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Apple Now Working With the NYPD To Curb iPhone Thefts

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the hip-to-be-robbed dept.

Crime 123

An anonymous reader writes "Back in late 2012, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg attributed the increase in statistical city-wide crime to Apple, noting that thieves had a propensity to target folks using iPhones and iPads. As an illustration of the problem, there were 3,890 more Apple product thefts than in 2012 than there were in 2011. At the time, Mayor Bloomberg's press secretary Marc La Vorgna explained that 'if you just took away the jump in Apple', crime in New York City would have been down year over year. Indeed, the number of major crimes reported in 2011 in NYC came in at 104,948 compared to 108.432 in 2012. If you exclude Apple related thefts from the figures, then the crime rate in 2012 is essentially the same as it was in 2011. In light of that, a new report from the New York Post details that Apple is now working with the NYPD in an effort to curb iPhone and other Apple related thefts."

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123 comments

How about bricking them? (4, Insightful)

MarchHare (82901) | about a year ago | (#42985751)

Why not simply brick any device reported stolen? I understand it's done in other countries (or for other devices).

Re:How about bricking them? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985805)

But that would reduce the likelihood of theft.

Which in turn would reduce 1) Apple street cred; 2) the need to purchase another Apple device.

Better to spend a few pennies on things like moisture detectors which presume that the consumer is a thief. That's the Apple way.

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986039)

bingo on #2.

the ability is already there to prevent "black listed" phones from getting on the network by blocking their imei number.
but thats not in the "best interest" of the carriers or phone makers.
think of it this way.
john steals bills phone. bill gets new phone (new purchase => money for manufacturer), john buys minutes from carrier for bills old phone (not disabled) (money for carrier).

then word gets out that stolen phones are disabled within days
no market for bills phone, not worth stealing by john like VCRs today, (no new purchase => bad for manufacturer) no new phone on network ( no extra money for carrier)

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

alvinrod (889928) | about a year ago | (#42986203)

This is a poor example. It assumes that Bill does't already have a phone and isn't buying minutes already. Unless Bill has been living under a rock or is so opposed to buying his own phone which can still be had for cheap, he already has a phone and is buying service from someone. In that case, getting a newer, shinier phone doesn't give anyone additional value outside of the thief. If Bill is poor or on hard times, he's not going to be doing business with a major carrier, so they won't get Bill's business anyway. If Bill is still the kind of person without a phone, it's likely he doesn't want one at all. The upfront cost to get a basic phone is next to nothing compared to the long term cost of the service, even with the providers who aren't trying to bend you over backwards.

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986917)

According to that theory, nothing will ever be stolen, because there are never any "Bills" that wants but, for whatever reason, dont have / wont spend the market rate for it.

And we are talking iPhones, which, arent next to nothing.

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986857)

Bill would be willing to pay an extra 10 cents for his phone because he knows it won't get stolen.

Re:How about bricking them? (4, Insightful)

DJRumpy (1345787) | about a year ago | (#42986867)

Actually your slant is misdirected. It's the cell providers who would brick a phone, and they can do so easily but have resisted calls to do so until recent pressure from certain congressmen and law enforcement brought the issue to a boiling point. It has nothing to do with 'Apple', other than the fact that those phones havea high market value, but rather there was nothing preventing a criminal from activating a known stolen phone on a providers network.

The simple fact is, that cell providers will happily continue to allow criminals to use your stolen phone, even knowing that it's stolen, because it's a source of revenue.

http://blog.chron.com/techblog/2012/11/finally-wireless-carriers-collaborating-on-stolen-cellphone-database/ [chron.com]

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

puto (533470) | about a year ago | (#42987491)

Really, at ATT we have been bricking phones for the last three months if they are reported lost or stolen...

Re:How about bricking them? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987095)

But that would reduce the likelihood of theft.

Not really, vain old people are very easy to steal from.

Plenty of people steal their iP*s just for lulz.

Re:How about bricking them? (4, Interesting)

jackb_guppy (204733) | about a year ago | (#42985827)

Why brick them? Just making using them useless. Every connection to network: WiFi or Cell, just opens a FaceTime connection, so the police can direct comunate with the current holder. So clean records.

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986065)

Yes, because the police have nothing better to do than to have officers sitting around in front of monitors and webcams, waiting to talk to phone thieves.

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986223)

Sure, why not? They apparently have cops assigned to foreign countries that will retrieve your stolen iPad should it makes it way there. Tracking down stolen Apple products is apparently a big priority with the NYPD. Jurisdiction, smurisdiction, the NYPD don't recognize no stinkin' borders!

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987985)

I doubt the validity of your claim. Any police officer entering into another country has exactly zero authority of law. You could beat his ass and then have him arrested by the local authorities for trying to mug you for "your" phone.

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about a year ago | (#42986343)

You're right. Cops in my neighborhood are busy finding dark parking lots and deep corners of parking garages to hide out in.

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year ago | (#42986429)

In NY, no, they don't:

http://gizmodo.com/5986233/apple-theft-is-so-bad-that-the-nypd-has-a-dedicated-itheft-division [gizmodo.com]

Apple theft is so bad the NYPD has an iTheft division.

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

nthitz (840462) | about a year ago | (#42986893)

Gizmodo uses the NYPost as a source of that story. Your bold statement makes me think you didn't even read the original /. post/article FFS

Re:How about bricking them? (1, Troll)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#42985957)

Someone files a false police report and someone's phone is bricked

Who's fault is it? I've known people who filed false rape reports and nothing happened

Re:How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986215)

lol wut?

Re:How about bricking them? (4, Informative)

tompaulco (629533) | about a year ago | (#42986565)

Someone files a false police report and someone's phone is bricked
Then the police department and the wireless service provider are both at fault for not verifying your identity and your ownership of the phone.

Re:How about bricking them? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986393)

Correct. Why is this such a difficult concept in the US? I use an unlocked iPhone in Australia. If it is stolen I promptly contact my telco, identify myself and they permanently deny that phone access to any network in my country. I buy a newer model phone and the dick who took my phone has a paperweight. I claim the loss on my home insurance and pay the insurance excess of a few hundred dollars and no market is created for stolen iPhones.

Re:How about bricking them? (2)

MrEricSir (398214) | about a year ago | (#42986783)

Why is this such a difficult concept in the US?

Because companies that make cell phones spend more on lobbying than the people who own cell phones.

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987783)

You think changing the IMEI / identifiers on any stole phone is hard?

Re: How about bricking them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987837)

Unfortunately everything sensible involving "regulation" seems to be hard in the USA....

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

milkmage (795746) | about a year ago | (#42987893)

the problem is remote bricking is software based. software can be defeated via jailbreak/rooting

even something like this has limited effect because phones are still usable (just not for voice communication)
http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/us-stolen-phone-database-goes-live/ [digitaltrends.com]

besides, it takes time for the buyer to figure out the phone won't work as a phone, but the thief still got their money (therefore will keep stealing)

tracking and going after the perp is the best way to curb thefts. If I was a thief, and knew there was a reasonable chance I could be found, i might think twice. a better approach is password to turn off.. or remote ENABLE (can't find a phone if it's not on the network, and in order to be on the network it has to be on). report phone stolen.. then, any time it's on, it starts chirping away "i'm here, i'm here" - don't forget people could get hurt during a mugging - that's what you really need to stop.

two busts, on one day for one phone:
http://digitallife.today.com/_news/2013/01/28/16739259-double-trouble-iphone-thief-busted-when-his-stolen-iphone-is-stolen-again?lite [today.com]

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

daver00 (1336845) | about a year ago | (#42988103)

Here in Australia at least I believe a phone can be blocked from accessing a network via its IMEI. You can't change and IMEI through jailbreaking.

Re:How about bricking them? (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about a year ago | (#42988639)

Why not simply brick any device reported stolen? I understand it's done in other countries (or for other devices).

Why not use Lowjack? Find the bastards, what they're doing besides stealing iPhones, iPads or any other electronic device, and take them down. Is it really a stigma if you steal something, you should be punished?

How will Apple help things? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985757)

Give users a free Android 'shell' to disguise their iPhones?

Re:How will Apple help things? (0, Troll)

masternerdguy (2468142) | about a year ago | (#42986067)

On the high end Android phones are far superior to Apple's offerings. On the low end they are decent quality and cheaper.

PR is the death of rationality (5, Funny)

kruach aum (1934852) | about a year ago | (#42985813)

If you only took away the amount of weight I gained from eating deep fried pizzas every meal, I actually lost weight last year!

Re:PR is the death of rationality (4, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#42985869)

Chuckle.

I thought the same thing when I read the summary. In one breath they are talking about Major crimes, and in the next sentence they lump in iphone theft in that group. Yet if you report an iPhone theft the police won't do a damn thing about it other than give you some paper to fill out. How is that considered a Major Crime?

Re:PR is the death of rationality (1)

Altus (1034) | about a year ago | (#42986159)

Its a high value theft. I assume they have some threshold for value of stolen goods that makes it major or minor.

Re:PR is the death of rationality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986441)

Its a high value theft. I assume they have some threshold for value of stolen goods that makes it major or minor.

New York as far as I know, under 1000.00 is petty theft. An iPhone is only a few hundred dollars.

Re:PR is the death of rationality (1)

ottothecow (600101) | about a year ago | (#42986651)

If you report a $3000 bicycle stolen, they won't do anything besides give you a piece of paper.

Same probably applies to a $3000 motorcycle (and honestly, to many cars costing far more). Those crimes are pretty hard to investigate and they probably figure that if you cared that much, you would have insurance.

Re:PR is the death of rationality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987375)

The same does apply to a motorcycle. Have the piece of paper to prove it.

Drove home from work one day, parked my motorcycle, went to bed. In the morning went to drive it back to work and the motorcycle was gone. Cover, cobra lock and all. Only thing left behind was a broken drill bit. I guess they tried to drill the lock.

Police were of zero help. Spent half the day waiting for them to show up. I was amused by the officers very first comment. "Are you sure you parked it here?". I quickly became annoyed at the lack of caring or interesting. It's almost as if writing up the incident was keeping him from more important things.

Re:PR is the death of rationality (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about a year ago | (#42986665)

You don't report it to a COP, you take it to a local sheriff as those get elected! They love getting results of capturing the thief as it brings good vibes to the community and makes him look like a hero.

Again. Stolen iPhone, call a sheriff. Not the "police".

Re:PR is the death of rationality (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | about a year ago | (#42986795)

We're talking about New York City. According to Wikipedia the New York City Sheriff is appointed by the mayor, not elected. I also doubt that everyone with a lost phone is going to be able to talk to this sheriff, there are just too many people.

Re:PR is the death of rationality (2)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#42986859)

Yeah, it seems the Sheriff of New York City amounts to a revenue collection role only. (Which is exactly what Sheriffs in Ye Olde England were, the Kings revenue officers first and foremost).

County government in New York City is largely a puppet of the city.

Re:PR is the death of rationality (2)

olivier69 (1176459) | about a year ago | (#42985943)

there were 3,890 more Apple product thefts in 2012 than there were in 2011

Wait... and there were 20 thousand more Apple product thefts in 2012 than there were in 1990 !

Re:PR is the death of rationality (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | about a year ago | (#42988631)

As fr as I can tell they don't say how iPhone thefts there were in 2011. Apple sold a lot more phones in 2012 than in 2011, and before 2011 it's a tiny percentage overall. So it may be that "per capita" (per iPhoneita) thefts were well down.

Context is fab (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985815)

La Vorgna will now be accused (perhaps correctly, and we could run some stats about that) of blaming Apple for NYC crime. The other headline-that-writes-itself is iPhone Thefts /Finally/ Affect Apple Profits Negatively (The Empire Strikes Back).

These are better than car analogies.

Re:Context is fab (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year ago | (#42986995)

La Vorgna will now be accused (perhaps correctly, and we could run some stats about that) of blaming Apple for NYC crime. The other headline-that-writes-itself is iPhone Thefts /Finally/ Affect Apple Profits Negatively (The Empire* Strikes Back).

These are better than car analogies.

* State

Nothing will work (3, Insightful)

boristdog (133725) | about a year ago | (#42985817)

Apple's consumers tend to want to show off the fact that they are Apple consumers. Even their phone & tablet covers have a hole to show off the logo.

My mother taught me not to flash around my valuables, but I doubt you can convince most folks to do this.

Re:Nothing will work (1)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | about a year ago | (#42985995)

When I step on the subway there is often an announcement requesting we do just that. It doesn't stop people from using their phones (apple or otherwise), which is enough to let a thief know you have it (no "flashing" required).

Re:Nothing will work (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986175)

Samsing's consumers tend to want to show off the fact that they are Samsung consumers. Even their phone & tablet covers show off the brand.

My mother taught me not to flash around my valuables, but I doubt you can convince most folks to do this.

Now do you see how stupid you sound?

Re:Nothing will work (1)

pecosdave (536896) | about a year ago | (#42986437)

Considering I don't see many Samsung cases with holes in them to show off the logo, no I don't.

Yes! Blame the victims! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986251)

Apple's consumers tend to want to show off the fact that they are Apple consumers. Even their phone & tablet covers have a hole to show off the logo.

Yeah, and BMW owners like to show off because they don't cover the logos either.

I fail to see how the presence or absence of a hole showing the logo provides evidence in support of your claim. My case has no hole and yet you can still tell by a casual glance that I have an iphone.

I don't care who sees my phone. The iphone isn't a status symbol. Was it ever? Maybe very, very briefly among a tiny crowd (who pretty much all had iphones.) I can't imagine wanting anything to do with someone who thought "Oooh, he has an iphone, he must be important" or other such nonsese. So why would I want to "show off"? In the unlikely event a beautiful woman was actually impressed by my phone, her stupidity would be a huge turn off for me. And if it's not good for that... Well, let's just say there's really no point to it as a status symbol at all.

Of all the people I know, both Apple product owners and not, only ONE person has ever expressed any interest in other's Apple products or showing off his own. He's a poor college kid who is very awkward and gullible. But for some reason I know quite a few people who (like you) make all kinds of wild derogatory generalizations about the owners of these products. Of those, the only ones I respect are the ones who have a principled view regarding things like locked down hardware.

There is wisdom in not taking out your phone in certain places. My ex-BIL returned an iphone he received as a gift because he knew he would be mugged for it in the places he traveled. But there is also wisdom in not being condescending towards large groups of people you don't even know. Maybe your mother should have taught you that.

Re:Yes! Blame the victims! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987829)

I've seen a picture of 3-4 people all with i Phones, "showing each other their gear" (yes, they're showing each other the same fucking phone).

I've had someone show me their phone just to show me that PicSay wasn't in their app store. It's like I thought they were lying? Why would I need or even want to see "no app found"?

Why do I pass by mall stores with a ton of people in there -- and they're not even buying anything! If they're not in there for "cool factor", I'm not sure why they're in there.

Why do I see hundreds of people lining up to buy these things on launch day? It's going to be the same price and the same device for the whole year...

If you can take a casual glance at the rear of a phone that has a case without large holes for logos and are able to determine what device it is, I give you props. At a distance of a few feet, it's actually somewhat difficult to see especially if the person is covering the button - a whole ton of phones have a silver-colored border and a black face.

Everything I've seen contradicts what you've said. Granted not ALL people are like that, and your college guy is probably one of the rare exceptions.

Your car analogy is also retarded. Most people don't put cases on cars to protect them -- though some put car bras on. If there's a hole just for the logo, then yes, I would think the same thing of those people.

Pure genius....;-) (1, Funny)

rts008 (812749) | about a year ago | (#42985821)

I know, they can use square corners for a disguise!

Re:Pure genius....;-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986125)

replace headphones with a pair of actually useful black headphones. Problem 99% solved.

Pass the blame (5, Insightful)

Sepultura (150245) | about a year ago | (#42985841)

This is a ridiculous supposition. Are we suppose to believe that the criminals responsible for these thefts were lured into stealing by the flashy Apple gizmos? Or that these criminals would reject crime and find honest work if only New York could rid itself of Apple products?

This is just another example of politicians passing the blame to something else. In this case it's Apple, as blaming Apple for life's ills is in vogue at the moment.

Re:Pass the blame (1)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | about a year ago | (#42986003)

Or that these criminals would reject crime and find honest work if only New York could rid itself of Apple products?

The claim (verified by the numbers in the summary!) is that crime wouldn't have risen if not for apple thefts. The bigger question is, would those thieves have stolen other items if apple products weren't so common, valuable, and portable? Or do apple products present a uniquely common, accessible, and valuable target for would be thieves? Such that without an increase in the number or thieves, an increase in the number of desirable opportunities would lead to an uptick in thefts.

Re:Pass the blame (2)

mythosaz (572040) | about a year ago | (#42986157)

Thieves are thieves.

iGadgets are merely the path of least resistance.

Re:Pass the blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986269)

They're possibly the easiest thing to steal. Just grab it and run.

Re:Pass the blame (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about a year ago | (#42987003)

When I grew up in NYC, I wouldn't have been flashing an expensive camera around my neck; today people walk around with $500 to $800 iPhones and iPads plainly visible and accessible. In fact half the time they're holding the iPads up in the air in one hand taking pictures. So easy to grab!

Re:Pass the blame (1)

theVarangian (1948970) | about a year ago | (#42986185)

This is a ridiculous supposition. Are we suppose to believe that the criminals responsible for these thefts were lured into stealing by the flashy Apple gizmos? Or that these criminals would reject crime and find honest work if only New York could rid itself of Apple products?

This is just another example of politicians passing the blame to something else. In this case it's Apple, as blaming Apple for life's ills is in vogue at the moment.

Thieves steal valuable things that are easy to fence. If you want to know what people covet most, take a look at what is being stolen. End of story.

Re:Pass the blame (1)

fermion (181285) | about a year ago | (#42986303)

No, the thief's are motivated by the high resale value of Apple products. At a pawn shop an old iPod Touch with max ram get get well over $100. And old iPhone almost $100. Steal one device a day and you are doing better than minimum wage, tax free. Hell, $100 a day, even three days a week, is almost 1600 a year. Unless you are into expensive drugs that is a living.

For the iPhone, it might be a simple deal. A police report is filed, the serial number is reported to Apple, and Apple reports the fact to the carriers who then refuse to activate and confiscate the phone. This obviousy would kill the market for stolen phones, and damage the market for used phones enough to significantly kill Apples share of the market. I suspect that many can afford to upgrade to new apple phones because they can sell the old ones.

Which is why a political solution is necessary. Level the playing field. Make a federal law that says the carriers must maintain a list of phones reported stolen,refuse to activate those phones that are stolen, and confiscate if possible. Create a penalty for falsely reports of stolen phones. This can also be done with tablets and netbooks with cellular service. But it is one of those cases where regulation is the only way to create a level playing field. One would be crazy to take a unilateral approach.

OTOH, non cellular devices would be a different matter. The only thing that can be done here is for Apple to brick devices reported stolen when connected to the Apple servers. This be risky, as it would, as stated, put Apple at a competitive disadvantage.

Re:Pass the blame (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986525)

You don't need a law.

You start a "certified used" buy back program. Not only do you make a small profit on the used phones, but promote the idea that phones bought outside the program are risky. You require your phone service vendors not to activate reported-stolen phones. You don't "buy back" reported stolen phones either.

You don't confiscate the stolen phones. You notify the police. There is no reason to further anger customers or to put store employees at risk.

You don't care whether the police follow up. If they do, great. If not, it means more non-working phones on the used market, thus driving people to your "certified used" program.

There's also all kinds of data and control of the market this kind of program would provide.

And yes, I am evil.

Bullshit analysis (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985883)

The vast majority of car thefts now involve fuel injection cars. If you don't count those, the crime rate would be down!

Make no mistake, we, the police department, are doing a GREAT job. It's your damn newfangled fuel injection systems that are the problem!

Password to power off (3, Interesting)

NoKaOi (1415755) | about a year ago | (#42985935)

How about just making it require a password to power off, put it in airplane mode, or disable Find My iPhone so you can use find my phone? As it is you can still turn the phone off even if the lock screen is passworded. I don't want to have to enter a PIN every time I unlock my phone, but I also don't want a thief to be able to disable Find My iPhone (such as by turning it off), and I wouldn't mind entering a password on the rare occasions I turn the phone off or put it in airplane mode. Do any Android phones have a feature like that?

I think most thieves know to turn off an iPhone that they've stolen.

Re:Password to power off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986371)

Most android phones let you pop the battery.

Re:Password to power off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986817)

There are (several) Android apps that let you lock specific apps, like the settings or your email or the Play store, etc. So leave the phone itself with a more insecure lock if you want to get to it fast and still have a pattern or password lock on the things you want to protect. I use this because my I give my phone to my kid to play with and he can use the games or other things, but can't mess things up on me.

Hard reset (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987313)

iPhones crash, like every other sufficiently complex device. It's rare (never happened to me) but it does happen, and so they have a hard reset ability. Any such hard reset functionality would nullify the effectiveness of such a feature.

Re:Password to power off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42988425)

I'm curious: if you got your way, what would stop thieves from putting phones in tinfoil bags?

tl;dr: Parent doesn't understand how the world works.

The NYPD has too much fucking money (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985937)

From last linked TFA:
One stolen iPad was tracked to the Dominican Republic and recovered with the help of an NYPD intelligence cop assigned to Santo Domingo.

Their own "intelligence" cop in a foreign country? Bloomberg and Kelly are power crazy.

Re:The NYPD has too much fucking money (4, Interesting)

Elbereth (58257) | about a year ago | (#42986191)

I don't think you understand how politics and police in a big city work.

There's the police force that the poor get, the police force that the middle class get, and the police force that the rich get. Generally, when cops come into poor neighborhoods, it's to bash heads. In middle class neighborhoods, you get sympathetic cops who politely explain that they're too busy to investigate your report. In the rich neighborhoods, they drop everything in order to find your missing poodle.

Re:The NYPD has too much fucking money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986501)

Just dial 911 and hand the phone to the perp when it connects.

Re:The NYPD has too much fucking money (1)

fafaforza (248976) | about a year ago | (#42987385)

Once we had two detectives come to out datacenter because someone sent an email with a return address hosted by a customer. No idea whether it was a real drop box or a faked envelope From, but the complaint was made by this annoying guy that took all that nonsense seriously. So yeah, they do have resources to waste. At least they recovered stolen property here and didn't just chase ghosts.

In related news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985977)

The LAPD were going to have a dedicated department for Android theft but received a C&D Letter from Apple and had to shut it down

This is another revenue stream ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42985987)

From the article: "“This technique of identifying stolen phones by their unique identifiers has been around for a number of years and is technically rather simple — the difficult part has been integrating with law enforcement to track down the stolen devices,” said Kevin Mahaffey co-founder of cellphone security firm Lookout."

It has been possible forever, but the wireless providers don't want to do it because it cuts into their revenue. Not only do they get money from you when you buy a replacement, but they also get money from the @#$@# who stole your phone, or bought it from the $%^$ who did when they sign up for services. There is no way they want to cooperate, unless you pay them a fee to look in their database to find the #$#@$@ using your phone. Then you've got to get the cops to do something about it. It appears that NYPD will because it is easier than catching other criminals.

Apple in Cahoots with the Big Apple (1)

KlomDark (6370) | about a year ago | (#42986009)

I guess we should have seen that coming, they already own the Apple Records label too. (Never would have drempt of that happening when they were still making the computers out of wood in the 1970s.)

In exchange, they will want the 'Big Apple' to now be known as the 'iApple', but after mass protests in the city they are forced to compromise to 'Bigipple'...

Silly example blaming Apple (1)

Grayhand (2610049) | about a year ago | (#42986019)

It's a little like saying if you just ignore all the Toyota thefts the number of cars stolen would go down. They are going for what's popular and easy to move. What's new?

Ban! (2, Funny)

RearNakedChoke (1102093) | about a year ago | (#42986045)

Apple products result in increased crime, you say? Well, the solution is simple - just ban iPhones and iPads.

Re:Ban! (1)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | about a year ago | (#42987925)

Nah, just mandate the sale of a handgun with every iDevice. Because, as we all know, guns prevent crime, right?

Then again, now I am envisioning the i45 with a slide-to-unlock safety... *shudders*

That's a hell of a drop! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986173)

" Indeed, the number of major crimes reported in 2011 in NYC came in at 104,948 compared to 108.432 in 2012."
From 104,948 to around 108.5!

Things I learned from this advertisement (2, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about a year ago | (#42986235)

From the Article "The California-based company then informs the NYPD of the device’s current location — and it can track it even if it was reregistered with a different wireless provider."...they then boast how they have tracked a phone to brazil!?

Nobody, no-one concerned that a Apple is tracking their customers, and can do so without their knowledge.

Seriously "Do no evil?"

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (1)

PRMan (959735) | about a year ago | (#42986319)

Seriously "Do no evil?"

You're mistaking Apple for Google. Apple has always been evil. People like evil, as long as it looks cool.

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986737)

Seriously "Do no evil?"

You're mistaking Apple for Google. Apple has always been evil. People like evil, as long as it looks cool.

Google can track your location, they know your browsing history, your shopping habits, what hobbies you have what kind of clothes you like to wear, who your friends are, what you look like, they can rifle through your email if you use their G-mail service, they know what kind of porn you like... the list goes on, and on, and on...... and you two are worried that Apple can find out where your phones are?

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987843)

You think Google's the only company that does this? At least they're up front about it.

APL does exactly the same thing and people turn a blind eye to it. Don't give me that bullshit about a person being the product instead of the phone. Go opt out of location based ads. OH WAIT, it's not on your i device -- it's on a website somewhere, indicated to you on page 45* of the EULA when you installed their software on your desktop!

*random number, but rest assured, it's buried in there.

Captcha: guiltier

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986605)

Seriously "Do no evil?"

You're mixing up your flavors of kool-aid again. While it's true that in most /. nerd rage fests you can swap "Apple" and "Google" without any side effects, it would really behoove you to learn the difference between them. Google is the business suit wearing "Mr Slick" kind of evil. Apple on the other hand is the sexy prettyboy kind of evil, like if David Bowie from The Labyrinth wore horn-rimmed glasses.

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (1)

bidule (173941) | about a year ago | (#42986673)

Nobody, no-one concerned that a Apple is tracking their customers, and can do so without their knowledge.

I thought that was true of any cell phone. Or is it only the SIM that can be tracked?

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986707)

no-one concerned that a Apple is tracking their customers, and can do so without their knowledge.

Protip: all carriers are tracking the location of all phones all the time. The cellular antenna system automatically knows your phone's ID and location simply by way of what towers you're connected to- that's how it works. Any police station can retrieve your location in the US by making a 5 minute phone call higher up, other cooperative countries only take an extra couple days of red tape. Additionally, any carrier that runs an on-line store gets the UUID of every phone that visits there, for similar reasons.

"Do no evil?"

Protip: Apple and Google are not the same company.

Re:Things I learned from this advertisement (2)

Rewind (138843) | about a year ago | (#42986833)

From the Article "The California-based company then informs the NYPD of the device’s current location — and it can track it even if it was reregistered with a different wireless provider."...they then boast how they have tracked a phone to brazil!?

Nobody, no-one concerned that a Apple is tracking their customers, and can do so without their knowledge.

Seriously "Do no evil?"

You have to opt in and setup Find My iPhone, so I don't see how that is without their knowledge. Unless you are talking about something different?

Take it out and shoot it, please! (1, Funny)

bidule (173941) | about a year ago | (#42986643)

As an illustration of the problem, there were 3,890 more Apple product thefts than in 2012 than there were in 2011

That sentence is suffering horribly. Please put it out of misery.

Iphone theft counts as major crime? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42986695)

Its theft of course but that hardly seems to be the definition of major crime. I would assume assault, murder, rape, robbery (with weapons for instance) would be major crimes.

Bloomberg ... (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about a year ago | (#42986705)

He came for the 16 oz soda, I did not say anything... yada yada yada, ..he came for the guns ... blah blah .. now he is coming after my iPhone but there is no one ...

Dumb NY argumentation ? Or just smoke ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987115)

if you just took away the jump in Apple', crime in New York City would have been down year over year.

Yeah, lets ignore those crimes., Lets just assume that all those iDevices where stolen for private use.

I mean, whats the chance that such an iDevice was stolen to be sold just to get enough to get ... whatever they are hooked on.

In short: If those iDevices would not be available most likely other devices/stuff would be stolen.

In other words, anyone ignoring those stolen iDevices without incoorporating the chance and result of "replacement theft" is either ignorant, or attempting to throw a disrespectfull "look how good we are doing" -sand into the voters eyes.

Apple crime in 2011? (1)

nickscalise (702579) | about a year ago | (#42987117)

Are they saying there were no Apple related crimes in 2011?

Cause if there was Apple related crime in 2011, you have to remove that to see exactly what the crime rate did without Apple.

Also, a one year change does not a trend make.

Just ban Apple products (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42987463)

You won't have as many iDevice thefts...

NYC, you asked for this. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42988213)

The city with the absolute highest crime rate of one of the most sought after pieces of electronics...also happens to have the most oppressive and restrictive gun laws in the entire country.

I would say I'm sorry, but I'm feeling more like a "tough shit" instead. Maybe next time you won't be so quick to give up your rights.

Have fun in your gun-free zone. Good to hear that's working out so well. I can practically smell the peace and love from here.

How about an all WHITE society... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#42988591)

that would fix this problem overnight. But we aren't 'allowed' to have our own countries to live in, that would be 'racist', according to our unelected, unseen Jewish 'masters'...

Do YOU know why you think white people shouldn't be allowed to have their own countries?

Obviously 90% at least of the perps of this crime are NON-WHITE.

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