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Hormel Gracefully Concedes On SPAM vs. Spam

timothy posted more than 12 years ago | from the and-laugh-it's-funny-too-ok? dept.

Spam 167

dattaway writes: "Hormel has given up complaining about 'spam' referring to junk e-mail and makes a good point about our trademark system." Hormel has actually seemed pretty quiet, even good natured, on this front for a long time -- unlike certain companies, they haven't attempted to throttle everyone using those fateful four letters in sequence. (And that would have made them look bad, anyhow. Language evolves.) Now if only they would send infinite supplies of can-cooked spiced pink meat to the nasty kind of spammers ...

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Re:At least the term's origin is now accurate... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#191693)

The spam term actually predates the infamous Green Card spam by a number of years. The reason that the green card incident was of note was:

1) It was commercial advertisement, which had only recently been allowed on the Internet.

2) They were the first to spam EVERY usenet group (and some multiple times), starting 10,000 simultanous flamewars.

The older usage of 'spam' didn't necessarily mean commercial posting. More like what's called 'crapflooding'.

Re:Eat it! (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 12 years ago | (#191695)

There are three reasons:

1. Fruit and vegetable consumption was much higher than it is today, partially negating the bad effects of high-fat diets.

2. Activity levels were higher, particularly in rural populations.

3. Most people died of something else first. For example, before widespread refrigeration, stomach cancer (from eating salted and smoked meats) was a leading killer.

Re:So, according to their policy... (1)

Phroggy (441) | more than 12 years ago | (#191697)

Yes, exactly. I'm surprised they haven't at least mentioed it to the Slashdot crew by now.

--

This is not news! (2)

Phroggy (441) | more than 12 years ago | (#191698)

As the article said, Hormel hasn't changed their policy on this in over a year - seems to me I remember that policy being on their Web site at least three years ago. They DO object (at least officially) to the use of their logo, or pictures of their product (such as the one Slashdot uses) being associated with junk e-mail, but they do NOT object to the use of the word "spam" (in lower-case letters) to refer to same.

--

Re:a further, but brief history of SPAM [revised] (1)

Isaac-Lew (623) | more than 12 years ago | (#191700)

If it comes from an animal (doesn't matter what *part* of the animal), it's not artificial :).

Re:Slashdot may be in trouble (1)

Isaac-Lew (623) | more than 12 years ago | (#191701)

SPAM (in all caps) is used for the Luncheon Meat, *not* for UCE. It wouldn't hurt slashdot to at least change the letters on the can to all lower-case, and maybe also change the color of the can (there are plenty of SPAM Luncheon Meat knock-offs at the grocery store in similar but different colored cans).

a year ago? (3)

deltab (3570) | more than 12 years ago | (#191703)

Hormel has actually seemed pretty quiet, even good natured, on this front for a long time [...]

Indeed, the datestamp on Hormel's page about this [spam.com] is Thu, 23 Jul 1998 18:46:44 GMT – nearly three years ago!

Re:Eat it! (1)

Ashen (6917) | more than 12 years ago | (#191706)

Well since we've already got a thread about the food going...

in Hawaii it's really popular to eat SPAM Musubi. They even sell it at 7-11 like they do hot dogs. It's just a slab of fried spam thrown on a slab of rice and wrapped in seaweed. Since I've left Hawaii, I still make it occasionally. My friends in Indiana think I'm weird, but it's good stuff. :)

Darn (2)

Y2K is bogus (7647) | more than 12 years ago | (#191707)

And I was so looking forward to Hormel making spammers eat their weight in salty pork products. Now my hopes are dashed!

You learn something new every day (2)

rde (17364) | more than 12 years ago | (#191712)

Follow SPAM with "Luncheon Meat" or other descriptor. Remember, a trademark is a formal adjective and as such, should always be followed by a noun.
I never knew that. But it does make life interesting. As well as arguing over linux vs. gnu/linux, we'll have the grammar nazis insisting it's the linux operating system, and the fsf grammar nazis insisting it's the gnu/linux operating environment.
Of course, it does mean I was right in referring to "that windows piece of shit"

Another meaning of spam (1)

Neoplasm (18542) | more than 12 years ago | (#191713)

I remember using (and still use today) the term spam over 12 years ago to refer to scrambled data on a floppy disk or on a BBS screen due to line noise. It just meant that it looked like it was chopped up and pressed together.

Memories (1)

Hugonz (20064) | more than 12 years ago | (#191714)

I used to have spam for dinner (nearly everyday)in Venezuela when I was about 13 years old. I liked it fried with lettuce and tomato. GOD how we preteens used to punish our poor bodies. =/

Hugo

Re:Eat it! (1)

ClipDude (31730) | more than 12 years ago | (#191720)

> Does anyone ever actually EAT this stuff?

Actually, I like Spam (the food product--I detest UBE). When I was growing up, we would eat it on camping trips. I think it tastes really good fried. I don't eat it much anymore, however, because of its fat content.
=======

Re:Slashdot may be in trouble (1)

Restil (31903) | more than 12 years ago | (#191721)

Interesting though, consider that the slang term "spam" as applying to UCE *IS* derived from the meat product, and therefore using the image is not misrepresenting.

To say you'll permit one and not the other is a tough sell. The two are mutually exclusive.

Now... had the term "spam" come from something completely unrelated to the meat product, then I can see the issue here.

-Restil

Re:Slashdot may be in trouble (1)

Necromncr (35589) | more than 12 years ago | (#191723)

Replace it with the tasty "Speat" from Heavy Gear. It's close enough. :) And you can use the empty tins to repair Gear armor....

before we say something un-worthy: (1)

perrin5 (38802) | more than 12 years ago | (#191724)

Let us not forget that Hormel was also VERY upset with Muppet Treasure Island (I believe) for using their name for the head of the tribe of wild boars in the movie...

They're not all soft and squishy, like their meat, they just know when to cut their losses.

Re:The best kind of publicity? (1)

Cabby (39912) | more than 12 years ago | (#191725)

But if your trademark is seen to enter the public domain then everyone else can use it too.
If everyone sells Rollerblades then how do you know which ones are the originals?

Xerox actually has entered the language in some places, which leaves Xerox in the uneviable position of trying to sell Xerox xeroxes..

And it only took them four years... (3)

r_newman (40868) | more than 12 years ago | (#191726)

Four years to realise that fighting the whole world in a battle that no one cared about - except for it's (mildly) humourous connotations - is counter-productive.

Of course they may have been told by their legal advisers that "spam" is now a defacto part of the English language (look iy up in the newer Oxford English dictionary) in both of it's meanings, and as such the use of the word to describe unsolicited e-mail could probably not have been challenged in court.

Re:Spam from spammers (2)

Cloud 9 (42467) | more than 12 years ago | (#191728)

Why not send all the spammers to Hormel to make Spam out of? We could feed the world....

UCE is people! PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!

Trademark dilution (2)

oneiros27 (46144) | more than 12 years ago | (#191729)

Think about it for a second -- if _every_ copier out there was called 'Xerox', then xerox no longer holds a brand name. Where's the name recognition and the benefit for publicity when anyone can use the name?

If the companies don't fight for their names, then not only can the general public use them to refer to all similar products, but their competitors can also.

For those that are from the south, I know you've seen this discussion:

I'd like a coke.

What type?
Sprite.

Although the 'Coke' name means 'Coca-Cola brand cola soft drink' in many areas, in some areas, it's used interchangably with 'soda'. (And I think it's still more normal than calling it a 'pop', which is the name I use to refer to my grandfather.)

And for those that believe that any publicity is good-- imagine that there's a scare due to some sort of tainting in the factory, and the headline reads

CONTAMINATED COKE BOTTLES KILL 4
But then the article says that it's some mom and pop soda company, and not Coca-Cola brand. If companies do not protect their trademarks, this is something that has the potential of happening. (The misleading articles, not the death of people by contaminated coke bottles)

Some people like spam (1)

darkonc (47285) | more than 12 years ago | (#191731)

Now if only they would send infinite supplies of can-cooked spiced pink meat to the nasty kind of spammers ...

For spammers who actually like spam (the meat), that might be encouragement.

I remember originally liking spam, but it needed careful treatment to get a really good tasting meal (this may be why a spam meal in pacific rim countries is rather expensive). Over time, I found it far easier to make a good-tasting meal out of "real" meat. Now I don't eat beef or pork at all.
--

Even more history of spam (Usenet) (5)

darkonc (47285) | more than 12 years ago | (#191733)

The way that spam became a usenet term only starts with the Monty Python sketch. What happened (a long time!) after the sketch is that some unhappy bugger decided to get annoying on the net (I don't remember the specifics of his complaint). He sent dozens of messages crossposted to many newsgroups with the text consisting of the extended version of the spam song

(spam spam spam.... ) {hundreds of lines of it!)

Originally, spamming really only referred to massive, crossposted postings on the usenet. Various names like UCE (Unwanted Commercial Email) / UBE (Unsolicited Bulk Email) were the techinical term for the email 'spam', but Spam is far easier to say and remember (and more fun). People seem to have settled on spam (to Hormels mild consternation).
--

Re:At least the term's origin is now accurate... (1)

weave (48069) | more than 12 years ago | (#191734)

Must have been after the fact. I was pretty heavily involved in the entire spam fiasco from the beginning (although not as rabid as some were). I've never heard that term. I do remember reading the post where someone compared what massive crossposting of ads to usenet as similar to the monty python spam sketch. It took off right away. Shame I never archived that stuff... :(

At least the term's origin is now accurate... (2)

weave (48069) | more than 12 years ago | (#191735)

I spent a lot of time on various newsgroups when the term spam was originally coined. It was around April '94 when the two scumbag lawyers from Phoenix spammed the world over usenet regarding green card lotteries (I even have an infamous "Joel Furr" T-shirt about it!). I was (and still are) a news administrator so spam really worried me (and still does).

Anyway, the term was coined from the Monty Python sketch. Shortly after that, most media outlets that ran a story on spam for some reason said the term came from the idea of "when spam hits the fan" and the resultant crap that flies everywhere.

I don't know where that came from, but it wasn't accurate, but was quoted as authoritave all over the news at the time.

At least I'm glad that pretty much everyone knows the true reason the word was coined in the first place. Small thing, but historical accuracy should always be maintained when possible.

Shame there are no archives from around that time...

Boom shakalakaah (1)

divec (48748) | more than 12 years ago | (#191736)

Let us not forget that Hormel was also VERY upset with Muppet Treasure Island (I believe) for using their name for the head of the tribe of wild boars in the movie...
That's very funny. "We see you have boom-boom sticks. Bye bye!"

Re:Slashdot may be in trouble (1)

Hard_Code (49548) | more than 12 years ago | (#191737)

It's all fair use anyway. It's not like Slashdot is in the "processed-canned-meat" industry and is trying to "fool" consumers. "Duh, hey Slashdot makes SPAM, I didn't know that"

AFAIK trademarks really only apply within a given industry. E.g., if Ford wanted to name a car Spam, that would probably be legal. In any case, Slashdot can always just show the cubical slab of Spam, as opposed to the packaging.

a further, but [revised] revision (1)

joq (63625) | more than 12 years ago | (#191743)


IMHO these sound neater

Stupid Problematic Asshole Messaging

Some Poor Asshole Menacing

Someone Posting Anonymous Manuer


who's your daddy (2)

joq (63625) | more than 12 years ago | (#191744)


One thing you have to keep in mind is that most ISP's, well a lot of them are sort of owned by one large corp. or have some form of agreement somewhere down the line. What's more is the fact that some of those ISP's may be providing colo services for some of those companies sending the spam.


wouldn't work (3)

joq (63625) | more than 12 years ago | (#191745)


Too many spammers have a variety of resources at their disposals to continue spamming, mixmaster remailers, horrible configurations of sendmail from corporations, and nickle and dime webservers, etc.

Now what may work, is going after those responsible for the advertisements contained in spam. Example www.joebloworsomething.com hires someone to promote their site, and those people send promotions out via way of spam, I feel holding the people at the site responsible is better fitted.

Now bear with me on this a second. Sure it can seem somewhat unfair, but no one asks for spam, and by using someone's resources (bandwidth, whatever) companies should be made aware of how much their actions cause versus the amount of people who actually reply to spam. Think about it, company X sends say 20,000 spam emails a day, of which 1 replies and actually buys something, but out of those 20,000 500 decide to take company X to small claims court bitching...

See the laws fail when they're passed because you can't have one country's law dictate what is law in another country, and many politicians fail to see that when they waste time and money with their so called AntiSpam bills. You don't cut weeds in the garden half assed, you cut them at the root.

Stolen Uranium, and unsolved murders? [antioffline.com] non fiction at its best

Not just the ISP's (2)

wowbagger (69688) | more than 12 years ago | (#191749)

I've said it before, and I shall now say it again: don't just go after the ISPs, go after the domain.

If you receive a spam advertising www.chocolatemonkeynuts.com, look up the DNS server for chocolatemonkeynuts.com, and complain to the service that hosts it. Get the domain pulled, as well as the web site. Web space is trivial to find, but it takes (a little) more work to set up a domain.

so modify the logo (1)

ChristTrekker (91442) | more than 12 years ago | (#191755)

So get timothy to hack the logo that /. uses. Replace "SPAM" with "UCE". Although I don't know if I'd want to eat something called UCE. Too close to UCK if you ask me.


I have zero tolerance for zero-tolerance policies.

About DAMN time! (1)

jacobcaz (91509) | more than 12 years ago | (#191756)

I had the domain name "spam.net" years ago and HORMEL and InterNIC forced it away from me.

Since I am/was the little guy I got shafted and they got a domain name back.

Four years later they realize what I was telling them back then, "Deal with it, noone will confuse my site for any trademark of yours."

*sigh*

Why does the little guy always get shafted?

-----

Slashdot may be in trouble (5)

UnifiedTechs (100743) | more than 12 years ago | (#191759)

From Policy Statement: We do not object to use of this slang term to describe UCE, although we do object to the use of our product image in association with that term. This would seem to say that Slashdot's use of a picture of a SPAM can to denote stories about UCE (Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail) is against their policy. And though I know I'll get modded down for saying it I can see their point.

Re:The best kind of publicity? (1)

belroth (103586) | more than 12 years ago | (#191760)

Didn't he set up a company to make the first ballpoint and name the company after himself? And didn't he also trademark that invention with the same name?
----

I disagree with this statement (1)

cecil36 (104730) | more than 12 years ago | (#191761)

Drangel mused that the new use of the company's top brand might actually benefit Hormel. The theory is that having more people talk and think about spam will cause more people to buy and eat SPAM.

Now who the heck eats SPAM all day?

So, now we can play nice, too (4)

KlausBreuer (105581) | more than 12 years ago | (#191763)

Funny, but this pops up on *every* spam topic:

Please refer to spam as 'spam', not 'SPAM'!
And either get rid of the icon, or photoshop it to show locercase 'spam'.

Darn, the company is being so reasonable, and we're still doing our best to irritate them with this.

I just don't get it.

---
"What, I need a *reason* for everything?" -- Calvin

SPAM in online gaming (1)

The_Messenger (110966) | more than 12 years ago | (#191764)

Also interesting is how the word "SPAM" has gone from describing torrents of unsolicited commercial email to almost anything that comes unwanted and in large quantities. For instance, in HL/TFC (Half-Life Team Fortress Classic), on the map Flagrun, using Soldiers and Demomen to fill a doorway with a constant barrage of explosive ordinance, effectively blocking passage, is known as spamming. The term is so popular that many other kinds of highly annoying newbie gameplay -- such as sniping, camping, spawncamping and anything involving a HWGuy -- are referred to as spam.

But even with "SPAM" being used to refer to so many varieties of horrible things, I doubt it has had any impact on the sales of potted meat. If anything, just the opposite -- after reading some of the posts in this article, I'm considering actually buying and trying some. Yum.

--

Re:The word 'hacker' (3)

The_Messenger (110966) | more than 12 years ago | (#191765)

. . . it's just as clear what people mean by hacker in context as it is that I don't have pink meat in my inbox.
I may not have any "pink meat" in my mailbox, but according to a large percentage of spam I receive, it is only a few clicks away!

--

Re:At least the term's origin is now accurate... (1)

pallen (111618) | more than 12 years ago | (#191766)

where did "Stupid Persons AdvertisMent come from then? Was this made up after the original use of the term or summat?

Eat more SPAM^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H (5)

RennieScum (118197) | more than 12 years ago | (#191768)

Drangel mused that the new use of the company's top brand might actually benefit Hormel. The theory is that having more people talk and think about spam will cause more people to buy and eat SPAM.

So this a case of accidental marketing.

Works on me. I had never had any SPAM before, but sometime in 1996, something changed in me. I tried it, and thought it was OK. Time passed, and I kept buying the stuff, and started trying out the recipes on the sides of the cans. Those folks at Hormel (tm) come up with some pretty tasty recipes! Let's face in, SPAM-n-eggs is pretty nasty, but Chicken SPAM-on-Bleu is fabulous! So is SPAM-a-roni and cheese, and SPAM and mushroom pizzas.

But take it from me, don't make SPAM cupcakes!

Spam? Baloney!! (1)

Eggplant62 (120514) | more than 12 years ago | (#191769)

Now if only they would send infinite supplies of can-cooked spiced pink meat to the nasty kind of spammers ...
I certainly hope you mean the clown that hit my email three times last night from 0-3pool107-193.nas6.los-angeles1.ca.us.da.qwest.ne t [63.233.107.193]. Three spams, same message to two email addresses, a third separate spam to only one email address. I'm tellin' ya, it's gettin' re-goddamn-diculous.

If I had gone away for the weekend, I'd have had 36 legitimate emails awaiting me from friends, family and the Metro Detroit Linux Users Group, and 26 spam emails. If I were to discount the mailing list mail (28 messages), I'd be wading through 26 spam emails to find seven legitimate messages.

Sorry, Hormel, but we didn't write that Monty Python script which seemed to so well describe a phenomenon similar to unsolicited bulk email. I'd be willing to rename it baloney, though.

Re:a further, but brief history of SPAM [revised] (1)

Combuchan (123208) | more than 12 years ago | (#191771)

You ever read into Spam, the meat? Accounts of what happened on the processing room floor justify the artificial meat connotation.

Meat that wasn't sold right away to butchers would pile up on floors for days, left to be picked at by the numerous rats, who would leave their droppings right in there as well. Then, every so often, the whole load (rats, ratpoop, and the rancid meat) would be dumped into a giant grinder and eventually sold off to stores.

Practices like this prompted the Pure Food and Drug Act, the first truth-in-labelling law.

a further, but brief history of SPAM (3)

Combuchan (123208) | more than 12 years ago | (#191772)

First an acronym for Specially Processed Artificial Meat (Spiced Pork and hAM also?). Fed to WW I soldiers in the trenches. Also at the center of the first spam debate--rancid meat. Was exposed by Upton Sinclair's novel The Jungle which detailed the horrendously unsanitary conditions of the meat packing industry. Spam's ingredients were first "Everything from the pig but the squeal!"

The nufty stuff you learn in HIS104 - 20th Century American History

Be fair now... (1)

clevershark (130296) | more than 12 years ago | (#191780)

Let's own up, it's not exactly like Spam had a terrific reputation before "unwanted commercial email" came along, now is it?

Kudos to Hormel for at least realizing that accidental and even ironic product placement can be good publicity sometimes. How many of us techies (and esp. network administrators) have bought a can of the stuff just to use as a sort of "mascot"?

The word 'hacker' (2)

not_cub (133206) | more than 12 years ago | (#191782)

And given the rapidity at which "spam" has entered the general lexicon in English and several other languages, trademark experts say Hormel would be foolish to fight the trend.

Perhaps we should bear this in mind when we jump on newspaper articles that use the word 'hacker'. A language only means what people use it to mean, and I'm sure it's just as clear what people mean by hacker in context as it is that I don't have pink meat in my inbox.

not_cub

Re:wouldn't work (2)

evilviper (135110) | more than 12 years ago | (#191783)

If companies get 4 orders out of 500,000 emails it's enough for them to continue. Remember that the companies are the ones profiting, not the ISPs. The ISPs have very little reason not to stop spammers once pointed out to them, especialy when it is against their TOS. In fact, you could make quite an arguement that their TOS are void if selectively enforced.

---=-=-=-=-=-=---

That's the point (2)

evilviper (135110) | more than 12 years ago | (#191784)

If an ISP doesn't enforce it's TOS on one consumer, they can't enforce it on any... If some lawyers had a hand in the high-tech industry, all this legislation against consumers (and spam) would be a thing of the past. So far, no one has stood up and fought it with any reasonable argument (like mine). It's just something that needs to be done to set the precident.

---=-=-=-=-=-=---

Re:That's the point (1)

xigxag (167441) | more than 12 years ago | (#191798)

If an ISP doesn't enforce it's TOS on one consumer, they can't enforce it on any...

You said this twice already, and there's no basis in fact to it. If you breach a contract, it's not a defense to say, "Others violated the same contract and got away with it, so why can't I?" Think about it. If you lend a friend $500 and he signs an IOU, he can't disregard it simply because he knows you forgave someone else's debt. If some lawyers had a hand in the high-tech industry, all this legislation against consumers (and spam) would be a thing of the past.

What are you talking about? The high-tech industry is rife with lawyers. Despite that, it's not feasible for a large ISP to sue all of its TOS violators, there are just too many. So instead, they pick a few egregious contract breakers to set a "precident" and hope that the fear of prosecution and a nice threatening cease-and-desist letter will scare others into compliance.

Re:a further, but brief history of SPAM [revised] (1)

fishbonez (177041) | more than 12 years ago | (#191800)

"Shut up! Shut up! I don't like SPAM!"

I think that's how we all feel when it comes to the UCE variety of Spam.

Not too surprising (1)

mizhi (186984) | more than 12 years ago | (#191802)

For the following reasons: 1) As stated, getting everyone to call spam by another name would be impossible. 2) They've probably discovered that it helps business. We have a SPAM (Luncheon Meat) can around the lab that we've named Mr. SPAM. We're geeks, sue us. 3) The executives at Hormel probably have half a brain.

Re:a further, but brief history of SPAM [revised] (1)

psyclone (187154) | more than 12 years ago | (#191803)

according to everything2 [everything2.com], SPAM stands for for "Specially Processed Assorted Meat" as artificial meat would probably be nastier than assorted meat. It also would not be properly followed by "Luncheon Meat" (or some other noun) as the trademark requests.

However, the first time I heard of spam == junk mail, I asked around and was told "Sometimes Pornographic Advertising Messages" which made sense to me at the time and makes sense now. If anyone can find a "published" location that describes spam as such, please post below.

So, according to their policy... (1)

riflemann (190895) | more than 12 years ago | (#191804)

They are able to sue Slashdot for associating spam email with the meat-esque stuff....look at the topic icon. :)

--
BB

Eat it! (1)

xx01dk (191137) | more than 12 years ago | (#191806)

Does anyone ever actually EAT this stuff? It must be like owning NKOB cd's or something. You know people buy this stuff, but no one ever owns up to it, and obviously, Hormel makes a tidy profit from it. Hmm? Come on everyone, you know who you are.

Re:Eat it! (1)

xx01dk (191137) | more than 12 years ago | (#191807)

Actually being in the military, I've probably eaten my fair share as well...

Just not sure if I'd have known.

Re:why is this a story? (1)

Ereth (194013) | more than 12 years ago | (#191809)

Must be a slow news day. Quick! Send in a submission about IPv4 running out of numbers unless we do something about it!

Re:Eat more SPAM (5)

Tirs (195467) | more than 12 years ago | (#191810)

Well, I'm European and I had never heard about a meal called SPAM before. When I went to the U.S. I saw the cans on a supermarket shelf, and I thought: "Hey, this stuff has the same name as junk mail!" I tried it just out of curiosity... and they won a new customer. A side effect of this story was that now I understand what the "Spam" icon in /. is.

Re:wouldn't work (1)

robbway (200983) | more than 12 years ago | (#191811)

I like the concept. I also feel that Politicians should be responsible for every political sign that ends up illegally polluting our roadways. However, what if a spammer wanted to kill a company by spamming unsolicited ads? Then the company is responsible for something they had absolutely no control over--which is often the case with political signs as well.

----------------------

Re:a further, but brief history of SPAM [revised] (2)

ColdGrits (204506) | more than 12 years ago | (#191813)

Actually, the use of the term "spam"to describe UCE comes from the Monty Python sketch.

You remember, the one in the cafe, where everything comes with Spam, includiong such delights as "Spam, spam, spam, sausage, egg and spam" etc.

So all the food came with vast quantities of spam, obscuring the rest of the food, just as email comes with vast quantities of UCE, obscuring the real emails.

(The sketch, btw, culminates in the Vikings in a corner of the cafe singing the Spam song -

"Spam, spam, spam, spam.
Spam, spam, spam, spam,
...
"
)

--

Re:ISPs (1)

journeyman101 (204743) | more than 12 years ago | (#191814)

Umm...not all ISPs are big corporations people. I own a small ISP and my /etc/mail/access is FULL of IP addresses that we block because of SPAM. Its very,very difficult to stop all of it just because of the sheer volume. DNS Blacklists arent a very good option as we well know because the groups not only add SPAMMERS, but also arbitrarily add people they dont like to the blacklist. (ORBS vs MAPS...remember) Saying that holding the ISPs responsible is absurd. Its like that recently made (screwed up) law, the DMCA..that everyone loves to hate. Maybe we should try to come up with a Collective solution to the problem instead of laying back and pointing fingers.......

Sound a little arrogant there.. (1)

Monkeyman334 (205694) | more than 12 years ago | (#191817)

I mean Follow SPAM with "Luncheon Meat", do you think these people have every tried SPAM "Luncheon Meat"? They should try and just get used to "SPAM, It's better than nothing". Or "SPAM, Looks like meat, smells like meat, must be meat"

Re:The best kind of publicity? (2)

Zero Sum (209324) | more than 12 years ago | (#191818)

The difference is this, Hormel don't give up their trademark if they dont pursue because SPAM and spam cannot be confused.

If Rollerblade or Xerox allow their trademarks to become generic words for in-line skating or photocopying, they loose the right to the trademark.

Ever heard of a "biro"? For quite a while nobody used the term "ball point pen" and the trademark is useless.

Re:The best kind of publicity? (1)

job2.12 (211949) | more than 12 years ago | (#191820)

It is bad.

Classic example;
think of when you order aspirin. Nine times out of ten do you actually get the brand aspirin or do you get another product with the same properties?

it's actually bad for the sales of the company

Re:Eat more SPAM (1)

BlowCat (216402) | more than 12 years ago | (#191821)

Not only SPAM. Americans also have CVS. I thought: "Hey, they are using version control for drugs!"

Many computer terms have another non-computer meaning in the US. For example, they are using term "mailbox" not only for e-mail!

recomended recipe (1)

morie (227571) | more than 12 years ago | (#191823)

I strongly recomend SPAM, SPAM, SPAM SPAM, Bacon and SPAM. But of course, there are other options.

Well-Done (1)

The Monster (227884) | more than 12 years ago | (#191825)

It's rare that you see someone giving up rather than sueing
Yes, it is. I think they were put in a no-win situation, because failure to "defend" their trademark could cause them to lose it, the way Bayer [bayer.com] lost "asprin [asprin.com]". As their site indicates, Rollerblade [rollerblade.com], Kleenex [kleenex.com], and Xerox [xerox.com] were nearly lost as well. But since they're being gracious about it, perhaps /. ought to grant this request of theirs [emphasis mine]:
We do not object to use of this slang term to describe UCE, although we do object to the use of our product image in association with that term. Also, if the term is to be used, it should be used in all lower-case letters to distinguish it from our trademark SPAM, which should be used with all uppercase letters.
How about a thumbnail image of the Python players as Vikings? Or would that be an IP problem all over again? With either Python (Monty) Pictures, Ltd. or the Minnesota Vikings [vikings.com], for all I know.

I know: a stack of those brown envelopes that look all official like they're from a government agency, but when you open them up - just a sales pitch?

Good for Hormel... (3)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 12 years ago | (#191826)

Kudos to Hormel for standing out as a shining example of a sensible, rational company in the otherwise delusional corporate world.

No kudos whatsoever to those who for years refused to even consider honoring Hormel's quite reasonable requests regarding the use of the SPAM trademark.

After years of sticking to your guns and standing up for what you believe in, you've finally beaten the good guys. Go, team.

Re:Eat more SPAM (1)

litheum (242650) | more than 12 years ago | (#191830)

man, i think it's pretty much an unspoken rule that you're not supposed to say that you eat that shit.

Re:Eat it! (2)

vacamike (248725) | more than 12 years ago | (#191832)

I eat it regularly. Fry it and put maple syrup on it...mmmm. That and fried bologna :)

________________________________________________ __

Re:Eat it! (2)

budgenator (254554) | more than 12 years ago | (#191834)

Spam luncheon meat is very popular over the whole Pasific rim and islands. My step-son reported that in Korea, a Spam dinner costs more than a beef steak dinner. Spam's only problem is that most English desended person's tend to be beef-eaters, and consider pork eating peoples in deragatory terms. Asian desended people tend to consider Spam a delicious treat. I consider it quite tasty, and often fry it and use it for a sandwich meat. The frying melts out a lot of the fat that some object to, after draining I would be suprised if the fat content is more than most beef based luncheon meats.

As for the name I had heard that it actualy stood for Shoulder Pork And haM. Also being a canned product means that it is not perishable like fresh meat would be, many third world countries just don't have the infrastructure to move large quantities of meat arround like most of us are used to. This explains its popularity with campers, its hard to keep meat with out refigeration.

Canned meats allow a lot of third world people to moderate the feast-fammine cycle, that they have all ways lived under, such as kill a pig and feast for a week, then half starve until the next one is ready. This is a big change in many cultures, it is difficult to conceptualize the thought of saving for the future when eat it before it spoils is all you've known. Actualy I've just about cleaned out my Y2K stock of Spam; so I guess that I'll have to tackle my Email next.

Re:The best kind of publicity? (2)

Pogue Mahone (265053) | more than 12 years ago | (#191839)

You've missed the point. The companies don't mind that everyone says "xerox that" or whatever. You're right, it's probably good for business, and in practice there's very little they can do anyway.
But to keep their trademark, they have to defend it - so they must go after people who use the name "officially", so to speak, in publications etc. If they didn't do this, they'd lose the trademark and they wouldn't be able to sue if (say) Canon brought out their new Xerox-2000 photocopier.
By being publicly strict but privately tolerant, they get the best of both worlds.

--

SPAM ROCKS! (1)

V'alien (265475) | more than 12 years ago | (#191840)

Ah! SPAM! I grew up on it. In fact, had it for supper this past weekend. I love it. My friends think I'm weird. But where I grew up (in the Philippines) it's like a staple diet. :)

I fry it till it's nice and crispy and eat it with rice. mmmm

man, i'm hungry now.

I have a good friend who is from Hawaii and he said that it's huge over there. So between the 2 of us we eat spam for everyone here in SC. :)

~V

The best part... (2)

nm42 (310685) | more than 12 years ago | (#191841)

"Other examples of famous trademarks having a different slang meaning include... TEFLON, used to describe President Reagan" - SPAM's message [spam.com]

That has to be the best veiled political statements in corporate america's history...

Re:Spam from spammers (1)

boyner (311903) | more than 12 years ago | (#191842)

I wouldn't feed beef-fed Americans to my dog, never mind other people. PS is it true that the high levels of growth hormones in meat over in the USA are responsible for your fat asses?

why is this a story? (1)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 12 years ago | (#191843)

from the wired article:
The [it's OK to call junk e-mail "spam"] policy, which has been in place at Hormel for a little more than a year, represents quite an about-face from just a few years ago.
The only time I've ever seen a Hormel comment on the term "spam" is at that page. Even the Wired article seemed to say that this is a non-issue: "Hormel said a year ago it's OK to call junk mail `spam'". Why is this on SlashDot now?

God bless those Albino Ninjas...

Re:The aspirin trademark (1)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 12 years ago | (#191844)

hmm. I was always told that Bayer lost the trademark to Aspring due to not enforcing it, but it appears that Isaac-Lew is correct [about.com]. Couldn't find any mention of it in his link, or at the Bayer site, though.

God bless those Albino Ninjas...

The best kind of publicity? (2)

OpenSourced (323149) | more than 12 years ago | (#191845)

The company Rollerblade, for example, did a pretty good job getting people to use the phrase "in-line skating" instead of "rollerblading" to protect its brand name. Xerox has also been vigilant in preventing publications from using the word "xerox" as a generic synonym for photocopy.

I just don't get it. It's bad for you company that everybody says "go rollerblading" or "xerox that" ? I would just say that's the best kind of publicity. Your trademark is in the dictionary, for crying out loud! Of course it's different with spam, nobody would like to be associated with that. But still I would say that adds rather than substracts from the value of your trademark. In the case of Xerox and Rollerblade , it's beyond my comprehension. (Oops, sorry, I forgot, a Trademark is an adjective so in the case of Xerox copiers and Rollerblade in-line-skates...)

Re:Spam from spammers (2)

SiMac (409541) | more than 12 years ago | (#191846)

I agree. SpamCop [spamcop.net] should partner with The Hunger Site [thehungersite.com] in this endeavor.

THANK YOU for your donation of 1.0 slice(s) of human meat to a hungry person, paid for by: Hormel.

--

show Hormel some respect (1)

beanerspace (443710) | more than 12 years ago | (#191848)

I think, in the nerd community, should show Hormel some respect for backing off. One sure way would be to buy a can SPAM and send it to ISPs who are notorious for spam.

It would financially reward Hormel, while giving the errant ISPs something to chew on.

Spam from spammers (2)

lup23 (444247) | more than 12 years ago | (#191849)

"Now if only they would send infinite supplies of can-cooked spiced pink meat to the nasty kind of spammers"
Why not send all the spammers to Hormel to make Spam out of? We could feed the world....

Actually... (1)

ReaganBSD (445631) | more than 12 years ago | (#191850)

I rather like SPAM, and always have. It's got a nice, distinctive flavour

My guess would be that even if Hormel won, people would still refer to junk email as spam. How can you change/stop that?

Here's an example. Did you know that the word "aspirin" used to be a registered trademark? Now it's not. There are lots of cases of trademarks slopping over into public domain even before the 75-year trademark expiration date. Hormel has to be vigilant in protecting its trademark.

For those of you who don't like SPAM, to each his own. Ever try a slice of SPAM with lettuce, tomato, onion and mustard on a lightly toasted sesame seed roll? Dee-leesh! SPAM is a bit like vodka that way--it really does need to be combined with something else for full enjoyment.

Go ahead. Eat your SPAM. Order the SPAMburger Hamburger football. Just don't spam me!

Re:The best kind of publicity? (1)

stinkgeek.com (450152) | more than 12 years ago | (#191853)

Urrm, "biro" is named after Ladislo Biro, the Hungarian inventor of the ballpoint pen not after a trademark.

Spam in my inbox all day (2)

ColGraff (454761) | more than 12 years ago | (#191856)

Spam! in my inbox all day
It's the best.
Thinking about bandwidth,
sending angry emails now.
Spam! Filtering it out,
keep it a-way from me!
The Internet is there
to send you Spam now.
The Spam is there to make you say "ow!"
Reading all my spam-mail, wondering if I'm a
junkie now. Spam!

With apologies to Weird Al Yankovic.

Re:Eat it! (1)

GPLwhore (455583) | more than 12 years ago | (#191857)

"because of its fat content."

They got to you as well ?
Every wondered how in the world people managed to look much better and avoid so many heart related disases 50 years ago, despite the fact that nobody even cared about "fat content" back then ?

Spam is an abbreviation (1)

llogiq (455777) | more than 12 years ago | (#191858)

It reads:
Stupid People's Annoying Mail.

--
while (!asleep()) sheep++;
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