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HTC Unveils Revamped HTC One

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the is-the-loneliest-number dept.

Cellphones 152

adeelarshad82 writes "Earlier today, HTC unveiled a revamped version of its One smartphone. The new HTC One has a 4.7-inch full HD 1080p display which is powered by a 1.7-GHz, quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 processor and a customized version of Android. The new phone includes support for NFC, Bluetooth 4.0, and DLNA for wireless streaming to a TV or computer. Measuring 5.4 by 2.7 by 0.36 inches, the phone weighs around 5 ounces. According to the specs, the phone will come with either 32 or 64GB of storage and 2GB of RAM, and it's backed by a non-removable 2300mAh battery. Unfortunately the phone doesn't include a memory card slot and has just two ports: a headphone jack and a MicroUSB that doubles as an MHL output for HDMI TVs. HTC One's 'UltraPixel' camera is nothing to sniff at either. HTC is trying to replace megapixels with 'ultrapixels,' cutting down the size of photos but using much larger individual pixels to sharply reduce noise and improve low-light performance. In a quick comparison with iPhone 5 and Galaxy S3, One's images were far clearer and brighter. The HTC One runs Android 4.1.2 with HTC's new Sense 5."

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HTC will need to prove themselves. (4, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947077)

Getting one phone out on a lot of carriers is a good move, but lets see if they can keep up with updates. So far HTC phones have been some of the worst at getting updated.

Is the bootloader unlocked? Is S-off easy to obtain?

Customers Satisfied (3, Interesting)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947139)

Getting one phone out on a lot of carriers is a good move, but lets see if they can keep up with updates. So far HTC phones have been some of the worst at getting updated.

Is the bootloader unlocked? Is S-off easy to obtain?

http://ondeviceresearch.com/blog/iphone-5-ranked-fifth-in-user-satisfaction%2C-behind-four-android-powered-devices#sthash.uPvDqYTk.O4PYwW2L.dpbs [ondeviceresearch.com] in the UK the HTC X is rated No 1 in smartphone satisfaction, so clearly they are doing something right. If you have concerns [ignoring you should provide the answers] perhaps your asking the wrong questions.

Re:Customers Satisfied (1)

mcrbids (148650) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947347)

Seeing your survey results doesn't surprise me. I bought the Droid Razr Maxx HD a month ago and I absolutely love this thing! It's amazing how much difference never having to worry about battery life is.

I mean literally never. With generous settings (Wifi left on, GPS off, 4G data on) I can go two full days without a recharge and still have about 10-20% battery at the end of day two. Getting through a single day has never been a problem.

Given that it's plenty fast (GTA III Vicy City plays well) big screen (a bit smaller than the GS3) that's bright, while still being a slim, svelte phone...

Yes!

Re:Customers Satisfied (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947495)

Two days isn't never. My old pre-smart phone would go well over a week without a charge. It was something you didn't worry about. My phone has a decent charge life (htc one x), but I still have to remember to charge it. If I go over two or three days and forget to charge it, I can't use it. That is bad. The goal for all phone makers should be one week rather than just accept diminished expectations.

Re:Customers Satisfied (3, Insightful)

AuMatar (183847) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948219)

Your pre-smartphone didn't do high speed data (requires more power), work as a mini-computer (power), have a high res display (power), had a processor that was a fraction of the speed (power). Its like complaining your car needs more gas than the old bicycle you used to ride. A week would be awesome, but we need major improvements in battery tech to get that. Until then, we live with what we have, and 2 days is a nice improvement over what we had a year or so ago.

Re:Customers Satisfied (1)

cristiroma (606375) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948577)

Yea, because it used to be a ... phone. Has a proper signal and loads of battery life. A proper phone is having an excellent battery life (5+ days), an excellent camera and an excellent phone capabilities. For 99% that would suffice. The rest is load of bull for the phone makers to justify the fat price you pay for some crappy features that people (almost) never use.

Kind of reminds me of my useless HTC Tytn II, which I paid $600 for, to have a bad GPS, a bad phone and a very bad organizer. (including the crappy calendar, e-mail, to-do list, tethering, stupid bluetooth, all these which never worked properly). In a small brick packaging.

Re:Customers Satisfied (2)

AuMatar (183847) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948811)

Actually the phone part of the deal is the part I use *least* frequently. I use it as a mobile web browser at least an order of magnitude more- I use that daily where I may have an actual call one a week or less. There's definitely a set of people out there who don't really want or use the smartphone features, but there's a lot more of us who do.

And guess what- there's plenty of dumbphones still out there. So buy one. The rest of us like having computers in our pockets.

Re:Customers Satisfied (0)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947617)

And you get to run an out of date OS that you can't update yourself!

Re:Customers Satisfied (1)

phaggood (690955) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948695)

> Droid Razr Maxx HD
I am waiting for this phone to come to Sprint; I replaced my Zio with an EVO with an extended battery but my wife doesn't want to trade her Zio for a phone as thick as mine even with the long battery life I get.

Re:HTC will need to prove themselves. (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947217)

*shrug* I'll take rare updates over the crashfest I had with the Samsung phones I used. I'm 3-for-3 in buggy unstable garbage models with them (some dumbphone, Transform, and whatever the replacement for the Transform was).

Still, HTC has moved to 'no keyboards', which, like the crashfest, kills my interest in purchasing. I wonder how long till they make cases with keyboards?

Two powerful reasons for removable bits (3, Informative)

dinther (738910) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947609)

I have a Samsung Galaxy S3. The damn thing only last a day and that means NOT using turn by turn navigation or 3D gaming. It would not make it through the day otherwise. For my holiday I purchased a dirt cheap battery with replacement back that more then doubles the battery capacity although it makes the phone twice as thick. I thought I'd use it only for the holiday but the fact I no longer need to turn the screen light to minimum and I can use whatever app I want made me continue to use this big battery. The thicker phone is easier to hold as well.

As for SD cards. As people that dropped their phone in the water how they recovered their data. It if is an SD card it can be dried and it will work. Build in memory required the rest of the phone circuitry to work in order to get the data off.

To me a closed phone (Fixed battery, fixed memory and customized (raped) android) is a lesser phone. My next phone will be from the Google Nexus line.

Re:Two powerful reasons for removable bits (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947905)

If you drop your phone in water, pull the battery or turn it off. Let it rest in some kind of desiccant for a few days. It will survive.

Re:Two powerful reasons for removable bits (1)

dinther (738910) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948099)

Ok, I think you missed the point. New example. A truck drives over your lovely HTC One and leaves a crushed circuit board behind. SD cards are very hardy and likely to survive the assault. either way, chances of a part (SD card) of the phone surviving are much greater.

Re:Two powerful reasons for removable bits (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948263)

The SD card likely will not survive what you describe. In any case, backups are the answer not a removable drive. You do backup any important data one way or another right?

Re:Two powerful reasons for removable bits (1)

synapse7 (1075571) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947929)

Sounds like you have Google Now and S-voice hotwords enabled for both services.

Re:Two powerful reasons for removable bits (2)

dinther (738910) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948083)

No idea what that is and no idea where or how to turn it off. That is half the problem with all the "customized" Android applications. Things get far too complicated.

Re:Two powerful reasons for removable bits (1)

WilyCoder (736280) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948089)

Dude I think that is a known software bug, have you searched on XDA for your specific issue? I recall having a similar issue with battery life on my S3 and there was some kind of hack to fix it. Something to do with the 3g radio cycling between H+ and H and 3g radio....I forget, its been a while since I fixed it...

Re:HTC will need to prove themselves. (1)

mlts (1038732) | about a year and a half ago | (#42949011)

You have to log on to HTC's site, punch in the IMEI code, and they will send you a file you can use for a fastboot unlock.

Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947115)

This phone is not acceptable for those two reasons, I don't care how great its screen is or how fast its processor.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947123)

SD cards are going away on phones. They are slow and lead to customer complaints. Besides USB on the Go basically obsoletes them. Removable batteries mean a battery door. This makes the phone thicker.

Personally neither is a deal killer.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Rob Riggs (6418) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947179)

Removable batteries mean a battery door. This makes the phone thicker.

Personally neither is a deal killer.

I've replaced the battery on every phone I have owned for the passed 6 years because they typically do not last longer than a year before they are degraded beyond usefulness. Yeah -- it's a deal killer.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947203)

What are you doing to them?

Replacing the battery once like that should still not be that hard to do. I have done that to several ipods over the years.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947557)

What are you doing to them? indeed. I have never had any issues with any Li-ion batteries as long as they are properly maintained. That means do not let it run below 20% (yes, it means stop yakking on the phone and stop playing games on the phone if it is that low).

For example: my company laptop's battery is about 4 years old. It can still retain 90% of what it used to be when it was brand new. Some of it is attributed to aging, while the rest is due to several unforeseen lengthy meetings.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948417)

I have never had any issues with any Li-ion batteries as long as they are properly maintained. That means do not let it run below 20% (yes, it means stop yakking on the phone and stop playing games on the phone if it is that low).

In which universe does that qualify as acceptable usability for a consumer device? Especially considering that typical high end smart phones don't even last a day, just running maps or other moderate loads.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42949031)

Over the past 8 years or so, every single rechargeable device I or anybody I know has owned for more than a year has lost a significant amount of battery capacity. Maybe it is only 30% capacity lost with high-end batteries after two years (~700 charge cycles), but when this is the difference between lasting 14 hours without a charge and not, the user sort of notices.

Incidentally, Li battery deterioration is a popular topic [ecsdl.org] of study [ieee.org] , characterization [ecsdl.org] , and consumer education [hp.com] .

  What do you do with your batteries to maintain their capacity? Maybe you are wealthy and don't notice because you replace the whole device instead?

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947331)

Wait, you don't buy a new phone every year like a good American? What are you, a communist?

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42948433)

What is your definition of "degraded beyond usefulness"?

Perhaps you are not the target market for rechargeable anything or need to read the manual on proper charging methods.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (3, Interesting)

ByOhTek (1181381) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947259)

I don't mind the phones being a bit thicker. I want my replaceable batter (since it's one of the more likely to go wrong components), I want a keyboard (I always have found even "the best" touch screens a hassle), and a SD card slot would be really nice, though not a dealbreaker like the first two.

Then again, the phone manufacturers are go so far for thin and light, they ignore forget about battery life and reception, which are more important than any of the above IMO.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947295)

I wish I could find a phone with a keyboard that did not suck. It seem they only put them on low end devices though or bootloader locked which is even worse.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Artraze (600366) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947625)

Samsung put out the Relay [wikipedia.org] on T-Mobile in the fall, which is quite competitive with the S3. While I don't care too much for Samsung phones, it has an unlocked bootloader, a decent keyboard, and reasonably active development.

Verizon and Sprint respectively have the similarly speced Samsung Galaxy Stratosphere II and Motorola Photon Q, both of which released around the same time. I can't speak to their lockedness.

While it is sad that they're few and far between, they aren't low end devices... They come out a few months or two after their tech is cutting edge and stay on the market much longer, since a carrier will only get 1-2/year. The delayed launch also gives that not high end appearance because, well, they're technically similar to last month's latest, which also means no fanfare for their release. (It also doesn't help that they'll usually cheap out a little on something like storage to pay for the keyboard.)

Anyways, in short, yeah, enthusiast phones don't generally have keyboards, but as far as high end just daily use devices, they're there.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947791)

I am not interested in being tied to one carrier, nor in a midrange phone. None of those are high end devices.
The display on the Relay is pathetic, it compares with my old Droid1 not a GS3.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (2)

Artraze (600366) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948879)

> I am not interested in being tied to one carrier, nor in a midrange phone.

Good luck with that on nearly any phone. Besides, the Relay can be unlocked for free from a service menu, DMCA not withstanding (T-Mobile is good with unlock codes besides).

> None of those are high end devices.

Yeah, sorry, they are, even months later. Really, aside from not having massive internal storage (a non-issue since they support SD cards), the only thing they are behind on is having 1GB RAM instead of 2GB, something that wasn't present on any devices available when they were released, IIRC. Their processors are still top of the line: the dual core Snapdragon S4s (based on Cortex-A15) have similar, if not better, performance than Samsung's quad core Cortex-A9s (as seen in international version of S3).

The cell radio has the same performance as the S3/Note II, it supports NFC, Bluetooth 4, MHL, 802.11n, etc.

What are you using to define "high end" exactly? Unreleased phones based on unreleased processors?

> The display on the Relay is pathetic, it compares with my old Droid1 not a GS3.

And this is where you reveal you are simply talking out of your ass. Of course the screen is "pathetic": you want a damn keyboard. The Relay's display tech is on par with the Note II: ~250dpi Super AMOLED. The problem is that it's currently impossible achieve the DPI required to make a 720p screen in that form factor (>350, vs 306 for the S3 and 326 for the iPhone 5's retina display). The only way to make the display better would be to make it larger. Specifically, the side of the Galaxy S3 and I would find a physical keyboard on that whale to be hard to use. Could they have maybe have split the difference and made it 270+dpi and ~960×540 like some other devices? Yeah, I suppose, but really that's splitting hairs.

In conclusion, the problem isn't with the phones, the problem is that you have a poor understanding of what the state of the art is and what is possible and you'd rather nitpick little things and necessary design tradeoffs than be happy with a solid high end device.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42948005)

It's getting old now, but my Samsung Stratosphere has a physical keyboard, ONE screen (I hate double screens), and is easily rootable. Still works well, although the battery life could be better.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

mcrbids (148650) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947525)

the phone manufacturers are go so far for thin and light, they ignore forget about battery life and reception

Perhaps you should take a look at the Razr Maxx HD. It's thin, light, has fabulous reception, fabulous sound quality, and a battery life measured in days.

No, it doesn't have a keyboard, so I
bought a folding bluetooth keyboard.

Now, when I need a keyboard, I have something that rivals a desktop, and when I want portability, I use Swype. And I'm honestly surprised at how well Swype actually does.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

rvw (755107) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947801)

I don't mind the phones being a bit thicker. I want my replaceable batter (since it's one of the more likely to go wrong components)

My replacable battery is a lifesaver when the phone crashes. Sometimes it won't turn off, and then pulling the battery out is the best way to reset it.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

JabberWokky (19442) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948119)

II want a keyboard (I always have found even "the best" touch screens a hassle)

You're not alone. The now ancient Epic 4G is still clinging in the top ten Android phones: https://plus.google.com/114278817778674561147/posts/C6Ei9EWZ9Yg [google.com]

Kind of shocking, but my wife and I both keep ours and are hoping somebody comes out with a keyboard case for the Note 2.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947281)

SD cards are going away on phones. They are slow and lead to customer complaints. Besides USB on the Go basically obsoletes them. Removable batteries mean a battery door. This makes the phone thicker.

Personally neither is a deal killer.

I don't think I'd want a phone without an easily replaceable battery - I replaced my one year old Galaxy Nexus battery last month and immediately got about 50% better battery life - back to when the phone was new.

I thought I'd regret not having an SD card slot, but I've only used just over half of the 32GB of storage space and that includes a half dozen movies that I loaded up before a long plane trip and a couple hundred CD's worth of MP3's. It still might be nice to have an SD slot so I could load up more media, but it's not nearly as limiting as I thought it would be and it sounds like USB OTG might make it a complete non-issue.

But I still want a replaceable battery - It doesn't even need to be convenient enough to do it on the go, I don't need a slide off battery cover, go ahead and screw it in place and make it a 15 minute process, just don't make it so hard that I'd need to send the phone away to the manufacturer and pay them $80 for a $20 battery.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

marcello_dl (667940) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947293)

No spare batteries? no no-downtime replacement if the battery dies? No easy extraction of data if the phone breaks? I'm willing to sacrifice A LOT of thickness/weight to get these features.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

compro01 (777531) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947491)

0. Going away? Really? Barring HTC and the Nexus 4, basically every current Android phone I see has a microSD slot, as does the new Blackberries and all the non-HTC windows phones.

1. They should ship a real SD card rather than the class 4 junk. A class 10 or UHS card will keep pace with the onboard flash easily.

2. So having a (quite possibly even slower) usb drive dangling off the phone is replacement for an SD card in the device? And then you're complaining about thickness in the same breath?

3. Not to any relevant degree. In stock condition, my Galaxy S3 is even thinner (0.34" to 0.36") than this unit and has a replaceable battery.

4. WTF is the big deal with thinness? Out of the box, my GS3 was rather too thin to hold comfortably and my hands aren't that big. An extended battery and case (specifically Seidio's extended active case) allow it to fill my hand nicely.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947549)

I don't mind thicker phones. In fact I'd prefer a higher quality non-smart phone if it had great voice and long battery life and replaceable batteries. Function over style. I wouldn't have even gotten the smart phone if I had a choice of useful basic phones instead (really, they were utter crap given that the good phone makers have just given up on the basic market).

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

synapse7 (1075571) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947573)

The S3 with removable battery and door is .7mm thinner than the HTC. I don't have any numbers, but I would wager the USH1 card is faster than internal memory, which is nice when copying large files or a large quantity of files.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947767)

They are not 'going away'. They are purposefully being phased out to force people through cloud services. EVERY phone/pocket computer should have removable memory.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948371)

SD cards are going away on phones

Sounds like wishful thinking from someone who doesn't have one. SD cards are plenty fast enough for me. I would far rather have an SD card than be forced to futz around with USB cables, dongles, adapters etc. I have some Android devices with SD card and some without. I have a strong preference for the devices with SD cards. That's one of the big annoyances of the Nexus 4, no SD card. Plus, needing a special tool or a pin (problematic on an airplane) to get the SIM card out is just plain idiotic. But I digress. I note that Samsung has begun to see the error of their ways in that regard.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948883)

Not only are SD cards plenty fast, but manufacturers are free to use flash so slow that it's not any faster than an SD card, and they may, to cut costs. Having internal storage is no guarantee of anything except lack of expandability.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

phaggood (690955) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948637)

>Removable batteries mean a battery door. This makes the phone thicker.

Bollox. The Sanyo Zio had a batter door that was at best the width of three sheets of paper; and the battery lastest much less than the lifetime of the phone (my wife still uses her somewhat-less-than 3yr old Zio)

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948787)

SD cards are going away on phones. They are slow and lead to customer complaints. Besides USB on the Go basically obsoletes them. Removable batteries mean a battery door. This makes the phone thicker.

Personally neither is a deal killer.

"slow and lead to customer complaints" smells like phone company bullshit.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

triffid_98 (899609) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948845)

1. Removable batteries mean larger capacity battery options and less Apple themed 'planned obsolescence' after the factory battery starts wearing out.

2. Class 4 SD cards are slow, Class 10 SD cards are not. SD cards are going away because it allows you to mark up the 'extra ram' version of your phone and/or tablet...again, something that's been standard on all fruit themed hardware since the very beginning.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

tompaulco (629533) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947553)

I don't care how great its screen is
The screen doesn't sound so great either. 4.7" diagonal on a 5.4*2.7 form factor? That's almost 3/4 of an inch of Bezel all the way around.

1080p for less than 5 inches? (1)

Dr. Manhattan (29720) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947627)

I've got a Galaxy S3, which is ~4.8 inches diagonal and 1280x720. I don't notice individual pixels - and I checked carefully since I hate the very idea of Pentile. But I really can't tell, and I'm up close to the screen probably more than I should be - long bus rides, etc.

1080p would be a complete waste on something less than five inches, so far as I can see.

Re:Non removable battery, no memory card slot. (1)

tgd (2822) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947595)

This phone is not acceptable for those two reasons, I don't care how great its screen is or how fast its processor.

Just as any mainstream phone manufacturer wouldn't care about the features you want.

If lack of either of those were an impediment to sales, they'd include them. They're not, so they don't. But I'm sure there's people at HTC who are broken up over an AC on Slashdot declaring its not acceptable to them.

" the phone doesn't include a memory card slot" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947151)

Pass.

Until HTC changes, no thanks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947155)

My last experience with HTC was that they rarely update their phones, they stay at least a full generation behind stock Android, and they stop offering *any* updates after about a year. From now on, I'm sticking with companies with better support (and preferably stock Android).

Re:Until HTC changes, no thanks (1)

MrL0G1C (867445) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947255)

From now on, I'm sticking with companies with better support

Which is?

(Not Motorola, their phones come out without very out of date OS and then they don't upgrade it.)

Re:Until HTC changes, no thanks (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947283)

Something marked NEXUS should get much quicker updates. Provided you are buying it from the play store and not a carrier branded version. All carrier branded phones lag behind though.

Re:Until HTC changes, no thanks (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947997)

Something marked NEXUS should get much quicker updates. Provided you are buying it from the play store and not a carrier branded version. All carrier branded phones lag behind though.

You can buy your nexus phone from the carrier. Just remember after opening the box to flash in the official Google factory image and it'll get updates that way.

The carrier image points updates at the carrier, while the official factory image points to google. It's just a little work with fastboot.

No reason not to flash the official image either.

Re:Until HTC changes, no thanks (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948291)

Where is this magic google factory image for the Sprint or Verizon Galaxy Nexus?

Re:Until HTC changes, no thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42948805)

*cough* Apple *cough*

Android wins on many fronts, but actually getting the latest OS version onto devices isn't one of them.

HTC One X Receives Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947363)

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/436822/20130219/htc-onex-android422-jellybean-cyanogenmod101-nightly-rom.htm [ibtimes.co.uk] The original HTC One X seems to be updated just right :) perhaps your experience is from fantasy...interestingly their allegedly is less Sense and more Stock in this Android too :)

Re:HTC One X Receives Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947653)

Or he has any phone other than that one. My GF has a Rezound and it is on 4.0 still.

Re:HTC One X Receives Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean (1)

Andy Dodd (701) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948479)

CM10.1 nightlies for a device released last spring just starting now is nothing to be proud of.

S-ON bullshit plus rampant GPL noncompliance = HTCs suck to work with for developers.

Samsungs with Exynos chipsets aren't much better... All of the Exynos maintainers have switched to Sony.

Infrared Remote Control (3, Interesting)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947197)

The revamped one includes a Infrared remote control...and its not mentioned in the summary. I know those who had the n900 had this functionality, but Nokia hardware seems to have taken any advantages they have, and sacrificed it for Microsoft. So its nice to see this feature come back. Hopefully we are going to see some nice software to back this up.

...now we just have to wait for the radio transmitter, a function I used a lot on the n900.

Hmmmm .... (-1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947199)

HTC is trying to replace megapixels with 'ultrapixels,' cutting down the size of photos but using much larger individual pixels to sharply reduce noise and improve low-light performance.

This doesn't sound like it's a good thing.

Lower res pictures with bigger pixels? That sounds more like "we've put in a lower resolution camera, and that's better".

Of course, the problem with low light performance on a phone is the sensor is so small as to be useless at the published megapixel rates. Which is why my cell phone will never replace my actual cameras.

Re:Hmmmm .... (4, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947233)

They made the sensor bigger for a given resolution.
That is a big image quality improvement.

I don't carry my camera everywhere with me. My smartphone is always with me.

No it means they foucsed on light not pixels. (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947321)

Lower res pictures with bigger pixels? That sounds more like "we've put in a lower resolution camera, and that's better".

No its about being able to see detail in a photo, by being able to record those differences. So pictures don't look washed out or black without being able to make out detail.

Physics wins (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947389)

Given that a cell phone has a certain range of thicknesses, you only get a small choice of focal depths -- roughly the camrea thickness - (imager thickness + front case thickness). That limits the useful physical size of your imager. Given the race for megapixels, each cell on the imager has gotten smaller, which translates directly to higher noise and, in particular, reducing max possible low light performance. In other words, cell phone pictures are shitty in poor light. By increasing the size of the pixels in the imager, you greatly improve the SNR of the system, which improves low light performance. Given that most of these pictures aren't going any further than facebook or texting to a friend, the pixels that don't show up don't matter, but the noise figure does. This is a win for everyone except instagram.

Re:Hmmmm .... (4, Informative)

Andy Dodd (701) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947537)

Other than the "ultrapixel" marketing bullshit - a lower resolution camera IS better at the sensor sizes of mobile devices.

There's a reason Canon dropped from 14 to 10 going from the G10 to G11 (or was it G9 to G10?) - yes, they DROPPED resolution in their flagship P&S.

It's well known to experienced photographers that more pixels = less area per pixel = lower dynamic range (more noise) per pixel, especially in low light.

Especially since there's a fixed amount of "overhead" per pixel taking up sensor area - as the pixels are packed more densely, that overhead becomes a higher percentage of the sensor area that is wasted.

10+ megapixels, even 8, is simply way too much for the sensor size of mobile devices. A mobile device with 75% of the pixel count of a DSLR but only 25% or less of the physical sensor area = guaranteed to be shit in anything but sunlight.

Re:Hmmmm .... (2)

anagama (611277) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947933)

Other than the "ultrapixel" marketing bullshit

I don't know if it's BS. They need some way to explain that more doesn't mean better. It needs to be short, because a four sentence paragraph will get a TL;DR. The vast majority of people assume more pixels means a better picture.

Example: http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3475983&cid=42947325 [slashdot.org]

Re:Hmmmm .... (2)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947593)

HTC is trying to replace megapixels with 'ultrapixels,' cutting down the size of photos but using much larger individual pixels to sharply reduce noise and improve low-light performance.

This doesn't sound like it's a good thing.

Lower res pictures with bigger pixels? That sounds more like "we've put in a lower resolution camera, and that's better".

Of course, the problem with low light performance on a phone is the sensor is so small as to be useless at the published megapixel rates. Which is why my cell phone will never replace my actual cameras.

My iPhone 5 has a great camera compared to most other phones. The 8 megapixel images it captures are about equivalent to those created by my 1.3 megapixel $400 digital camera manufactured in 2001. The lower resolution, larger sensor size approach taken by HTC in this new phone looks like a massive step change improvement over the iPhone.

Unfortunately, the other problem in iPhotos is that they get way, way oversharpened and autoleveled to blow out bright pixels and crush all the dark pixels into a uniform black. This makes objectively poorer photos with less information, but since phone users don't usually postedit their photos by applying color correction or unsharp masks, it leaves us with the impression that the iPhone has _more_ detail and color fidelity. Even major review sites makes this mistake (Ars, for instance). I think the solution is analogous to what a lot of dedicated cameras have done for about 15 years - capture something similar to a RAW image, but when you display it on your phone screen or post a shrunken version to FB or whatever, process it to look punchy and exciting without eliminating the original, high quality image.

Physics (5, Informative)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947711)

Lower res pictures with bigger pixels? That sounds more like "we've put in a lower resolution camera, and that's better".

No, it's better - provided they have made the pixels bigger. I'm sick of phones with so-called multi-megapixel cameras, which give noisy photos in the best of circumstances. A typical 8 Mpix sensor would be much better as a 2 Mpix sensor of the same total detector size and sensitivity, and sometimes, they should have even fewer pixels with the the same total detector area and sensitivity.

Here's the essential info: shot noise [wikipedia.org] is unavoidable - it's intrinsic in the physics of photon arrival at the detector. The sigma of the output noise is the square root of the number of photoelectrons.

So if you have a crappy electron well that can hold 10^4 photoelectrons when full (a "decent" cellphone camera), the signal to noise ratio is barely 100 (10^4 divided by square root of 10^4). Similarly, the photon flux per pixel in good lighting will rarely exceed 10^5 photons per second per pixel, due to the tiny lens aperture and small pixel size. It's unsurprising that the images are utter crap, as the output gain must be cranked up (amplifying noise as well as signal) to get any shot in less than 1/100 second. People downsize their images in almost all circumstances, unless they're happy with blurry and/or noisy images. FWIW, this is borne out by my experience with my own Samsung Galaxy S3 and Nokia E70, my daughter's HTC Desire Z, a colleague's Nokia 920, a friend's Samsung Galaxy S2, another colleague's iPhone 4, and various other Nokia, Samsung, and Siemens phones belonging to family and friends They are all crappy in nearly all circumstances[*], unless downsized 2:1 or more (i.e. at most one quarter of the pixels).

In a DSLR, the much larger electron well means that a pixel can hold up to 10^6 photoelectrons, so the signal to noise ratio is closer to 10^3. Similarly, the larger aperture (there's a reason for those big lenses) and larger detector pixels mean that it gets a flux of more than 10^8 photoelectrons per second per pixel in typical lighting. That's why even action shots in 1/1000sec exposure can be sharp and have relatively low noise.

[*] Exception: a relatively long exposure shot of a still life scene, or a deliberately extended exposure shot of running water or similar (with hand support to improve steadiness), say 1/15 sec or thereabouts. Not what cameras in phones are commonly used for...

Re:Hmmmm .... (1)

Daniel Phillips (238627) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948463)

Lower res pictures with bigger pixels?

Yes. My 20D with 8 megapixels takes much higher quality pictures that any known cell phone, or any point and shoot with 50% more nominal pixels. It's not just the vastly better optics, it's also the quality of the sensor.

Re:Hmmmm .... (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948867)

Yes. My 20D with 8 megapixels takes much higher quality pictures that any known cell phone, or any point and shoot with 50% more nominal pixels. It's not just the vastly better optics, it's also the quality of the sensor.

You did mention the optics though, there's just no point to 10MP with a quarter-inch lens. All it does is blow up your file sizes.

A lesson for HTC (5, Informative)

Maow (620678) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947213)

Dear HTC,

I love the hardware on my HTC Amaze 4G but I'm sorry to say that I cannot buy another HTC phone.

I'm telling you why so you can reverse the decline you've been suffering.

1) Allow users to remove / not load HTC Sense and opt for the pure Android experience. Sense is lovely, but sometimes I don't want to use up resources on it.

2) Make your phones (more) hacker friendly. There is no CyanogenMod available for this phone because the drivers weren't released in a timely manner (if I understand the issue correctly), therefore the development community moved on to other phones and it isn't supported.

3) Stop it with the non-removable batteries and lack of external SD card slots.

4) UPDATES for Android! My phone updated from 2.3.4 to 4.0.3, but I'm still waiting for 4.1 (and doubt I'll see 4.2). Unacceptable. If you make it easier for CyanogenMod, etc. to run on your older phones, IMHO it will raise your presence in the dev community and increase your exposure / perceived value. You need the dev community to support your phones. With the ability to run CM, you then won't need to issue support for older phones if you don't desire to, as we can update our phones ourselves.

Re:A lesson for HTC (1)

war4peace (1628283) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947569)

1. Go Launcher EX. It's super-effective :)
2. No. There's no need for an Average Joe to hack and put some (officially) unsupported software release on a phone. If you really need CyanogenMod, there's a plethora of products which can be hacked as such. One of the main reasons my (very large) company uses HTC smartphones is exactly that: they are far more difficult to root. It's something Global Security was looking for.
3a: yes, that's a deal-breaker for me. My HTC Desire S with Androind 2.3.5 had an issue where it would completely hang when docked, and there was NO method do make it work again, except popping the battery out. So if this shit happens on a phone with no removable battery, what are you going to do? Wait until battery drains out?
3b: I realized I don't care. I never took my SD card out of the phone, always used dock or USB cable to transfer stuff, so there's no difference if it's glued to the phone or removable.
4. Updates are good, but sometimes they are simply not feasible for older phones.

Re:A lesson for HTC (2)

KodaK (5477) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948235)

Sense is much deeper than the launcher. It's like a cancer that spreads into all the menus and built in systems. I absolutely despise it and I just returned a One X because of it.

Re:A lesson for HTC (2)

AuMatar (183847) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948491)

Yes, there is a reason that the owner needs to be able to put on any hack he wants- he owns it. It's his. He has every right to install any software he wishes on that device. Even though I've never installed an android image, not allowing me to is why I would never buy an HTC phone or suggest one to either friends family or as an IT purchase.

As for updates- you're worried about security and you don't think updates are important? Wow.

Re:A lesson for HTC (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947707)

None of that will help HTC taken on the competition. Apple are exactly the same as you don't want, but they're #1 by a huge margin in high end phones.

Re:A lesson for HTC (1)

sremick (91371) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947743)

Agreed about the batteries and MicroSD card. This is 2013. There's no excuse for lacking these features. All my cell phones have had removable batteries back to my original Nokia candybar. On Android a single battery can't get you through a full day of use if you're a serious user, and not everyone can get to a charging source constantly. Keeping spare charged batteries is critical. Plus not everyone wants to replace their whole phone just because the original battery (a $5 part) only holds 50% of its original capacity now, when the phone is otherwise sufficient.

And expandable storage isn't just about running out of what is built-in to the device. It's critical for backups should something happen to the phone hardware (failure, damage, etc). Pop the memory card into a replacement phone, restore from Titanium Backup, and you're back up and running in short order. No other solution via the "cloud" or PC backup comes close to being as flexible, convenient or powerful. I have my phone set to automatically back up to itself (external MicroSD card) nightly, no user intervention required.

All my cell phones back to early 2000s (when it was still called "Transflash") have had expandable storage. I'm not going to start giving that up just because some manufacturers are assholes and are trying to push consumers into being conditioned/brainwashed to not expect/want that anymore.

This is 2013. Anyone trying to market a phone needs to stop pulling an Apple, insulting consumers and treating us like imbeciles. Stop gluing the case together and taking away critical options. If we wanted a stupid i-device we'd go buy a fucking iPhone. But we won't: we want Android, which normally COMES with all this. Get with the program or GTFO of the marketplace. Samsung, now HTC. It's fucking infuriating. No removable battery, or no expandable storage = no sale. Period.

Re:A lesson for HTC (1)

steelfood (895457) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947881)

For your particular phone, the latest stable Cyanogen Mod will get it to 4.1.1.

My understanding is that they've been much better with the One series. Both the One X and the S can be updated to 4.2.2 using a Cyanogen nightly. HTC is not the fastest at pushing out OS updates, but they seem to be fine when it comes to supporting community projects. I don't really know too much though, as I'm not a part of that community.

By far the largest problem (IMHO) with HTC's phones is the ten different models that are all slightly different. Even with the One series, there was the One S, One V, One X, One XL, and One X+, and the non-One-branded Evo 4G LTE. Getting the various models straight is still incredibly confusing, especially as some phones were only supported on some carriers, and some phones were far inferior versions of others.

It seems the HTC One is intended to solve this problem. They made this as the one phone to rule them all. Every carrier (except Verizon) gets the same phone. There's no confusion over which model is better, or which one supports which radio band.

Both the SD card and the battery are issues, but I think for most (regular) people, the confusion over the product name was what turned them off from HTC in general.

Re:A lesson for HTC (1)

eudaemon (320983) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948639)

I'm been happyish with my Nexus One. Yes it's ancient. Not, it hasn't been updated in forever and the system speed and size are two years after purchase *very* limiting factors in using the phone. But the fact that it has a stock android OS, removable battery which has been upgraded to a stack of extended life batteries (one for running with the GPS on for tracking, another for in-the-office, and a backup) has extended the life of the phone considerably. I would have worn the stock battery completely out by now. I have replaced the SD card at least once and would do it again if it took larger or faster ones. I know Google is spreading the myth that removable batteries are dead and sd cards are "going away." I can say with all honestly the only reason I consider the Nexus 4 a possible replacement for my Nexus One is because at $350 it's just at the edge of disposable, it runs a stock OS and there's no a ton of crapware/bloatware on the phone. But if someone wants to compete with the Nexus 4 by offering similar features at a reasonable price and include removable storage and batteries, they'll get my money. I'm perfectly happy if someone wants to bury the removable storage in the phone behind the battery cover and make it SDXC UHS-I card. I don't care if it's an expensive accessory. As long as I can upgrade it later. Stop trying to build in profit for cheap components by making them unupgradeable, already. Sheesh.

Re:A lesson for HTC (5, Interesting)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948847)

I'll give you HTC's responses. Note I'm not endorsing them, just telling what they will say. My personal comments are included.

1) Allow users to remove / not load HTC Sense and opt for the pure Android experience. Sense is lovely, but sometimes I don't want to use up resources on it.

Sense is what differentiates our phones, all our apps are designed for it and would need modifications to fit in with the vanilla Android theme, our phones have industry leading performance etc.

Comment: Apparently future versions of Android (Key Lime Pie?) will allow manufacturers to more easily skin the OS and optionally allow users to turn the skin off.

2) Make your phones (more) hacker friendly.

Lots of work for 0.00001% of our users, and lots of headaches from the people who think they know what they are doing but don't and brick their phones instead. Seriously, Samsung went to the trouble of introducing a counter that tracks how many times you installed an unofficial ROM because people kept bricking their phones and returning them.

Comment: We are a niche market, but well served by Google and some really rather good Chinese phones.

3) Stop it with the non-removable batteries and lack of external SD card slots.

We make lots of money on battery replacement and charging £50 for an extra 8GB of storage.

Comment: Okay, they wouldn't use those words, but that's what it boils down to. The only option is to boycott I'm afraid. Speak through your wallet.

4) UPDATES for Android!

It does what it does when you buy it. If you want new stuff buy a new phone.

Comment: Again future versions of Android are supposed to improve this situation, and again the only solution is unfortunately to vote with your wallet.

You need the dev community to support your phones.

Those guys are a support nightmare for us. We really want them to leave us alone.

Revamp the EVO (shift) (1)

phorm (591458) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947227)

I'd love to see a hardware-updated version of the "evo shift", which had a MicroSD slot, removable battery, and a PHYSICAL KEYBOARD (minus the issue with the screen contacts).

Yeah, thin phones are nice, but HTC needs to do something to make themselves different from the Galaxy S series (that doesn't involve loading crappy "partner" software on the phone).

No Removable stiorage or battery (1)

Gonoff (88518) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947263)

2 Deal killers in 1 deal? Impressive!

I have a Nexus 7 tablet which has no removable storage. This is a pain. I keep all my music in Google play but that is not all I want storage for..

I have a Galaxy GS2 and put a high capacity battery in it after a few months. Yes, it made it thicker. No, that did not make it any less excellent in any way. In fact, it made it easier to hold!

I will now call on the power of the free market and buy something else instead.

Re:No Removable stiorage or battery (1)

anagama (611277) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947843)

I have a nexus 7 and was annoyed that it doesn't automatically show up as a USB drive when connected to my computer. Bugged me for a long time -- there are apps to transfer files over your network but they seem slow. I resorted to scp more than once. Till I finally stumbled across http://www.android.com/filetransfer/ [android.com] . Now when I plug in the tablet, I get a file browser to move things around. It's great.

As an aside, Airdroid http://www.airdroid.com/ [airdroid.com] is an awesome over the network method. Still kind of slow, but the interactive user interface with your phone/tablet is way cool. I just don't ever need anything but file transfers, and plugging in the USB cable is faster/easier -- but in a way, I wish I did want to do other things because of the objective coolness of this app.

Camera? (0)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947325)

It's 4MP. Many phones have 8MP these days. Seems like an odd corner to cut.

Re:Camera? (1)

Kingkaid (2751527) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947393)

It isn't a corner to cut. They are taking a different tact. Rather than having a so so camera with 8mp they opted for a good one with 4mp. The camera captures more light so it is better at low light and gets less noise in the photos. For those being viewed on the phone it will still more than suffice.

Re:Camera? (5, Informative)

jonnythan (79727) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947507)

The biggest problem with cell phone cameras is that the pixels are small and not sensitive. HTC decided to go with fewer, bigger pixels that collect more light and are more sensitive. I'd much rather have a 4 MP picture with less grain and noise than an 8 MP picture with more grain and noise. After all, you only look at the pictures at around 2 MP max.

Better camera in some ways (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947779)

1) As mentioned, the photosites are larger so in theory it may have better low light performance (though some 8MP cameras have technology to help that as well).

2) The new camera has something called "Zoe" mode, where you can record a video at full resolution, and use any point in the video later, at any time, to pull a full-size still image from.

They are just trying a slightly different take on a cell camera, which I think is a great idea.

Re:Camera? (1)

tgd (2822) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947969)

It's 4MP. Many phones have 8MP these days. Seems like an odd corner to cut.

The funniest thing about your reply is the Insightful moderations. Clearly neither you, nor the mods, read the article.

Hint: megapixels effectively never matter when it comes to consumer digital photography...

HTC Sense is garbage (1)

Omnifarious (11933) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947433)

I'll consider this phone once CyanogenMod is available for it.

HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsung (4, Interesting)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947597)

If I were HTC, I would *let* Samsung take the flat-slab, single-button, iPhone clone handset market...and then concentrate on the niches. For example:

--HTC Universal: Every possible cellular frequency is supported, and shipped SIM unlocked. One handset that can roam freely between Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, and AT&T, plus European and Asian cellular systems, at full data speed.

--HTC Marathon: Twice as thick as an iPhone...with a 5,000mAh battery that can last two full days on a charge.

--HTC Pure: From Google's Github to your phone in 72 hours. Those pining for a Sense-free, timely update situation can have it in the Pure.

--HTC Click: My HTC Touch Pro2 had, hands down, the best keyboard on a mobile phone I've ever used. The Click is that handset with a new processor, more RAM and storage, and capacitive screen.

--HTC Tower: If you live or work too far away from a tower for a normal handset to get a signal, the Tower will ensure your call gets there.

--HTC Vault: For users with far too much data, this handset has 256GB of internal storage, and uses the same technology as a desktop SSD to ensure that data gets in and out as fast as possible.

--HTC Flick: Glass lenses and optical zoom increase the thickness of this handset that has a camera that outperforms even most dedicated point-and-shoot cameras from Canon and Nikon.

--HTC Simplicity: There's still a small dumbphone market, and the Jitterbug caters to users who want a phone that reliably makes phone calls and is easy to read. The Jitterbug can withstand a little competition.

--HTC Tinker: This handset is born to be hacked. No locked bootloader, no rooting required, and images for Android, Windows Phone 8, and Ubuntu are all available direct from the manufacturer.

There are plenty of niches where HTC can compete. They just have to stop trying to play the "lowest common denominator" card and trying to convince users to choose them over the Galaxy S3.

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42947783)

--HTC Flick: Glass lenses and optical zoom increase the thickness of this handset that has a camera that outperforms even most dedicated point-and-shoot cameras from Canon and Nikon.
 
You clearly don't understand optics or CCDs.

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (-1, Flamebait)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42947795)

I like you idea of specialization but...

--HTC Marathon: Twice as thick as an iPhone...with a 5,000mAh battery that can last two full days on a charge.

That would just equal what an iPhone 5 gives users today in terms of battery life.

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (1)

truetorment (919200) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948137)

I like you idea of specialization but...

--HTC Marathon: Twice as thick as an iPhone...with a 5,000mAh battery that can last two full days on a charge.

That would just equal what an iPhone 5 gives users today in terms of battery life.

Only if that iPhone 5 isn't doing *anything*; I haven't seen any iPhone 5s that last much longer than a day, and then only on light, low-use days!

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (1)

zyzko (6739) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948163)

I like your ideas, but the final question in the marketing meeting is: How many people will buy this? And while your ideas are great and all...there is not so much market for those. Because the consumer (or their employer) selects the one which is the latest fad or most cost-efficient. An example: Nokia has tried for years to be "the manufacturer" in quality (I know personally how they test they their stuff and compare it to competitors, and it is quite thorough) and in cameras. So far the results...not so great. So the things consumers really care are elsewhere. Geeks would love a "Click", but if you only have 2000 customers (who would still bitch and moan about the price) what's the point? The same with "Universal" - both consumers and corporate buyers prefer contracts. End of story. Marathon...umm...Motorola made this already? Pure, Google has this. Tower, Nokia has tried this, call quality is not a dealmaker. Vault, interesting concept, not doable right now without a hefty pricetag. Flick - Done by Nokia, did not fly that far. Simplicity: Many have tried, some have succeeded, most have not. Market is there, but it is a difficult one. Your todays grandma doesn't wan't to have "simplified" phone, just "easy". Tinker: Good luck with licensing. This is actually the one I would have, but I realize that I'm a geek, and the market isn't there. And I would probably choose the one which I know can be hacked and is cheaper.

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (2)

tool462 (677306) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948339)

Nice, but you forgot one:
--HTC Pony: Designed exclusively for a hypothetical user base (probably doesn't exist) that will cost millions in development and, if lucky, will sell 10s if not 100s to easily disoriented consumers. At least two Reddit subforums will absolutely love it. The subsequent bankruptcy filing by HTC will ensure the highly collectible status of the phone.

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (4, Informative)

static416 (1002522) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948351)

Interesting ideas, but to play devils advocate, there are many problems with what you propose.

Primarily, this many SKU's is completely uneconomical for a company that's already seeing declining sales and profit margin. It's not just the number of models, it's the fact that they'll have to make multiple versions of each one for each country and carrier, and storage capacity.

-- HTC Universal: In addition to all the flavours of 3G/H+, you want support for all LTE frequencies? Good luck with that. Even assuming that it's technologically and financially feesible to cram that many different radios into one handset, it's still not useful. Many CDMA providers will not let you bring a phone to their network that has not been purchased through their stores. Even some GSM providers that can't block it will make it as difficult as they can. Even then, how many people really need access to more than 2 networks at most? The market would be incredibly small, and the cost of the phone would be enormous.

-- HTC Marathon: Interesting. But it's probably more reasonable to just sell one phone of any type with an option of multiple officially supported battery sizes.

-- HTC Pure: It's possible, and I'd buy it, but chances are it won't happen. Officially selling a non-Nexus pure-Android phone implies that your Sense brand is not as great as you'd like. So it's unlikely.

-- HTC Tinker: There is no way you'll ever get a phone that officially supports both Android and WP8. Microsoft would never allow that. And there is no convincing non-carrier reason you need to lock your bootloader on any device. Having a specific version just for the unlocked bootloader seems wasteful. Just unlock them all.

Overall, it makes more sense to just make one or two phones and include whatever of these options are feasible.

So instead of everything you proposed, they could just release the HTC One with an unlocked bootloader, varying internal storage, provide downloads for officially supported AOSP images, and multiple battery sizes. That's actually feasible and economical. That doesn't satisfy every possible niche, but it gets to the big ones, and the increase in production/engineering cost is much less significant.

But it still won't happen. Fact is that the cost of catering to these niches is probably far more than then the associated increase in revenue. Best you can hope for is an unlocked bootloader.

Re:HTC should stop competing with Apple and Samsun (1)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948779)

You've echoed many of the sentiments responded elsewhere, and I'll hope that the other posters are eagle-eyed enough to see this response instead of me cutting-and-pasting everywhere.

I pulled a few ideas off the top of my head, clearly without the market research or engineering teams required to actually bring one to fruition. I'm also not saying that every model is a good idea, just that if HTC keeps trying to compete with both the iPhone and Galaxy series phones, they're going to have to be very content with third place. The Marathon, for example, has a much better chance when its only competition is the Droid Razr Maxx HD. The Click has a great chance of being the best phone with a slide-out keyboard, especially when no competitors seem to want to address that at all. The Simplicity clearly isn't going to sell by the trillions, but doing so helps win a MUCH easier race with a relative minimum of R&D behind it. The Tinker already exists: it's called the HTC HD2, and it already runs WinMo 6.5 officially, with unofficial ports of Android, WP7, Ubuntu, and an incredibly-buggy-but-technically-bootable WP8 port. HTC might not be able to "officially" make it happen, but a wink and a nudge and a set of drivers that just so happen to cross compile incredibly easily, they can simply follow the trail that already exists.

What I'm ultimately getting at is that HTC is trying to do what everyone else is doing - making phones more anorexic, shinier, and shedding user replaceable parts. Their last flagship phone was the Evo 4G, and then Samsung completely stole their thunder, and they've got an incredibly challenging uphill battle ahead of them if they're going to return to the glory days of the Sensation and the Evo.Instead, I'm suggesting that by sacrificing their lust for the best selling Android handset ever, they can make handsets that won't sell in GS3 numbers but will have a particular "killer feature" that some users were sad to give up by getting their shiny Samsung. They won't all flock back, but they'll at least have a differentiating feature besides the flip clock.

Why HTC is Loosing User? (0)

rainhill (86347) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948179)

My observation is, because a hard, physical 'home' button is missing on front face of HTC phones. That made me choose a Samsung Galaxy S1, S3, over HTC.

IPhone and Samsung Galaxy both have a physical 'home' button on their phone.

All right, a new Slashvertisement! (1)

RocketRabbit (830691) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948699)

And one that includes a plug for the stillborn NFC technology too! WHERE'S THE FUCKING IRDA PORT BITCHES?

Nexus (1)

Jethro (14165) | about a year and a half ago | (#42948995)

I want HTC to build a Nexus phone again. The Nexus One was (relatively speaking) the best Nexus phone made, in my opinion. The Samsung Nexus phones were/are OK (I have a Galaxy Nexus now) but they were never the absolute top of the line phones. The Nexus 4 is a nice piece of hardware but has some serious flaws (low, non-expandable memory being the show-stopper for me).

I might have to just give up on Nexus phones and hope for good Cyanogenmod support for this guy. But I'll see what Google brings out in May.

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