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V&A Scraps Napalm Death Gig For Fear Decibel Levels Will Damage Sculptures

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the slaves-to-the-grind dept.

Music 79

An anonymous reader writes "The Victoria and Albert Museum has cancelled an 'experimental' concert by a death metal rock band amid fears that the high decibel levels could destroy some of its most treasured artefacts, including Ming vases and priceless sculptures. The British band planned to play inside a specially-constructed ceramic sculpture with the idea that the piece would explode under the force of hits such as Order of the Leech and Fear, Emptiness, Despair" I believe this "death metal rock" is known as "grindcore." Maybe they should book Manowar next.

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Fuck yeah! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225141)

Smash the art smash the art!!!

WWHOOOOOO!!!

Re:Fuck yeah! (1)

Gordonjcp (186804) | about a year ago | (#43225333)

Smash the art smash the art!!!

They did, by cancelling the gig in which they smash the art. By doing so they can deconstruct the event of smashing the purpose-built sculpture.

It's pretty clever stuff.

Maybe the band should have been... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225167)

Disaster Area - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disaster_Area_%28fictional_band%29#Hotblack_Desiato

Re:Maybe the band should have been... (2)

F34nor (321515) | about a year and a half ago | (#43231099)

Chapter Twenty-one
Down on the dry, red world of Kakrafoon, in the middle of the vast Rudlit Desert, the stage technicians were testing the sound system.

That is to say, the sound system was in the desert, not the stage technicians. They had retreated to the safety of Disaster Area's giant control ship which hung in orbit some four hundred miles above the surface of the planet, and they were testing the sound system from there. Anyone within five miles of the speaker silos wouldn't have survived the tuning up.

If Arthur Dent had been within five miles of the speaker silos then his expiring thought would have been that in both size and shape the sound rig closely resembled Manhattan. Risen out of the silos, the neutron phase speaker stacks towered monstrously against the sky, obscuring the banks of plutonium reactors and seismic amps behind them.

Buried deep in concrete bunkers beneath the city of speakers lay the instruments that the musicians would control from their ship, the massive photon-ajuitar, the bass detonator and the Megabang drum complex.

It was going to be a noisy show.

Aboard the giant control ship, all was activity and bustle. Hotblack Desiato's limoship, a mere tadpole beside it, had arrived and docked, and the lamented gentleman was being transported down the high vaulted corridors to meet the medium who was going to interpret his psychic impulses on to the ajuitar keyboard.

A doctor, a logician and a marine biologist had also just arrived, flown in at phenomenal expense from Maximegalon to try to reason with the lead singer who had locked himself in the bathroom with a bottle of pills and was refusing to come out till it could be proved conclusively to him that he wasn't a fish. The bass player was busy machine-gunning his bedroom and the drummer was nowhere on board.

Frantic inquiries led to the discovery that he was standing on a beach on Santraginus V over a hundred light years away where, he claimed, he had been happy over half an hour now and had found a small stone that would be his friend.

The band's manager was profoundly relieved. It meant that for the seventeenth time on this tour the drums would be played by a robot and that therefore the timing of the cymbalistics would be right.

The sub-ether was buzzing with the communications of the stage technicians testing the speaker channels, and this it was that was being relayed to the interior of the black ship.

Its dazed occupants lay against the back wall of the cabin, and listened to the voices on the monitor speakers.

``OK, channel nine on power,'' said a voice, ``testing channel fifteen ...''

Another thumping crack of noise walloped through the ship.

``Channel fifteen AOK,'' said another voice.

A third voice cut in.

``The black stunt ship is now in position,'' it said, ``it's looking good. Gonna be a great sundive. Stage computer on line?''

A computer voice answered.

``On line,'' it said.

``Take control of the black ship.''

``Black ship locked into trajectory programme, on standby.''

``Testing channel twenty.''

Zaphod leaped across the cabin and switched frequencies on the sub-ether receiver before the next mind-pulverizing noise hit them. He stood there quivering.

``What,'' said Trillian in a small quiet voice, ``does sundive mean?''

``It means,'' said Marvin, ``that the ship os going to dive into the sun. Sun ... Dive. It's very simple to understand. What do you expect if you steal Hotblack Desiato's stunt ship?''

``How do you know ...'' said Zaphod in a voice that would make a Vegan snow lizard feel chilly, ``that this is Hotblack Desiato's stuntship?''

``Simple,'' said Marvin, ``I parked it for him.''

``The why ... didn't ... you ... tell us!''

``You said you wanted excitement and adventure and really wild things.''

``This is awful,'' said Arthur unnecessarily in the pause which followed.

``That's what I said,'' confirmed Marvin.

On a different frequency, the sub-ether receiver had picked up a public broadcast, which now echoed round the cabin.

``... fine weather for the concert here this afternoon. I'm standing here in front of the stage,'' the reporter lied, ``in the middle of the Rudlit Desert, and with the aid of hyperbinoptic glasses I can just about make out the huge audience cowering there on the horizon all around me. Behind me the speaker stacks rise like a sheer cliff face, and high above me the sun is shining away and doesn't know what's going to hit it. The environmentalist lobby do know what's going to hit it, and they claim that the concert will cause earthquakes, tidal waves, hurricanes, irreparable damage to the atmosphere, and all the usual things that environmentalists usually go on about.

``But I've just had a report that a representative of Disaster Area met with the environmentalists at lunchtime, and had them all shot, so nothing now lies in the way of ...''

Zaphod switched it off. He turned to Ford.

``You know what I'm thinking?'' he said.

``I think so,'' said Ford.

``Tell me what you think I'm thinking.''

``I think you're thinking it's time we get off this ship.''

``I think you're right,'' said Zaphod.

``I think you're right,'' said Ford.

``How?'' said Arthur.

``Quiet,'' said Ford and Zaphod, ``we're thinking.''

``So this is it,'' said Arthur, ``we're going to die.''

``I wish you'd stop saying that,'' said Ford.

It is worth repeating at this point the theories that Ford had come up with, on his first encounter with human beings, to account for their peculiar habit of continually stating and restating the very very obvious, as it 'It's a nice day,`` or ''You're very tall,`` or ''So this is it, we're going to die.``

His first theory was that if human beings didn't keep exercising their lips, their mouths probably seized up.

After a few months of observation he had come up with a second theory, which was this --- ``If human beings don't keep exercising their lips, their brains start working.''

In fact, this second theory is more literally true of the Belcebron people of Kakrafoon.

The Belcebron people used to cause great resentment and insecurity amongst neighboring races by being one of the most enlightened, accomplished, and above all quiet civilizations in the Galaxy.

As a punishment for this behaviour, which was held to be offensively self righteous and provocative, a Galactic Tribunal inflicted on them that most cruel of all social diseases, telepathy. Consequently, in order to prevent themselves broadcasting every slightest thought that crossed their minds to anyone within a five mile radius, they now have to talk very loudly and continuously about the weather, their little aches and pains, the match this afternoon and what a noisy place Kakrafoon had suddenly become.

Another method of temporarily blotting out their minds is to play host to a Disaster Area concert.

The timing of the concert was critical.

The ship had to begin its dive before the concert began in order to hit the sun six minutes and thirty-seven seconds before the climax of the song to which it related, so that the light of the solar flares had time to travel out to Kakrafoon.

The ship had already been diving for several minutes by the time that Ford Prefect had completed his search of the other compartments of the black ship. He burst back into the cabin.

The sun of Kakrafoon loomed terrifyingly large on the vision screen, its blazing white inferno of fusing hydrogen nuclei growing moment by moment as the ship plunged onwards, unheeding the thumping and banging of Zaphod's hands on the control panel. Arthur and Trillian had the fixed expressions of rabbits on a night road who think that the best way of dealing with approaching headlights is to stare them out.

Zaphod span round, wild-eyed.

``Ford,'' he said, ``how many escape capsules are there?''

``None,'' said Ford.

Zaphod gibbered.

``Did you count them?'' he yelled.

``Twice,'' said Ford, ``did you manage to raise the stage crew on the radio?''

``Yeah,'' said Zaphod, bitterly, ``I said there were a whole bunch of people on board, and they said to say `hi' to everybody.''

Ford goggled.

``Didn't you tell them who we were?''

``Oh yeah. They said it was a great honour. That and something about a restaurant bill and my executors.''

Ford pushed Arthur aside and leaned forward over the control console.

``Does none of this function?'' he said savagely.

``All overridden.''

``Smash the autopilot.''

``Find it first. Nothing connects.''

There was a moment's cold silence.

Arthur was stumbling round the back of the cabin. He stopped suddenly.

``Incidentally,'' he said, ``what does teleport mean?''

Another moment passed.

Slowly, the others turned to face him.

``Probably the wrong moment to ask,'' said Arthur, ``It's just I remember hearing you use the word a short while ago and I only bring it up because ...''

``Where,'' said Ford Prefect quietly, ``does it say teleport?''

``Well, just over here in fact,'' said Arthur, pointing at a dark control box in the rear of the cabin, ``Just under the word `emergency', above the word `system' and beside the sign saying `out of order'.''

In the pandemonium that instantly followed, the only action to follow was that of Ford Prefect lunging across the cabin to the small black box that Arthur had indicated and stabbing repeatedly at the single small black button set into it.

A six-foot square panel slid open beside it revealing a compartment which resembled a multiple shower unit that had found a new function in life as an electrician's junk store. Half-finished wiring hung from the ceiling, a jumble of abandoned components lay strewn on the floor, and the programming panel lolled out of the cavity in the wall into which it should have been secured.

A junior Disaster Area accountant, visiting the shipyard where this ship was being constructed, had demanded to know of the works foreman why the hell they were fitting an extremely expensive teleport into a ship which only had one important journey to make, and that unmanned. The foreman had explained that the teleport was available at a ten per cent discount and the accountant had explained that this was immaterial; the foreman had explained that it was the finest, most powerful and sophisticated teleport that money could buy and the accountant had explained that the money did not wish to buy it; the foreman had explained that people would still need to enter and leave the ship and the accountant had explained that the ship sported a perfectly serviceable door; the foreman had explained that the accountant could go and boil his head and the accountant had explained to the foreman that the thing approaching him rapidly from his left was a knuckle sandwich. After the explanations had been concluded, work was discontinued on the teleport which subsequently passed unnoticed on the invoice as ``Sund. explns.'' at five times the price.

``Hell's donkeys,'' muttered Zaphod as he and Ford attempted to sort through the tangle of wiring.

After a moment or so Ford told him to stand back. He tossed a coin into the teleport and jiggled a switch on the lolling control panel. With a crackle and spit of light, the coin vanished.

``That much of it works,'' said Ford, ``however, there is no guidance system. A matter transference teleport without guidance programming could put you ... well, anywhere.''

The sun of Kakrafoon loomed huge on the screen.

``Who cares,'' said Zaphod, ``we go where we go.''

``And,'' said Ford, ``there is no autosystem. We couldn't all go. Someone would have to stay and operate it.''

A solemn moment shuffled past. The sun loomed larger and larger.

``Hey, Marvin kid,'' said Zaphod brightly, ``how you doing?''

``Very badly I suspect,'' muttered Marvin.

A shortish while later, the concert on Kakrafoon reached an unexpected climax.

The black ship with its single morose occupant had plunged on schedule into the nuclear furnace of the sun. Massive solar flares licked out from it millions of miles into space, thrilling and in a few cases spilling the dozen or so Flare Riders who had been coasting close to the surface of the sun in anticipation of the moment.

Moments before the flare light reached Kakrafoon the pounding desert cracked along a deep faultline. A huge and hitherto undetected underground river lying far beneath the surface gushed to the surface to be followed seconds later by the eruption of millions of tons of boiling lava that flowed hundreds of feet into the air, instantaneously vaporizing the river both above and below the surface in an explosion that echoed to the far side of the world and back again.

Those --- very few --- who witnessed the event and survived swear that the whole hundred thousand square miles of the desert rose into the air like a mile-thick pancake, flipped itself over and fell back down. At that precise moment the solar radiation from the flares filtered through the clouds of vaporized water and struck the ground.

A year later, the hundred thousand square mile desert was thick with flowers. The structure of the atmosphere around the planet was subtly altered. The sun blazed less harshly in the summer, the cold bit less bitterly in the winter, pleasant rain fell more often, and slowly the desert world of Kakrafoon became a paradise. Even the telepathic power with which the people of Kakrafoon had been cursed was permanently dispersed by the force of the explosion.

A spokesman for Disaster Area --- the one who had had all the environmentalists shot --- was later quoted as saying that it had been ``a good gig''.

Many people spoke movingly of the healing powers of music. A few sceptical scientists examined the records of the events more closely, and claimed that they had discovered faint vestiges of a vast artificially induced Improbability Field drifting in from a nearby region of space.

Re:Maybe the band should have been... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43232649)

YAY! You've read a book! Thanks for letting us know.

What was the name of that band again? (2)

mcgrew (92797) | about a year ago | (#43225201)

The Who? Pink Floyd? Disaster Area????

Re:What was the name of that band again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225269)

Disaster Area can smash art from miles away. This is weaksauce compared to them.

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

fermion (181285) | about a year ago | (#43225341)

A bar next door to me used to play extremely loud country music by incompetent musicians right up until the curfew cut in.

Diasater Area would have been preferential. Fortunately out city put in an ordinance not based on the sound level, which the bar was always under, but on how the sound effected objects in nearby areas. If vibration can be felt at another property, violations can be issued.

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#43225707)

Let me guess: The bar war there before you moved in?

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#43225759)

Duh. The bar was there before you moved in?

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225977)

Pfft that's nothing. Here in Vancouver BC, people complain about noise from people partying at the beach across from their apartments. Damn city, how dare they put a natural beach across from a residential building!

Re:What was the name of that band again? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43226093)

Loud cunts aren't really a part of the "natural beach."

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#43227449)

Actually they are.

Normal people make noise when they are having fun on the beach.

Assholes move into someplace and immediately demand it be changed to suit them. They also often think they own a beach just because they own the land above the high tide line.

Re:What was the name of that band again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43229539)

Neither do apartment buildings. What's your point?

Re:What was the name of that band again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225755)

Not only were they bad, the sound made objects pop into existence? Wow. Bad country is bad, but I had no idea...

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#43226031)

When you say 'vibration can be felt' do you mean 'detected by human senses' or 'detectable'? A busybody with a good optical interferometer could have a field day with the latter interpretation...

Re:What was the name of that band again? (2)

skids (119237) | about a year ago | (#43226609)

I remember seeing "The Zombies" perform a reunion show in an old arts theater surrounded by an audience that looked for all getout like a milquetoast PTA meeting.

They decided to perform a few Argent numbers. Until the plaster started falling on them.

With today's sound systems you don't need to be Deathklok to damage some of these old buildings.

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

Tapewolf (1639955) | about a year ago | (#43227017)

In the late 60s, my parents saw some of the first performances of 'Hair' in the West End, at blistering volume. This eventually caused the theatre to collapse, around 1973 according to Wikipedia, and it's citation is here: http://www.thisistheatre.com/londontheatre/shaftesburytheatre.html [thisistheatre.com]

Re:What was the name of that band again? (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43228497)

I remember seeing a brass band play in the local church, in about 2000. Flakes of plaster fell from the roof. The church is between 200-1000 years old (Wikipedia is very unclear on this point), so I'm not surprised the V&A is concerned. I wonder why they booked the band in the first place.

I saw Laibach [youtube.com] play in the Turbine Hall in the Tate Modern last year. That was a fantastic gig, in what felt like a very appropriate location. The volume didn't matter, I'm sure the building (ex-power station) could withstand it, but the atmosphere was very different to a 'normal' concert though -- no support acts, a *huge* room, lots of Tate sensible people. Napalm Death at the V&A could also have been very strange.

You Suffer (1)

rodrigoandrade (713371) | about a year ago | (#43225247)

Maybe they should just play You Suffer (the shortest song ever recorded at 1.316 seconds long) to see if the structure will hold.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_Suffer [wikipedia.org]

Re:You Suffer (1)

tippe (1136385) | about a year ago | (#43225631)

That's very fascinating! I wonder if you could use "You Suffer" (which is sufficiently short it can almost be considered an "impulse") to determine the impulse response of the sculpture, and somehow using the outcome of that to determine which other Napalm Death song is most likely to cause the structure to fail.

Re:You Suffer (1)

worf_mo (193770) | about a year and a half ago | (#43234539)

And there I always thought SOD's [wikipedia.org] Diamonds and Rust [youtube.com] was concise. The extended version clocks in at 5 seconds, with the actual song taking up the first 3, the rest is silence.

Not hardly... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225249)

Napalm Death is most certain not grindcore. The death metal appelation is correct.

Re:Not hardly... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225283)

Not only that, they've been around for over 30 years now - not exactly the "new thing all the kids are into these day." Summary obviously written by someone's grandfather.

Best sound balance (5, Funny)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | about a year ago | (#43225251)

Regular concert goers judge that the best sound balance is usually to be heard from within large concrete bunkers some thirty-seven miles away from the stage, whilst the musicians themselves play their instruments by remote control from within a heavily insulated spaceship which stays in orbit around the planet - or more frequently around a completely different planet.

Great User Interface, though! (3, Funny)

billstewart (78916) | about a year ago | (#43225525)

Every time you try to operate one of these weird black controls, which are labeled in black on a black background, a small black light lights up black to let you know you've done it.

Re:Great User Interface, though! (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about a year ago | (#43226411)

You know - I'd always assumed that the unwritten reasoning there was that the color spectrum was just outside the range of human perception. Not that it was just so silly that everything about the band was black.

Re:Great User Interface, though! (1)

Derek Pomery (2028) | about a year and a half ago | (#43230651)

Unwritten?
===========
``Perhaps whoever designed it had eyes that responded to different wavelengths,'' offered Trillian.

``Or didn't have much imagination,'' muttered Arthur.

``Perhaps,'' said Marvin, ``he was feeling very depressed.''

In fact, though they weren't to know it, the decor had been chosen in honour of its owner's sad, lamented, and tax-deductible
condition.
===========

Re:Great User Interface, though! (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about a year and a half ago | (#43233865)

Erm... wow. Some selective memory on my part!

Re:Great User Interface, though! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43254393)

You know, there are other themes for the GNOME 3 desktop.

Re:Best sound balance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225773)

Now you have the next episode of Deathlok.

Re:Best sound balance (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#43226361)

If you put your towel in your years, you'll be able to survive 0.45321 second longer than everyone around you.

Re:Best sound balance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43228465)

How does one place a physical object inside a temporal one?

Re:Best sound balance (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | about a year and a half ago | (#43233255)

Very carefully as to not collapse the wave function that is the universe.

Re:Best sound balance (1)

uvajed_ekil (914487) | about a year and a half ago | (#43230661)

Regular concert goers judge that the best sound balance is usually to be heard from within large concrete bunkers some thirty-seven miles away from the stage, whilst the musicians themselves play their instruments by remote control from within a heavily insulated spaceship which stays in orbit around the planet - or more frequently around a completely different planet.

As a regular concert goer of a couple of decades now, I feel I am qualified to throw in my two cents. I can say that music sounds best on a blistering hot summer day, in the middle of a field, in Tennessee, with a healthy helping of booze, a mean case of swampass, and about 80,000 close friends. Not what you were looking for, but that's what I like. Screw museums, anyway. They're for winter time, and nerds.

Re:Best sound balance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43233687)

Screw museums, anyway. They're for winter time, and nerds.

Yeah, you won't find any nerds hanging out on this site.

Re:Best sound balance (1)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | about a year and a half ago | (#43233811)

Tennessee? I don't know. Sounds like an ominously high risk of the concert being for a country band.

Oh lord. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225267)

I believe this "death metal rock" is known as "grindcore."

This is how I know I'm old.

I believe no True Headbanging Scotsman would ever use the ridiculous term, "grindcore".

Real reason for cancellation (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225281)

The planned ceramic sculpture was was only built to 18cm scale instead of the agreed upon 18 meters.

Re:Real reason for cancellation (1)

lemur3 (997863) | about a year ago | (#43225365)

LOL..

it took a while for that one to sink in.

great work anonymous coward.

Re:Real reason for cancellation (1)

arnodf (1310501) | about a year ago | (#43225501)

modpoints!

Re:Real reason for cancellation (2)

tippe (1136385) | about a year ago | (#43225653)

Proof, if I've ever seen it, that the metric system just doesn't work.

Re:Real reason for cancellation (1)

dr_dank (472072) | about a year ago | (#43225931)

I heard it was a puppet show scheduling conflict.

skins? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225305)

Isn't Napalm Death a band from the t.v. show "Skins"?

grindcore (1)

dismorphic (730041) | about a year ago | (#43225447)

I'd pay good money to see that \m/ Grindcore FTW.

GWAR... (1)

x0 (32926) | about a year ago | (#43225531)

Invite GWAR. They can be the sculpture *and* the band.

Grindcore? (1)

Sigvatr (1207234) | about a year ago | (#43225911)

If I had any emotions left over after my daily Lexapro doping I would be outraged that the OP has no idea what grindcore is, you uncultured... guy. Whatever.

Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Death (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43225945)

Fellas,

Grindcore is a term for the hybrid between death metal and extreme punk hardcore. It grew out of the crust scene (Amebix, Discharge) and the thrash scene (Cryptic Slaughter, DRI, COC, MDC) of the early 1980s.

Coming just a few years later, it used punk style tunes with metal riffs and the "Motorhead-influenced" gravel voice noisy vocals.

All members of Napalm Death had previous experience in crust punk bands, and were tight with other crust punkers like Extreme Noise Terror, whose sound is very similar to Napalm Death's.

In their later years, 1991 and on, Napalm Death took on more influences from death metal bands. However, it is a mistake to consider them death metal, because in spirit and outlook, they're very much punk and choose to keep themselves separate from the metal community.

Read the motherfarkin' heavy metal FAQ:

http://www.deathmetal.org/faq [deathmetal.org]

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43226719)

OP is a fag

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (2)

cide1 (126814) | about a year ago | (#43227475)

I always know when I'm listening to the wrong music, cause it has a "scene".....this works with music, cars, and just about anywhere else the word "scene" is used to indicate hip.

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43227743)

Go back to your lazy-boy grandad, before you break your "scene".

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43228641)

I always know when I'm listening to the wrong music, cause it has a "scene".....this works with music, cars, and just about anywhere else the word "scene" is used to indicate hip.

"Scene" essentially means "fans" or "hobbyists". You may as well apply the term to football, fishing, film or philately. Or anything else more than one person has an interest in.

(Can you give an example of music without a scene? One of my colleagues likes going to see operas, but he obviously has other friends who do the same, and they swap recommendations and go to concerts together. That's a 'scene'.)

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (1)

uvajed_ekil (914487) | about a year and a half ago | (#43230921)

(Can you give an example of music without a scene? One of my colleagues likes going to see operas, but he obviously has other friends who do the same, and they swap recommendations and go to concerts together. That's a 'scene'.)

Hmm, maybe hobo music? I suppose there may still be a hobo scene, unless no one rides boxcars anymore due to the litigious nature of contemporary society. Any other type of music has its own scene, if said music currently exists.
Real country doesn't have much of a scene anymore. It has been supplanted by country-pop wannabe cowboys who seem to be contractually obligated to include one song about a tractor on every album, regardless of whether they have ever lived or worked on a farm.

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (1)

uvajed_ekil (914487) | about a year and a half ago | (#43230729)

So if your music really has no scene of its own, it must be one of two things: swing music, since the fad revival it enjoyed briefly 10-15 years ago has mercifully ended and no one listens to it again, or harpsichord music, which has been dead for a long time, thankfully. You must be too underground and cool for anything else. Or perhaps you just don't do music?

Even opera has a definite "scene," though I have never been exposed to it, which is okay.

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43228561)

It grew out of the crust scene

I'm not sure if it's from a film, but round here whenever someone names a new music genre, we finish our drinks.

("Have you heard of Refrigerated Gore Goblin? They're a new transient math-art glitch dub-rap acidcore psy-d-m jazz group, they played in Dalston last weekend.")

Re:Grindcore: yes, it exists, and fits Napalm Deat (0)

uvajed_ekil (914487) | about a year and a half ago | (#43230687)

Fellas,

Grindcore is a term for the hybrid between death metal and extreme punk hardcore.

Yes! But grindcore is easily differentiated from both death metal and hardcore punk in that to play grindcore you neither need to understand more than one tempo, nor know how to play your instruments nor give a fuck. True death metal practitioners practice incessantly to perfect their craft, odd as it may be, and hardcore musicisans, while generally not giving a fuck, do (somewhat ironically) conform to a particular sound and style. Grindcore is, well, more like noise created by non-musicians who think simply holding a guitar, drumsticks, or a microphone automatically makes one a musician. To each his own I say, but grindcore just sucks.

Grindcore? (1)

Jawnn (445279) | about a year ago | (#43226043)

So..., that's another word for "aimed at adolescent males", then?

Re:Grindcore? (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43228841)

So..., that's another word for "aimed at adolescent males", then?

I think they're into something else by now. Grindcore is perhaps a decade too old for that.

I don't know what that 'something else' is. Brostep? [youtube.com] (The video at least features a couple of 12 year olds, but I'm pleased the videos churned out in my adolescence didn't include violently holding up a man to get ice cream.)

Why Napalm Death? (1)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year ago | (#43226117)

Why Napalm Death? There are a lot better deathmetal bands out there. There are even a lot louder bands. I've been to thousands of concerts, and I can tell you that... BY FAR... the loudest live band on earth is MotorHead. I've seen them several times and still had ringing in my ears despite earplugs. Metallica would be a distant 2nd, but they suck total ass now so forget them. If I had to pick, I would have went with Vader. They're still touring, still very good... and aren't just some dudes that took over the band name like Napalm Death is.

Re:Why Napalm Death? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43226741)

Isn't Lemmy using a walker now? Maybe if Napalm Death could get Lee Dorrian back.

Re:Why Napalm Death? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43226747)

I believe Manowar still holds the record for loudest band.

Re:Why Napalm Death? (1)

hondo77 (324058) | about a year ago | (#43227169)

Yeah, Motörhead is the only band I had to put stuff in my ears for during a show. However, they already did the damaging a building thing in Cleveland back in 1984 [google.com] (the very tour where my ears needed the aforementioned protection).

Re:Why Napalm Death? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43227559)

1. Second on Motorhead. In 15+ years of metal shows, they are the loudest band I've ever seen, by far... and it was an outdoor show.

2. How long does a band have to continue with the same lineup before "just some dudes that took over the band name" no longer applies? They're going on about 20 years now with the same lineup, aren't they?

If they want to be really experimental (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43226577)

Maybe they should play their death metal / grindcore at low volume. They could be the quietest metal band on earth.

Why rock? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43226581)

>death metal rock band
Why do americans put the metal genre under the "rock" tag? IMO metal is so vast that it should be considered a separate genre. Not a subgenre of rock.

Not all of us do. (1)

hessian (467078) | about a year ago | (#43228239)

Why do americans put the metal genre under the "rock" tag?

Not all of us do, and in fact, I'm very glad to meet someone else who agrees with me that this is an important distinction.

Metal is its own genre, composed by its own standards. It emerged from rock (specifically, prog rock, soundtracks to horror films, loud hard rock and early punk combined) but it is not rock.

If you're up for some analytical historical data, would you read The Heavy Metal F.A.Q. [deathmetal.org] ?

Er, what? (1)

Necron69 (35644) | about a year ago | (#43226967)

I hereby nominate this post for Slashdot's Most Obfuscated Post Title of the year.

Seriously, the title gives absolutely no clue what the article is about. Not everyone lives in your town, goes to your museum, or listens to your death metal.

Necron69

Re:Er, what? (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43229145)

I hereby nominate this post for Slashdot's Most Obfuscated Post Title of the year.

Seriously, the title gives absolutely no clue what the article is about. Not everyone lives in your town, goes to your museum, or listens to your death metal.

Agreed -- The linked article is also from a newspaper only published in London.

The "V&A" (Victoria and Albert Museum) is the least well-known of the three (excellent) free museums on Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London. Most tourists who visit London have probably walked past it on their way to see the dinosaurs (at the Natural History Museum) or see the steam engines / cars / computers (at the Science Museum), but only about half go inside the V&A. It has by far the least appeal for children: art, sculpture, design and fashion -- which probably explains it.

(So, to advertise my city: although accommodation isn't cheap, most of the best (and largest) museums and galleries in London are free to visit. You can see what we stole from the rest of the world in the British Museum, the people who did it in the National Portrait Gallery, the art they liked in the National Gallery, the art they didn't like in the Tate Modern, the boats they used in the National Maritime Museum, the science and industry they invested in in the Science Museum, the clothes they wore in the V&A, the animals they liked to collect in the Natural History Museum, and the things they killed other people with in the Imperial War Museum. However, since it rains nowhere near as much as popular perception abroad suggests, you probably wouldn't want to spend all your time in museums.)

Napalm Death! (1)

router (28432) | about a year ago | (#43227027)

I saw them in 91, it was my first death metal show. I think I wore that shirt for the whole first week of high school that year. Awesome....

andy

More Appropriate Bands (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43227325)

Bolt Thrower or Cathedral. Both are English, both are still active, and both would have performed in sculptures much sturdier than a pile of Birmingham bricks.

I figure two British tanks gutted out on the inside for Bolt Thrower and a Gallows Stage for Cathedral.

Of course if their message was about poverty and the effects of class within society, they could have spent the money they would have spent on this in a donation to soup kitchen or homeless shelter.

Re: More Appropriate Bands (1)

spiralx (97066) | about a year ago | (#43227885)

Bolt Thrower maybe, but even when death metal was the only thing I listened to Cathedral were fucking ghey, I can't imagine how you'd consider them death metal.

Cathedral/Napalm Death history (1)

hessian (467078) | about a year ago | (#43228175)

Cathedral's founding vocalist, Lee Dorrian, was one of the original vocalists of Napalm Death and can be heard on Scum and From Enslavement to Obliteration.

Most people consider Cathedral to be doom metal [deathmetal.org] .

Should also Invite.... (1)

LoRdTAW (99712) | about a year ago | (#43227337)

Anaal Nathrakh. Formally a two man band that now records and plays live with members of Napalm Death, both are from Birmingham. I am sure a few of their songs could easily destroy a sculpture, as well as anyone and anything in the vicinity.

Re:Should also Invite.... (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43229347)

Anaal Nathrakh.

That ("More Fire Than Blood")... is actually quite good. Thank you!

(I don't like most death metal, but mostly because it has growly lyrics which are impossible to understand and is so loud (compressed) that the whole thing sounds like mush.)

I still prefer folk [youtube.com] metal [youtube.com] . Particularly if it's silly [youtube.com] . :)

Death Volumes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43230071)

We subject our most sensitive sense organs, capable when undaaged of hearing the merest whisper, to clearly illegal and to this reader's mind immoral levels of amplitude, all in the name of something few can explain adequately.

What percentage of most audiences would not prefer the same performance at a more tolerable sound level?

I'm old, but I felt this way when I wasn't. And I'm a trumpeter! (Usually we sit in the back, fortunately for us.)

Sigh.

Re:Death Volumes (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | about a year and a half ago | (#43233605)

{To be read in the voice of pinhead from hellraiser}

The most sublime art is that of suffering. To fully appreciate the music your very soul must bleed the black blood of disappear. Then and only then will you become a god amongst the weak and wretched mortals. I have such sights ... and sounds to show you my friend...

Hey let's make a Disaster Area joke (1)

Swampash (1131503) | about a year and a half ago | (#43231067)

because no-one's done that yet

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