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Yahoo Buys UK Teen's Smartphone News App

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the sounds-familiar dept.

Businesses 88

judgecorp writes "Seventeen year old Nick D'Aloisio has sold his smartphone app Summly to Yahoo for an undisclosed sum. The app — created when he was 15 — aggregates news stories by topic and condenses them for time-strapped readers. D'Aloisio and his team will go to work at Yahoo when the deal closes. From the article: 'Summly was founded by 17-year old Nick D’Aloisio when he was just 15 from his home in London. The service works by sorting news stories by topic and condensing them into bite-sized chunks for time-conscious readers. The Summly application will be closed down and integrated with Yahoo’s existing range of mobile applications. D’Aloisio and the Summly team will be joining Yahoo as part of the transaction, which is subject to customary closing conditions and is expected to close in the second quarter of 2013.'"

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Summary Fail (4, Informative)

OverlordQ (264228) | about a year ago | (#43275257)

Way to restate the same thing about 5 times to make it looks like there's any real content.

Re:Summary Fail (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#43275377)

It's just a softball for the algorithm that promises to cut it down for 'time-conscious' readers(seriously, when did having the attention span of a crack-addled monkey get redefined as a good thing?) By repeating approximately one sentence worth of actual information more or less verbatim, it sharply increases the odds that the system will actually work...

Re:Summary Fail (3, Insightful)

nanoflower (1077145) | about a year ago | (#43275441)

That's not necessarily for crack-addled monkeys alone. If the algorithm does a good job then it allows someone to quickly scan through the summaries and decide what is worth reading and what isn't. That's what we all want out of the Slashdot summaries but often don't get.

Automated Summary? (1)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year ago | (#43278073)

There are stories that are straight forward, and making an informative summary for that type of stories are no brainers

But for stories that are a little bit complicated, it's not that easy to condense it into an informative summary of that story

I have submitted enough stories to slashdot (and end up with 99% rejection) to know that to do the job well requires much more than a word-selection algorithm

Since Yahoo is paying a hefty sum for that app, perhaps Yahoo knows something that I don't

Re:Automated Summary? (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | about a year ago | (#43278651)

The reports say that the algorithm written by the teen was based upon or is part of the family of iterative algorithms more commonly referred to as genetic algorithms [wikipedia.org] . The basic idea is to start with a set of possible solution candidates, article summaries in this case, and then pick the best ones iteratively while using so called genetic operations like crossover and mutation to modify the sets before each successive iterative evaluation. In the context of summarizing a body of text one might consider the set of all possible five sentence paragraphs that could be constructed by breaking the article down into sentences. Then, depending upon how well or not each sentence matches certain heuristic qualities, it might be trimmed from the paragraph or promoted and crossed into other paragraphs and so on. The final result after a certain number of iterations is an increasingly good "fit" on the solution candidate or in this case a "good" summary of the article as judged by the intended human audience. Although text processing and heuristic analysis is a relatively well developed field, with many good evaluation heuristics to borrow, this teenager is never the less to be commended for his efforts. I certainly wasn't sophisticated enough at age 15 to even be thinking about doing something like this. That being said, this algorithm probably has limitations. It may be good at summarizing pop culture articles (draw your own conclusions on what that says about modern "journalism") but there's really only so much that one can do with 5 or even 8 sentences. This may not end up being as valuable as Yahoo thinks because I'm virtually certain that both Google and Microsoft have people that can match and probably exceed it. Indeed, for all we know Google has already doing this for years with it's news summaries and just hasn't publicized it. Still, 30 million is nothing to be sneezed at and I salute this young man for his achievement.

Re:Summary Fail (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#43275535)

It's just a softball for the algorithm that promises to cut it down for 'time-conscious' readers(seriously, when did having the attention span of a crack-addled monkey get redefined as a good thing?) By repeating approximately one sentence worth of actual information more or less verbatim, it sharply increases the odds that the system will actually work...

By gods, you're right! Let's all stop writing abstracts for scientific papers. What a ridiculous idea, abstracts! If all the lazy academicians with the attention span of a crack-addled monkey can't be bothered with reading my twenty pages long paper, screw them! ...or not?

Re:Summary Fail (3, Funny)

JeanCroix (99825) | about a year ago | (#43275565)

I propose we define the Crack-Addled Monkey ("CAM") as a unit of measure for attention spans. Those of us older than 40 could probably measure in the hundreds or thousands of CAMs, even reading entire books (on paper, no less) in a single sitting. Whereas those who need their bite-sized news stories further condensed into sub-tweet sized nuggets would measure in the milliCAM range.

Re:Summary Fail (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#43275653)

This is funny. My attention span is usually very short, but I've been known to read as much as three or four books in the 250-300p range per day on some occasions ("day" being something like 12-14 hours of being awake). Is there something wrong with me?

Re:Summary Fail (4, Funny)

Hal_Porter (817932) | about a year ago | (#43275989)

Sounds like you have Attention Surplus Disorder. The cure is irregular sleeping hours and meal times.

Eat more junk food (try to get at least 50% of your calories from Red Bull, Mountain Dew and Cheetos)

Spend more time on the Internet. Try to avoid slashdot stories unless they the summary is by samzenpus. Don't read the articles, just the summaries. Try to replace your time spent reading books on reddit.

If you read this far you have a serious and possibly fatal case.

Re:Summary Fail (5, Informative)

Kenja (541830) | about a year ago | (#43275389)

And nowhere does it explain how Yahoo has any money... very suspicious.

Re:Summary Fail (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275489)

It also doesn't say how much Yahoo paid. They probably offered the teenager some Funyons and an official Marissa Mayer signed poster.

Re:Summary Fail (1)

shadowturtle (960092) | about a year ago | (#43276545)

It also doesn't say how much Yahoo paid. They probably offered the teenager some Funyons and an official Marissa Mayer signed poster.

Somewhere along the lines of $30 million. Seriously. http://allthingsd.com/20130325/yahoo-acquires-hipster-mobile-news-reader-summly-like-we-said-it-might/ [allthingsd.com]

Re:Summary Fail (1)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43279471)

Apparently it ones in the multiple tens of millions.

Seriously, Yahoo just paid at least $20million for something they could've engineered for a fraction of the price themselves?

Mayer really does have absolutely no idea what she's doing does she?

Re:Summary Fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43280121)

The Evening Standard claimed $20 million. City AM claimed £17 million.

Re:Summary Fail (1)

bitt3n (941736) | about a year ago | (#43283155)

It also doesn't say how much Yahoo paid. They probably offered the teenager some Funyons and an official Marissa Mayer signed poster.

and they mumbled 'Mayer' so it sounded like 'Miller' [wikipedia.org]

Re:Summary Fail (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | about a year ago | (#43276291)

Despite being "dead in the water" Yahoo has been turning a profit for some time now. As far as I can tell their only recent quarters where they did not make a profit were in 4th Q of 2008 and 1st Q of 2009. Yahoo may not be sexy and "hot", but they also are steadily making a profit.

Re:Summary Fail (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about a year ago | (#43277667)

Yahoo has a pretty healthy bank account and revenue stream, as anyone who actually read their financials (as opposed to parroting how "Yahoo is dying") knows.

Re:Summary Fail (1)

BonThomme (239873) | about a year ago | (#43278691)

Curious, their cash flow from operations is less than zero.

Signed,
Anyone who actually read their financials

Re:Summary Fail (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275417)

Welcome to the world of modern journalism. How else do you think that sleepy cities like Pittsburgh fill 3 hours of evening news without actually touching on anything that the people should really be aware of?

Re:Summary Fail (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about a year ago | (#43275591)

Families in Pittsburgh can't afford electricity to power the plasma TVs they went further into debt to afford before 2008, so it doesn't really matter much anyway.

Summly Fail (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#43275491)

Way to restate the same thing about 5 times to make it looks like there's any real content.

That's obviously because you're not reading it with Summly, which would shorten in into just three lines.

Irony (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275531)

Way to restate the same thing about 5 times to make it looks like there's any real content.

The service works by sorting news stories by topic and condensing them into bite-sized chunks for time-conscious readers.

Accidental irony?

Re:Summary Fail (1)

jittles (1613415) | about a year ago | (#43275533)

Way to restate the same thing about 5 times to make it looks like there's any real content.

It's a bug in his algorithm, he obviously condensed the article incorrectly. Oh wait, you mean he doesn't work for slashdot? Does that mean the editors are real people?

Money Laundering (1)

goombah99 (560566) | about a year ago | (#43275815)

This got me thinking that Apps and internet companies are a great way to launder money. You buy illegal goods under the cover of publically paying someone for their "app" which turns out to have no value later. Politicians that want illegal direct donations can skip to whole speaking fee nonsense which has reasonable caps and instead author dubious apps and sell these to the Koch brothers for ten million a pop.

Re:Money Laundering (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43279213)

I had the same thoughts.

Entropy conservation. (1)

goombah99 (560566) | about a year ago | (#43275863)

His algorithm is actually like a heat pump. It reduces the article's entropy by pumping random redundant text into slashdot.

Cue a dozen patent trolls (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275313)

Starting law suits over this.
Cue half a dozen news publishers sueing over aggregating their stories.

Sigh.

Re:Cue a dozen patent trolls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275365)

+1

Re:Cue a dozen patent trolls (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43276935)

I wish a dozen Yahoo shareholders, if there are that many left, would start the lawsuit instead. Already made money shorting it after their celebrity CEO du jour's little work at home tantrum. Time to go do it again I guess.

Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275319)

First they cancel telecommuting, and now they blow millions on some kid's news aggregator.

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

robably (1044462) | about a year ago | (#43276137)

Literally. It doesn't mention it in the article but on the BBC teatime news it said Yahoo had paid "dozens of millions of pounds" for the app, as well as hiring the kid. So somewhere over 24 million pounds, or 36.5 million dollars.

I'll just spell that out: THIRTY SIX AND A HALF MILLION DOLLARS.

Words fail me.

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43277271)

If they gave me 36.5 million dollars I wouldn't be running off to work for Yahoo. I'd try to invest the money sensibly and retire. There something fishy here. I think this is just a ploy to lure a bunch of starry-eyed kids into paying for IT courses, at a time when there isn't much of a future in the IT field!
 

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year ago | (#43280227)

If they gave me 36.5 million dollars I wouldn't be running off to work for Yahoo. I'd try to invest the money sensibly and retire.

Unless you decide to take up "literally burning piles of money" as a hobby, you don't have to do anything sensible with 36.5 million dollars to be able to retire on it.

You might not be able to buy 250 million dollar yachts and play with the real big boys, but who cares?

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

mattack2 (1165421) | about a year ago | (#43284169)

What do you count as not being sensible but you could still live forever on it?

Presumably he only gets around 2/3 of that after taxes, right? So $20 mil (later stories have said $30mil was the purchase price). TONS AND TONS of money. But I'd still invest it in something reasonable, even some in ridiculously low 1% CDs, and some in dividend paying stocks, to just live off of the ~$200+K/year without getting out of bed.

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

KZigurs (638781) | about a year ago | (#43284309)

That's standard terms of acquiring small startups. They just paid 30 mil not for the code (the app will be closed), but to have this Fresh Hipster Talent on board. I think they are mad, but so does lots of others.

Yahoo! is AOL these days. There is no way back.

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (2)

kevingolding2001 (590321) | about a year ago | (#43278001)

I'll just spell that out: THIRTY SIX AND A HALF MILLION DOLLARS.

Actually, spelling it out would be "Tee aitch eye are tee why space ess eye..."

But yeah, that is a ridiculous sum of money.

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

Hal_Porter (817932) | about a year ago | (#43276303)

Makes you wonder if they shouldn't have aggregated the minds of the excess telecommuting employees using the algorithm and turned their bodies into cup cakes.

So you'd be able to read a five line summary of Bud's thoughts- which was probably more than you got out of him when he was telecommuting - *and* you'd have tasty cupcakes to keep you in the office with his IM handle written in icing on top in the CEO's charmingly girly handwriting with little smilies and hearts instead of dots on the letters.

Plus some of the summaries would contain dark hints like "SOYLENT GREEN", "SLEEP AT YOUR DESK", "MM RUNS A GINGERBREAD HOUSE", "THE CUPCAKES ARE A LIE", "HELP IM STUCK IN AN OVEN" and so on.

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (2)

holostarr (2709675) | about a year ago | (#43278629)

Whats worse is the kid didn't even do anything special. according to Summly's own website [summly.com] , they partnered with SRI International for the AI: "Summly came to SRI International with a core concept to solve the information overload problem, which is especially challenging for mobile devices because of their limited screen size," said David Israel, Ph.D. So SRI wrote the AI piece which does the heavy lifting, and the kid's company made pretty UI to display the summarized articles. $30 million well spent...

Re:Another step in Yahoo's demise (1)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43279487)

"So SRI wrote the AI piece which does the heavy lifting, and the kid's company made pretty UI to display the summarized articles. $30 million well spent..."

It doesn't stop there, apparently they had a 3rd party making the Android version for them who are now ticked off that the app they've built wont see the light of day. In other words his company couldn't even do the Android side of things in house.

What exactly has Yahoo paid for here? a 17 year old who can write an iOS interface for a bit of software he bought in? For over $36million?

Yahoo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275321)

This would have been really exciting if it would have been Google! or Apple!

Way to shoot for the stars kid, way to shoot for the stars.

It was fun while it lasted (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275341)

Looks like it's time for that bubble to pop again!

How is this app any different from the news apps.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275345)

..already available in the App Store, or any of these: http://lifehacker.com/5845798/five-best-news-aggregators

Re:How is this app any different from the news app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275437)

Maybe Yahoo approached them all and he was the cheapest for them to buy outright whereas others would probably only license it/ tied up with GNU restrictions.Furthermore, Yahoo has a marketing dept to make the most out of it.

Re:How is this app any different from the news app (1)

dandelionblue (2757475) | about a year ago | (#43277033)

It summarises the stories for you, apparently quite competently (I haven't used it myself - it won't run on a 2nd gen Touch). As far as I could tell, none of those aggregators in the linked article do that.

Re:How is this app any different from the news app (1)

miroku000 (2791465) | about a year ago | (#43278005)

It summarises the stories for you, apparently quite competently (I haven't used it myself - it won't run on a 2nd gen Touch). As far as I could tell, none of those aggregators in the linked article do that.

That feature sounds nice. But, how long would it take someone to reverse engineer how it works. Why would Yahoo spend more than 1 engineer's annual salary buying this? It sounds like the kind of thing that could be replaced by a pretty small Perl Script.

Re:How is this app any different from the news app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43278835)

the money transfer is probably some type of money laundering or tax scam, rather than payment for rights to a technology.

Look, lets say some random average nerd claimed on his taxes that he paid a friend or a family member even a few thousand dollars for some software that is a reimplementation of well known existing software? Thats right, the IRS would be on that like flies on shit!!!!!

Re:How is this app any different from the news app (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year ago | (#43280283)

the money transfer is probably some type of money laundering or tax scam, rather than payment for rights to a technology.

That is a serious accusation based on no evidence or logic whatsoever. It is at times like this that I wish you couldn't post anonymously on the internet, so that this kid and/or yahoo! could sue you for criminal libel and reducing the overall intelligence level of the internet.

Re: How is this app any different from the news ap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43286911)

This is like those star search late night talent shows my parents used to make me watch. The little kids always wins no matter how terrible they are since the audiences eat that shit up.

Anyways, why wonder about this, it's not like nepotism is new.

Will he work remotely? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275359)

Where is his work space on joining Yahoo as a 17 year old.

Re:Will he work remotely? (1)

nanoflower (1077145) | about a year ago | (#43276011)

Presumably he already has an office since the company consists of more than just him. So they can either continue working in their existing offices (that will now be Yahoo offices) or they can work in Yahoo's London offices (I'm guessing they do have some.) Either way everything I've seen says that they really bought the company to get this guy more than his app. Apparently they believe that he has good insight into where the social media is going and can help them develop new products that will help Yahoo improve their existing services.

Re:Will he work remotely? (1)

sirsnork (530512) | about a year ago | (#43276315)

Even if that's so, this is Yahoo, so no one will ever listen to him and they will continue to do all the batshit crazy stuff they do that no one likes or even cares about

Bye Bye Freedom! (2)

CMYKjunkie (1594319) | about a year ago | (#43275369)

"D’Aloisio and the Summly team will be joining Yahoo as part of the transaction..."

Well there goes working from home, kid!

So.... they plan on killing the app then? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275425)

The Summly application will be closed down and integrated with Yahoo’s existing range of mobile applications.

Sounds like they're going to take what was probably a nice, small app with streamlined code, and bloat the everloving piss out of it by integrating it into the godawful nightmare that is anything that Yahoo touches. Seriously, who even USES yahoo any more? I honestly have not heard a single person I know utter their name in at least 5 years.

Well, whoever has this app now, you probably want to look for a replacement, because I'd bet money on the 'integrated' version being a horrendously slow, ad-filled behemoth of an app that eats most of your memory.

Re:So.... they plan on killing the app then? (1)

tehcyder (746570) | about a year ago | (#43280323)

Seriously, who even USES yahoo any more? I honestly have not heard a single person I know utter their name in at least 5 years.

Why do people keep posting shite like this on slashdot? We know yahoo! aren't all cool and trendy like the beloved Google or Apple, but they're still a company with turnover of $1 billion a quarter (quick Google) so they're doing something all right.

Re:So.... they plan on killing the app then? (1)

KZigurs (638781) | about a year ago | (#43284345)

AOL has a fairly large turnover as well...

Re:So.... they plan on killing the app then? (1)

KZigurs (638781) | about a year ago | (#43284341)

They are going to get rid of the app and fold the core algorithm into yahoo websites.

i like this the best (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275427)

http://www.allthingsnow.com

This will be an interesting thread (0)

ciurana (2603) | about a year ago | (#43275451)

/me just gets the popcorn and watches.

but (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43275613)

he did all the work from home!

Ooo, young blood. (1)

briancox2 (2417470) | about a year ago | (#43275615)

Is this supposed to revitalize my interest in Yahoo stock? The kid wrote a news app. Not a social media platform.

They wanted the name? (4, Insightful)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year ago | (#43275629)

The Summly application will be closed down

So they just wanted the name and the programmer, but not the app?

Re:They wanted the name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43278891)

No, they didn't want people to filter out the kardashian posts.

Um, so... (3, Insightful)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about a year ago | (#43275663)

He reinvented Slashdot? I don't know because I didn't RTFA which is apparently what this app is all about.

Re:Um, so... (5, Funny)

Garridan (597129) | about a year ago | (#43275949)

No, he reinvented Slashdot editors. There seems to be room for improvement...

Oh come on! (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#43275759)

This pisses me off more than a nerd who gets a girl! >:-(

Re:Oh come on! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43277209)

Seriously man, it's not fuckin hard.
10 Listen to the girl
20 Agree with her, but don't offer advice
30 Loop 10 until she is in love with you.....

God damn amateurs.

When does he report? (1)

BenJeremy (181303) | about a year ago | (#43275857)

It's going to be a heck of a commute, from the UK to Sunnyvale.

Re:When does he report? (1)

Zaiff Urgulbunger (591514) | about a year ago | (#43276179)

It's going to be a heck of a commute, from the UK to Sunnyvale.

It's okay, it's 2013 so he can telecommut... oh wait, yeah you're right!

Re:When does he report? (1)

xaxa (988988) | about a year ago | (#43276643)

It's going to be a heck of a commute, from the UK to Sunnyvale.

Yahoo have an office in central London.

Pretty sure TLDR beat them.. (1)

ilikenwf (1139495) | about a year ago | (#43275907)

It's an interesting project with NLP tossed in there.

http://tldrstuff.com/ [tldrstuff.com]

I've tried it on my tablet and prefer to read the original articles, but meh.

What is the advantage of this (1)

Ukab the Great (87152) | about a year ago | (#43275963)

As opposed to a news corporation dutifully maintaining a good RSS feed?

Not relying on the corporation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43277409)

to be dutiful?

follow the money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43276093)

Might want to do a little reading up on who Nick's daddy is, lads.

That should help you understand a company exists which makes such a simple product, and why it's apparently being bought out.

Umm (1)

opusman (33143) | about a year ago | (#43276841)

Yahoo has mobile applications? o.O

Dotcom bubble money (2)

petsounds (593538) | about a year ago | (#43277413)

$30 million for a newsreader app. Really. $30 million.

Apple recently spent, according to estimates, $20 million on a company which allows phones to map indoor spaces. That tech will directly help improve their Maps product. So $20 million for very innovative stuff. Apple will surely get their money's worth out of that purchase.

In contrast, $30 million for Summly, which probably just packaged some open source libraries for summarizing documents. I don't see any secret sauce or innovation in this product. This purchase smells of desperation by Mayer & Co, but I guess if I was Yahoo and had no products anyone cared about, I'd be desperate too.

Re:Dotcom bubble money (0)

bungo (50628) | about a year ago | (#43282323)

Well, you know what it has done?

It's given Yahoo exposure everywhere, here on slashdot, and every web media news source I've seen - BBC, CNN, even newspapers down in Australia.

Now, is it $30 million worth of raising their profile? Maybe not, but it does let a lot of people know that Yahoo are going things, and this is far more (positive) exposure than they had before Mayer took control.

Re:Dotcom bubble money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43317653)

why do you say even newspapers down in australia?
do you think the bits take longer to get here so the media would report on it late, or cos its not a dingo eating a baby it wouldnt be reported on at all?

Hey, I remember this kid. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43277793)

He was the subject of some news stories a while ago.

As I recall, said stories were very, very careful to dance around the fact that his father had essentially set him up through his connections with some pretty powerful people. The app itself isn't crap, but it isn't good either- it's just a net zero and went absolutely nowhere after he got his initial "investments" through his family. Frankly, given the breadth of the knowledge on the internet and how easy it is to type code into a graphical IDE and click "run", I'm not surprised about the age thing either. My youngest (13 years) has already published his own math game on the iOS store with my help of course, but he wrote the game engine himself while I did the graphics and UI.

I'm not even sure why this is news. Yahoo must have been pretty bored to buy a news aggregator when they could have wrote their own for half the price. Maybe his father pulled a few more strings for him or something.

Re:Hey, I remember this kid. (1)

gizmo2199 (458329) | about a year ago | (#43281857)

And that's really what bothers me about the whole thing. Apart from some idiot in the NY Times calling him a "genius programmer", what bugs me is that there's is no way he has the CS skills to do this by himself (which would have been impressive). And what do we find: he was able to get a bunch of seed money from wealthy investors and hire some developers and "partner" with an AI company to do the actual backed. I'm sure the fact that his dad is a banker and his mom is a lawyer had nothing to do with any of that!

So, because of his background he gets the money, while some kid in India or China who read Knuth when they were 10 years-old, can't get paid more than $20k per year to do triple what this "genius" did.

Re:Hey, I remember this kid. (1)

psithurism (1642461) | about a year ago | (#43286027)

I'm not even sure why this is news.

$30 million dollars is why this is news. I've got two friends publishing Apps for their livelihoods, and combined they make half what I do as a typical developer.

There may be a lot of comments saying "this app is crap," but still no one has explained how he got $30million for it. You've theorized connections, others have theorized: anything that uses yahoo's typical interests.

Someone got rich and famous over a simple app, while all the app developers I know are scrounging by while producing much fancier apps. That is news.

firsut po5t (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43278081)

to the transmiis1on list of other

Will they be allowed to telecommute? (1)

RougeFemme (2871421) | about a year ago | (#43278311)

Since D'Aloisio, at least, lives in London, will he have to move to California to work for Yahoo once the deal closes?

Alternative headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43278887)

Staff Still Employed at Yahoo! Out-Coded By A 15 Year-Old

Zombie Yahoo (1)

bayankaran (446245) | about a year ago | (#43278921)

Yahoo is seriously dead.

They were murdered by an ex Hollywood hack they hired as the CEO - Terry Semel - who probably knew how to massage egos of Hollywood actors but had no idea on science, internet, technology and so on. Remember Yahoo buying broadcast.com - I still don't know what was broadcast.com - other than the fact it was a nice URL. Mark Cuban and a lot of people who brokered the deal got rich by sales commission from Cuban - that's all.

Jerry Yang and David Filo are no Sergey Brin and Larry Page. They are not even a Zuckerberg.

No one can turn around Yahoo. It is like trying to rejuvenate Blockbuster in the Netflix age. Marissa Mayer made a serious error in judgement by signing on to be the CEO of a dead duck. If she does not think of an exit strategy she will be the next version of Meg Whitman and Carly Fiorina - seriously boneheaded chief executives whose only qualities are they are excellent in PR and networking (not 'computer networking', they won't know a CAT5 from Pussy Cat.)

Re:Zombie Yahoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43279371)

Yes, Yahoo is dead.

In the West.

How does a free app support over a dozen employees (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43279735)

I want to know how a company giving away its app supports over a dozen employees. I can't figure out how to make enough money to pay for equipment costs and the Apple developer program with an app. I'm either missing something important, or there's a lot more to this than meets the eye.

Re:How does a free app support over a dozen employ (1)

gnupun (752725) | about a year ago | (#43283045)

Ever heard of venture capital? That pays the bills before any sales are made.

Yahoo's legendary lack of getting it right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43285705)

The app is fine, Yahoo overpaid because that's what they do. Then they'll screw it up because that's what they do. Then Google will do it because Yahoo didn't do it right. Net investment 30M, net value 0, Yahoo-style.

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