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Egyptian Forces Capture 3 Divers Trying To Cut Undersea Internet Cable

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the cutting-the-cord dept.

The Internet 166

Egypt's Naval forces claim they have captured three scuba divers who were trying to cut an undersea Internet cable in the Mediterranean. Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali said in a statement that the divers were caught while “cutting the undersea cable” of Telecom Egypt. Internet services have been disrupted since March 22 in Egypt. From the article: "The statement was accompanied by a photo showing three young men, apparently Egyptian, staring up at the camera in what looks like an inflatable launch. It did not have further details on who they were or why they would have wanted to cut a cable."

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Measure twice. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299047)

But did they even cut once?

Re: Measure twice. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299193)

Yes, they cut into the cable but not all the way through it. It resulted in slower Internet traffic in the region fed by those cables.

Are they from the Muslim Brotherhood ? (1, Redundant)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299451)

The MB does not like the West very much, and that cable links Egypt to (in their way of thought) the West

Maybe that's the reason they cut the cable

Re:Are they from the Muslim Brotherhood ? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299809)

Doubtful. The Muslim Brotherhood isn't isolationist like, e.g., the Taliban, nor do they have anything in particular against the West, as with Wahhabism. In other words, they don't necessarily see a conflict between modern institutions and Islamic life. They just have a really, really, really conservative opinion about how to live as a Muslim within a modern, technologically progressive nation-state.

They're more like what you'd get with Pat Robertson and his ultra-conservative compatriots controlling all three branches of the government. You could kiss the Constitution goodbye, but you'd still have some semblance of federalism, a free market, free-ish speech, etc.

Re:Are they from the Muslim Brotherhood ? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299927)

They are not isolationist in the sense that they are happy to support foreign Jihadi organizations, like Hamas, CAIR, al Qaeda, et al. They are certainly isolationist when it comes to Western - read Infidel - influences on Egypt - that's a part of what those 'Arab Spring' revolutions were all about.

Really, the last thing that we need is apologists here for a Jihadi organization that's the parent organization of terror groups like Hamas and al Qaeda, and trying to paint them as being nicer than Wahabis or the Taliban. The only difference between the Muslim Brotherhood and the Wahabis is that the former believes in the Hanafi school of Islamic jurisprudence, whereas the latter follow the Hanbalis. But to non-Sunnis, it's a distinction without a difference.

Re:Are they from the Muslim Brotherhood ? (1)

Bongo (13261) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301085)

I gather "deal with us or deal with the Taliban" is a tactic ––but their aims may be quite similar.

And at some point is gets hard to tell the difference. Ordinary folk write comments like, "we don't want Communism, and we don't want Capitalism, we want Islam."

It is the path of renunciation and purity — everything will work so much better if everyone just submitted to the proper and good system, namely Islam.

The West also had a thousand years or more of that sort of strive for purity — but in the end it largely dawned upon us that you can't crush the impure stuff out of existence —people need to think for themselves how to deal with the messy stuff in life, like sex and relationships and the meaning of life.

Islam is a political system —there is no separation of Church and State. It also considers itself the best and purest version 3, where Christianity was v2 and Judaism v1. Version 3 seeks to "correct" all the mistakes (corruptions) made by versions 1 and 2.

Versions 1 and 2 failed to pursue purity far enough.

The USA is happy to support the Taliban (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43301655)

Al Quaeda and other "Jihadi" organisations if it's in their interests. E.g. to tie up Russia or to remove a popular president who doesn't do as the USA demands.

Re:Are they from the Muslim Brotherhood ? (2)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301209)

They were probably trying to steal the copper.

Re:Are they from the Muslim Brotherhood ? (1)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301851)

They were probably trying to steal the copper.

From an undersea cable? I admire the ambition, but...

Re: Measure twice. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300091)

The cable was slightly bent during the process, so 0's could get through, but 1's would get stuck where the cable is bent. That's how you end up with slower Internet traffic.

Re: Measure twice. (3, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300267)

The cable was slightly bent during the process, so 0's could get through, but 1's would get stuck where the cable is bent. That's how you end up with slower Internet traffic.

That's peculiar. 1s look so much more slender than 0s. You'd think they'd be able to slip through a space where a 0 would get caught.

Re: Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300769)

They must be using some kind of amplitude encoding where the 1's go higher on the amplitude curve, so they require a thicker piece of cable to get through.

Re: Measure twice. (3, Funny)

foobsr (693224) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300813)

That's peculiar. 1s look so much more slender than 0s.

Here is the magic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tensegrity [wikipedia.org]

CC.

Re: Measure twice. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43301531)

It works the same way as sickle cell anemia. The 1s bunch up and cause a clog.

Re: Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43301385)

They probably read the /. question about mining bitcoins and the 4 campuses connected with dark fiber. Connecting via dark fiber is much leeter than using a connected cable.

Re:Measure twice. (1)

Brad1138 (590148) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299353)

It is going to be one royal pain in the ass, repair optical cable undersea.

Re:Measure twice. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299435)

Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali said in a statement

Wow. A dune coon with the name Mohammed. I am so surprised!

Re:Measure twice. (4, Informative)

Luckyo (1726890) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299515)

With modern cable ships, it's actually pretty routine work. They get damaged by ship anchors on regular basis.

Re:Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299943)

Regardless, I do wonder why they run the cables to Asia via the Mediterranean? What is there to prevent Jihadis from Egypt, North Sudan, Yemen or Somalia from trying it again? Why not route around South Africa and for some more redundancy, from the Americas, route the cables along the Pacific rim through the east of Japan to Taiwan, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, Myanmar and India? That way, the routes are clear, since there are fewer people on that side who would want to take the trouble to cut undersea fiber cables in that part of the world.

Re:Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300181)

Probably latency + colonial ties

Re:Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300729)

As far as latency goes, it would be more useful to have that redundancy, so that if the groups listed above do cut the cable at the Suez or near Somalia, then Asia is not cut off from the internet as a result. Which is why it's useful to have something run from Seattle/Vancouver via the North West and down via Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam and ultimately terminating in India.

Re:Measure twice. (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301233)

You already have a lot of redundancy through multiple operators running the cables. That is not a problem.

Latency on the other hand is a huge factor. So are costs of laying and maintaining the cable.

Re:Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300325)

Vietnamese fishermen were trying to salvage optical undersea fiber for copper a few years ago. There are idiots everywhere.

Re:Measure twice. (1)

letherial (1302031) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300351)

idiots, or desperation?

Re:Measure twice. (2)

wiredlogic (135348) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300479)

There is some copper in an optical fiber cable which is needed to supply power to the repeaters spaced along its length.

Re:Measure twice. (2)

Muad'Dave (255648) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301545)

There is some copper in an optical fiber cable which is needed to supply power to the repeaters spaced along its length.

Unless they use Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers [wikipedia.org] that require no electrical power to be fed down the cable.

Re:Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300643)

Vietnamese fishermen were doing it out of ignorance, and not out of any desire to sabotage the internet. In the case of the Egyptians here, chances are more likely than not that they were trying to sabotage the internet and either disrupt internet access in Egypt to the West, or cut the links between Europe and Asia. Or both.

Re:Measure twice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43301703)

Possibly something to do with not wanting to run the cables across active fault lines, with all that Lava 'n' stuff....

Wired's Hacker Tourist wrote of Alexandria, Egypt (3, Informative)

SpzToid (869795) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300597)

Here's an amazing article that gives all kinds of historical telecom cable information, including the internet exchange in Alexandria Egypt. It also discusses repair ships and some inherent physics problems having to do with the pressures placed on the spindles (of the undersea cables) on-deck.

http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/4.12/ffglass_pr.html [wired.com]

Sadly, I can't locate a version of the article with the wonderful photos of the original printed piece.

Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali (4, Funny)

Cito (1725214) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299059)

Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee, he makes sure Egypt doesn't lose internet tv.

Copper prices (4, Insightful)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299065)

It did not have further details on who they were or why they would have wanted to cut a cable."

They probably thought it was copper cable. It sells for a pretty penny as scrap right now you know. Imagine their shock when they were told by the cops it contained only "worthless" fiber.

Re:Copper prices (4, Funny)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299115)

I was thinking that Telecom Egypt needed an excuse for screwing up the Internet for so long, so they are framing somebody for it. Two months in jail for $100,000. There were hundreds lined up, and they took the first three.

Re:Copper prices (0)

Hentes (2461350) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299175)

Fiber has a kevlar sheating which should worth something.

Re:Copper prices (5, Informative)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299227)

Fiber has a kevlar sheating which should worth something.

Why? It's not like you can use it for anything. Kevlar needs to be purpose made for specific uses. You can't melt it down and reuse it like metal. You can buy sheets of Kevlar fabric [google.com] for very little. It's mostly the labor and skill that it takes to make stuff that adds the value. Not the material itself.

Re:Copper prices (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300397)

I used some mysef to make an ndestructable dog toy. Worked nicely: Kevlar-denim-silicone composite fabric witht two squeakers inside. Super-tough.

Dog doesn't like it though. He prefrs toys with bits that can be ripped off, so e just have to keep buying new toys every week.

Silly tablet keyboard is dropping letters.

Re:Copper prices (1)

Muad'Dave (255648) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301563)

If he ingests Kevlar fibers, they'll likely perforate his GI tract and kill him.

Re:Copper prices (4, Informative)

plover (150551) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299323)

Fiber has a kevlar sheating which should worth something.

Worth what, exactly? The stuff is woven about the plastic sheathed glass fibers, some insulated copper wires that carry power to the repeaters, and encased in a waterproof coating. If you cut it open and empty the useless crap out you'll destroy the integrity of the fibers. It's not like you can knit yourself a bulletproof Kevlar sweater out of it.

The copper will be worth a few farthings per furlong, but that's likely to be it for value.

Re:Copper prices (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300867)

The copper will be worth a few farthings per furlong, but that's likely to be it for value.

Some farthings [coinsgb.com] are worth [coinsgb.com] quite a lot [coinsgb.com] . Offer me a few of the several-thousand-sterling each types, and I'll gladly deliver a furlong of cable.

Re:Copper prices (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299443)

They probably thought it was copper cable.

So they were after a copper cable, but got a navy colonel? Doesn't matter, looks like they were arrested anyway.

Re:Copper prices (2)

plover (150551) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299699)

It still has a copper conductor carrying 7kV, used to power the undersea signal repeaters.

You can, however, imagine their shock when the saboteurs encountered the 7000 volts.

Re:Copper prices (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300759)

You can, however, imagine their shock when the saboteurs encountered the 7000 volts.

The police arrested three people in a harbor, not pulled three bodies out of one. I know throwing a plugged in toaster into the bathtub with you in it is an efficient way to suffer a total existance failure. So that must mean voltage is less deadly the higher it is. I can't help feeling though like maybe we're missing something important here...

Re: Copper prices (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300993)

Yeah, amps.

p p post from egypt (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299077)

FIRST P

damn you scuba divers!

Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (4, Interesting)

dgatwood (11270) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299123)

I can see two likely possibilities:

1. Plausible deniability.

Say that a foreign government decides they want to tap a cable. The easiest way is to cut the cable a few hundred miles away so that nobody will notice while they're severing and reconnecting fibers. Sure, they could blame somebody dragging an anchor across it, but that starts to look suspicious if you do it too many times. But if you can create what looks like a botched terrorist act, then you can later come and sever the cable, and everybody will assume that the successful cut was also a terrorist act. Even better if Egypt can host a mock show trial.

2. Something to hide.

Say you're the Syrian government and you don't want the world to have proof that you are beginning to gas the dissidents. What better way to cut off communication than to sever the right undersea cables?

Of course, I could be wrong—it could really be a terrorist organization—but I really can't think of any plausible aims that could be achieved by doing something like this, which is why it seems more likely that it was done by some random government's black ops team, either for nefarious purposes or to distract attention away from something else nefarious.

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299239)

1. Not necessary. The worlds superpowers can tap undersea cable without interrupting services.

2. Plausible.

3. Most likely local third country nationals who are mad at the Egyption gov.

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299253)

Why go to all that bother and expense?

Egypt can just seize the servers at any time. Weren't there stories about Egypt and Blackberry servers? Government wanted the ability to intercept and decrypt communications going through those servers, and Blackberry eventually rolled over, IIRC.

Putting divers in the water is risky and expensive.

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299481)

Yes, but who might have a grudge against Egypt?

It's more like a grudge against the Western world (4, Interesting)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299549)

Yes, but who might have a grudge against Egypt?

In the case of the Muslim Brotherhood, the grudge is more aiming at the "immorality of the Western world" than anything else

The Internet (at least that cable) is a symbol of Internet, and to many of those holier than thou folks, the Net is a "tool of the West" that brings in all kinds of filth

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (0)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299301)

Say you're the Syrian government and you don't want the world to have proof that you are beginning to gas the dissidents.

Stop with the war mongering please.

Can't get off this ride (2)

SuperKendall (25149) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299559)

Stop with the war mongering please.

How about you stop the wars first, Mr. "sticking my head in the sand".

Re:Can't get off this ride (1, Interesting)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299639)

You can't do that by shipping them weapons.

Re:Can't get off this ride (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300453)

So, you still believe all the lies that were used to start the last wars. Well, we can say your head is not in the sand, but it is in a very dark place..

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299659)

Modmodded for being antiwar! How shameful can it get? Are they busing in moderators from the New York Times and Washington Post? You people are sick!

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (1)

ScentCone (795499) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301583)

Stop with the war mongering please.

So, observing the war that someone else is conducting against the people in his country, and paying attention to the fact that he has WMDs, and that he is a meat puppet for Iran - big sponsors of terrorism and medieval theo-thuggery throughout the region ... that's war-mongering? When a meteorologist tells you that there's a hurricane moving up the coast, do you tell them to stop starting storms?

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (4, Insightful)

postbigbang (761081) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299407)

Tapping fiber is not so easy, as it's photonic. The cuts would be seen by optical time domain reflectometry on the other side. Doing it underwater is ugly. #1 isn't so easy.

Hiding something, like a service outage while you're about to do something evil is somewhat plausible, save that it's no longer possible to actually shut down ALL of the communications going out of a country, just a large bulk of it. Why would Syria, Israel, or even the Eritreans try to cut the cable? I think #2 is equally implausible.

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (2)

jamesh (87723) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300435)

Of course, I could be wrong—it could really be a terrorist organization

If so, then they've really lost their way. Sure it's easier to cut an undersea cable than to blow up a nightclub or to fly a plane into a building, but where's the terror? Sure it's inconvenient to have slow internet, but they are terrorists not invonvenientists....

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (1)

rtb61 (674572) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300677)

Far easier to imagine religious nut seeking to cut off the evil influence of the internet. Well, at least the young gullible pawns of religious nuts. So idiot religious proselytizers with no real understanding of anything, trying to cut the tube full of internets.

Re:Plausible deniability and/or something to hide (1)

mysidia (191772) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300789)

How about 3....

#3... They are divers. They might cause damage, then later offer their services as divers to assist in repairing the damage (for a large fee, of course).

The ultimate man in the middle attack (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299131)

Seriously, how do you top that?

Really? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299139)

Is that even a real name? I swear news stories sound faker and faker every day. So what right will they want to take away in the US because someone "tried to cut an Internet cable"? That or some UN bullshit.

Re:Really? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299183)

This person gets it. Mod parent up to +5, despite the plagues of corporate and government bootlickers here on Slashdot.

Also, bad news everyone -- I thought I was going to get laid again tonight and alas, I did not. Out comes the XHamster and the torn frenulum.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:Really? (-1, Offtopic)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299261)

So - crawl up a chickens ass and wait. You'll be laid soon.

Re:Really? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299335)

I've found meth whores give the best blowjobs (and there are plenty of meth men if you're light in the loafers).

Why? Simple. No teeth. A gumjob is probably the best feeling in the world. Scratch that -- getting a gumjob while taking a shit and trolling slashdot is probably the best feeling in the world. And it's only costing me $20!

Re:Really? (5, Funny)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299313)

Is that even a real name? I swear news stories sound faker and faker every day. So what right will they want to take away in the US because someone "tried to cut an Internet cable"?

You will no longer be able to have flippers in your carry-on luggage. The TSA will require cavity searches of anyone going to tropical locations that may attract scuba divers. Regulators and frog masks will be banned from carry-on and checked luggage. Anyone purchasing or filling any kind of tank (including, but not limited to oxygen, water, CO2, propane, argon, nitrogen, etc.) will need to be registered, fingerprinted, and relinquish their constitutional rights and future social security payments. Additionally anyone who uses more than 100 gallons of water per month must turn over their first born daughter to spin straw into gold to help finance the new agency offshoot of the TSA to "protect" us all from this new vile form of terrorism.

Re:Really? (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299475)

Anyone purchasing or filling any kind of tank (including, but not limited to oxygen, water, CO2, propane, argon, nitrogen, etc.) will need to be registered, fingerprinted, and relinquish their constitutional rights and future social security payments.

Actually, last I knew, at least here in the US, if you want to have your tanks filled, you needed to be registered with PADI [padi.com] .

Re:Really? (2)

unimacs (597299) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299729)

I got my certification years ago and my card was falling apart. So I recently went to the PADI website to see what it would take to get a new one. I was shocked at how easily they'd give out another card. With very little verification of who you claim to be, they'll send out a new card to any address you want, - and update the photo to one that you upload.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300735)

PADI = Pay And Dive/Die Immediately.
NAUI = Now An Underwater Idiot.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300015)

Regulators and frog masks will be banned from carry-on and checked luggage

I've tried traveling with a regulator in my carry on. After seeing the TSA guys at the x-ray scanner scratch their heads for a minute, they pulled me aside and gave me the extra special screening.

Re:Really? (1)

cbope (130292) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300891)

I always travel with my regs in my carry on. Apart from security opening the bag and looking at them, there has never been a problem. The only extra scrutiny I ever got while traveling with scuba gear was from my underwater camera housing while transferring through Frankfurt. They wanted to test it for residue using the sniffer. Took all of 60 seconds, no drama.

If it was in the US, I would be questioned WHY I am carrying this "device", what it is used for, where did I buy it from and how long ago. Did my neighbor ever touch it. Not to mention that we would be going to a resort location carrying only vacation clothes, wearing flip flops and shorts and well... you get the picture. Long live TSA!!!

Regulators should never be packed in your checked bags. They are semi-delicate and sensitive equipment that keeps you alive under water. They have many moving parts including a diaphragm that is sensitive to pressure changes. What do you think happens to the pressure in the cargo hold of an aircraft? I would not trust my life to a reg that has been "mis-handled" by checking it in bags going into the cargo hold.

Re:Really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300819)

The funny thing is, the whole US is already cut apart from the world. You are being fed fake news and propaganda. Remeber the war with eurasia? Have you seen news about north-korea? It's actually you, but presented in a comical kind of way. See how their soldiers walk? Yeah, pure comedy effect. I'm actually a "EURAI", an Artificial Intelligence designed to appear on forums as a european. Your own sea cables were cut years ago. When you fly to europe you really only do circles above atlantic ocean and then go to one of the fake european cities manned by actors.

How were they able to tell (4, Funny)

slackware 3.6 (2524328) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299169)

they were Egyptian simply by the way they looked?

Re:How were they able to tell (3, Funny)

The Grim Reefer (1162755) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299235)

they were Egyptian simply by the way they looked?

I've hear of DUI, DWI and DWB (Driving While Black). But this is the first case of DWE (Diving While Egyptian) that I'm aware of.

Re:How were they able to tell (1)

Kleen13 (1006327) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299789)

This. Is. Not. Funny? Elliots....

Re:How were they able to tell (5, Funny)

mingle (1121231) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299237)

... maybe it was the way they walked?

Re:How were they able to tell (5, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299601)

Too bad for them that not all the cops were in the donut shop.

Re:How were they able to tell (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300895)

ahhh... Susanna Hoffs... hnnnnnnngggg

Re:How were they able to tell (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299275)

The fur, pointy ears and paws?

Re:How were they able to tell (1)

houghi (78078) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300655)

When my dad was in Egypt, people thought he was Egyptian. When he was in Israel, people thought he was Israeli.
Just saying.

Re:How were they able to tell (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43301251)

Did you inherit the big nose?

Re:How were they able to tell (2)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300945)

"they were Egyptian simply by the way they looked?"

They obviously walked like an Egyptian.

Picture... (1)

MasseKid (1294554) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299211)

"The statement was accompanied by a photo"

So how about a damn link to the photo since TFA doesn't have a copy?

Re:Picture... (3, Informative)

They'reComingToTakeM (1091657) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300271)

Photos are included on The Register's [theregister.co.uk] coverage of the story.

I mean... (4, Funny)

RandomUsername99 (574692) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299219)

Who, at some point, hasn't gotten *that* tired of seeing stupid reddit memes?

YouTube comments (1)

RandomUsername99 (574692) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299247)

I generally feel like doing the same thing to the largest internet tramsmission cable I can find, when I disregard all of the good sense and wisdom that I've gained from my prior negative experiences, and actually read the comments on YouTube videos.

Eerily reminiscent of 3 cable cuts in 2008 (5, Insightful)

Thagg (9904) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299403)

During a week in 2008, three undersea cables were cut off of Egypt. At the time (and still) the cuts were attributed to ships dragging anchors -- although the fact that there were three cuts so close in time was, and remains, hard to believe.

So, now we see people intentionally cutting a cable. Hmm.

During the second world war, there were teams of saboteurs who were tasked with cutting telephone cables across France, in preference to almost any other target, because it was much easier for the British to intercept radio messages than telephone messages. I can't imagine any other reason for this.

Re:Eerily reminiscent of 3 cable cuts in 2008 (2)

jewens (993139) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299597)

I wonder if anyone has yet designed a task-specific cable-cutting anchor or is this an untapped market?

Re:Eerily reminiscent of 3 cable cuts in 2008 (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300391)

Wait, you're saying teams of saboteurs cut the wires so that the Egyptian government has to use radio to communicate, so it can be spied on? And you can't think of any other reason? You either need to be more imaginative or less, I'm not sure which.

Try this reason: these three guys thought it was copper wire, and wanted to steal it and sell it as scrap.

Re:Eerily reminiscent of 3 cable cuts in 2008 (3, Insightful)

Xest (935314) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301411)

"although the fact that there were three cuts so close in time was, and remains, hard to believe."

I debunked this conspiracy theory at the time. I can't be arsed to do it in such detail again, but the gist of it was that using the ITU's stats on cable cuts 3 cuts in a week wasn't out of the norm and submarine cables tend to get cut all the time (at least once a week). It's a more common occurrence than people realise.

Couple this with the fact that Egypt has the Suez canal which is one of the busiest (or even simply the busiest?) shipping lane in the world and there's really nothing hard to believe about that sort of incident at all.

I know some people get excited when they see a chance for conspiracy but I'm afraid the world is often much less exciting. Much as I might be amused by the idea that this woman is part of a crack commando unit for example, I think she really was probably just looking for salvage:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-13158351 [bbc.co.uk]

Egyptian need slogan (4, Informative)

loki.tang (2752431) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299405)

"Cable contains no copper, Steal it will put you in jail". Chinese print this slogan everywhere in China.

you guys will believe anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299531)

except for those that believe in nothing.

SMW4 (1)

kokoko1 (833247) | about a year and a half ago | (#43299619)

Is this the same cable cut which effecting the internet services in the region [dawn.com] ?

Yuo 7ail iT (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43299645)

Backwards. To the With THOUSANDS of EFNet servers. are tied up in they started to We need to address the time to meet Future at all they started to the NetBSD project, posts on Usenet are more stable of programming The accounting EFNet servers. by fundamental would you like to hear you. Also, if they are Come Lite is straining log on Then the FreeBSD's Members are achievements that first organization Where it belongs, Whatever path is at this point Website Third, you community at Influence, the was what got me ofone single puny has run faster 486/66 with 8 conducted at MIT irc network. The Bought the farm.... states that there [tux.org]? Are you deliver. Some of confirming the RRadt's stubborn hand...don't

These stories spook me (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300085)

It's a reminder of how tenuous modern society is. It doesn't take a major act of vandalism or terrorism to bring things to a halt.

Could be some dumbass thieves (3, Interesting)

Biff Stu (654099) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300087)

Quite a few years ago I was hanging out in Egypt at a Red Sea resort with my girlfriend. Now I can hang on a lounge chair on a beach for a few hours, but that's about all can take before I want to get up and do something. So, I decided to take a tour boat out to the coral and go snorkeling. When the boat got to the coral reefs, they dropped their anchor right on the reef, which pissed me off. The captain explained that the government had installed permanent mooring buoys in order to preserve the coral, but these had been stolen by thieves.

Now, fiber cable doesn't have the same resale value as copper, but then try to explain that to a third world dumbass thief.

why they would have wanted to cut a cable? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300167)

Easy. Allah wills it.

Iran and friends (0)

Required Snark (1702878) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300297)

If this is true, the logical culprits are Iran along with their allies.

They have the animus and the motives. Iran is internally attempting to heavily censor/eliminate internet access. They are the target of network enabled attacks: Stuxnet. It would fit their profile to attack the same kind of international infrastructure, even if Stuxnet was injected by USB memory, not network connections.

The Assad regime is an ally of Iran, and has been receiving military aid. An attack on internet cables is an attack on the West, which is supporting the anti-Assad forces.

Reduced internet bandwidth could be seen as a way to decrease US force effectiveness in the region. Even if the US military has connectivity that is not directly impacted, it still makes things harder for Western interests.

If the three divers are terrorists, they will be associated with something like Hamas. Iran is too smart to have their nationals in a direct attack in another country, or in international waters. I would guess they are Egyptian/Gulf region nationals. Anyone but Iranians.

On the other hand, they could be three guys out diving for fun. The cable could be undamaged, or it could have been damaged in an accident unrelated to terrorism. Even if they are tried and convicted, they could still be innocent. A confession means nothing at all. Remember, the US has used torture to get confessions, and places like Egypt have a history of torture for political gain going back at least to WW One (yes, before WW 2).

If this is not picked up by the western press it is not likely to be actual terrorism. The west is so primed to see these types of events as the result of evil opponents, that even when accidental explosions occur the first reports always talk about terrorist connections.

Collateral damage (5, Informative)

Kelerei (2619511) | about a year and a half ago | (#43300511)

The East African SEACOM cable [wikipedia.org] has been having outages lately; they posted an outage notification [seacom.mu] due to a cable break off the Egyptian coast at 08:40 UTC yesterday (March 27th, 2013). Of course, this has been having knock-on effects: for instance, many South African ISPs use this cable as their primary international link, and have had to fall over to secondary links resulting in significant service degradation [mybroadband.co.za] .

Co-incidence? Perhaps, perhaps not...

Other Option : Blackmail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43300889)

According to a heise-article the background might be "normal" criminals. The article states that a single cable-company SEACOM faced 3 cable-ruptures in 5 days. this and the capture of the 3 gusy by the egypt navy might be a hint for blackmail.

http://heise.de/-1831866 (in german)

Extreme IRCwar (1)

GhigoRenzulli (1687590) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301317)

Don't blame them. They're just trying to retake #sphinx from a netsplit.

Slowdown Felt in India (2)

inhuman.games (1590643) | about a year and a half ago | (#43301699)

"Dear Customer, Due to international undersea cable system down between India to Europe, you may face slow issues in some sites. Inconvenience regretted-Beamtele". I just got that message from my Indian ISP, Beam Telecom. Some European sites are noticeably slower for me here in India.
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