after being criticized by EFF and FSF. He mentioned some changes in the way use can 'disable' the search results. However the company has showed that under no circumstances they will disable the online search by default as demanded by EFF and FSF. Shuttleworth was simply spinning the wheel moving things around to give an impression that something has been done where as the core problem remains — Dash sends keystrokes by default and legally every user agrees to send such keystrokes to PRODUCT.canonical.com server to be shared with partners like Facebook."

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279 comments

hello hosts file (5, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#42936961)

127.0.0.1 product.canonical.com

Parent got a +3 (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937335)

He only got a +3 so far?!?

for that information, I think he should get a +5 insightful for the next month even he's posting Goat.se links.

Re:hello hosts file (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937405)

See that APK? You can do it without being a total crank nutjob.

Re:hello hosts file (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937523)

Are you sure you got the right host?

$ ping product.canonical.com
ping: unknown host product.canonical.com

Re:hello hosts file (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937849)

Nope, my grandmother just told me it's productsearch.canonical.com

Re:hello hosts file (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42938005)

I would argue that once a distribution has gone "dark" in the manner that Ubuntu and its parent company Canonical have, measures like these are a moot point... Yes, you can block their servers. Now. If they decide to write a daemon that watches the host file for alterations and automatically restores it to a protected backup, what then? You find a way around it of course. Then they come up with more protection, you come up with more ways around said protection...and nobody wins.

The alternative is to use something else. I have a favourite distribution but I'm not going to hawk it here as an alternative because I'm not a shill :P I do suggest this though, in all seriousness -- instead of measures like these, try another distribution. Any one that you like! And be sure to let Canonical know you switched -because- they forced you into taking measures like altering your host file just to feel secure from THEIR OWN SPYWARE!

Linux distro's survive upon word of mouth and goodwill from the community -- if you take away that second part, the first part tends to dry up rather quickly too. Don't fight with your own OS to protect your security, just use one that doesn't force you into it in the first place, no matter what that might be!

LOL (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42936965)

Stop using Shitbuntu and the problem solves itself.

Re:LOL (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year ago | (#42937319)

Parent is flamebaiting a bit, but I agree. There are no lack of Debian-based distros which don't come with the increasingly concerning baggage that Ubuntu is being bundled with. I retired my last Ubuntu machine about eight months ago and am Debian-only now.

Re:LOL (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937445)

I'm in the minority here because I really don't care about the advertising. Linux is for servers and development.

However the feature is astonishingly retarded. I'm trying to launch the console and it shows me "Console" the movie? WTF, why would anyone ever click on that? What else is there, "Spreadsheet" the movie? This is the worst advertising placement ever.

It would be another thing entirely if they only showed this stuff in a media query view. In fact iTunes and other media managers have a similar feature.

Re:LOL (1, Offtopic)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#42937473)

This. Ubuntu has jumped the shark so long ago. It lost what made it special. Why is anyone still using it?

Re:LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937687)

This.

Meme.

Jumped.

The.

Shark.

Re:LOL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937697)

Aim for the lowest common denominator...

Same reason iPhone is still popular. Much better available, but marketing has it as "standard" and "easy enough for mom" and the sheep buy it.

Re:LOL (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937909)

And yet iPhone has more and better apps and it's hardware in benchmarks outperforms any phone in its class with less RAM and CPU cores. It also has a faster GPU than any of ita contemporary competition. The iPhone 5 smacked the shit out of the Galaxy S IIII performance.

Yeah .... just in my experience. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937539)

I use a couple of different Linux distros currently, many more in the past and also *BSD now.

What Ubuntu does that no one has done was make it easy for the user. The way Ubuntu does things is a Windows killer - if it weren't for the pre-installation of Windows on every fucking thing that's not Apple or handheld.

See, unlike everyother distro, when you install something on Ubuntu, it'll work (sample: everything I've installed) - and I mean using the distro's software manager - even Windows can't make that claim. Calibre for example. Updating Calibre on XP involves uninstalling and installing again; otherwise if you don't do the uninstall f the old version, when you run it, you get the old version. Ubuntu just upgrades with no hassles.

Ubuntu does have a user experience that is superior to every other distro out there - and I think they know it.

And don't get me started on how spell check for Slashdot on firefox foesn't work on Mint.

Re:Yeah .... just in my experience. (2)

Desler (1608317) | about a year ago | (#42937677)

See, unlike everyother distro, when you install something on Ubuntu, it'll work (sample: everything I've installed) - and I mean using the distro's software manager - even Windows can't make that claim. Calibre for example. Updating Calibre on XP involves uninstalling and installing again; otherwise if you don't do the uninstall f the old version, when you run it, you get the old version. Ubuntu just upgrades with no hassles.

Then that means Calibre's installer is broken. That has nothing to do with the OS.

Re:Yeah .... just in my experience. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937845)

See, unlike everyother distro, when you install something on Ubuntu, it'll work (sample: everything I've installed) - and I mean using the distro's software manager - even Windows can't make that claim. Calibre for example. Updating Calibre on XP involves uninstalling and installing again; otherwise if you don't do the uninstall f the old version, when you run it, you get the old version. Ubuntu just upgrades with no hassles.

Then that means Calibre's installer is broken. That has nothing to do with the OS.

Perhaps you are right.

But that doesn't negate the user experience.

Re:LOL (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | about a year ago | (#42937859)

I have to agree. For the most part I've always liked Ubuntu, but even after moving to Xubuntu after the Unity nonsense I still didn't like the direction they were/are going in. Moved to Linux Mint XFCE and haven't looked back.

And honestly, I don't even mind that Gnome and Unity have been the abysmal disasters that they are either. XFCE works great for the most part. I do run mutter instead of xfwm because it has a better compositor, but thats pretty seamless and works great.

Re:LOL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937385)

I ditched them a year or two ago, but this sort of thing is ensuring that I don't go back.

This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (5, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#42937017)

All that will happen is people will move to fedora or mint or countless other Linux distros.

Mark, if you want to make some money try selling something worthwhile. Games would be one idea, hell get steam to give you a cut if you make installation of steam optional during OS install. Selling users data is a bad idea.

Re:This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937249)

Exactly. Or even just ask me if I'm ok with stuff like this. Tell me what I'm sharing, who with, and ask if I want to enable it. Depending on what that says, I might well have said, "Yeah sure."

Re:This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (5, Insightful)

Captain Hook (923766) | about a year ago | (#42937929)

Tell me what I'm sharing, who with

The problem with that is that all your keystrokes go to a single Canonical controlled server and it's the server which then forwards the data to whoever it wants.

Today you sign up for Amazon getting the search queries but without any changes to your machine tomorrow they go to Facebook as well, and then the day after they all get stored by Canonical as a way of providing historical context to the searches you've made (just so they can better server your queries... nothing creepy about it).

Sure they say you are agreeing to Amazon get the search queries in all the big font agreements people are signing now but I bet the licence lets them send the data to whoever they chose to.

Shuttleworth shills ubuntu (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937341)

Mark Shuttleworth has devolved. He's decided to accept the definition of User as something other than Owner. He's raised the port cullis and thrown open the doors for third parties to hunt User metadata, revealing his allegiance, defaulting to a state of non-concern for the least among us.

I'm sure it's convenient for him to imagine he's still engaged in promoting Linux, but at what cost?

How much did he get for his soul? How much did he get for everyone else's?

Re:Shuttleworth shills ubuntu (4, Insightful)

jareth-0205 (525594) | about a year ago | (#42937377)

I don't know if you can call the person who owns the company that makes Ubuntu a 'shill'...

Re:Shuttleworth shills ubuntu (4, Insightful)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#42937507)

That's the root of the problem, it's a company, not a community that's behind Ubuntu now, and companies need money to survive. I wouldn't be suprised if there was an Ubuntu Pro & Ubuntu Enterprise released soon that have licensing fees associated with them as "custom solutions for businesses". *shrug* if they bring at least some currently windows-only application vendors to Linux, the other distros will benefit also.

Re:This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (3, Informative)

Yobgod Ababua (68687) | about a year ago | (#42937347)

I recently moved from Fedora to Ubuntu because I'm trying to do more dev work and -all- the development tools and library releases these days seem to be more Ubuntu-friendly.

I was more Fedora-friendly because I came from a RedHat admin background, but I kept running into more and more projects/games/libraries that interpreted "LInux support" to mean Ubuntu, so I gave in. Since then it's actually worked out pretty well, although I still prefer yum to apt-get...

Re:This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (2)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | about a year ago | (#42937375)

All that will happen is people will move to fedora or mint or countless other Linux distros.

Just installed Mint here, and I have to say I am really enjoying KDE over the default Ubuntu environment.

Re:This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (1)

fatphil (181876) | about a year ago | (#42937875)

But he'll be losing only the people who mind him taking his snooping tax anyway. His actual revenue stream will blindly remain.

Re:This is how shuttleworth kills ubuntu (-1)

TheSpoom (715771) | about a year ago | (#42938049)

Ubuntu has already lost the power users (of which I am one). Now we continue for the too-slow shift to something else. I've seen this happen many times: piss off the power users and you'll eventually lose everyone.

Amazing. (3, Insightful)

Virtucon (127420) | about a year ago | (#42937037)

It amazes me that when somebody does something as a business that it infuriates people especially when they get something for free. Yes, Ubuntu is taking free software, wrapping it as a supportable bundle and distributing it. So now they've hooked into the information sharing arrangement. It's easy enough to disable as well and the hosts file solution is also there. I wonder if just charging $10 a download / dvd would make more sense then adding another keylogging data collector out there. Frankly Facebook is the worst and the network of data collectors it's partnered with is becoming more and more troublesome.

Re:Amazing. (5, Insightful)

redmid17 (1217076) | about a year ago | (#42937091)

It amazes me that people in charge of projects like Ubuntu think that a policy like that won't have a significant impact on the popularity of the distro over the long term, especially with heavily slanted tech crowd that uses Linux distros in the first place.

Re:Amazing. (1)

Virtucon (127420) | about a year ago | (#42937267)

Well, what is the most popular Linux distro out there? I would argue that the changes that Ubuntu have brought (or packaging as it were) has made it much more palatable for novices to adopt; It's not all for techs out there to use Linux. Fedora right now has its set of detractors as well, so what's left? If you want to put an easy wrapper on it, Android is the most popular Linux distro out there right now. I will now receive a bombarding of shots because everybody says Android isn't Linux, but we do have a Kernel and packages that are based at the core of Linux but I'll grant you it isn't Ubuntu or Fedora. So do we just start running Android and forget Ubuntu and Fedora? I don't think so because there's also a lot of features in all that other package bloat. I remember when Debian running on Power architecture (I started back in 1998 on Mac Clones running Debian) was very small, light and worked great but you had to cobble together all the right packages from dozens of websites to make it work. Now, with Fedora and Ubuntu the repositories take 98% of the guesswork out of the equation, except when you have funky hardware or sound card issues. So, while the tech side has to be placated, here's Ubuntu trying to make it mainstream, so maybe bad judgement to be sure, but commercialization will make it more successful and frankly with all the Facebook, LinkedIn and other Social sites, most of those people won't object to what they're doing. They won't care because they don't until they suddenly wake up one day and find that their lives have been cataloged, friends analyzed and habits down to that one time you looked at monkey porn comes up on a search result for you.

Re:Amazing. (1)

redmid17 (1217076) | about a year ago | (#42937411)

I'm sure some resourceful people will figure out how to fork a linux distro and apply their own non-Orwellian touches to it. Oh wait, they already have. There's your answer.

Re:Amazing. (2)

rolfwind (528248) | about a year ago | (#42937449)

Well, what is the most popular Linux distro out there?

I have nothing concrete to go by, but according to Distrowatch's Page Hit Ranking, Linux Mint by a margin.

But that's probably among people who install OSes and not necessarily commercial use.

Re:Amazing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937861)

Who recommended Ubuntu in the first place to novice users? That's right: us tech people.
Ubuntu's peak was hit WAAY before these Big Brother spying tactics being forced upon the userbase.
People like me decided Ubuntu was heading in the wrong direction FOR YEARS now, and jumped board.
I highly doubt Ubuntu is even that popular or relevant anymore. Try asking tech people. We're litterally CREATING the trend, and have been for a LONG time.
These new unpopular and sickly moves just proves what we've already said for years, beginning at the peak or just before the peak of Ubuntu's popularity curve.

Same with Facebook. Remember Myspace? There is no limit to the speed which something void of value can drop, just like stocks (although don't take this as stock-advice, I personally believe FB is just as likely to go up as down at this point in time. Short-term seems to favour a rebound now, but on unsound footing - so be careful!).

Re:Amazing. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937101)

It amazes me that when somebody does something as a business that it infuriates people especially when they get something for free.

It amazes me when some people seem to think that free products or services are somehow above criticism. It's as simple as this: if it isn't changed, people who care enough about it won't use it or will stop using it. There is nothing wrong with either of those.

Re:Amazing. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937103)

it shouldn't be easy enough to disable, it should be easy enough to enable. That's the whole difference. Most clueless users are not even aware that their data are sent away, they never heard of this mess. Not to talk about them knowing what a host file is ...

Re:Amazing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937123)

Your virginity is astounding.

Re:Amazing. (1, Troll)

ifiwereasculptor (1870574) | about a year ago | (#42937151)

Agreed. You can disable it. And you don't even have to fiddle around with apt or anything, it's an option present in their own GUI. Slashdot, Google and the whole rest of the internet is much more annoying, since to disable ads you have to download AdBlock. Canonical is giving you a choice. "Here, use our ad-supported OS. You don't want ads? Ok, then, just use the damn thing entirely free anyway!" I fail to see how that can be anything other than completely ethical.

Re:Amazing. (4, Informative)

earlzdotnet (2788729) | about a year ago | (#42937241)

Slashdot ... is much more annoying, since to disable ads you have to download AdBlock.

Or just get positive Karma and check the "disable advertisements" options :)

Re:Amazing. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937269)

Agreed. You can disable it. And you don't even have to fiddle around with apt or anything, it's an option present in their own GUI. Slashdot, Google and the whole rest of the internet is much more annoying, since to disable ads you have to download AdBlock. Canonical is giving you a choice. "Here, use our ad-supported OS. You don't want ads? Ok, then, just use the damn thing entirely free anyway!" I fail to see how that can be anything other than completely ethical.

Except they aren't offering that choice, they where sneaky and underhanded. As other have said, it's spyware. Ubuntu did a great job for a while, but first it was Unity and now this. They're treating their users like we don't have a choice. I do and won't be installing Ubuntu again.

Re:Amazing. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937201)

I wonder if just charging $10 a download / dvd would make more sense then adding another keylogging data collector out there.

YES! Enough of this ad-supported bull shit. Enough of this it's Open Source so it should be free, but not really free because we gotta eat so we'll sneak in some underhanded revenue stream bull shit. If you want to make money sell your product at a fair price. Make it Open Source, which means that people can compile their own version for free if they want, Sell the Binaries.

I'd gladly pay $10, $20, $30 to download a good binary version that saves me time. I'd gladly pay $10-30 for a good product.

Re:Amazing. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937323)

It amazes me that when businesses who build a model based on user participation get defensive when users ask for something in return, like privacy. Ubuntu has done a lot for the community, but the community has done a lot for Ubuntu. The same goes for Microsoft, Apple or any business. Everyone seems to think that success happens in a vacuum. Just because you add something to the wonderful tapestry that was in place before you showed up, doesn't mean that you are infallible. Ubuntu in general has garnered a lot of bad blood with the community as of late and every day people become less happy with the product. As in any commodities based environment, if your customers aren't happy they'll stop using it or go elsewhere.

Re:Amazing. (5, Insightful)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | about a year ago | (#42937407)

It amazes me that there are people who will excuse the ethics of an action, if it is a business doing so to support a free product. Who cares if its "super easy" for the non-technical users ubuntu is marketed at to find and edit the hosts file. Giving users a product for free doesn't justify everything. Selling user data without an explicit opt-in is unethical, and I don't want to contribute in any way to a distro engaging in that practice.

Re:Amazing. (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42938051)

Mod parent up. I see the "WELL IT'S FREE" excuse not just for Linux, but for all sorts of stuff. Being free does not make a project immune from criticism and it does not mean that the devs can't be doing something evil through their free product.

Re:Amazing. (3, Insightful)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about a year ago | (#42937609)

It amazes me that when somebody does something as a business that it infuriates people especially when they get something for free.

Shuttleworth picked the wrong crowd to spring this on. I don't think "Free" means what you think it means here or else you would understand.

Re:Amazing. (0)

Virtucon (127420) | about a year ago | (#42937977)

What the Stallman version of Free? Yeah, I understand that side of the equation as well but what exactly do you mean by "spring this on?" I mean, they announced it last year and also stated how it could be disabled. Was it insidious no, wrong in a lot of people's opinion maybe, commercially oriented, definitely. If Shuttleworth decides that he doesn't want to change what he's doing then "market forces" will go to another distro. I quote "market forces" because other than CDs and Support for Ubuntu, where else does he make any money on this deal? I'm happy with Debian, Fedora or Ubuntu especially after I rip out all the crap that's unnecessary. Right now these distros are getting fat and bloated anyway and after every release I find myself spending a lot of time getting rid of crap. This little annoyance is no different and can be turned off easily. Whether or not it's disabled initially is a little more subtle. Okay, so now somebody comes up with "Ubuntu Crapware Remover" and you can add the ppa, install it via synaptic or apt and viola, problem solved. Better yet, go to one of the many blogs to get rid of the crapware.. http://blog.burrowsapps.com/2012/07/ubuntu-stripuninstall-bloatware.html [burrowsapps.com]

   

It's time to (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937053)

get back to Slack

The End of Ubuntu? (5, Insightful)

fallen1 (230220) | about a year ago | (#42937055)

I would say that pretty much ends the usefulness of the Ubuntu line. Anyone who thinks that sending all my keystrokes to their server - which they can in turn sell off to third parties - is, in my not so humble opinion, bat fucking crazy.

You should not have to edit hosts files or anything else to make a product usable, because that product should not be spying on you from install forward. I do believe my personal response to Mark is a big "FUCK OFF AND DIE". End of story. End of Ubuntu.

Re:The End of Ubuntu? (4, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#42937155)

I would say that pretty much ends the usefulness of the Ubuntu line. Anyone who thinks that sending all my keystrokes to their server - which they can in turn sell off to third parties - is, in my not so humble opinion, bat fucking crazy.

Yeah, I've defended a lot of their questionable behavior, but this is utterly indefensible. This is spyware by definition. I hope they get their peepees smacked. Nice to know my last ISO download was a waste of time, as I won't be using it. I guess I'm headed for Mint...

+

Re:The End of Ubuntu? (5, Informative)

jma05 (897351) | about a year ago | (#42937647)

> Anyone who thinks that sending all my keystrokes to their server...

Well. Not ALL keystrokes. Just Unity Dash searches. Doesn't Android's integrated search bar do something like this too? Not that it makes it OK of course.

Re:The End of Ubuntu? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937953)

Correct me if I am wrong, but it is not "all keystrokes". It is only those entered into the Dash search feature, and the reason is so that it can search multiple online sources for information rather than just your hard drive.

While I agree that this should be made clear to users prior to first use, I don't think it makes Ubuntu useless by any stretch of the imagination.

We should get paid for our data. (0)

concealment (2447304) | about a year ago | (#42937063)

I think this situation can be resolved by viewing our search data as akin to the content we'd put online on a blog with a Google AdSense account attached.

If you're passing our data on to an end user, that user needs to pay for it, and thus this can't be a question of default settings but of a contract made between user and giant monolithic search engine company.

Re:We should get paid for our data. (4, Informative)

MoonFog (586818) | about a year ago | (#42937321)

No. There's a world of difference between the stuff I might put up on a blog, Facebook, G+ and whatever else social network exists, and the data I use my computer to handle. What if you're having legal troubles? IRS are after you? You have applications for a Betty Ford-like clinique? Tax returns? These are things that you're NOT going to be putting up on Facebook or your blog, but documents you might have to have. This is data Ubuntu has no business knowing that I have on my computer.

1st of ALL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937359)

You should have the choice!

It's FOSS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937079)

So if you don't like it, compile your own version that doesn't have the behavior you don't like, and install that.

Re:It's FOSS! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937097)

People do. It's called Linux Mint.

Why people use linux: AVOIDING MALWARE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937113)

Why do people use linux? To AVOID MALWARE.

Keystroke logging by default? (4, Insightful)

accessbob (962147) | about a year ago | (#42937129)

I replaced Ubuntu with Mint when I was first confronted by Unity because I couldn't abide the new UI.

Sounds like that was the least of the reasons to go...

I was thinking that it's been a while and that I should have another look at how Unity has evolved, but not if they are reduced to doing this to stay in business.

Re:Keystroke logging by default? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42938001)

Let's really think about this though.

Remember what the significant difference between Ubuntu and Mint was?

Mint installed some popular proprietary closed-source software by default; Something that Ubuntu refused to do.

This meant that you could play MP3s out of the box, without having to type "sudo apt-get blah blah blah...". You didn't have to go on a quest for Flash, SUN Java JDK, and lots of other pretty cool stuff, that Ubuntu turned up it's nose at "because it wasn't open source".

But then this?

Backroom payola deals to install spyware, and whatever else, defaulted to run quietly as background services, by default???

Wow. Just wow.

Re:Keystroke logging by default? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42938019)

Sorry, I wanted to finish this off by pointing out: Now we have BOTH popular Debian distros polluted by proprietary closed source packages.

It's worth thinking about that.

Neither are any longer under your complete control by default.

Haters gonna hate... (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937139)

I would expect a better effort to write a summary.

It is evident that the submitter is full of hate.

Not the end (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937173)

Just use another derivative like
Kubuntu. The privacy is there and the GUI is better!

NOT LEGAL (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937191)

An EULA is only lawful where it alludes to copyright protection.

The interception and broadcast of traffic is not a copyright issue as it is defined under existing wiretap laws.

Ubuntu is involved in a criminal interception program and key members should be arrested.

Re:NOT LEGAL (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937951)

Are you a lawyer, and is this legal advice?

I think you are talking bullshit, so if you have any evidence to backup your assertions then please provide some links.

I don't see a problem with it. (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about a year ago | (#42937255)

Canonical can have a good poke about in /home/gordonjcp if they think it'll help. Why?

Because I'm getting bombarded with advertising *anyway*.

If the adverts are going to be there then they may as well be for stuff I actually want, rather than constantly advertising pharmacies that will discreetly ship to the US without requiring a prescription (why would you want to buy drugs over the internet, never mind without a prescription?). If advertising stuff that I want to buy helps a company that I'd like to support but can't be bothered actually handing over cash to, then that's fine by me.

Re:I don't see a problem with it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937443)

If advertising stuff that I want to buy helps a company that I'd like to support but can't be bothered actually handing over cash to, then that's fine by me.

So true. These guys will even help you with products to improve your partners sex life by knowing what you like. Don't see why such nobilitiy is being shot down.

Re:I don't see a problem with it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937465)

Yes, we know you like being a corporate whore. You don't need to tell us in every story about privacy.

Re:I don't see a problem with it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937487)

why would you want to buy drugs over the internet

Some people with medical problems are on fixed incomes, and the drugs they need cost a lot in the US, but only cost pennies abroad.

Re:I don't see a problem with it. (1, Flamebait)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about a year ago | (#42937509)

Sucks to live in a country with third-world healthcare then, doesn't it? I don't really want to hear about their problems.

built into the kernel?! (3, Insightful)

nadaou (535365) | about a year ago | (#42937283)

> We will aim to enforce this at the kernel level, hence
> the CC to Jamie S who leads our security team.

WTF? Why is that needed? To keep jr devs from accidentally re-enabling it? Or, in fine /. conspiratorial tradition, is the keylogging built into the kernel?!

Re:built into the kernel?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937475)

For now I'll assume this means adding an iptables rule, but said in marketroidese.

RIP ubuntu (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937307)

RIP ubuntu now you're the evil empire of linux..

Fuck ubuntu (5, Insightful)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about a year ago | (#42937519)

This is the problem with "success" of open projects as they grow they require more and more money to continue to reinforce their expansion and it only snowballs downhill from there. Before you know it your out there selling your soul and your users data to the highest bidder. You can still reap profit on support alone but you can't expect it to support an organization of any size with fat paychecks for all doing this. There aint any shortage of corporate customers happily willing to purchase yearly support subscriptions whether they actually need it or use it.

Distributions put together by people who give a shit don't have this problem. The cost of packaging in time and effort is such a minsicule effort and mostly a solved problem contrasted with the effort required to produce operating system and software bundled with it.

What if bash maintainers decided they need more money too and decided to ship your keystrokes off to facebook as well? What if the maintainers of every one of the thousands of packages that go into a modern distribution followed suite? Spying by default is indefensible.

Uninstalling tonight (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937581)

I had no idea this was going on..... I do guess that is my fault. Does this happen even if you remove unity?

Ubuntu has been pissing me off more and more with each release lately, but thats the last straw, I am switching to Mint tonight. Is anyone aware of similar issues with Mint?

Thanks Ubuntu! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937597)

Without you, I would have never ever, ever, ever discovered Debian!

Short term versus long term impact (1)

hmmm (115599) | about a year ago | (#42937625)

Ubuntu might write off people who oppose this change as a small minority of geeks, and the vast majority of people won't care.

Which is true in the short term. Unfortunately as history has proved repeatedly, the "vast majority of people" go to a geek for advice. That might be a family member, a trusted friend or some geek writing something online. They might not understand what the issue is, but over time they will hear the geek background noise about what Ubuntu is doing. In the Medium to Long term, Ubuntu is in trouble if they continue down this track.

Re:Short term versus long term impact (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | about a year ago | (#42937959)

The problem here is that geeks are the primary audience for ANY Linux distribution - even Ubuntu. The minority users for Linux are the non-geeks.

They can't approach PR stuff from the same angle as Microsoft or Apple. If they piss of the geeks they have pissed off the majority of their userbase. Personally, I'm done with Ubuntu, the same way I'm done with Gnome. Luckily there are still distros (Mint) and desktop environments (XFCE) that still "get it" and listen to the users.

Only one way... (1)

drankr (2796221) | about a year ago | (#42937645)

to resolve this situation: make it opt-in. I know they're trying to finally make some money, but this will hurt them in the long run on that level as well. This type of thing, intrusive internet advertising on the desktop, it's what they call "untenable". People who want that much integration with the internet will surely buy a Chromebook and run Linux, *and* still not have ads on their desktops.

My personal observation (5, Insightful)

koan (80826) | about a year ago | (#42937661)

Using Ubuntu these days goes against why I used Linux to start with.

Last gasp of a desperate, dying company (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937729)

Goodbye, Ubuntu. Goodbye, Canonical. Maybe next time you'll remember you can't do whatever you want like it's your personal little fiefdom.

Makes me wonder if they forgot to look up the definition of the word ubuntu.

Nice work (1, Flamebait)

lapm (750202) | about a year ago | (#42937779)

Nice work Mark, you have convinced me to move to some other distro. I will not install any keylogger in my computers willingly. Bye bye, it has been nice few years (since 2009) and now i move on. I understand corporations need to gain income, but selling out your users is wrong way to do it. Forceing your users to install mandatory keylogger is even more wrong. So you can count my 6 computers out of your installation base please.

IP theft? (1)

boojumbadger (949542) | about a year ago | (#42937795)

Can I claim that anything I do on my Ubuntu computer is published by me and thus covered by copyright? I do not own the operating system and the company can access what I do in dash so isn't it like I am publishing my activities to them and their clients? Hit them with a take-down notice.

I admit this thought is not well formulated buy it is the germ of an idea, no?

I never liked Ubuntu from the getgo and like it even less now but I have to admit that it has produced some benefits to the Linux community.

facepalm @ slashdot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937847)

So there you have it, the most popular linux-distro since forever making new strides every day, getting Valves and Nvidias attention, making the linux-desktop available to the layman...
 
...and you're all "Boohoohoo, somebody bundled it with an affiliate-program that can easily be disabled, hence they are the spawn of anal-sex between Jobs and Gates!".

Mint'ers, go fuck yourselves, if Ubuntu is so much add odds with your morality then why do you use a distro based off of it?

Complaining about this thing is like sending a Ferrari to the chop-shop because a seagull happened to take a shit on it.

It's not immoral or anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42937897)

It's just weird.

There's clearly room for a nice, user friendly, for profit desktop OS now that Windows has left that market. Shuttleworth seems to want Ubuntu to be that OS. Presumably an easy to use linux distro could be that OS.

Adding layers of complexity and useless features (or anti-features) nobody wants to a system that most people (apparently for some reason) already find too complex is... not just the wrong way to position themselves to be that OS, it's also really obviously the wrong way, to the point where one has to wonder how they could have possibly made this mistake.

I can't even see why people would get mad about this. There are so many groups that are willing to do all the useful work that cannonical does, but for free, that if cannonical goes out of business nothing of value is lost. Not even from a marketroid point of view -- Redhat has proven that commercial linux can work already. So Ubuntu's failure wouldn't even harm morale. :)

Oh, n00buntu... (2)

ilikenwf (1139495) | about a year ago | (#42937901)

This really isn't the only reason to avoid Ubuntu, but it is the most compelling. Aside from dependency hell, Unity, and the ridiculous amount of patches that get applied to all the packages, that many times break applications (I'm a developer for http://getnightingale.com/ [getnightingale.com] - Ubuntu's taglib is completely hosed from our perspective), and in general it is TOO friendly to the user, making them dumb and complacent in most cases.

I talked to Hak5's Darren recently and he's moving away from Ubuntu, and I did 4 years ago to Arch for my single user machines and Debian for my servers. I haven't looked back since. Most other distros are much more in line with the open standards and software that Linux is all about than Shuttlebuntu. Give some other distros a try, and you may find one that just blows your mind...like Archlinux, Debian, Mint, or whatever else.

An easy fix (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42938083)

1. Sniff packet and determine format and destination of the information.
2. Create script to produce random weird porn searches such as 'transsexual midget horse porn'
3. Create another script to randomly spoof the address with these fake searches.
4. Distribute scripts, have a huge number of people run them, and then laugh at the data that's getting shared.

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