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Copyright Alert System To Launch Monday

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the launch-into-orbit,-i-hope dept.

Piracy 224

An anonymous reader sends this excerpt from the Daily Dot: "Starting next week, most U.S. Internet users will be subject to a new copyright enforcement system that could force them to complete educational programs, and even slow their Internet speeds to a crawl. A source with direct knowledge of the Copyright Alert System [said] the five participating Internet service providers will start the controversial program Monday. The ISPs — industry giants AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner, and Verizon — will launch their versions of the CAS on different days throughout the week. Comcast is expected to be the first, on Monday." Of course, there are many ways around the Copyright Alert System, so it probably won't be terribly effective.

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224 comments

To be fair. (4, Insightful)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year ago | (#42985295)

This is actually a pretty moderate approach compared to just suing single mothers for millions of dollars for downloading an MP3 once.

Re:To be fair. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985319)

Exactly, plus it still stops the Obama voters from pirating shit.

Re:To be fair. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985389)

Exactly, plus it still stops the Obama voters from pirating shit.

Nah. Obama voters are pretty smart compared to their GOP or Lib counter parts and will just get around it.

Re:To be fair. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985379)

Ubuntu £inux is the root cause of software piracy. It is distributed in an ISO format, the same format that pirated games are typically distributed in. It also has a torrent app that comes in the default install and automatically opens when a torrent is downloaded by your browser! This is entrapment and training the next generation of software pirates. Did you know Ubuntu sends all your infos to the NSA and that the Ubuntu phone is rumored to have a black specs NSA tracking ribbon (the same one used in $20 bills)? I can cite many references on slashdot to similar claims. Ubuntu is unable to run the hit 10/10 release Aliens: Colonial Marines (its an express elevator to epic) which means if Ubuntu is adopted widely the AAA game industry will collapse and millions will be unemployed. Does this mean Ubuntu's ultimate goal is to devastate the US economy? I don't know but I will ask the question. Personally I installed Windows 8 and have a worry free desktop. Microsoft is the hero in all this, fighting an uphill battle against the Ubuntu Tycoons who are brainwashing college students with promises of a "free high quality OS" - Like piracy, there is a price, and it is your immortal soul!

What are you on? (-1, Troll)

kawabago (551139) | about a year ago | (#42986007)

or are you really that stupid?

Re:What are you on? (4, Insightful)

Genda (560240) | about a year ago | (#42986053)

DUDE! That thing sticking outta the side of his head... is his tongue in his cheek... next you're supposed to laugh... and now we know why there are no savant comedians...

Re:What are you on? (1)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | about a year ago | (#42986201)

or are you really that stupid?

I sincerely hope you're just one-upping the tongue-in-cheekiness of the parent poster. It was so thick, people walking around my cubicle slowed to a crawl.

Re:To be fair. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986041)

Cannot tell if ironic or stupid.

Re:To be fair. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986199)

*Face Palm*

Re:To be fair. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985385)

Is it as bad? Well, this could easily affect innocent people, and it could be used against anyone. Hell, since there's no real oversight, I can say that it probably will.

Regardless of whether it's as bad as some of the other insane copyright enforcement schemes, it's still unjust.

Re:To be fair. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985631)

This is actually a pretty moderate approach compared to just suing single mothers for millions of dollars for downloading an MP3 once.

It's "pretty moderate" in the same sense as beating up a woman is "pretty moderate" compared to raping her.

Re:To be fair. (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985753)

It's the oldest trick in the book

Threaten somebody with rape and torture long enough, and a "mere" weekly beating will seem "pretty moderate" and many complete retards will even act like it's a "good" thing.
And for that, the deserve the beating. Stupidity is supposed to hurt.

But: "Educational" programs? You mean brainwashing with lies!

I would say this reminds me of "A Clockwork Orange". But it is much, much worse.
In the movie, there's at least a valid reason: You get a brainwashing if you harm others.
But here, it is: You get a brainwashing, if you don't let the Content Mafia harm you!

Until the whole population believes in the lie of imaginary property, without questioning or checking.

Every. Single. One. Of the Content Mafia MUST go to pound-me-in-the-ass prison RIGHT NOW. Do not pass go. Do not collect 200 quadrillion dollar.

Re:To be fair. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985755)

Only it will now be used IN CONCERT with lawsuits, not instead of.

Re:To be fair. (4, Insightful)

c (8461) | about a year ago | (#42985779)

This is actually a pretty moderate approach compared to just suing single mothers for millions of dollars for downloading an MP3 once.

True, but keep in mind that this is likely just in addition to suing single mothers for millions of dollars for downloading an MP3 once. I don't expect they're going to call off their political lobbying, either.

Re:To be fair. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985795)

The funny thing is that all this is gonna do is grow tor's (and other thingies) use to levels unseen before. It will take some years, sure, but sooner or later these dumbasses are going to be scratching their heads wondering what the hell is that seemingly random flow out there that they cannot crack.

Re:To be fair. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986005)

Or ISPs will begin to terminate or hugely throttle encrypted communications that pass a size threshold. Online buying and banking should still be fine, but online backups and VPNs are clearly for business-class users only.

Re:To be fair. (2)

Snufu (1049644) | about a year ago | (#42985877)

Step 1: Apply egregious, extortionate infringements on personal freedoms.
Step 2: Replace egregious infringements with milder versions so that in comparison the victim might not recognize the infringement.
Step 3: Prophetz.

Re:To be fair. (5, Funny)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#42985921)

...pretty moderate approach...

A guy got stopped by a cop for rolling through a stop sign.
The guy started complaining about it, saying, "C'mon man, I slowed down before crossing."
The cop rips him out of the car and starts to beat the crap out of the guy, saying, "Do you want to me to stop? Or do you want me to slow down?

Re:To be fair. (5, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#42986333)

I agree. Nothing can ever go wrong when government and corporations establish a re-education programs.

Download Linux (2)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#42985331)

En mass, then go for a class action lawsuit when they throttle you. Problem solved.

Re:Download Linux (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | about a year ago | (#42985707)

Why would they bust you for downloading Linux? Do you have any idea how the system works?

Re:Download Linux (2)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | about a year ago | (#42985783)

Somehow, I suspect that if you downloaded Linux over BT but with the filename skyfall.iso you'd still find yourself answering someone's accusation (or just getting black marked without any opportunity to answer). How these systems tend to work is unfortunately rather well known, since Big Media have screwed up so many times by going after perfectly legitimate and legal activities that were a bit too close to some keyword they naively searched for.

Re:Download Linux (5, Interesting)

Mr. Slippery (47854) | about a year ago | (#42985839)

Why would they bust you for downloading Linux?

I got a nasty letter from my ISP telling me "No peer-to-peer". I called them, and said "WTF guys? I download Linux distros and OpenOffice ISOs via torrent, all kinds of 100% legal and legitimate content." "We don't care. No peer-to-peer."

So I signed up for a VPN, of course.

Re:Download Linux (2)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985959)

Who is your ISP?

Re:Download Linux (3, Informative)

Denogh (2024280) | about a year ago | (#42986061)

Why would they bust you for downloading Linux?

I got a nasty letter from my ISP telling me "No peer-to-peer". I called them, and said "WTF guys? I download Linux distros and OpenOffice ISOs via torrent, all kinds of 100% legal and legitimate content." "We don't care. No peer-to-peer."

So I signed up for a VPN, of course.

I wonder if they also go after all the folks that are just trying to download the latest WoW patch. Seems like most MMORPGs these days use P2P updaters.

Re:Download Linux (3, Insightful)

whoever57 (658626) | about a year ago | (#42985879)

Why would they bust you for downloading Linux? Do you have any idea how the system works?

Any excuse to limit the usage by high-bandwidth users. Comcast would be much happier (and profitable) if, despite all the adverts about the speed Comcast offers, you used your connection only to check your email a few times per day. No streaming media, etc..

Re:Download Linux (2)

nabsltd (1313397) | about a year ago | (#42986029)

Any excuse to limit the usage by high-bandwidth users.

I think the solution should be that we need call up Comcast, Verizon, etc., and find out the method to report someone as "infringing", post it here, and then everyone should just report a few dozen random IPs that are known to be in the US networks of these companies. There is no penalty for a false accusation, so let's just see what happens if they have to deal with 50-60 million reports in a month.

Re:Download Linux (4, Interesting)

Wesley Felter (138342) | about a year ago | (#42986073)

Fortunately or unfortunately, only agents of the *AA can report infringement. The system cannot be turned against itself. Arguably this is unfair to all copyright holders who are not part of the *AA, but the flip side is that you can pirate non-AA content with impunity.

Clones in GNOME Games (2)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#42986209)

Several video games come with Ubuntu, and some of these appear similar to popular non-free commercial games. If the owner of copyright in one of those games complains, then everyone who downloaded Ubuntu might be getting a nastygram.

Good News (4, Informative)

Wonko the Sane (25252) | about a year ago | (#42985387)

For VPN providers.

I'm partial to AirVPN since they accept Bitcoins for payment and let you connect via Tor if that's what you want.

Re:Good News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985543)

I'm partial to AirVPN since they accept Bitcoins for payment and let you connect via Tor if that's what you want.

Lol. That is all.

Re:Good News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985969)

I'd rather trade livestock for dial-up... on a party line

Get a "business class" account (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985451)

One of the "ways around CAS" is to get a business account, just like Starbucks would have for their free wifi. Verizon DSL for small business starts at $30/mo. Sign up for this, open your wifi, and pirate to your heart's content.

Can't catch me, I'm behind 7 proxies (1, Funny)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#42985477)

And the real pirates will continue to secretly proxy their stuff over encrypted channels.

I've heard that one before (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | about a year ago | (#42985855)

What were those, the famous last words of a few Anonymous script kiddies right before they got arrested?

Finding someone who is "anonymous" on the Internet is hard, in the same way that cracking a new hardware-based DRM scheme is hard. It can take a lot of work, at least if you're the first person trying to do it, but ultimately trying to establish two-way communications over the Internet and yet remain completely anonymous is just as futile as trying to lock up content that you're also showing to someone. There may be many levels of indirection that are difficult to follow, but it's impossible to do what you actually need to do and yet still remain 100% safe from hostile activity.

Re:I've heard that one before (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985901)

What were those, the famous last words of a few Anonymous script kiddies right before they got arrested?

You mean those idiots who:

1) Revealed themselves in other ways or used dodgy proxy services in the same country as the government they were pissing off
2) Pissed off someone with tons of resources

These companies are not the government. They are not magic.

Finding someone who is "anonymous" on the Internet is hard

Making it almost impossible for someone to find you is quite simple, though. It's just that a lot of these idiots make trivial mistakes.

Re:I've heard that one before (2)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | about a year ago | (#42986167)

I understand what you're saying, but just remember the old warning: you have to be lucky every time, and they only have to be lucky once. Everyone makes mistakes, even world class black hats, and most people ripping off the latest movie aren't world class black hats even if they think they're smart because they heard the terms "proxy" and "VPN" once.

Re:Can't catch me, I'm behind 7 proxies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986091)

Real pirates will fire a big ol' canonball up yo ass. I'd watch out for dem muthafuckas

Mega or Usenet secret plan, or mass disobedience? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985485)

This seems designed to make everybody do mass disobedience (kind of like speeding). Or maybe it is a secret business plan by Mega for their new website that will make id of pirated material difficult? Then again, Usenet may stage a comeback....

Re:Mega or Usenet secret plan, or mass disobedienc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985903)

Encrypted connections to known usenet providers will probably get you "struck" the same as encrypted torrenting will, and everyone (according to the US Dept of Justice) who uses Mega is a pirate.

Re:Mega or Usenet secret plan, or mass disobedienc (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | about a year ago | (#42985971)

Fortunately DtecNet can't see what Usenet providers you're connecting to. Oh wait, you don't have any idea how the six strikes system works and even if you did you'd just spout conspiracy theories anyway.

Massive consumer backlash (1)

Citizen of Earth (569446) | about a year ago | (#42985487)

in 3... 2... 1...

Re:Massive consumer backlash (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985745)

Yes, big backlash, but where will people go when they backlash? The isps mentioned are all monopolies or duopolies, so you can't go elsewhere, except to a competitor who's doing the same things.

Re:Massive consumer backlash (1)

maugle (1369813) | about a year ago | (#42986355)

Well, I suppose you could lob a few bricks through the windows of their nearest office once a month, with the number of windows smashed determined by (monthly price of service * (number of ports blocked + number of false claims made against you + (advertised speed - actual speed)) / price of window).

Note that the units of advertised speed and actual speed can be determined by how you feel about the ISP's overall behavior and level of service. Slightly annoyed? Use MBps. Extremely pissed off? baud.

PLEASE!!! (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985489)

Can we PLEASE keep referring to it as "Six Strikes system"? Not the Industry-concocted, innocent-sounding "alert system" crap? Thank you.

Throttling connection to 256k (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985497)

I like how they think that after six strikes, throttling DL speeds to 256k will stop people form pirating.
For the last week, my internet has been down. I've been relegated to connecting to my neighbour's WiFi down the block, using my cellphone as a dongle for my computer. With this set up, I'm only able to get DL speeds on Bittorrent of 125k max. I still have no trouble downloading several movies and TV shows in a day, one at a time. Browsing the web and streaming video isn't a problem either.

Full Encryption (4, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#42985499)

This will only speed up the race to fully encrypted comms.

Re:Full Encryption (1)

lgw (121541) | about a year ago | (#42985861)

Freenet is just waiting for people to realize that strongly encrypted P2P is there and waiting for them.

Please don't let that happen -- not yet (2)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | about a year ago | (#42985913)

This will only speed up the race to fully encrypted comms.

Which will promptly be declared illegal in itself and probably with worse penalties than the original copyright infringement, unless you're connecting to an organisation sufficiently rich to allow it like a bank or government. Consider the way that merely circumventing technical measures protecting a copyrighted work is enough to make your actions illegal in many countries now even if your actual use of the work would have otherwise been completely legal. Just mention something about terrorism or child pornography and add the copyright thing as a rider, and every bought-and-paid-for politician this side of Mars will be voting for it to protect the public or something.

Copyright reform needs to happen before we get to everyone encrypting everything by default, or it's in danger of being the catalyst for something far worse than anything the **AA and their international brethren have ever done.

Re:Full Encryption (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#42986163)

Which will speed up the race to regulate the use of encryption. On their wire you will never get relief. The monopoly is cemented in place, encountering little to no resistance.

Will be effective (1)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year ago | (#42985555)

The people with clue will not be affected, the people with not enough knowledge, in the other hand, will end being punished for doing things that they don't understand or see as possibly wrong, or even without doing anything, as being used as proxies or unsecure wifi access points.

And considering what could be considered illegal [torrentfreak.com] this will be the perfect tool to put out of circulation inconvenient people or to push public opinion in the direction they want.

Even the Government... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985581)

Don't they know to write properly?

In spanish we have a phrase: the "h" is mute (as it doesn't sound). People forget to write it where it belongs... but know the government too...

The acronym is not CAS, it is

C A S H

force violators to take educational courses (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985599)

" force violators to take educational courses". where they can learn the 'company line'. I'll switch ISP's when one tries that shit with me, and when their are no ISP's to switch to, get away with as much as possible and make it a RULE to NOT purchase any IP media ever, regardless.

  A solution to this would be if everyone just stopped going to theaters and stopped buying movies for about 6-12 months, it would bankrupt all these corps and there wouldn't be a lobby to try to criminalize this stuff. Sure no new GOOD movies for a few months but startups would think differently until they too got to big for their britches.

Re: force violators to take educational courses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986087)

A solution to this would be if everyone just stopped going to theaters and stopped buying movies for about 6-12 months

Can't happen. The people who care already don't go to movies because nothing decent is getting produced while everyone else thinks that TV and movies are as necessary to life as air and water and therefore will do anything to keep it coming.

Re: force violators to take educational courses (3, Informative)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#42986113)

...it would bankrupt all these corps...

And they'll come back at you with, "You're putting people out of work!"

Meanwhile, company officers will simply shift their portfolios, and write down the losses onto the smaller investors and the taxman.

Opportunity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985635)

Now is the time to setup VPN servers and rent out access to those poor and repressed people =)

So are they going to target all bittorrent users? (4, Insightful)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#42985659)

Because I'd have to say I have a problem with that.

I don't use Bittorrent very often, but when I do, it's to download content that is entirely legitimate. I have to say that if they accuse you of infringing on copyright, you should be permitted to at the very least be able to say "No I didn't", and have that actually mean something.

Due Process (3, Insightful)

Adrian Lopez (2615) | about a year ago | (#42985685)

The Obama Administration pressured ISPs into adopting this scheme. Now we get private enforcement of copyrights without the usual defenses against such. No government involvement, so no due process. People should be more worried about this than they really are, especially considering the government's involvement.

Re:Due Process (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985931)

Agreed, I can easily imagine a future scenario where repeated attempts to access 'copyrighted' material on a wikileaks website would cut your connection. The system will already be in place - just needs a tweak or two to "protect the children".

Re:Due Process (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985997)

The Obama Administration pressured ISPs into adopting this scheme. Now we get private enforcement of copyrights without the usual defenses against such. No government involvement, so no due process. People should be more worried about this than they really are, especially considering the government's involvement.

This should be modded using the Ackermann function [wikipedia.org] for scaling.

Re:Due Process (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986109)

The Obama Administration pressured ISPs into adopting this scheme. Now we get private enforcement of copyrights without the usual defenses against such. No government involvement, so no due process. People should be more worried about this than they really are, especially considering the government's involvement.

So, if only the government were involved, we wouldn't have to worry, but because the government is involved, we have to worry?

Make up your mind.

Re:Due Process (1)

Adrian Lopez (2615) | about a year ago | (#42986273)

So, if only the government were involved, we wouldn't have to worry, but because the government is involved, we have to worry?

Government is not involved in enforcement actions under the copyright alert system, but it was very much involved in its establishment. Sorry if I misspoke.

Re:Due Process (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986139)

Its called Fascism.

In AD 2101... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986301)

Just wait until they start using drones to enforce it....

Still worried (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985709)

I've never pirated anything. Whether you care to believe that, or not, is irrelevent to me.

I'll be unsurprised if I am flagged as a pirate, though.

I have a one strike system (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985743)

one notice and I use a swedish vpn and verizon's marketing department doesn't get my data....oh well

and since a year of vpn costs less than 2 new blu ray disks i come out pretty far ahead

Re:I have a one strike system (1)

letherial (1302031) | about a year ago | (#42986085)

I got one better, i get one strike and i start cracking all the WPS wireless routers around my neighborhood...its fucked up, but hey, ill get dirty np

Oh noes, stick with hijacked corporate APs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985759)

Oh noes, stick with hijacked corporate APs so you don't get your residential neighbors in trouble. Wifi security is still a joke on 99% of deployed routers. This policy is so anti consumer, I can't wait to hear about the class action.

Internet access is a public utility (5, Insightful)

Snufu (1049644) | about a year ago | (#42985775)

like phone lines, water, and electricity. Would you accept an unelected corporate group like Hollywood policing your phone conversations and throttling the line if they didn't like what they overheard you saying? Or throttling your water supply if they objected to the flowers growing in your yard?

Inform your elected officials. Make it clear that we will not tolerate these for-profit commercial groups invading our privacy and abusing public resources. Apply citizen utility rights to internet access.

(By the way, expect small captured governments like New Zealand to bend to corporate influence, but how is this stuff not struck down in modern social leaning nations such as France?)

Re:Internet access is a public utility (1)

Dekker3D (989692) | about a year ago | (#42985867)

As far as I understand, this is a US only thing. France is not affected by this particular law... though yeah, I don't get how the initial three strikes thing went as far as it did either. Good thing I live in the Netherlands, which might almost seem progressive on the copyright front if you don't watch the news too carefully.

Re:Internet access is a public utility (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986079)

CAS isn't a law (France's HADOPI is). This is just an agreement between Big Content and the five big ISPs. Entirely extrajudicial. Also, doesn't affect you; it's entirely contained in the U.S.

Why this is REALLY really stupid (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985799)

State of the art copyright 'protection' methods use signature databases. Companies acting as 'agents' on behalf of copyright 'owners' scan various forms of their clients 'property' to create signatures that can be tested against video/sound streams, or against packet streams intercepted at the ISP using 'deep packet inspection'.

Now, here we are talking about the later- the ISP inspecting the 'signature' of data traffic to the users. Firstly, false positives will swamp the system. We have already seen have legal live video streams have been closed down by automated signature testing systems. But let us instead consider the 'valid' matches.

To fight back, users will need packet streams that are unique to the user. While this is frequently described as 'end to end' encryption, simpler solutions also work. The 'deep packet' signature test fails if the data stream suffers ANY per user modification, and that can include a simple XORing of most of the packet via an XOR key at the head of the packet. This really isn't 'encryption' but data 'morphing' where the same data can have a massive number of different forms, confusing or defeating a 'signature' based approach.

Data morphing can be done with near zero computational processing, unlike proper encryption. The goal is simply to ensure the same data has a vast number of different forms. And included 4-byte XOR key, for instance, has 4000 million variants, if memory serves, requiring this number of signatures in the database to dumbly recognise ONE packet.

Now, today, governments benefit greatly from the mostly open nature of data transmitted across the net. Intelligence agencies must be doing their nut over useless proposals that simply have the effect of moving us ALL to obscured forms of net traffic. The new US system will ensure EVERYONE will come to the conclusion "I do not want my ISP sniffing my traffic".

PS Automated (or Human) takedowns of non-live material can never work. If the worst comes to the worst, people will simply post encrypted 'zips' with no description, and tell people to "watch this space". Seven days later (or whatever), the password will be posted alongside a description of contents. Sure, this still allows the uploaders to be targeted, but their has NEVER been a time when uploaders were unable to be targeted.

Since survey after survey shows that 'pirates' are also the biggest purchasers of 'legal' content, we already know that the solution is in providing the legal services people want (which means EVERYTHING available EVERYWHERE for use on ALL devices). The tech war should not be wasted on 'downloaders' but on finding better ways to get paid content available universally.

Re:Why this is REALLY really stupid (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | about a year ago | (#42985991)

Six strikes doesn't use DPI, but I'm sure you enjoyed coming up with that elaborate fantasy about how to evade DPI.

I didn't say it did, but it will. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986289)

Your reading comprehension skills match your knowledge of where the industry is going. 'Six Strikes' sets a precedent. When it doesn't work well enough, the industry will easily persuade politicians to force the ISPs to use methods already widely deployed by music/video streaming companies.

Let me make this so simple, even you can understand. Takedowns at Youtube, for instance, began with copyright owners having to identify infringing work themselves, and then make direct appeals to Google. As soon as the principle was established that Google was aware of massive amounts of infringing content, and that removing this content with takedown requests was far too slow, various courts DEMANDED (note that word) that Google develop technology solutions that could automatically recognize infringing content from lists of data provided by the owners.

Up to now, ISPs have acted as 'common carriers'- responsible for NOT knowing what traffic passes over their network. 'Six Strikes' reverses this position. Now the ISP is engaged in being a PARTY TO the process of identifying infringing content. Sooner or later, the ISPs will be obliged to use the same 'state of the art' as Google and others.

Now DPI can take many forms. As used by the intelligence agencies, it is obviously about reconstructing the data streams in their entirety, using databases of all common protocols used by higher network layers. Anti-piracy DPI does NOT need this mega-expensive approach. Signature matching is a statistical method that looks for patterns in runs of bytes. I am interested why you are so determined to distract people from anti-piracy solutions currently being implemented by signature-matching software companies across the planet. I would guess you financially benefit from such work, and desperately hope your solutions can be mandated for use by ISPs before countermeasures become widespread.

Of course, some might split-hairs as to whether signature matching counts as DPI, but that is irrelevant to my point.

To be honest, you sound a lot like the people who shill forums telling people that the government has 'magic' tech that can recover properly erased hard-drive files, or retrieve files from smashed drives. Or like the shills that deny the government has DPI equipment attached to ALL networks provided by the major telecoms companies in the USA. Funny how people who shill to a common purpose will use completely opposite arguments when it serves their purpose. In reality the government will do whatever tech allows it to do within cost constraints UNLESS the people fight back.

Re:Why this is REALLY really stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986023)

Now, here we are talking about the later- the ISP inspecting the 'signature' of data traffic to the users. Firstly, false positives will swamp the system. We have already seen have legal live video streams have been closed down by automated signature testing systems. But let us instead consider the 'valid' matches.

Except no, that's not how this is working. This is based on what the copyright holders report to the ISP. In most cases it'll probably be from them monitoring the torrent swarm's IPs and reporting them to the ISPs. No it doesn't have the same issues as deep packet inspection, but it has an entirely different set of issues. Like the fact that the copyright holders can report whatever they want to the ISP with no oversight to ensure accuracy and with no cost to the copyright holder, and if the ISP customer wants to appeal it'll cost them a fee and the burden of proof is on them.

Re:Why this is REALLY really stupid (2)

lgw (121541) | about a year ago | (#42986357)

Sure, this still allows the uploaders to be targeted, but their has NEVER been a time when uploaders were unable to be targeted.

Freenet protects uploaders (actually better than downloaders, though it's quite strong both ways). Freenet is a fully cooked P2P network with strong encryption, lacking only a client as easy to use and configure as BT (c'm, free software movement!). Given the network effect (why use Freenet when there's no content there; why upload there when there are no users) I doubt people will make the switch untill they're forced off what works today, but if people really do start losing their connection over this crap ... Freenet is waiting.

Bend Over (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985899)

I'd love for someone to explain to me how this isn't practically collusion [wikipedia.org]. I am all eyes.

what triggers a strike? (1)

WillgasM (1646719) | about a year ago | (#42985951)

If I've read right, this isn't the ISP detecting BT traffic or anything. The MAFIAA still has to find your IP and issue the alert. So as long as I'm keeping trackers proxied, using DHT, and blacklisting the copyright goons, does that mean no strikes?

Pure Kafka (3, Insightful)

DrJimbo (594231) | about a year ago | (#42986037)

From the 2nd fine article [computerworld.com]:

If you feel "wrongly accused" then there is a $35 'review fee' to see precisely what you are accused of. It's refunded if you win, but if the Copyright Alert System is so sure of itself then why charge at all? Why not let individuals know what they are accused of without this stipulation that the fee is to stop "frivolous appeals?"

You actually have to pay money to see what this non-government cabal is accusing you of? It costs them next to nothing to tell you what the exact accusation is. It's just a few more bytes in the warning email or in a web page linked to by the email. I could maybe understand having to pay a fee to contest the charges but it is truly Kafkaesque to have to pay a fee just to find out what the charges are.

Just get a VPN or VPS (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986161)

I have money and I'm willing to use it!

I only want to have to deal with one thing though. I don't want a hulu, and a netflix, and an iTunes, an amazon, etc. I just want something that I can plug into my TV and just type in what I want and then watch/listen to it.

Yeah, I get it. The content owners need to wheel and deal and figure out licensing and who can distribute what, etc. and whathave you. Well, guess what? I don't give a fuck. That's not my problem! And I'll be DAMNED if I have to watch advertising.

Right now the only thing that fits the bill is an elaborate setup of open source & home grown software with usenet and bit torrent running in my piracy VM. I recently added a seedbox to the mix, so that bit torrent downloads happen on a server that I rent pretty much anonymously. End result is that me (or my wife) types in what we want in a little search box, (with some optional parameters for video quality, etc.) and a few minutes later what we want shows up in a folder. Works for movies, works for music, works for TV, and it works for auto-downloading TV shows as they air too. Usenet and seedbox cost money and it took some know-how to set up but it's cheaper than the netflix/hulu thing and the selection is as good as it'll ever get. Plus I don't have to watch ads.

Our species needs new mental frameworks for dealing with information and ideas now that this internet thing has come along. Trying to regulate information sharing is doomed to fail if the information gets "out" onto the web. The sooner we, as a species, can come to grips with this, the better. I see myself as a pioneer in this new digital age.

Join the revolution! Get a VPS, a VPN, a seedbox, or all of the above.

Re:Just get a VPN or VPS (1)

YrWrstNtmr (564987) | about a year ago | (#42986267)

I only want to have to deal with one thing though. I don't want a hulu, and a netflix, and an iTunes, an amazon, etc. I just want something that I can plug into my TV and just type in what I want and then watch/listen to it.

Yeah, I get it. The content owners need to wheel and deal and figure out licensing and who can distribute what, etc. and whathave you. Well, guess what? I don't give a fuck. That's not my problem! And I'll be DAMNED if I have to watch advertising.


Guess what? Your boss wants the same thing. Push a button, and quality stuff flies out of your mouth for free. Do you think they like paying you thousands of dollars a year? Hell no.
Unfortunately, it doesn't work like that. I fully agree that the current system needs major tweaking, and the current rulers of the content you seek are asshats. But 100% free to your eyeballs isn't the answer, either.

Re:Just get a VPN or VPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986349)

You hit the nail squarely on the head. These things have never change. See: religious tolerance, slavery, womans rights, racism, science, public utilities, justice, equality. Never happens without bloodshed and massive upheaval and public outcry, once it does happen and things reach an equilibrium it slowly corrodes in cycles. See tribes > Fiefdoms > Industry > Corporation. These are always initially beneficial for the group that adopts them, but eventually they turn in on themselves. Those that worked for the East India Trading company benefited greatly until such a time as there were alternative means to transport goods.

These rich *IAA asshats are just seeing how far they can push us as a species before all out chaos and lawlessness happens. Their in collusion with the bankers and the lawmakers. And its only a matter of time.

Unfortunately it is an evil at its core that is part of our human nature. As a young kid being picked on I wished the whole world to experience the feeling of powerlessness. But as a man I do not. This is the difference between us and the *IAA goons (all who are affiliated with them) and their banking buddies.

End of the Indy Film Industry? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986219)

I would be curious to see how this will effect the smaller movie production companies. Currently I have a subscription to Netflix but I admit I do stream and download more alternative content off the internetz, and also big budget Hollywood films. I still go to movies in the theater though, because I have always loved the experience. I can't imagine ever owning a cable TV ever again though, and there's only one video store left in my town. I do not like Apple or their products as I have had some bad experiences, so iTunes is out. I suppose I could rent content off Amazon, but I really doubt it has the variety of programs and movies available that there are in the wild. It's a strange situation, as I am a huge cinephile and I'm always the first to talk about movies past and present to friends and spread the word. I can't imagine I am the only one in this scenario. What will happen when people such as myself, who have become accustomed to having a huge reservoir of programming, especially stuff outside the mainstream at their fingertips for little or no cost are left out in the cold. Hmm... without the incredible word of mouth situation that the internet has given us, it seems like the Indy film industry is going to take a major hit. And that just sucks.

Deep packet inspection is illegal search (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986249)

Deep packet inspection is like someone opening your mail to see what sort of letter it contains. This is an illegal search. The ones performing the search don't even have any authority. An individual corporation like Comcast snooping through your connections is a wire tap being performed by a private party. I believe this is illegal activity and I would like to see Comcast sued in court over this. Who has a good lawyer and some money for this? Let's protect the right to privacy.

P.S. Let's not get in to a bunch of paranoid "no privacy already" bullshit because we don't have to accept that reality. Don't allow yourself to be so apathetic. Illegal behavior can be prosecuted.

P.P.S. Fuck CAPTCHA

So do something about it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986327)

Cancel your account.

Oh, that would be an inconvenience to you? God forbid you should have to go without Facebook and Twitter for a while, and actually start living life the way it was meant to be lived. God forbid you should actually have to pick up the phone and CALL SOMEONE rather then leaving a message on somebodies virtual wall.

Americans just don't fucking get it. Nothing will ever change unless you're willing to sacrifice stuff on your end to make a point. It's all just big talk and whining until something actually needs to be done, then everyone quickly adopts the mentality that "Oh someone else will take care of it for me".

Seriously, if you don't have the balls to call up your ISP and tell them to fuck off (hint: if everyone did this, they'd change their views on these issues REALLY FAST), then shut the fuck up. You have no right to complain about this shit. Don't tell me you need the internet because you don't. The whole problem with your society is that you THINK you do, because corporations and companies love that kind of crap. "I need my Facebook, therefore I need internet, and since there's only one ISP that services me I have no choice if they decide to change their terms of service".

Your entire society is ass backwards. You're so enslaved to the corporations it's hilarious in a sad kind of way. Companies think it's their right to have you as their customer, and that they can do whatever they want as a result. In reality, companies should think it's a privilege to have you as your customer because you're willing to pay them for something you see of value. If you don't like what they're selling then they need to know that you have the guts to go without it, because that will force them to change their services offered into something you find more palpable. This is the way it is in a good portion of the rest of the world.

Grow some fucking balls and do it. Cancel your service. Make sure they know why. If you all do it, you'll figure out really quickly that you DO have the power to change things you don't like. Stop complaining about it on the internet and take action. And don't you dare tell me that you can't do it because you "need" internet or you "need" TV. Bullshit. At most, all you need is a phone line. Take the time you've saved from watching your stupid TV shows and surfing the internet and take up hiking or something. Stop being willful slaves to this kind of corporate idiocy.

Re:So do something about it. (1)

flimflammer (956759) | about a year ago | (#42986363)

Oh, that would be an inconvenience to you? God forbid you should have to go without Facebook and Twitter for a while, and actually start living life the way it was meant to be lived. God forbid you should actually have to pick up the phone and CALL SOMEONE rather then leaving a message on somebodies virtual wall.

Of course you do realize there is far more to do on the internet than Facebook and Twitter, right? Suggesting that some individuals don't need the internet at all is absurd.

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