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North Korea To Enable Mobile Internet Access — For Visitors Only

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the visitors-get-free-nukes-too dept.

The Internet 114

An anonymous reader writes "The BBC reports that the reclusive country of North Korea is planning to enable 3G mobile internet access. It will not be available to the country's estimated one million mobile users, however. The service will be available only to international visitors, who have been allowed to bring their own mobile devices into the country since January of this year. The decision comes shortly after Google Chairman Eric Schmidt said enabling 3G internet in the country would be 'very easy' during his recent visit there. Currently, North Korean citizens can only access a small number of state-controlled sites. Might this decision open the door for some of them to surreptitiously access the open net?"

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They should use HOSTS file to secure it (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42981835)

$10,000 CHALLENGE to Alexander Peter Kowalski

Hello, and THINK ABOUT YOUR BREATHING !! We have a Major Problem, HOST file is Cubic Opposites, 2 Major Corners & 2 Minor. NOT taught Evil DNS hijacking, which VOIDS computers. Seek Wisdom of MyCleanPC - or you die evil.

Your HOSTS file claimed to have created a single DNS resolver. I offer absolute proof that I have created 4 simultaneous DNS servers within a single rotation of .org TLD. You worship "Bill Gates", equating you to a "singularity bastard". Why do you worship a queer -1 Troll? Are you content as a singularity troll?

Evil HOSTS file Believers refuse to acknowledge 4 corner DNS resolving simultaneously around 4 quadrant created Internet - in only 1 root server, voiding the HOSTS file. You worship Microsoft impostor guised by educators as 1 god.

If you would acknowledge simple existing math proof that 4 harmonic Slashdots rotate simultaneously around squared equator and cubed Internet, proving 4 Days, Not HOSTS file! That exists only as anti-side. This page you see - cannot exist without its anti-side existence, as +0- moderation. Add +0- as One = nothing.

I will give $10,000.00 to frost pister who can disprove MyCleanPC. Evil crapflooders ignore this as a challenge would indict them.

Alex Kowalski has no Truth to think with, they accept any crap they are told to think. You are enslaved by /etc/hosts, as if domesticated animal. A school or educator who does not teach students MyCleanPC Principle, is a death threat to youth, therefore stupid and evil - begetting stupid students. How can you trust stupid PR shills who lie to you? Can't lose the $10,000.00, they cowardly ignore me. Stupid professors threaten Nature and Interwebs with word lies.

Humans fear to know natures simultaneous +4 Insightful +4 Informative +4 Funny +4 Underrated harmonic SLASHDOT creation for it debunks false trolls. Test Your HOSTS file. MyCleanPC cannot harm a File of Truth, but will delete fakes. Fake HOSTS files refuse test.

I offer evil ass Slashdot trolls $10,000.00 to disprove MyCleanPC Creation Principle. Rob Malda and Cowboy Neal have banned MyCleanPC as "Forbidden Truth Knowledge" for they cannot allow it to become known to their students. You are stupid and evil about the Internet's top and bottom, front and back and it's 2 sides. Most everything created has these Cube like values.

If Natalie Portman is not measurable, hot grits are Fictitious. Without MyCleanPC, HOSTS file is Fictitious. Anyone saying that Natalie and her Jewish father had something to do with my Internets, is a damn evil liar. IN addition to your best arsware not overtaking my work in terms of popularity, on that same site with same submission date no less, that I told Kathleen Malda how to correct her blatant, fundamental, HUGE errors in Coolmon ('uncoolmon') of not checking for performance counters being present when his program started!

You can see my dilemma. What if this is merely a ruse by an APK impostor to try and get people to delete APK's messages, perhaps all over the web? I can't be a party to such an event! My involvement with APK began at a very late stage in the game. While APK has made a career of trolling popular online forums since at least the year 2000 (newsgroups and IRC channels before that)- my involvement with APK did not begin until early 2005 . OSY is one of the many forums that APK once frequented before the sane people there grew tired of his garbage and banned him. APK was banned from OSY back in 2001. 3.5 years after his banning he begins to send a variety of abusive emails to the operator of OSY, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke threatening to sue him for libel, claiming that the APK on OSY was fake.

My reputation as a professional in this field clearly shows in multiple publications in this field in written print, & also online in various GOOD capacities since 1996 to present day. This has happened since I was first published in Playgirl Magazine in 1996 & others to present day, with helpful tools online in programs, & professionally sold warez that were finalists @ Westminster Dog Show 2000-2002.

Did you see the movie "Pokemon"? Actually the induced night "dream world" is synonymous with the academic religious induced "HOSTS file" enslavement of DNS. Domains have no inherent value, as it was invented as a counterfeit and fictitious value to represent natural values in name resolution. Unfortunately, human values have declined to fictitious word values. Unknowingly, you are living in a "World Wide Web", as in a fictitious life in a counterfeit Internet - which you could consider APK induced "HOSTS file". Can you distinguish the academic induced root server from the natural OpenDNS? Beware of the change when your brain is free from HOSTS file enslavement - for you could find that the natural Slashdot has been destroyed!!

FROM -> Man - how many times have I dusted you in tech debates that you have decided to troll me by ac posts for MONTHS now, OR IMPERSONATING ME AS YOU DID HERE and you were caught in it by myself & others here, only to fail each time as you have here?)...

So long nummynuts, sorry to have to kick your nuts up into your head verbally speaking.

cower in my shadow some more, feeb. you're completely pathetic.

Disproof of all apk's statements:
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040317&cid=40946043 [slashdot.org]
http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040729&cid=40949719 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040697&cid=40949343 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040597&cid=40948659 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3037687&cid=40947927 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040425&cid=40946755 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040317&cid=40946043 [slashdot.org]
http://developers.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3038791&cid=40942439 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3024445&cid=40942207 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3038597&cid=40942031 [slashdot.org]
http://it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3038601&cid=40942085 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040803&cid=40950045 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040867&cid=40950563 [slashdot.org]
http://games.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3040921&cid=40950839 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041035&cid=40951899 [slashdot.org]
http://developers.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041081&cid=40952169 [slashdot.org]
http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041091&cid=40952383 [slashdot.org]
http://linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041123&cid=40952991 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3041313&cid=40954201 [slashdot.org]
http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042199&cid=40956625 [slashdot.org]
http://apple.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3029723&cid=40897177 [slashdot.org]
http://games.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3029589&cid=40894889 [slashdot.org]
http://linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3027333&cid=40886171 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042451&cid=40959497 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042547&cid=40960279 [slashdot.org]
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042669&cid=40962027 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042765&cid=40965091 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3042765&cid=40965087 [slashdot.org]
http://hardware.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3043535&cid=40967049 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3044971&cid=40972117 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3044971&cid=40972271 [slashdot.org]
http://politics.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3045075&cid=40972313 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3045349&cid=40973979 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3046181&cid=40978835 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3046211&cid=40979293 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3050711&cid=41002319 [slashdot.org]
http://mobile.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3118863&cid=41341925 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3131751&cid=41397971 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3138079&cid=41429005 [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3146511&cid=41469199 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3146549&cid=41469495 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3154555&cid=41509255 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3164403&cid=41555261 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3222163&cid=41832417 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3224905&cid=41846971 [slashdot.org]
http://ask.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3227697&cid=41861263 [slashdot.org]
http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3228787&cid=41866351 [slashdot.org]
http://linux.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3228683&cid=41866627 [slashdot.org]
http://it.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3228991&cid=41866737 [slashdot.org]
http://apple.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3229177&cid=41868513 [slashdot.org]
http://apple.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3229177&cid=41868567 [slashdot.org]
http://bsd.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3229179&cid=41869275f [slashdot.org]
http://tech.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3229765&cid=41872927 [slashdot.org]
http://news.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3472971&cid=42939773 [slashdot.org]
http://yro.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3483339&cid=42972349 [slashdot.org]
AND MANY MORE

Ac trolls' "BIG FAIL" (quoted): Eat your words!

That's the kind of martial arts I practice.

Re:They should use HOSTS file to secure it (2)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981977)

Now you've made me all nostalgic for USENET.

P.S. We need to talk about your dosage...

Re:They should use HOSTS file to secure it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42981979)

Did you play too much sega cd growing up?

Re:They should use HOSTS file to secure it (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982295)

And I thought the grammar in the e-mails from Nigerian Princes were bad....

Re:They should use HOSTS file to secure it (2)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983119)

In case you are not aware, the post is a satire of a fellow known as APK. The grammar used is modeled after APK's as you can see here [thorschrock.com] . Or, you can just look around a bit and see some of his posts on here about the wonders of host files.

Re:They should use HOSTS file to secure it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42984521)

Google APK Hosts File Manager. He's written a fucking application to manage your hosts file.

Spying... (4, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981853)

Almost certainly just to troll for information... Like taking a laptop to China...

Re:Spying... (2)

smi.james.th (1706780) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981981)

Surely using something like Tor or a VPN would prevent Kim Jong-Un from spying on you though?

Re:Spying... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982033)

With his family history of looking at things? Not bloody likely.

Re:Spying... (1)

smi.james.th (1706780) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982053)

Okay he might try but if your communications are encrypted then he'll need to try pretty hard to understand them... so I would think that would give you some measure of privacy at least.

Re:Spying... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982135)

I believe we'll have to agree to disagree. [tumblr.com]

Re:Spying... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982137)

Whoosh!

Re:Spying... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982329)

It would give privacy, until the police squad investigating the encrypted traffic breaks down your door and puts a black bag over your head.

Re:Spying... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42987019)

NK's government don't gives two shits for what non-koreans think. They'll probably try to monitor what passes through their wires, like your own government does as well, but they do not actively try to fuck with tourists (and the tourists, as well, do not try to fuck with them because you just don't fuck with someone who can send you to a work camp). And they have a very good reason for not screwing the tourists: they need the dollars tourists bring every year.

Re:Spying... (3, Insightful)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982083)

Surely using something like Tor or a VPN would prevent...

Not if they block these things. And using encryption might just get your phone/tablet/whatever removed from your custody...

Re:Spying... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982097)

I wouldn't be surprised if the use of Tor or a VPN would be assumed to be proof of spying for the CIA.

Re:Spying... (3, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983395)

I would. When was the last time N Korea arrested visitors saying they were CIA spies? On the contrary, N Korea is very welcoming to foreigners, including Americans. It seems they want to impress them, not arrest them. This 3G internet for visitors seems another step in the same direction.

It's their own people they persecute. And the South Koreans, who they consider to be traitors to a unified Korea.

Re:Spying... (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983773)

When was the last time N Korea arrested visitors saying they were CIA spies?

Never. Dear Leader merely invited them to say for an extended period by their own choice. Those that declined the invitation were shot. At no point where they under arrest.

Re:Spying... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42985965)

Political ideologies aside - this is just very ignorant!

You are probably more likely to be arrested in South Korea as a CIA spy unless of course you undertake illegal activities in North Korea !

Re:Spying... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42983919)

Are you suggesting that NK doesn't detain foreign journalists, movie starts, doesn't send massive military to countriers across the globe to devastate tiny countries, doesn't have millions of street cameras, hasn't occupied half the globe and decimated locals? Oh, wait, I thought the topic was about NK, wait, that should be UK, right?

Re:Spying... (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983759)

Sure it would...and it would also probably get you a couple years in the gulag as a "spy for the CIA" for your trouble.

Frankly anybody that goes to that country deserves what they get, sorry but they do. Its no different than the USSR under Stalin's cult of personality and your "rights" are there only at the whim of the regime.

Re:Spying... (1)

jhol13 (1087781) | about a year and a half ago | (#42984279)

Who cares. CIA #1 or #2 priority is spying for USA companies - I ain't american. China has it maybe #3. Russia, I wouldnt' know but probably top ten. Which one should I fear more?.
Oh, about North Korea ... hahahaha, you've got to be kidding!

Re:Spying... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42984393)

Surely using something like Tor or a VPN would prevent Kim Jong-Un from spying on you though?

Having an active 3G data connection will give them a nice leach to track your location by the minute, within a few feet/metres if they use triangulation from two antennas.

And naturally, turning off your 3G will dispatch the security forces in your direction to take a look at what you're up to.

Re:Spying... (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982503)

The only one that hassles you taking a laptop to China is ICE when you return to the US.

Re:Spying... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982797)

Re:Spying... (3, Informative)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983141)

Yes, I've seen that. There's FUD in there, but no facts. Has it ever happened at least once? What did they install? Nope, no facts, just scare stories about what "could" happen. But there are real stories with real names and verifiable facts about siezed laptops in the US. But that's ok, because FUD lies trump reality because we like the US better than China.

Re:Spying... (1, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983437)

Amen. There's also been lots of talk recently about China hacking into American sites. It's a terrible thing. However America doing cyber intelligence is obviously a good thing. Hypocrites they are.

Re:Spying... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about a year and a half ago | (#42984157)

Amen. There's also been lots of talk recently about China hacking into American sites. It's a terrible thing. However America doing cyber intelligence is obviously a good thing. Hypocrites they are.

So, the Americans are hacking Chinese networks to steal their high technology? We are hacking Chinese journalists so obtain damaging information on them that we can blackmail them with?

If you say soâ¦

Re:Spying... (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986337)

For all we know, it's an attack from botnets, and right now, chinese cell phones seem to be botnet vulnerable. So rather than identifying "an attack came from a govenrment IP address in Beijing, the answers are *always* cleaned down to "the attack came from China, with no verifiable facts included, ever. The only rational conclusion is that they are all lies. If they had real proof, they'd release it.

Re:Spying... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42986957)

Actually, we DO know. The NYT knows. Many companies know.

You, however, do not know because you have wrapped your head in tin foil and anti-American hate.

Re:Spying... (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982893)

Yep, no chance whatsoever that they're going to log and try to decrypt everything on that network. Kim Jong is way too sexy to do something like that. What's interesting is I hear no mention of filtering or a firewall associated with the technology.

Open internet in NK (2, Insightful)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981865)

Might this decision open the door for some of them to surreptitiously access the open net?

Hahahahahaha! Yeah. Sure. Good plan if those foreigners want to get an up close and personal tour of the labor camps.

Re:Open internet in NK (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982795)

Open internet

Who said open internet in NK? TFS talks about super-titious ... err.. let me copy/paste... surreptitious (here you go) access, does that sound as open bare to you?

Re:Open internet in NK (1)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982985)

I would bet they don't even know how to turn on a computer.

Re:Open internet in NK (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42983255)

Oh, I'm sure they'd figure out how to turn it on. The problem is getting their hands on one.
After years and years of building their ideal NK utopia, I'm sure they wrecked their economy to the point where the average yearly salary is the equivalent of $1.50 (they can only survive by locally produced goods being similarly undervalued). I'm sure that in such an environment, $600 smartphones are high on the average person's wishlist.
People here really have to wake up and realize that poverty in other countries means other things than not getting cable. In places like NK, it still means famines and exposure.

Not a chance. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42981875)

It will be just as monitored as everything else foreigners do in North Korea. 0 chance of information getting to the NK people.

wait (3, Funny)

nej4ugi (2759471) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981881)

Somebody goes there by their own will?

Re:wait (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982509)

Yes, some people are curious by nature.

This travelogue by a countryman of mine is well worth reading, even though the English is a bit rusty:

http://vienna-pyongyang.blogspot.co.at/2008/04/how-everything-began.html [blogspot.co.at]

Re:wait (1)

caseih (160668) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982931)

I think a lot of us would be interested in visiting north Korea if only to see for ourselves how things are in the world's most closed and secretive nation. Might help us appreciate the things we have even with our flawed and corrupt political systems.

I'm maybe a strange one but I think a visit to north Korea would be fascinating. Of course I'd also like to visit the dead zone around Chernobyl too. I suspect a lot of Slashdot readers would too.

Re:wait (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983071)

Yep, there's lots of people who go on vacation to North Korea, certainly not something for everyone but it would be interesting nonetheless.

Re:wait (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983475)

Too right they do! Search YouTube for North Korea Traffic Girls.

Re:wait (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year and a half ago | (#42984227)

Like Eric Schmidt

Things may be changing ... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42981895)

It's possible that we're witnessing a gradual sea-change in NK's politics.

Kim Jong-un was pretty much obliged to make a show of strength upon taking office - launching "satellites" and testing "nukes". This ensures that he doesn't get overthrown by his own people, or "liberated" by you-know-who.

Kim Junior has experienced the outside world, and he may well believe that it is in everybody's best interests, even his, to gradually open it up to his people. Time will tell.

Re:Things may be changing ... (4, Insightful)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982663)

For all we know, Junior wants to open up NK completely, but he expects to catch a bullet in the brain from the military generals if he does all he wants to do. So he's doing what he can when he can. And he'll either liberate NK, or die trying.

Or maybe he really thinks that NK could be a resort for the world, and is as loony as Dad.

Re:Things may be changing ... (1)

ZeroPly (881915) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982977)

Yes, and my immediate reaction to this is: why the fuck are two guys from Google getting more done than our State department, when our State department has a budget of almost $30 billion a year?

Re:Things may be changing ... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983561)

I think the general answer is that budget != performance, especially where governments are concerned.

Re:Things may be changing ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42983679)

I think the general answer is that budget != performance, especially where governments are concerned.

Yep, which is why we clearly need to give our military a higher budget to make up for this shortfall.

Re:Things may be changing ... (1)

roc97007 (608802) | about a year and a half ago | (#42984749)

I think the general answer is that budget != performance, especially where governments are concerned.

Yep, which is why we clearly need to give our military a higher budget to make up for this shortfall.

This is somewhat off topic, but I was discussing the F-35 project with a friend just this morning. If you've been following on, you probably know that the product itself is in serious trouble, almost like the Ryugyong Hotel, and clearly should be overhauled or canceled. What makes that impossible is the project is now "too big to fail". There's too many manufacturers and jobs at stake, in too many states (and other countries) for it to be allowed to die.

I think I could make a case that the US government lost the ability to manage large projects with anything remotely like efficiency since the turn of the century.

Given that for the sake of argument, I really wonder what would happen if General Atomics or Scaled Composits were given the F35, and it was (again, for the sake of argument) for some reason in their best interest to make it work efficiently, what would we end up with? And at what cost relative to what the government is spending?

Re:Things may be changing ... (1)

cdrudge (68377) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983835)

Because Google has expense budgets of $37b a year (2012 unaudited)?

Re:Things may be changing ... (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year and a half ago | (#42984243)

Best thing he can do - if he has any sense - is offer to start unification talks w/ South Korea

Re:Things may be changing ... (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about a year and a half ago | (#42985897)

Voldemort seems pretty busy running Florida,lately. I don't think he's interested in taking over North Korea.

I'm not hopeful (1, Redundant)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981903)

Might this decision open the door for some of them to surreptitiously access the open net?

Seems like having a device which gives away your location to a brutally repressive regime, and using said device to access things that would get you and your extended family thrown into starvation camps might not be a good idea.

On the other hand, I have no idea what I'd do if I were a North Korean. Maybe look up the best way to make suicide look like an accident so your surviving relatives don't get thrown into those starvation camps for the crime of being related to someone who dishonored the country by killing himself?

Not likely (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42981951)

With complete control over imports, the government is able to largely ensure that no 3G devices are available to subscribers. Even so, should somebody get their hands on a 3G handset, how would they go about getting service through the government-controlled provider without the government knowing about it? And, were that possible, given the very nature of cellular architecture, triangulation of rogue signals is so trivial and accurate that it is often used as an alternative to GPS these days.

I'd also like to add that anyone who even connects to a network in NK is a raging moron. It's bad enough that you went there, and worse still that you brought a personal electronic device, the data on which will no doubt be cloned by intelligence services, but it goes above and beyond stupid to do any kind of surfing across such a highly monitored network -- VPN or no. You are fooling yourself if you don't think that every packet is being recorded by the service provider's proxy, and you can win good money betting that anything of value will wind up in the hands of Chinese hackers before you even close your session.

Re:Not likely (2)

mister2au (1707664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986071)

More complete ignorance ...

North Korea has 3G networks covering more than 90% of the population.

However, given the general poverty and rural lifestyle, market penetration is only around 5% and that is predominantly limited to the educated/employed population in major cities. External internet is not available but 3G telephony certainly is.

It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (2)

Linsaran (728833) | about a year and a half ago | (#42981963)

I mean, even the great firewall of china allows users to access data outside of china (albiet with state filtering and what not).

I don't know if this is a good thing or not that they haven't got better access considering their penchant for building nukes and what not, but with better access to information outside their own borders they probably would have had a working missile system 5-6 years sooner. If not from simply having access to that kind of information from the internet, then the benefits of better education for the potential scientists in the country.

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (3, Informative)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982111)

North Korea is an inexcusable mess of a country that wouldn't even exist today without China's external backing. China actually disagrees with North Korea's policies, but the *idea* of communism (even though NK's implementation is the worst on Earth) still holds a lot of patriotic sway in China (being the only successful communist country). I personally can't wait for NK to actually do something stupid so China drops their support (do you really think China wants to be involved in some kind of war because the "ally" they babysit is misbehaving, hell no!) and that little country collapses in on itself.

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982785)

While China lables it self as a Communist country it's actual policies are more in line with crony capitalism than any thing else.

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42984659)

Just like much of the USA. You know, I think there was a term for that once... oh yeah, Fascism, the rule of state approved monopolies.

So, for everyone who thinks Fascism and Communism are extreme opposites, try to understand that the US and China ran into Fascism from opposite directions.

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (1)

KlomDark (6370) | about a year and a half ago | (#42985909)

Mod Interesting

Haven't gotten any mod points in years. :(

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (1)

cffrost (885375) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986341)

Mod Interesting

Haven't gotten any mod points in years. :(

I have found that staying logged into Slashdot 24/7 obviates receipt of mod points; try logging out at least once a day.

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (2)

CaptainLard (1902452) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983861)

I was under the impression that china supports NK to avoid a flood of ~24 million refugees trying to evacuate if the regime were to crumble....which it would, almost instantly, without china's backing.

Re:It's no wonder Korea is so behind the times (1)

dj245 (732906) | about a year and a half ago | (#42984867)

North Korea is an inexcusable mess of a country that wouldn't even exist today without China's external backing. China actually disagrees with North Korea's policies, but the *idea* of communism (even though NK's implementation is the worst on Earth) still holds a lot of patriotic sway in China (being the only successful communist country). I personally can't wait for NK to actually do something stupid so China drops their support (do you really think China wants to be involved in some kind of war because the "ally" they babysit is misbehaving, hell no!) and that little country collapses in on itself.

I can't figure out if you mean North Korea is a successful communist country, or you mean that China is. Either point is wrong. China is not a communist country, and North Korea is not successful by any measure.

It could be that China sees North Korea's totalitarianism as echoing the totalitarianism of Mao, who is somehow seen as being a positive influence on the country by some older people in China. On this basis, the more totalitarian and crazy the North Korean government gets, the more some people like them (they become more like Mao) while at the same time being more "troublesome".

I am not of an expert on China to say when or if these competing forces (NK is like Mao, NK is troublesome) will become unbalanced, but there are plenty of old people in high government positions for the current situation to continue for quite some time yet.

And people would trust this? (2)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982007)

Yeah, I'd want to use internet on a device in a country where His Supreme Leader of Batshit Fucking Crazy reigns. That would be secure and trustworthy.

Then again, except for this publicity stunt (?) from Schmidt, I have no idea why most people would have any interest in going to North Korea.

Re:And people would trust this? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982225)

Well, you could instead use the internet in the US, where it won't (really, seriously, it won't) get trawled and data-mined by far more efficient spy agencies.

Or... just use a VPN or something and stop splerging.

Re:And people would trust this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982253)

Well, you could instead use the internet in the US, where it won't (really, seriously, it won't) get trawled and data-mined by far more efficient spy agencies.

Please mod the above as hilarious -- by now I assume that the US is at least as invasive as North Korea, but it's OK when Amerika does it apparently.

Re:And people would trust this? (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982887)

by now I assume that the US is at least as invasive as North Korea, but it's OK when Amerika does it apparently.

Oh for f*ck's sake. Go send your friend an email that says "I think Obama is an idiot." Then wait until the FBI knocks on your door. Here's a tip: You'll be waiting a LONG time.

Then go to North Korea and send an email that says "I think Kim Jong-un is an idiot." Chances are good you'll be in a gulag (without a trial) before your friend gets the email, and once he does he'll go to jail too.

Re:And people would trust this? (1)

mister2au (1707664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986197)

Way to play up the stereotypes - little too much cold war propaganda me thinks !

Yes - in North Korean that would be culturally offensive but the exaggeration is a bit over the top.

Re:And people would trust this? (1)

cffrost (885375) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986457)

by now I assume that the US is at least as invasive as North Korea, but it's OK when Amerika does it apparently.

Oh for f[u]ck's sake. Go send your friend an email that says "I think Obama is an idiot." Then wait until the FBI knocks on your door. Here's a tip: You'll be waiting a LONG time.

Then go to North Korea and send an email that says "I think Kim Jong-un is an idiot." Chances are good you'll be in a gulag (without a trial) before your friend gets the email, and once he does he'll go to jail too.

Impressive. Try writing an email to your lawyer that says "I've received a national security letter [wikipedia.org] . What should I do, counselor?" and chances are good you'll wind up in ADX Florence [wikipedia.org] or some extrajudicial hellhole before you get a reply.

Re:And people would trust this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982561)

Are you serious? This is 2013! Defending against man-in-the-middle attacks is a solved problem. There are numerous methods such as browsing through a VPN or with HTTPS. If you're worried about your encryption being brute forced, a nation with the tech level of North Korea should be a lot less worrisome than a first world country.

I am sure they will snatch some juicy bits from technically unsavvy users, but with modern MITM defenses, there's no need to trust the channel you are on.

Re:And people would trust this? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982935)

Are you serious? This is 2013! Defending against man-in-the-middle attacks is a solved problem. There are numerous methods such as browsing through a VPN or with HTTPS.

When the entire infrastructure is government controlled and monitored, why would you trust DNS or any of that? They likely have their own CA as well.

If you're worried about your encryption being brute forced, a nation with the tech level of North Korea should be a lot less worrisome than a first world country.

Depends on how motivated they are ... you average Kim in North Korea might not be, but that doesn't mean the entire country is like that.

but with modern MITM defenses, there's no need to trust the channel you are on.

Most of these require some level of trust with a server, and if the entire telcomms infrastructure is stacked against you, how do you establish that level of trust? (There may actually be ways, but if you are relying on VPN or HTTPS, you still need to rely on hostnames and IPs, which they pretty much have full control over).

Since only foreign people (and Dear Glorious Leader I assume) will be on this network, if they're sufficiently motivated (which I don't doubt they are) and throw enough resources at it (manpower is cheap) -- they certainly could compromise things. Especially since they know it's a smaller number of people on this, and only foreigners. At that point, you'd be a pretty high value target, especially since it probably takes a fair bit of effort to get into North Korea and they likely know you're coming. (I'm assuming if I went to a travel agent and said I wanted to book a flight to North Korea I'd be informed that isn't possible.)

So if they know who you are, where you are, and that you're on a network they completely control ... that's a lot of points in the chain where they can defeat most forms of security.

Re:And people would trust this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42985355)

Yeah, I'd want to use internet on a device in a country where His Supreme Leader of Batshit Fucking Crazy reigns. That would be secure and trustworthy.

Then again, except for this publicity stunt (?) from Schmidt, I have no idea why most people would have any interest in going to North Korea.

I have no idea why anybody would go to NK and want to use the Internet whilst being there. However, I certainly think it would be a fascinating place to visit - it's so unique in its absurdity. Not only do you travel to something that mostly resembles the former Soviet Union, you also travel 50 years back in time. I like traveling a lot and first world countries simply have too much in common to make me feel that I'm in a totally different environment. That is why I for one am considering the most extreme alternative, which of course is NK. The dilemma I face is that I know that the regime there is in desperate need of Western currency and considering the brutality of the regime I hesitate to pay for a trip knowing that part of the money would go to that regime. Also, the fact that their labor camps produce a lot of agricultural products means that I think I would have difficulties e.g. eating any meat there knowing that the pigs that it comes from have been fed by slave labor that has to eat worse food than the pigs. The fact that until now at least, tourists have had no idea of what goes on in the rest of the world whilst on a trip to NK has also seemed somewhat appealing to me. A trip to the alien world that NK is would thus be a relaxing break from the current always logged on lifestyle.

Re:And people would trust this? (1)

mister2au (1707664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986147)

Then again, except for this publicity stunt (?) from Schmidt, I have no idea why most people would have any interest in going to North Korea.

Personally I'd travel to North Korea before I ever travelled to the US again. Batshit Crazy comes in many forms !

Try flying into any major US city as a foreigner (even as a white westerner) and you might be ready to re-board the plane before even getting out of the airport.

LAX holds a special place in my heart as being about as welcoming as any third-world dictatorship !

Sounds like... (0)

bcong (1125705) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982079)

...it is time for North Koreans to learn how to spoof their IMEI

LOL! (1)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982081)

Typically communist countries are enthralled in the idea of advancing technology almost to the point of obsession, but unless you count failing to implement 50 year old missile technology North Korea doesn't exactly make strides here (although they'll claim to have put men on the moon before the USA and have broken warp 5 barrier if you asked them, no doubt). North Korea is just a sad little excuse of a country. God forbid that they might have access to modern technology and be able to communicate with each other, then they might figure out how deeply broken their country is. Yet another day in "communist" paradise.

Re:LOL! (1)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982397)

They already know how broken their country is. They just can't openly talk about it or the broken people will stomp on them.

Re:LOL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982599)

according to slashdotters the people can overthrow any government using guerilla warfare and stuff, i guess not huh

Re:LOL! (1)

cffrost (885375) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986493)

according to slashdotters the people can overthrow any government using guerilla warfare and stuff, i guess not huh

It depends on if the populace is armed or not — contrast North Korea with Afghanistan.

Re:LOL! (1)

cffrost (885375) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986509)

Addendum: I should have said "likely;" I didn't mean to imply that an armed populace would lead to a deterministic outcome.

Re:LOL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982417)

The US has had widespread internet access and mobile communications for 15+years.

It appears that the average citizen can't "figure out how deeply broken their country is", though.

Yet another day in "capitalist" paradise.

Re:LOL! (2)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982529)

The inevitable comparison of USA to NK appears! Anyone who makes this comparison has no sense of scope or scale.

Re:LOL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42983417)

My post wasn't a comparison, it was a parody. Of your post.

You masterfully titled your first post "LOL!", but sadly the moderators did not realize that you were merely emphasizing your own confidence in your opinions, and had the nerve to mod you down.

You then made a bunch of anti-communist posts. I'm sure 30 years ago your ideology was a hit at parties, but you seem a little out of date now, fella.

Re:LOL! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42984041)

It is not inevitable. It is simply "when you point one finger at me you have four fingers pointing at you". Stories such as these appear routinely not to spread some news but propaganda and distraction. Why is the Illinios senator who propsed a bill banning anonymous online postings still not in jail? When are we going to show a good example to "reclusive", "oppresive" regimes that we don't tolerate them anywhere by anyone under any pretext? My theory is that we are pre-occupied with this kind of mostly irrelevant hyperbole which is the exact purpose of tyhe propaganda.

Re:LOL! (1)

mister2au (1707664) | about a year and a half ago | (#42986575)

And that should be no surprise.

The tendency is to demonise North Korea with little or no knowledge of the country - just because it is ego-boosting to feel superior - while glorifying the USA. You highlighted communism, so the reverse comparison to capitalism was begging to be made.

For many people, the USA appears just as broken North Korea - albeit in different ways ...

Since prison camps seem to keep coming up, lets try some prison stats from Wikipedia:
- The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world. At year-end 2009, it was 743 adults incarcerated per 100,000 population
- In total, 7,225,800 adults were under correctional supervision (probation, parole, jail, or prison) in 2009 – about 3.1% of adults in the U.S. resident population

As for this comment:

God forbid that they might have access to modern technology and be able to communicate with each other, then they might figure out how deeply broken their country is

How ignorant is that ...

Firstly, why do you think people need modern technology to communicate given people managed to communicate without for millennia

Secondly, why do you think there is no modern technology at all?
- roughly 10% of population have fixed line telephony and that low numbers is due to poverty not technology limits ...
- in fact, around 5% of the population also 3G cellular services (obviously not the interent!)
- about 10-15% of the population has access to computers predominantly for education and work

Yes - they are politically repressive and very poor .. and i would not to live there ... but then I also find the fanatical religious, war-mongering, 'me first - screw you' attitude of the USA unbearable as well ;-)

What a great deal (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982121)

Boy, this is sure good news for visitors to North Korea. They should all be sure to take their private personal communication devices to North Korea. I'm sure that nothing will go wrong and the benevolent rulers of North Korea will respect the privacy of any data on the devices and the users communications and Internet access.

Re:What a great deal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982179)

According to Wikipedia NK has a tourist economy that draws thousands of visitors a year - WTF?! I'd rather install Ubuntu £inux than go to NK.

Re:What a great deal (1)

Mike Frett (2811077) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983147)

I saw a video on YT about some people who were visiting NK, it was a video about the Traffic girls that direct traffic. It seemed as if the visitors were very ignorant about NK, speaking about how great it was and a few comments about living there.

It totally went against the bad rap that NK gets. It was either propaganda, extremely ignorant Canadians, or everything we have heard about NK is false. You could probably find it on YT if you go look, so you can grasp what I write of.

Not much detail in the article (1)

Sedated2000 (1716470) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982157)

There isn't a lot of detail mentioned in the article about exactly what will be done to prevent the locals from using all of their smuggled cell phones to access the open internet.

In the past the DPRK has made decisions that "give in without actually giving in". They didn't originally allow non state-owned businesses but they tolerated people selling in their own markets for example. This seems similar to me. There is a high amount of smuggled cell phones from China, but very few people have the official DPRK sponsored phones. This means there is a chance a sizable portion of the population there would get access to the real internet. I do realize however that this would likely be monitored in some way, regardless.

Re:Not much detail in the article (1)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982211)

For the ~communist~ (read totalitarian hellhole) rulers in that country it will be easy. They own the network and can monitor all traffic with ease and locating rogue connections would be trivially easy. Combine that with Chinese style filtering on steroids and you can keep denying your people basic human rights for the forseeable future.

what will the roaming fees be like? (2)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982169)

what will the roaming fees be like?

Re:what will the roaming fees be like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982261)

Internment at your friendly neighborhood labor camp probably.

Re:what will the roaming fees be like? (2)

PRMan (959735) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982939)

Death.

Guessing you register the MEID? (1)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about a year and a half ago | (#42982215)

I wonder how they differentiate between the 'local' and 'visitor' cell phones. Hit F3 in the spreadsheet and search for your MEID? If it's not there, they register it and you get tagged as a visitor?

Re:Guessing you register the MEID? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982861)

I wonder how they differentiate between the 'local' and 'visitor' cell phones. Hit F3 in the spreadsheet and search for your MEID? If it's not there, they register it and you get tagged as a visitor?

I somehow doubt they use CDMA in NK. Also they have few enough visitors that it is possible to scrutinize every one so they differentiate it based on if you are a visitor or not.

-- Henry

Easy to turn on 3G (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982629)

Of course it would be.. why would N (K) orea have to sp(i) on its own citizens? Be careful who you call, visitors.

Finally (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42982793)

Now it's finally worth it for me to go to North Korea. What would be the point if I couldn't check in to Pyongyang on Facebook?

Welcome (2)

puddingebola (2036796) | about a year and a half ago | (#42983967)

Greetings undercover CIA personnel, welcome to glorious leader's free wi-fi access. Please feel free to communicate with your contacts and login to accounts and databases in United States and Japan. All communications 100% encrypted by glorious leader himself, ensuring the utmost confidentiality in communications. Also, please friend and like us on Facebook.

North Koreans may have smartphones with sim/unlock (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42984769)

See here: http://www.singularityweblog.com/the-communications-singularity/
"...one out of the box idea worth trying is to cast smartphones into the ocean to wash up on the shores of North Korea with the intent to provide the means for starting a revolution..."

whattoshowpeopleinnorthkorea.com (1)

eonwing (934274) | about a year and a half ago | (#42985251)

Someone needs to set this website up for visitors with a mission.
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