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Ask Slashdot: How Would You Feel About Recording Your Entire Life?

Unknown Lamer posted about a year and a half ago | from the just-ask-for-your-file dept.

Privacy 379

skade88 writes "As I get older, I find the little details of my life slip away from my memory after years and decades pass. I find myself wishing I had a way to record at least sound and video of my entire life. It would be nice to be able to go back and see what I was like when I was younger without the fog of memory clouding my view of the past. It would be cool to share with my boy friend and future kids how I was when I was younger by just showing them video from my life. Do y'all know of any good way to do this? I would settle for recording what I see from a first person point of view. There is also concerns that range beyond the technical. If I were to record my entire life, that would mean also recording other people, when they are interacting with me on a daily basis. What sort of privacy laws pertain to this? Even without laws, would others act differently around me because they were being recorded with my life record? How would it make you feel if your friend or family member did this?"

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Resources (5, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009717)

You might look into Vannevar Bush's efforts [wikipedia.org] on the memex machine [wikipedia.org] as well as the follow on to him, Gordon Bell [wikipedia.org] and his MyLifeBits [wikipedia.org] . This was discussed on Slashdot in 2007 [slashdot.org] .

Google's Glass [google.com] might one day accomplish what you're asking. I saw a kickstarter about facebook glasses that recorded but I'm not going to link to that as I don't think it was very ... well received?

If I were to record my entire life, that would mean also recording other people, when they are interacting with me on a daily basis. What sort of privacy laws pertain to this?

So personally, I would use this only on my property and public property. And then I would separate the data between data from the property I was on and public property and just be mindful if I was sharing that the people in the public property video did not give their consent to be recorded. I think this means different things in different states so if you would tell us your state/commonwealth you could probably get better information. Personally, people would act weird if they knew they were being recorded and since it was for my own personal records and on public property I wouldn't see how it would come to light that I own it let alone archive it.

If you wanted to be absolutely respectful of other people I would suggest only using it on your property and then bringing a stack of waivers with you for people to sign before you started recording. Good luck!

Re:Resources (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009855)

I'd also recommend checking out the documentary film We Live in Public [wikipedia.org] . It covers Josh Harris' unusual livestreaming projects in the 90's.

Also Steve Mann (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009931)

Steve Mann has been doing this for a while, and has documented his experiences trying to record (at McDonalds, and other fine institutions).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Mann

You'll find he's already addressed many of the questions.

Re:Resources (3, Insightful)

turkeydance (1266624) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010139)

1. some folks see the camera/microphone and 'clam up': stage fright. 2. other people are very protective of their words/image (politicians, preachers, bloggers). 3. as for me, no. i've been recorded. the result was factual and awful.

Re:Resources (4, Funny)

Dishevel (1105119) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010269)

A large part of our lives are recorded.
unless you live in the UK where most of your life is recorded.

Tag this (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009719)

#ifihadglass

Google Glass ad (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009727)

The conspiracy nut in me says this is a not so subtle Google Glass ad.

Re:Google Glass ad (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009887)

Dear Google,

I do not want you to index my entire fucking life. KTXBYE.

Re:Google Glass ad (3, Informative)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010153)

The somewhat reasonable person in me says this is a not so subtle Google Glass ad.

And to answer the question that was posed: No, I don't want you recording all your interactions with me. But if you're looking to end our friendship, doing so would be an efficient expedient towards that that end.

What is the point? (4, Funny)

alen (225700) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009731)

At some point after you die someone will throw the hard copy in the trash and delete the digital to make room for porn

Re:What is the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009759)

Are you sure your boyfriend wants to see it?

Re:What is the point? (1)

h3llfish (663057) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010115)

You would not be asking what the point was if a worst-case scenario involving your child went down, and video of the event was nearly instantly uploaded to remote servers. You could stick with GPS only, but don't you think you'd have a better shot at the most favorable possible outcome if you had video, too? Or even if you couldn't change the outcome of events in any way, the video of your child's life could very easy go from trivial to one of your most treasured possessions, heaven forbid.

Re:What is the point? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010275)

whats it like to fear everything?

Tragedy, and Strange Days (5, Insightful)

SpectreBlofeld (886224) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010371)

Counterargument: what if you recorded the worst-case scenario? Accidentally viewing that video of your child being hit by a car could be devastating. And I can see too many people obsessing over re-watching those 'happy memories' (now gone sour) of ex-girl-or-boy-friends. This latter point - and many other interesting ones regarding this idea taken to an extreme - were covered in the quite decent mid-90's quasi-cyberpunk film 'Strange Days'.

For those who haven't seen the film (no real spoilers here, I'm describing something that happens in the first 15 minutes): the film describes a future in which a banned underground technology allows the direct recording of one's memories. The main character (the perennial 'loser' type) is a guy who illegally sells recorded memories on the black market. He can never emotionally get over the fact that his bitchy ex-girlfriend dumped him because he constantly sits alone in his apartment replaying memories of the good times, when he and she went rollerskating, or were bumpin' uglies.

Part of moving on to the next event in your life involves not necessarily forgetting the past, but sort of 'shelving it' and not replaying it over and over. Wounds will always be fresh in your mind if you have an instant replay button.

That would be (1)

bobthesungeek76036 (2697689) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009733)

one long YouTube video!!!

Seriously? (5, Insightful)

jittles (1613415) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009741)

If it were a family member? I'd probably break their recording device. Seriously. And if it were a friend, I'd probably be hesitant to hang out with them. The fog of memory is a good thing, usually. It helps you to remember the things you really enjoy about your friends and family, and forget the things that really drive you nuts. Also consider the legal implications for yourself if you have such a recording device. If you ever are suspected of a crime, or investigated, sued, or anything else, they will subpoena the video / audio from this device. It could be very detrimental to your case, and even used out of context against you. There is no reason to record every second of your life. When would you ever listen to your entire life again? Just do what most people do. Record those precious moments that you know you're going to have, and keep a journal about the daily/weekly/monthly things that you think are significant to you at that time.

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009863)

Also, the police will constantly beat you senseless for "breaking the law" by recording them.

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009923)

and it's just too much work

Re:Seriously? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010037)

What an incredibly short sighted answer, a shameful act that it was mod'd anything positive.

I use to run a creative labs cheap-o mic that happen to pic up the entire room, ran this fucker all through high school occasionally making music but more often then not enjoying the memories. There was no special moment it was turned on, it just was... Now 10 years later it's a pretty amazing thing to go back and listen to, same with my webcam took any picture I could with the 6 feet of USB cord I was provided. You have no idea how much I wish I had access to the recordning devices and cameras we have today, you have no notion of how amazing it is to go back and listen to what were mundane conversations with people who may or may not be alive who may or may not be locatable... it's an incredible thing and I am eternally grateful I have these files.

If you want to sit around and wait for just the "kodak moments" well buddy you aren't going to know half the shit that was really going decades past.

Re:Seriously? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010147)

By definition, you couldn't ever listen to more than half of your entire life again.

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010149)

I'd bow down to them for taking geekiness to the next level of awesomeness.

Re:Seriously? (3, Insightful)

Geste (527302) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010327)

@jittles:"The fog of memory is a good thing, usually. It helps you to remember the things you really enjoy about your friends and family, and forget the things that really drive you nuts."

Wonderfully put. I have a sneaking suspicion that the OP is just going through a brief bout of meteor envy, but the idea seems like a terrible one. I have many pictures of friends and family that I enjoy looking at, but none of them involve someone sitting on the toilet, puking up Jagermeister or getting a boil lanced.

Oh, and +50 to the gent who said forget my life, let me record my dreams. I am much smarter, more creative and funnier when I finally make it to REM-land. I *really* wish that technology existed

Jim

'Tis the exceptional fellow who lies awake at night thinking of his successes.

Re:Seriously? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010337)

like that episode of house with the woman with perfect memory, estranged from her family because she couldnt forget the time her sister ran into her with a car

dreams (5, Insightful)

j00r0m4nc3r (959816) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009751)

fuck my life, i want to record my dreams

Re:dreams (1)

vivek7006 (585218) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009921)

Could not agree more.

Re:dreams (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010217)

i want to record your dreams

bad idea (5, Insightful)

Sperbels (1008585) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009755)

would others act differently around me because they were being recorded with my life record? How would it make you feel if your friend or family member did this?"

Yep, I know I would. I wouldn't want to be around you, and I'd be extremely formal and business-only when talking to you. If a friend or family member did this I'd be extremely annoyed with them.

Re:bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009975)

Indeed. My response would probably be closer to 'what friend/family member?' I'm very, very glad that I don't know you. I hope.

Re:bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010041)

would others act differently around me because they were being recorded with my life record? How would it make you feel if your friend or family member did this?"

Yep, I know I would. I wouldn't want to be around you, and I'd be extremely formal and business-only when talking to you. If a friend or family member did this I'd be extremely annoyed with them.

Ah yes, it would be like if they were a financial products salesperson. Some of my family members are insurance salespeople. It was made VERY clear to them that they are more than welcome as long as they don't try to sell their shit - and it IS shit - especially Variable and Index Annuities.

Re:bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010057)

Yep, I know I would. I wouldn't want to be around you, and I'd be extremely formal and business-only when talking to you. If a friend or family member did this I'd be extremely annoyed with them.

Yeah that's why reality TV and documentaries never work. People can't get over cameras? I mean does anyone remember the max exodus from the work force and down towns when recording became popular in private business and city government?

Re:bad idea (1)

Sperbels (1008585) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010319)

I'm just saying how I would react, not how everyone else would react.

Re:bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010205)

Takes a special kind of arrogance to think that someone recording things that interest them can't have access to YOU.

dodgy ground (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009771)

Wearing a recording device into homes and/or other buildings, or in work environments would be a huge privacy concern and legal nightmare.

Generally speaking, if you are recording people without their knowledge or permission then it will likely turn out bad at some point.

Personally, if someone in my family started wearing it all the time then it would annoy me and I would look to remove the problem (remove myself from the situation or tell them to leave it at the door).

The fog of memory is vital (5, Insightful)

holophrastic (221104) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009781)

...it's not a bad thing. It's not detrimental. The skill to forget is of extreme importance. You'll find that many serious psychological disorders stem from not being able to forget.

Consider modern-day home-security companies. "The comfort of knowing that you're safe." You'll find hundreds of companies offering you the ability to have cameras recording your front door, and being able to watch the video from your phone wherever you are.

Let's be very clear. "Feeling safe" doesn't mean that I get to watch my house all day every day. It means that I don't need to watch my house at all. I have no interest in viewing those cameras while I'm away.

As for your boy friend, and your future young goats, no one wanted to see your vacation slides last century. No one will want to watch your daily videos this century. It's that simple.

And, to be clear, no, I don't want you to record me.

Re:The fog of memory is vital (4, Insightful)

eldavojohn (898314) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009987)

You'll find that many serious psychological disorders stem from not being able to forget.

Okay. List them. "Serious psychological disorders"? Go ahead and list them out of the DSMIV or whatever you can find. I'd be curious because GMail and GChat have made my life a thousand times better with their impeccable recording and recall abilities. "Remember when I suggested The Naked and Famous to you like three years ago? Oh, you don't? That's funny, this e-mail says otherwise."

As for your boy friend, and your future young goats, no one wanted to see your vacation slides last century. No one will want to watch your daily videos this century. It's that simple.

That's where you're wrong or it's impossible to prove that no one will ever want to see it. I would absolutely love to see the world through my grandfather's eyes.

One time I went to a thrift store and they had random family effects. One of them was this ancient black leather flip book with about 50 black and white plate photographs in it and as I flipped through them I saw settlers on the plains. Standing next to Native Americans. Standing next to mud huts that they had cut with sod. Standing next to oxen tied to a manual plow. On and on they went. The thrift store had priced it at $54. I said, "When is this from?" and the guy shrugged. "What were the names of these people?" and the guy shrugged. I offered him $20 for it and he said the photos were worth more than a dollar a piece. So I carefully inspected it and left it. I thought about it for a week and stopped back in to actually shell out $54 and it was gone. I was kind of glad it was gone, I don't need more crap in my room ... but it was something unique and interesting to me.

I think that the History Channel would be a thousand times better if they just did a two hour special on what a laborer's life was like in Egypt or Babylon or Inca civilizations or any ancient world. They would have to edit it but I would find even the mundane things like how they prepared their meals to be interesting.

So, I think you're wrong. And I think that those handful of black and white photos have expanded to stacks of color photos and now long videos of family gatherings from VHS to CCD. Is it really that absurd to think that someday your offspring will wonder what life is like? Or 200 years from now any random person just curious about life was like in our time?

Yes, it is a bit narcissistic to select yourself and to think that your immediate friends and family want to sit through 24 hours of your boring life. Not necessarily true, however, if you consider it from a downstreamer's point of view. Ideally you would record your life and disallow access to it until you're dead.

Re:The fog of memory is vital (1)

Smauler (915644) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010299)

I think that the History Channel would be a thousand times better if they just did a two hour special on what a laborer's life was like in Egypt or Babylon or Inca civilizations or any ancient world. They would have to edit it but I would find even the mundane things like how they prepared their meals to be interesting.

Yup... good luck with that. No one knows what a laborer's life was like in Egypt or Babylon, and there is no way of knowing, either. We can find out what their diet was approximately, and some diseases they suffered from, but apart from that, we've got very little.

Many historical and prehistorical "factual" programs are guesswork. "Harder" sciences like biology are constantly changing - look at the definition of birds/mammals/reptiles, which I was taught at school. Now we have good evidence that birds are essentially dinosaurs, and crocodiles are more closely related to them than they are to other reptiles.

Without written records, we know almost nothing. Also, old written records never, ever record everyday things, because it was expensive to write and store stuff. For a good example of a very important civilization which shaped modern Europe that we know nothing about, look at the Etruscans [wikipedia.org] .

Re:The fog of memory is vital (3, Interesting)

lobiusmoop (305328) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010133)

Very much agree with this. Recently watched a program called The Boy Who Can't Forget [channel4.com] that looks at this. They interviewed Jill Price [wikipedia.org] who suffers from hyperthymesia; she talks about the trauma she suffers because of it (the pain of never being able to forget your mistakes particularly).

Saw something similar on Through The Wormhole (2)

arf_barf (639612) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009785)

A while back I saw an episode of Through The Wormhole that showcased just that. A professor and couple of students were recording snapshots of their lives for the last 3 years. Snapshots, because that's how our memory works and a picture is all we need to remember things and of course you would run into storage issues with 24/7 video recording...

Drones recording from Sky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009789)

If you saw the NOVA special Rise Of The Drones, you can see that it will likely be that everything on earth will be recorded from cameras in the sky in the future... so whatever legal issues are ironed out with that should apply to your personal version. You'll probably have to wait that long until the tech is convenient for you :)

Not as cool as you might think. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009793)

"The Entire History of You" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Mirror_%28TV_series%29

Relavant Movie Title (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009797)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Final_Cut_(2004_film)

My rule has always been "record nothing" (5, Interesting)

Anderson Council (1096781) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009805)

So maybe take it for what it's worth. I'm a bit of a tin-foil hat wearing type.

I understand exactly what you're thinking about here, but I'm a huge fan of not second-guessing the universe too much. I have such wonderful memories of my own youth...all seen through the rose coloured lens that is time, and frankly I suspect my memories are better than the real thing was. Better the only record I can muster is my own rose-tinted view of things. Every once in a while I remember the excessive dumb-assery that accompanied the great memories and shudder. I don't need a record of that.

Thus why I don't like recording anything to begin with. If it's worth remembering, you'll remember. If not, who cares. Nothing we do today will change the fact that in five billion years this planet will be a burnt cinder hurtling through cold space...yeah, that VHS recording of my first child's birth is really something to cherish. Actually, it's pretty freaking gross and pollutes the otherwise overwhelming emotion I can remember from that day. It's like I was there.

On the upside, I leave little evidence for others to use against me later ;). One person's way to remember the good times is another person's ammunition to strike at you with when you're down.

--
~AC

Be careful what you wish for (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009821)

A few years ago, I started keeping a very detailed journal. It wasn't long before I came to the conclusion that a perfect memory, or a near perfect memory is generally a bad idea. You begin to live in the past, you begin using the information in ways it shouldn't be used, as evidence, as weapons, as a way to obsess about events, mistakes, ways you were wronged... It keeps you from forgetting things that should be forgotten and keeps you from forgiving and moving on. Even the good memories can be used to take you to daek places. This is why I no longer keep a journal and I can only imagine a perfectly recorded life would be that much worse. Of course, everyone is different, that's just how I am and I just caution you to be careful what you wish for.

Exit Through The Gift Shop (1)

alancronin (1171375) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009827)

Thierry Guetta done this, it was later made into a film called 'Exit Through The Gift Shop': http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exit_Through_the_Gift_Shop [wikipedia.org] about him following Banksy.

Re:Exit Through The Gift Shop (1)

markjhood2003 (779923) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010047)

I loved that film. Quite a head trip at the end.

More to the point.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009829)

..how much less space would a recording of your life take up after deduplication?

Journal (3, Informative)

guantamanera (751262) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009833)

I been writting a journal since age 12, and all I been using is pen and paper. Going through the pages is faster than rewinding with a digital device. When you read through memorable moment many years later you will notice the the memories will flood back in, and even the smells of the moment will make it back. You don't even have to read the whole to thing you wrotem just a few snipets and your brain will fill in the blanks. Also written journals are more collectible than digital files, so if your family does not read it after you pass some stranger will.

In a limited way, we already are (0)

eksith (2776419) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009843)

Well... some of us are. I've got a Twitter account, I blog and regularly visit forums and all of that records some aspect of my life and mood at the time.

Of these, I think Twitter may be in a way a "life stream" if you will, with photos moments of joy, terror, embarrassment and intrigue are captured for us (and the rest of the world) to see. Fleeting memories can be condensed (or expounded to multiple Tweets) to snippets of insight into who we are. That's still pictures and text though, if you're recording video, well YouTube is already there for you and storage is getting cheaper.

Now the tricky bit, as you say, is privacy. You can decide what aspect of your life you want to share, but by that very act, you're sharing bits of other people's lives; those you interract with even in some small way. Privacy as it pertains to a TOS is by and large unenforcable IMO as all one needs is the means to access a private stream and it's out for the world to see. The bigger problem is what other people can do with that stream.

I feel the inhibitions to being recorded as part of someone else's "life stream" will decline as long as we trust the platform we use can't distort that recording. Else we'll need to counter with our own "life stream". Lying will become quite a bit harder and maybe some of us will lose an inner monologue, but overall, we'll still be us.

Take it from someone who partly does this... (1)

zuki (845560) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009853)

.. someone else will have to be listening to it all. (not you)

Leave it to nostalgia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009871)

Trust me, it won't be as nearly as interesting as you think it would.

If I had one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009877)

...ambivalent.

instant replay (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009879)

It would sure help with arguments with my wife

Re:instant replay (5, Insightful)

FoolishBluntman (880780) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009899)

It would sure help with arguments with my wife

Yes, you could win them all and be divorced in no time.

reminds me of cameras at sporting events (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009881)

Some people who go to sporting events (especially parents at kids games) or rock concerts seem more intent on recording the moment than they are enjoying or participating in the event itself. It almost seems they are more intent on collecting evidence on what great experience they just had, than actually having said experience.

Just enjoy life, snap a few pictures and save them, write stuff down in a diary (I guess they'd be online these days, or at least digital), remember personal anecdotes and practice retelling them to family and friends. Nobody wants a blow-by-blow account of how you spent the last 25 years. If they did, they're the kind of creepy people you wouldn't want around anyway.

Tons of ways (3, Insightful)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009889)

Even in the "old" days we did it with camcorders, cameras and cassette recorders. You get that all in phones, portable games consoles or a laptop now. I would use something like google glass though. You'll look stupid, it's in the cloud and can disappear at any time and google is an advertising company so you'll no doubt be tracked and monetized.

I fixed that for you (1)

Grashnak (1003791) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009901)

As I get older, I find the little details of my life slip away from my memory 15 minutes after something happens

Fixed that.

Black Mirror - An Entire History of You (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009905)

This kind of technology is considered in UK Channel 4's excellent series Black Mirror in an episode called An Entire History of You [wikipedia.org] . It looks at the ups, the downs, and the irritating social faux pas that will certainly emerge if we have such a technology. Highly recommended.

Memories of my child (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009913)

My daughter is 2 years old and I don't know how many hours of video there are documenting her life. What I find is when I go back to said videos, my actual memory of her as a newborn is replaced by a memory of what's on the video. Sometimes it's just better to remember the experience as it was.

I would like for a way for videos and and photos to be locked up for many years and only be accessible when the distant memory of her as a newborn is all but forgotten.

No; absolutely not (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009917)

Two reasons:

First, I like to remember my life the way I remember it - not from some video recording. It just seems cold and impersonal - nothing can capture what I was thinking and feeling at those moments.
Second, oh my God it would be boring. There is so much down time, so much wasted space, so much mundane. Have you ever heard someone singing with headphones on - live? Have you ever compared that to the final, fully produced version? I don't care how good a singer you are (and I know some very, very good singers) - there is no may it will measure up.

I don't think I would like it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009927)

For starters, recording every part of your life would be every bit of your life. Sure you could put off the recording device at some moments, but come on, at one point, you will forget to put it off in the toilet and then there is that great memory on tape. Never mind the many other embarasing things you do.

Nor do I think a little bit of fog in your memories is such a bad thing. Time heals all wounds, who of us doesn't have moments in time they rather forget? I don't think I would want to go through a bunch of bad memories to be sure that awesome memory was that awesome. If you played games or watch movies, ever returned to one you played or watched years ago, especially as a child? I have, and only few stood the test of time. Most of them turned out to be rather bad.

In my opinion, if I am getting recorded, I will act very, very differently. Nor would I go on any vacation with you if I know the whole thing is going to be recorded. Get a few pictures or a small clip of some nice bits, but don't record the whole thing. I probably wouldn't share many other moments with you out of fear something stupid happens. That stupid thing happening and later talking about it is fine, but having the whole thing on tape is a step further.

How about legal things other than privacy? Every bit you record is potentially evidence for something wrong you did. Imagine the record of a particular moment is needed for a criminal case one day, if they have the whole thing, they will be able to find many other illegal moments, for everybody does something illegal at one point in time, no doubt. Watching a downloaded movie? Downloading music? Hit a pole with your car? Fleeing from breaking something while on a drunk night? I am sure many people can relate to at least one of these and can think up plenty more moments that could have at least landed them a fine.

Let me end by saying, that once I read that democracy can only happen if not everybody is under constant surveilance, for everybody does something wrong. And if everything is seen, it means there can be selective enforcement of the law. Don't start on it on a small scale, don't give them a chance to start it on a big scale.

Personal experience (5, Insightful)

JeanCroix (99825) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009937)

My did got a VHS camcorder in the 1980s and spent a significant amount of time and money on tapes to record as much as he could of my and my sisters' significant life events - proms, sports, graduations, weddings, etc. To this day, those VHS tapes sit there decaying, never watched. It seems like everyone is too busy living their current lives and experiencing the present to have time to start delving into even the "important" moments of the past. Photos? Sure. Video? Hasn't happened yet. Maybe I'll be proven wrong some day.

Start now. (1)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009941)

As I get older, I find the little details of my life slip away from my memory after years and decades pass. I find myself wishing I had a way to record at least sound and video of my entire life. It would be nice to be able to go back and see what I was like when I was younger without the fog of memory clouding my view of the past. It would be cool to share with my boy friend and future kids how I was when I was younger

So are you talking about showing your kids this archive when they are older? Or are you talking about kids you've yet to have? I ask because if you are still young enough to have kids and are already forgetting so much you may want to seek professional help. Or are you more concerned with how getting older changes your perspective on things? If so, then you could simply do what people have done for hundreds of years (or longer), start keeping a journal. Or do a frequent video journal or something.

That being said, I'd like to do this too. That way I can replay what I said to my wife to finally prove to her that what she thinks she heard is not what I said. Or so I can know once an for all if I'm nuts and my memory has gotten even worse than I thought.

see "Final Cut" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009959)

starring Robing Williams.

skade88 writes "As I get older, ... (1)

ls671 (1122017) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009979)

skade88 writes "As I get older, ...

isn't it a little late to think about it at 88?

No sir, I don't like it (1)

egcagrac0 (1410377) | about a year and a half ago | (#43009983)

When I am old and decrepit, I would like to look back fondly through my revisionist memory and think of the good times - whether I had them or not.

As my grandmother once said, "Don't confuse me with facts - I know what the truth is."

Re:No sir, I don't like it (1)

vux984 (928602) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010091)

As my grandmother once said, "Don't confuse me with facts - I know what the truth is."

I think your Grandmother is setting the school curriculum too. Or at least someone who lives by her advice.

The Final Cut (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43009989)

I'm surprised that this has not been brought up yet....Robin Williams starred in it:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0364343/

It would be depressing. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010001)

Most people's lives are incredibly monotonous and boring. This would probably only help them realize the enormous waste they are making of their lives.

If you had everything in the world ... (1)

bugnuts (94678) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010009)

where would you keep it?

Documenting your entire life sounds interesting until you realize you could spend the entire REST OF YOUR LIFE reviewing it recursively.
To me, that sounds like a dumb proposition. Or perhaps incredibly egotistical. I might've been interested in a few interesting things my late mother did, but honestly, I prefer her description of it with her interpretation and memory. I wouldn't want to even see what happened, as that would ruin it.

However, some folks have set up webcams in their houses which could get recorded (I know of one that started nearly 10 years ago), and even Google glass is taking beta applications now for everyday life stuff. Just be aware of the privacy considerations.

Oh oh! And heres video from the time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010011)

... I had really bad constipation. Listen to me grunt and groan on the pot!

At least you can explain to your kids exactly why they should be getting enough fiber.

The world isn't ready yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010025)

I'd love to do this myself, if it weren't for the social backlash. I wouldn't share the stream, and in fact would never view most of it myself; it would act as a secondary memory, searchable on demand. I don't buy the 'forgetting is good' argument. To actually remember everything may be a problem, but that's not the point here; it's about gaining the ability to choose what to remember and what to forget, and that is incredibly powerful.

Stop living in the past (1)

gatkinso (15975) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010045)

St Peter will have all the recording you need...

Denial is at the core of such desires. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010049)

The denial of death is what I am referring to when I mention denial.

Most people who ever lived were quickly forgotten.

Most people who are alive today will also be quickly forgotten.

Recording everything won't change that.

Best to live NOW while you can and enjoy your life. It is the only life you will ever get.

Oh ,and Ray Kurzweil ? You're gonna die too, dipshit.

You want a Memoto (1)

intermelt (196274) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010053)

A device has been created for this. You are looking for the http://memoto.com/ [memoto.com]

It's been done (1)

BlindRobin (768267) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010059)

This is what diaries are for. Primitive I know but it's amazing how those little narratives jog the memory.

20 years of fast forward. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010067)

It would take a life time to watch again. It would take 2 lifetimes to find the interesting stuff you do remember and want to see again. It would take 4 lifetimes to review and edit out the 99% crap that you just will never care about (in your life time).

I just don't think anyone has the time for this.

Some things are best forgotten (1)

erroneus (253617) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010077)

One of the best things about growing up is being able to forget (or deny) what an idiot you were when you were younger. Surely, our mistakes make us what we are today, yet people persist in judging others by the mistakes which were made and not what someone may have become after having committed them. We too often presume a person *is* the mistakes of their past and that a person can never be more than he is today. What a pathetic way of seeing things... but then again, most people see things through their own eyes... the eyes of a person who lacks the ability to change, improve or to learn.

Experiencing Life and Being Ready for Death (5, Interesting)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010093)

When I travel, I almost never take pictures. This is probably an over-correction on my part, but I cannot get over the way so many spend so much time taking pictures that they never pay attention to where they are, to what they're doing. If too much effort is given to it, the need to record everything can overcome the very experiences one wishes to record. The best things cannot be captured in stills or in video, but even if one is there it may be missed if one neglects the world for the sake of a 1.5" LCD on the back of a camera.

For the one who wishes to record everything, I would wonder if he has fully considered why. I would be concerned that it derives from an unaddressed discomfort with mortality and this inhibits present unhappiness. The one who records everything is anxious about the future, lest he should then forget or be forgotten in it. When he reviews the past, he forgets the very moment he lives in. Either way, the present, the only thing we can really do anything about and the only moment in which we can find happiness, is neglected.

I can imagine a handsome young man who marries a beautiful girl. He is captivated by her and they take many pictures together. But as he gets older, their youthful beauty fades. The man looks continually at the pictures with a sense of loss, not having learned to love what he has in the moment he's in. The girl he married is in those pictures and has passed away long before either of them die.

We can never find happiness in this life unless we have peace. We can never find peace until we accept our mortality. And once we realize that we will die, and that no amount of recording will change that, then we may understand the importance of the moment we're in. When we've paid attention to the life we're in, however, we have some hope of being ready for death, for we may then know we've lived life for what it was worth.

Re:Experiencing Life and Being Ready for Death (1)

Ambassador Kosh (18352) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010167)

Or we could use modern technology and fix the whole dieing part. Given how good our neural interfaces are getting for things like artificial arms, legs etc it is pretty realistic that in another 10 years we will be able to make synthetic body parts better than human. The first step would be to take your brain out of your body and put it in a robot body. The next step would be to replace your brain cells with artificial counterparts. If you can get both of those done then death will be a far less serious issue to deal with.

I fully intend to make myself a robot and explore the universe. We are already machines, we are just poorly made chemical machines, it is time for an upgrade!

Re:Experiencing Life and Being Ready for Death (1)

Kittenman (971447) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010245)

I can imagine a handsome young man who marries a beautiful girl. He is captivated by her and they take many pictures together. But as he gets older, their youthful beauty fades. The man looks continually at the pictures with a sense of loss, not having learned to love what he has in the moment he's in. The girl he married is in those pictures and has passed away long before either of them die.

I was a handsome young man who married a beautiful girl twenty years ago, you insensitive clod!

Find someone else who wants the same... (1)

femtobyte (710429) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010101)

Marry someone, and spend the rest of your lives helping each other remember who you are and what you've done.

Fifty years from now, you'll be able to look back at everything you've done together --- and realize what a terrible idea that was in the first place, but at least now you have someone to commiserate with.

Looxcie, if you really want (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010117)

You could buy that Looxcie and record everything. But, as others have said, don't live in the past. Besides, the vast majority of a person's life is meaningless drivel. That's why I don't get the appeal of those Go Pro cameras, either. Just enjoy the experience!

Black Mirror S1E3 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010119)

Your wish could turn into a nightmare

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/black-mirror/4od#3327868

I would probably stop being your friend (1)

Ambassador Kosh (18352) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010131)

I know it sounds pretty harsh but I would find it uncomfortable to be around someone recording at all times. Over time I would find more and more reasons just not to come by and eventually would not see you at all anymore.

I don't really like the idea of being watched all the time and I don't like sharing personal information that I don't have to share. I don't do facebook, twitter, or any other social networks and being around someone that was recording constantly would just be way too invasive.

If my family did this I would probably only talk to them over the phone or email.

Tiny Travel Tracker (1)

Time_Ngler (564671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010165)

A shameless plug, but check out my android app: Tiny Travel Tracker http://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rareventure.gps2_trial&hl=en [google.com]

You can store your GPS path for your entire life in an encrypted database on your phone. I found it really useful for remembering things I'd otherwise have forgotten. "Oh yea, I went to *that* bar, now I remember"

Facebook? (1)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010179)

If you're not already recording your life events on Facebook, I'm sure your friends are having a pretty good go at doing it for you!

More throughts (1)

BlueCoder (223005) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010211)

The problem is that the law treats recording devices differently from your brain. Anything artificially recorded on a personal device is not sacrosanct and is subject to seizure. Who knows what will happen to privacy once machines can actually read everything in your head. And then you have "augments" that will incorporate incorporate electronic and biological enhancements to their brain. If you have a flash chip in your head the data will likely be seizable.

Taking all that even further it may become practical to rewrite memories in a brain or even bypass them to rely only on artificial memory mechanisms. Governments will then be able to outlaw thinking. Imaging being forced to sit in a chair to have your memories reviewed and if they don't like them changed. A country like Iran or North Korea would love that.

It will undermine your powers of self-delusion, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010247)

and they are essential to your ability to find meaning in your otherwise arbitrary existence.

Unless you are going to fit the camera with a rose coloured filter?

My gods, how boring (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010277)

Seriously, how boring would that be?

One of the neat things about memories is that we tend to forget the moment to moment mundanities while retaining the extraordinary bits. Yeah, so we might have to reconstruct a bit and things may not come back the same, but that's what photographs and letters and the occasional home movie is for... However, look how bloody boring all those hour upon hour of sitting at work answering customer cases or pounding out code would be.

hell, most people I know don't ever watch their wedding video after they see it once - they might look back at some of the wedding photos for years, but nobody watches the video more than once or twice.

I'm just thinking how boring it would be watching a replay of watching myself watch a previous life event.... Seriously, we're not all that "most interesting man in the world", and the sooner we realize that the sooner we can stop bothering our friends and family with endless home videos and LifeBitz or whatever.

Feh.

Don't worry... (1)

FridayBob (619244) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010279)

... as you continue to grow older you will eventually reach a point at which your distant past will once again become crystal clear -- like it was just yesterday!

Only if it were magic (1)

davidwr (791652) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010283)

What I would like is a "photographic memory" (with all the other senses too!) and a magic device that upon my death, would record all of my memories and have those memories stores, un-viewed, until everyone alive when I die and their children and grandchildren had been dead for several hundred years.

Imagine the fun historians could have a millennium from now if they had access to 7 billion people's perfectly-recorded memories.

Re:Only if it were magic (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010403)

What I would like is a "photographic memory" (with all the other senses too!) and a magic device that upon my death, would record all of my memories and have those memories stores, un-viewed, until everyone alive when I die and their children and grandchildren had been dead for several hundred years.

Imagine the fun historians could have a millennium from now if they had access to 7 billion people's perfectly-recorded memories.

They analyze the data and say "Why does a society that has developed so many comfortable chairs do most of their reading while sitting on the toilet?"

Probably should not do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010313)

A memory which forgets is a blessing. As we get older we tend to look back on our past selves and realize just has stupid and embarrassing we were. Forgetting details of your past is a good thing, don't try to replace that natural process with technology. Take pictures of a few special moments, snap a few vacation shots, photograph your wedding or your children. Those are nice milestones, but don't record the tiny details, they aren't important and this process will only distract you from living your life.

Plus, chances are none of your family or friends will want to be around you if you're recording all the time. It's seriously annoying and a privacy violation.

Use a song instead... (1)

file_reaper (1290016) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010323)

This is anecdotal, but I usually associate memories with songs... So every year, I try to find a good song I like, and just attach memories with it, and put that song away in an album and not listen to it for a couple of years. Just play that album again later and the memories come flooding back. I find it to be quite nice.

Keep a journal (1)

jtownatpunk.net (245670) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010325)

I have a friend who's kept a journal for longer than I've been alive (well, maybe not quite that long but still a long time) and it can be very interesting hearing his take on events from the before time, uncolored by 20+ years of failing neurons.

A 24/7 video record is pretty pointless. The purpose of recording the events of your life is to record the interesting events of your life, not sitting on the pot for 20 minutes trying to squeeze out a grunter.

Good Grief! (1)

sillivalley (411349) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010361)

"If you give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest of men, I will find something in them which will hang him." -- Cardinal RIchelieu

So how long would it take going through those recordings to find something...

But don't worry, our technological society is evolving to that point asymptotically -- you probably already carry a tracking device in your pocket that also can be used to make phone calls; if you drive a recently manufactured car it has a rat box in it that your insurance company can use to try to avoid any liability, and there are proposals for future model years to make that rat box collect even more information. Sound and pictures will get there eventually.

Where's the percentage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010365)

Why would I want to document my alleged "crimes" for the corporate police state?

You crazy?

Are you joking? (2)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43010375)

Wow! I have few enough seconds waiting for me in the future without wasting them reviewing my past. Frankly, I'm going to enjoy the moments I have waiting for me, not the dusty days gone by.

Focus on the now. Forget the past - it's gone and there's nothing you can do to actually relive it; don't worry about the future - it will be here in a minute, anyway.

I'd have a 16 hour buffer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43010389)

..you wake up, you put on Google glass, you turn on record. You record 16 hours of FHD video, then you go to bed and when you take it off you find your day's highlights, or maybe you indicated them when they happened. "Cortana, bookmark this moment". Then those moments are saved and the rest of those 16 hours are erased, and you go to bed. Then after a few years, you have a few weeks of solid video that's just everything that happened that you didn't see coming but never want to forget. I'm down. As long as that info is stored on MY hard drives and not up in someone else's cloud.

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