×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Dell Offers Ubuntu Option With Alienware Gaming Desktop

timothy posted 1 year,18 days | from the year-of-the-linux-sorta-console-looking-thing dept.

Linux Business 135

dartttt writes "Dell has launched a new Ubuntu gaming desktop (first ever?) . Alienware customers can now choose either Windows or Ubuntu when buying a new X51. Ubuntu option is initially available to U.S. customers only and the price starts from $599." Also in Ubuntu news: Canonical announced on Friday the final beta release of Ubuntu 13.04, aka Raring Ringtail (the main release, as well as the growing flock of other *buntus).

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

135 comments

But where are the games? (3, Insightful)

invictusvoid (2882111) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377521)

where are the Linux games ?

Re:But where are the games? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377537)

http://store.steampowered.com/browse/linux/

Re:But where are the games? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377563)

Out of the 25 or so games I have on Steam, only about 25% of them are Linux compatible. All of them older games (Original Half life, original Counter Strike, etc). No Skyrim, Dead Space, HL2, etc.

Re:But where are the games? (5, Informative)

Mike Frett (2811077) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377867)

I have about 30, most all of them are compatible or will be once Valve releases HL2. And we already know any new games Valve releases will be Linux native. There are also dozens of sweet Kickstarter projects about to be released also. And lgdb.org has a huge database of games.

I think what you are really saying is "Where are the Graphically Superior Games". Well, IMO Graphics don't make the game, but they are nice to look at. The solution is to stop buying Windows only games and check the compatibility before you buy a game so you're not stuck.

Re:But where are the games? (2)

Svartalf (2997) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378293)

Not to mention there's a bit of a big push to get games out- everyone on Steam's at least passingly interested in Linux versions of their titles now.

Re:But where are the games? (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | 1 year,17 days | (#43378881)

While I agree quite a few games with older graphics are often better games. People don't tend to spend the luxury price for an alienware PC to play world of goo. That being said I do believe if valve can manage to push things foward with the "steambox" idea, we could wind up with an unprecidented future generation of games with linux compatibility.

Re:But where are the games? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | 1 year,17 days | (#43380141)

Of the 30 Xbox games I have, only about 8 of them work on Xbox360. THats how i view this issue, as a back-compat problem. Both Sony and Microsoft have paid lip service to back-compat but Steam on Linux is supposed to somehow magically do everything. Its going to take time, but more AAA titles WILL be coming to Linux.

Re:But where are the games? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378031)

DRM on Window - Evil
DRM on Linux - OHMERGOSH I CAN'T CONTAIN MY ERECTION!

Have fun playing your 5 year old games.

Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (4, Informative)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378161)

DRM on Window - Evil
DRM on Linux - OHMERGOSH I CAN'T CONTAIN MY ERECTION!

That's because the DRM on these Linux games tends to be Steam DRM. DRM is evil, but Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user in practice. Unlike Assassin's Creed 2 and SimCity (2013), which made headlines for requiring a continuous Internet connection during gameplay, games using Steam DRM only require the user to connect to the Internet once after installation and every 30 days thereafter for single-player or same-screen multiplayer mode.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (3)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378285)

Sorry - DRM is still evil. I might consider a game or something that I have to connect to the internet ONE TIME for verification. Every thirty days after? No sale. No phone home features, thank you very much.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (0)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378371)

Sorry - DRM is still evil.

What non-evil solution do you have to the problem of mass copyright infringement?

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (1, Informative)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378503)

http://www.baen.com/library/prime_palaver1.asp [baen.com]

Copyright infringement is not comparable to bank robbing. At it's worst, it's comparable to children snitching candy. It's a problem that doesn't really need solving. Piracy is free advertising.

I'm not interested in "protecting" "intellectual property". Entertain the people, and the people will reward you.

And end up selling one copy (1)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,17 days | (#43378771)

http://www.baen.com/library/prime_palaver1.asp

Several letters posted there encourage making a sample chapter free to read. Ouya will do this.

Piracy is free advertising.

Until you sell one copy to someone in the warez scene and everyone else gets their copy from the warez site.

Re:And end up selling one copy (2)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379029)

You should read more of Jim Baen's free library.

They put free books online. They are free as in free beer, just download it and enjoy. Free, free, free. Baen pirated the books himself, opening his own warez site to do so.

Multiple authors have noted that soon after putting the book online for free, sales of that book skyrocket. Mostly, they put older, out of print books online, but that book immediately sells like hotcakes in bookstores around the nation. Hell, around the world, I guess. Not only does that particular book sell, but related books sell (anthologies and such). PLUS - the author notices an increase in his other works.

Free publicity always pays.

Entertain the masses, and the masses will reward you. Being a dick about your "intellectual property" just pisses people off. Many gamers have told us the same thing, right here on slashdot. Jim Baen agreed, he put his money where his mouth was, and he proved the theory to be right.

Rest in Peace, Jim Baen - the world needs a lot more people like you!

Pay to upgrade their experience to what? (1)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379505)

Multiple authors have noted that soon after putting the book online for free, sales of that book skyrocket.

That works for books because there is another medium in which some people prefer to view the same work. People who prefer to read books in a paper form have an opportunity to pay to upgrade their experience from free reading on an electronic device to paid paper. If an entire old video game is given away, on the other hand, people can upgrade their experience from free-to-play on the device to paid what?

Re:Pay to upgrade their experience to what? (3, Interesting)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379601)

I'm not the one trying to make a living by entertaining people. In fact, I'm very UNentertaining. People pay to not see or to hear me.

What I know for sure is, gaming is trying to follow in the footsteps of the music and movie industries. They really need to back up, look at reality, and find another way to go.

I no longer play games. I got tired of them. But, I know for a fact, that purchasing a game, only to run into DRM bullshit only forces people to torrent the cracked versions. I did it, and I've watched my sons do it. Whether it's a CD check, or an online activation check, or whatever, if I have to jump through a hoop to play the game, it's not worth playing. Just grab the cracked version, and you don't have to jump ANY hoops.

Just entertain people, and see if they reward you. Stop treating entertainment like it has to be a big business. Don't spend 3 million dollars developing a game, in the hopes that you'll make twelve million in sales. That's just retarded Hollywierd thinking.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43380061)

Nope it's not a problem. The music industry lost tons of money for the decade after file sharing took off. Who knows why? I'm sure it wasn't music piracy.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (1)

devent (1627873) | 1 year,17 days | (#43380167)

It's not even that (children snitching candy). If a kid steals a candy bar, that candy bar is gone. It is a loss to the shop. If a kid downloads a game it is not stealing, there is no measurable loss. Any "loss" is hypothetical and the kid downloading the game from TPB can have multiple reasons: a) kid have no money b) kid can't buy the game (stupid ratings) c) the game is not available in stores d) kid is lazy and don't like to go downtown to the store e) it's Sunday and the store is closed, and so on.

All of those reasons would not have resulted in an extra sale if piracy would not be possible. Thus there was no loss. But what is better: kid wasting time to play your game or kid is wasting time to do something else, like going outside or watch TV? I highly think that it's it in your best interest that the kid is wasting the time with your game. As you see, DRM is not only a big fuck you to your customer, but it will not and cannot increase your sales.

Instead you should look at why the kid is downloading your game for free instead of paying for it. Instead of increasing investment in DRM, you should invest in making your game as easy available as possible.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43378875)

If there are no non-evil solutions to a problem, perhaps we should rethink things.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (2)

Entropius (188861) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379289)

Well, this last month some people went to the Internet and said "Give us money, and we will make you a spiffy game, and will sell it DRM-free. We'll need about a million bucks."

The Internet gave them $4 million, so much money that they had to scramble to find ways to spend all of it to make their game spiffier.

Re:Steam DRM tends to feel less evil to the user (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43379227)

I wouldn't consider if it requires verification even *once*. Especially bound to give trouble if I have to reinstall for some reason.

Re:But where are the games? (2)

Svartalf (2997) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378303)

Heh... DRM's not a mandatory thing for Steam use. It's another lego block in the API. At least a good part of the Indie titles don't use that lego block. Personally, I'm not for DRM, mind...but I do hope you're not ever using a gaming console, because by definition, you're using DRMed titles- PERIOD.

Emulators and not-an-emulators (3, Informative)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377975)

Nearly every game for NES, Super NES, or Sega Genesis works in emulation on Linux. If you have a Retrode, you can turn your Super NES or Genesis cartridges into ROM files and play them that way, or you can use a Kazzo to dump NES cartridges.

And if you're not into emulation, you can try Wine, which is not an emulator. Plenty of PC games made for Windows work in Linux through Wine. Or you can try a load of amateur games made with SDL or Pygame.

Re:But where are the games? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378001)

http://store.steampowered.com/browse/linux/
duh?

That's weird. (4, Informative)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377525)

You have the inquisitiveness and good taste to use linux, but you have a low bar for standards, shitty taste, and willingness to overpay for Alienware?!

I mean, I'm glad to see linux anywhere it can get to, but that's such a bizarre pairing.

Re:That's weird. (0)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377553)

Correct if I'm wrong, but isn't Alienware that company that charges twice the price of a normal laptop for one that's in a slightly customised case?

Re:That's weird. (5, Insightful)

Verunks (1000826) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377599)

if you want a gaming laptop there aren't many other choices, and they are all priced around the same

Re:That's weird. (2, Interesting)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377827)

Though, if you want a gaming laptop, someone will hopefully intervene and nudge you away from it as the name is kind of oxymoronic. Even in 2013, I believe people need to be disabused of the idea that (short of spending $5,000 on an insane system every year for a 12lb crazy ass laptop) there is really such a thing as a "gaming" laptop.

Except maybe for linux, because on linux the majority of ported games tend to be . . . a little more trivial (sorry, I tried to come up with a less dismissive word).

Re:That's weird. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377949)

I bought an alienware abut 4 years ago. Cost me about 3,000 and will still play everything that comes out just fine (though no longer at max settings). At the time I was working as a merchant marine so it was great to have something to take on the ship with me. Even now I use it as a backup/lan party machine rather than taking my whole desktop setup. However little sense these machines may make for most people they do serve a useful purpose in the market.

Re:That's weird. (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378081)

At the time I was working as a merchant marine..

Damn, I wish I was younger. I'd be one one a them boats so fast it's make my wife's head spin.

And now you're telling me I can play Borderlands 2 in the downtime? Hell yes.

PS3-class gaming with no GPU (2)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378003)

Even in 2013, I believe people need to be disabused of the idea that (short of spending $5,000 on an insane system every year for a 12lb crazy ass laptop) there is really such a thing as a "gaming" laptop.

You might not be able to get PS4- or Durango-class gaming on a laptop, but PS3-class gaming is certainly attainable. In the past, Intel's "GMA" integrated graphics processor has been nicknamed "Graphics My Ass" compared to even a low-end AMD or NVIDIA GPU. But a year ago, a PC with an Ivy Bridge CPU was seen to run Skyrim at over 40 fps [anandtech.com] . If a PS3-class game runs that well on Intel graphics, think of how much better AMD's laptop GPUs will handle it.

Re:PS3-class gaming with no GPU (1)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378137)

I wouldn't consider a laptop that is capable of playing games at a level comparable to a 2005 video game console to be particularly appealing nor considered a "gaming laptop". I would assert that for something to truly be a "gaming laptop", it should be able to play modern games recently released with only minor acceptable sacrifices (obviously, not running with maximum eye-candy cranked up, for example). I think this is an especially fair demand framed in the context of how expensive they are.

Re:PS3-class gaming with no GPU (1)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378215)

it should be able to play modern games recently released with only minor acceptable sacrifices (obviously, not running with maximum eye-candy cranked up, for example).

That depends on what you mean by "recently released" and "acceptable sacrifices". Skyrim was first published in the fourth quarter of 2011 (source: Wikipedia), and Ivy Bridge graphics pulled 40+ fps on Medium settings (source: Anandtech). And as I said earlier, there are laptop GPUs more powerful than the one in Ivy Bridge. My point is that any laptop with an NV or AMD GPU is probably a "gaming laptop" by now.

Re:PS3-class gaming with no GPU (0)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378451)

I can tell the instance the framerate drops below 60. 40 fps looks laggy as shit.

PS3-class game? You mean one that runs only at 480p, 720p & 1080i ? Ewww. No thanks.

If I'm going to pay $#,### dollars on a laptop I want a GPU that doesn't suck ass; Intel's GMAs have always sucked for performance as you point out.

I'll keep waiting until shitty mobile GPUs can run 120+ Hz in 2 yr old games. I'm in no rush to blow money on something that will be obsolete in a few years. Hell, I just picked up a GTX Titan so I can run today's games at 1080p @ 120+ Hz on the wonderful Asus VG248QE 144Hz.

Re:That's weird. (1)

thoth (7907) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378113)

I bought a Sager Midern gaming notebook 3 years ago, for right about $2000. It is heavy, but more like 9 lbs not 12.

Yeah, it was pricier than a regular notebook, and I could have gotten a more awesome desktop for that much, but overall, I'm really happy with the gaming notebook.It has decent stats for me (core i7, 6 GB, 500 GB HD originally but I swapped out for a 250 GB SSD, 17" 1920x1200 screen, GeForce 285M, wireless). I'm not into FPS games so I don't need every graphics setting maxed out. This thing plays the games I want to play just fine - mostly MMOs, indie puzzlers, RPGs, strat games, etc.

And the portability is very useful. I hate headphones (I wear glasses so headphones eventually pinch my ears against the frames) so if I'm bothering somebody (somebody else wants to watch TV) I can take my games to the 2nd or 3rd floor. Or to a LAN party (kinda rare for me these days, but I've dragged midtowers to those and that kinda sucked to do).

So basically, $5000, every year, 12 lbs: not even close.

Re:That's weird. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378245)

I don't think that's true anymore. Modern games require less expensive hardware to run than ever - a gaming laptop under $1k is much more powerful than a console, and can run most games.

The most crucial part of even a cheap gaming laptop is a semi-decent discrete AMD/NVIDIA graphics card, as opposed to an integrated Intel one. Frustratingly enough, most non-gaming vendors still provide laptops with weak graphics cards relative to the CPU, even though the difference in performance can be orders of magnitudes.

I'm trying to look at low-end gaming laptop vendors objectively, and Alienware/Dell don't seem that bad. Can you find a better one?

Re:That's weird. (1)

Entropius (188861) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379343)

Not so much.

I'm typing on a machine I bought a week ago -- an Asus G46. It's a 14" machine that is a bit overbuilt (important to me because I want something durable), but still clocks in at about 5 pounds. The CPU is a 3GHz dual-core i5, which is really not so bad; the GPU is a GTX660M, which runs anything I have thrown at it at very high FPS. (I actually don't have games installed yet that will really stress it, but people's reviews rate it very highly.) It runs quite cool; the cooling system on the thing is quite beefy, and exhausts out the back so you don't bake yourself. The battery lasts for 5-6 hours when not running the 660M.

It cost about $900.

No, it's not as powerful as the dual GTX580 beasties, but I don't need it to be.

The one drawback is the screen -- it's only 1366x768, which is not the best for a 14" panel, but when I'm at home I have a 1080p monitor anyway.

Re:That's weird. (2)

Patch86 (1465427) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378005)

What actually is a "gaming laptop"? One with an i7 processor and a non-Intel video card? That's not that difficult to buy. A quick search of Amazon shows me 96 results for just that. 31 of them have a 17" or greater screen size too. Pretty much every PC manufacturer is represented there.

No judgement on price though; the ones I can see look fair enough at £500-£700.

Re:That's weird. (1)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378159)

I'd consider a gaming laptop to be a laptop that can play current releases just fine at reasonable frame rate and only sacrificing the graphic fidelity a little bit (meaning, not dropping everything to minimum). Being able to play a game that was released five years ago shouldn't really qualify it as a "gaming laptop". Also, you have to factor in the price of a laptop that can meet this requirement and then consider how quickly it will become obsolete for that function. Unless you sleep on piles of money every night, the concept of a true "gaming laptop" is unfeasible.

A laptop that can play TF2 (from 2007) or facebook games or a game that is two or three years old (and perhaps with lowered settings) is what I would just call "a laptop".

Re:That's weird. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378243)

and importantly, not cremating itself in the process

Re:That's weird. (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378307)

To me, a "gaming laptop" is a laptop that is too big or heavy to comfortably carry around or sit on top of your lap and has hardware (CPU/GPU) that emphezises processing power over energy consumption.
Basically, it's a gaming desktop that is convenient for dragging along to a LAN party but not very convenient for typical laptop use.

Re:That's weird. (2)

Entropius (188861) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379421)

They've not been that way for a long time, if you get ones that have x60-class (560, 660, etc.,) GPU's rather than the 580/680 class ones. They may not run all your games on ultra at 1920x1080 with FSAA on, but is that really that big of a deal?

I'm sitting here with one in my lap right now, actually. It's barely warm, not that heavy, not that big (it's small enough that I plug it into a real monitor when I'm at home), the battery lasts a long time, and it still runs games quite well. No, it's not a beast with multiple high-end GPU's in SLI, but I can't afford one of those anyway.

Re:That's weird. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378353)

I don't think even the i7 processor is necessary. I've always seen it as a minor upgrade for a major price, while discrete graphics are orders of magnitudes better than integrated.

Re:That's weird. (2)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377737)

I haven't followed them much, since the brand was acquired by Dell, but yes - they're one of those Northwest Falcon / Doghouse Systems type of companies that build you a gaming rig for a lot more than you could build one yourself (between 150% and 200% of what you could put it together yourself for). That isn't to say it's a total rip off, but you could reasonably also find someone to build it to your specs for you if you don't want to do the dirty work and still come out a lot cheaper than paying the "there's a little alien logo on my ridiculous looking chassis" fee.

As someone else mentioned, they're one of the only games in town if you want a "real" gaming laptop (still an oxymoron if you ask me) -- but at a ridiculous price point.

Anyway, I just took a look and even their high end doesn't seem very high-end, anymore. Alienware used to put out some pretty beefy systems (but not beefy enough for the insane markup). All I can find under the Alienware brand for desktop gaming PCs is an "X51" with 16gb RAM, a 1.5gb GTX 660, a i7-3770, and a 256gb SSD. Throw in a chassis, mobo, and decent PSU and you could do this for about $1,000 or less retail. Dell can do it for $1,500 (ooh, but that includes Valve's Steam client - pre-installed!).

Oh, actually, they seem to have a hexacore lineup called "Aurora", too . . . It's pretty much the same thing, but with an i7-3820 and dual 680s . . . for $2,700!

Re:That's weird. (2)

crafty.munchkin (1220528) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377613)

$599 in the US. Base model is $1299 in Australia, for a PC spec which could be bought for $800 without the glowing Alien head.

Yeah, I can see that working out well for them...

Re:That's weird. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377767)

I thought that some of their lower-end laptops were actually a good value, if you didn't want to be stuck with intel graphics. Or can you find a better gaming laptop vendor?

As for buying desktops, of course it's always a lot more cost effective to build your own.

Re:That's weird. (1)

Entropius (188861) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379459)

The Asus gaming laptops are pretty nice. They're not super-high-end, but they're quite nice, and not that expensive.

Re:That's weird. (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43378789)

That and Dell has a habit of abandoning some after a year.

Look at the M11x-R1. No new video drivers since March 2011. You're largely stuck with Dell's drivers if you want the switchable graphics to work.
Dell doesn't have any replacement batteries in stock and hasn't at least for months, so if your battery is like that of many other M11x owners and dead after 2.5 years, you pretty much have a small desktop computer now.

Comical (0)

Dunbal (464142) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377541)

A struggling computer manufacturer has the brilliant idea of combining two struggling brands in the hope of saving itself. Ubuntu has been "meh" for a while now, and Alienware has earned a reputation for being overpriced crap. Who knows, maybe this will work for Dell. But I doubt it. The kiddies and the people attracted to shiny are all about smart-phones and tablets. They don't want a lap/desktop anymore. That means the market has shifted, and those of us still left in the computer market are a hell of a lot more savvy now, on average.

Re:Comical (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377673)

Not comical. Revealing desperate for any traction at all, sure. Dell clearly thinks that branch of product can't do well enough on Win alone, and "linux gaming" has been making headlines lately, so what the heck.

Ubuntu itself doesn't matter per se. They'd go with Ubuntu because they'd want the closest to 'safe well-supported mainstream brand' they could find. But it's no turn-off to anyone who'd prefer another distro because they'll load it easy enough, and the 'ubuntu inside' assures them it's a high end laptop that /definitely/ has a full set sorted of linux drivers for a change.

Ubuntu naming reset! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377575)

This just in: Ubuntu will use this opportunity to reset their naming. R is far up the alphabet already and Rearing Rattlesnake may have a case of Rampaging Ringworm. So, in conjuction with Alienware, 13.04 will ("informally" of course) be known as "Alluring Alien".

Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377617)

Dell and Ubuntu. All you need now is some spyware from Sony and you've got the perfect storm of crapware.

Re:Wow! (1)

Seumas (6865) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377835)

Dude! You're gettin' a command line! :D

No, seriously, I would love to see some sort of goofy slip-up on the installation media cause all of these laptops to go out in "server mode", with no desktop. :)

Re:Wow! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377955)

Yes, because a BSOD is so much better and modern.

An apt-get away (1)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378017)

I would love to see some sort of goofy slip-up on the installation media cause all of these laptops to go out in "server mode", with no desktop.

Fortunately, Ubuntu is based on Debian, for which a desktop environment is just an apt-get away.

Nice! Fedora will look brilliant on it (0)

aakkuan (2591459) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377645)

I have been looking for linux compatible game machines!!!

Re:Nice! Fedora will look brilliant on it (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378257)

Try System76. Again, a bit of a premium, but they have a 17" laptop that makes a pretty decent gaming machine and is fully Linux compatible.

Slashdot. related was website owned by the United (-1, Offtopic)

jahnvi (2889887) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377687)

States-The site, which bills itself as "News for Nerds". submitted and evaluated news stories about science and technology related topics. Slashdot was founded in 1997 as a blog, Chips and Dips, by Hope College computer science Rob Malta, also known as "Commander Taco" and classmate Jeff Bates, also known as "Demos". Discussion is moderated bay user-Randall selected mandatory are assigned points which they can use to rate a comment. The site's comment are moderation system is administrated by its own open source content management system, Slash, which is available under the GNU General Public Licence. 7 million unique visitors per month are received over 5300 comments per day. Occasionally, a story will link to a server causing a large surge of traffic, which which can overhasty some smaller or independent sites. The phenomenon is known as the "Slashdot effect". For more details please visit http//:www.dkspire.com

Microsoft Kinect Spy System (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377693)

Microsoft Kinect Spy System (THIS ARTICLE IS BEING SCRUBBED FROM THE NET - Pin, Archive, Share this article quickly!

= Microsoft Kinect Spy System

THIS ARTICLE IS BEING SCRUBBED FROM THE NET. THE SITE IT WAS ORIGINALLY POSTED TO YANKED THE PLUG ON THEIR WHOLE SITE!!! COPY/PASTE THIS ARTICLE AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE TO DISCUSSION FORUMS, BLOGS, FACEBOOK, TWITTER, AND ARCHIVE AND MIRROR THIS DOCUMENT SO IT DOES NOT VANISH FOREVER!

"So you just got the Kinect/Xbox360 gaming system and you're having fun, hanging out in your underwear, plopped down in your favorite lounge chair, and playing games with your buddies. Yeah, it's great to have a microphone and camera in your game system so you can "Kinect" to your pals while you play, but did you read that Terms of Service Agreement that came with your Kinect thingy? No? Here, let me point out an important part of that service agreement.

If you accept the agreement, you "expressly authorize and consent to us accessing or disclosing information about you, including the content of your communications, in order to: (a) comply with the law or respond to lawful requests or legal process; (b) protect the rights or property of Microsoft, our partners, or our customers, including the enforcement of our agreements or policies governing your use of the Service; or © act on a good faith belief that such access or disclosure is necessary to protect the personal safety of Microsoft employees, customers, or the public."

Did you catch that? Here, let me print the important part in really big letters.

"If you accept the agreement, you expressly authorize and consent to us accessing or disclosing information about you, including the content of your communications⦠on a good faith belief that such access or disclosure is necessary to protect the personal safety of Microsoft employees, customers, or the public."

OK, is that clear enough for ya? When you use the Kinect system, you agree to allow Microsoft (and any branch of law enforcement or government they care to share information with) to use your Kinect system to spy on you. Maybe run that facial recognition software to check you out, listen to your conversations, and keep track of who you are communicating with.

I know this is probably old news to some, but I thought I would mention it because it pertains to almost all of these home game systems that are interactive. You have to remember, the camera and microphone contained in your game system have the ability to be hacked by anyone the game company gives that ability to, and that includes government snoops and law enforcement agents.

Hey, it's MICROSOFT. What did you expect?

And the same concerns apply to all interactive game systems. Just something to think about if you're having a "Naked Wii party" or doing something illegal while you're gaming with your buddies. Or maybe you say something suspicious and it triggers the DHS software to start tracking your every word. Hey, this is not paranoia. It's spelled out for you, right there in that Service Agreement. Read it! Here's one more part of the agreement you should be aware of.

"You should not expect any level of privacy concerning your use of the live communication features (for example, voice chat, video and communications in live-hosted gameplay sessions) offered through the Service."

Did you catch it that time? YOU SHOULD NOT EXPECT ANY LEVEL OF PRIVACY concerning your voice chat and video features on your Kinect box."

###

= "Listen up, you ignorant sheep. Your government is spending more money than ever to spy on its own citizens. That's YOU, my friend. And if you're one of these people who say, "Well I ain't ever done nothing wrong so why should I worry about it?' - you are dead wrong. Our civil liberties are being taken away faster than you can spit. The NSA is working away on its new "First Intelligence Community Comprehensive National Cyber-security Initiative Data Center' to keep track of every last one of us. This thing will be the size of 17 football stadiums. One million square feet, all to be filled with more technology and data storage than you could imagine. And 30,000 spy drones are set to be launched over America which can each stay aloft for about 28 hours, traveling 300 miles per hour. WHY? Why do we want these things in our skies?

The military is now taking a keen interest in the Microsoft Kinect Spy System, the fastest selling electronic device in history. Conveniently self-installed in over 18 million homes, this seemingly innocent game system, armed with facial recognition programming and real-time recording of both sound and video, will be used by our own government to spy on and record us in our own homes.

And it doesn't stop there. Other game systems such as Nintendo's WWII are also being turned into government-controlled spy systems. WHY?

That's the real question. WHY?!!! Why is our own government spending billions and billions of dollars to spy on its own people? To keep us safe? Do you really believe that?"

= Microsoft's Kinect System is Watching You
Published on Apr 5, 2012 by TheAlexJonesChannel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkYgC-AvPGM [youtube.com]

"Microsoft X-Box Kinect games device has a video camera and a microphone that records speech. Microsoft has stated that users "should not expect any level of privacy concerning your use of the live communication features," and the company "may access or disclose information about you, including the content of your communications."

###

= Big Brother alert: Microsoft wants to know how many friends you've got in your living room

- http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/technology/micwright/100008237/big-brother-alert-microsoft-wants-to-know-how-many-friends-youve-got-in-your-living-room/ [telegraph.co.uk]

"One of Microsoft's latest patent applications[1] is a humdinger. It proposes to turn the Kinect camera into a snitch for movie studios, reporting back just how many friends you've got in your living room and what they're watching. Think that sounds alarmist? Here's what it actually says: "The users consuming the content on a display device are monitored so that if the number of user-views licensed is exceeded, remedial action may be taken." It's that blatant â" a system to spy on private viewing habits.

If put into practice, Microsoft's plan could mean that the film you're watching suddenly stops playing if it detects that you've got more people squashed on to the sofa than the licence allows. You'd then be prompted to buy a more expensive licence to keep watching. It's as if Big Brother had built 1984's Telescreen not to monitor the population but to ensure no one was pirating the Two Minutes Hate.

In all likelihood, Microsoft will struggle to actually apply this patent in the real world. While copyright holders would be delighted, customers would be turned off by such a draconian system. But that's what's interesting about this application and patent applications in general: they often reveal what companies would do if they could get away with it. The black and white drawings and blandly technical language can cover immoral, scary and downright evil ideas.

There was an even more striking example from Apple earlier this year[2]. In September, it was granted a patent for "Apparatus and methods for enforcement of policies upon a wireless device", i.e. a system allowing companies or governments to remotely disable mobile phones and tablets in a particular area.

While Apple mentions benign examples such as preventing phone calls from disturbing concerts or ensuring devices are switched off on planes, it also states: "Covert police or government operations may require complete "blackout" conditions." That's exactly the kind of feature certain governments would love to use to suppress pictures and videos. The patent Apple put its stamp on is a handy form of censorship regardless of whether it will ever apply it.

Last year, Google's chairman, Eric Schmidt, said that the company would hold off from creating a facial recognition service because it would be "crossing the creepy line". Still, Google has filed for and been granted extensive patents in the area and, as its Project Glass augmented reality goggles move forward, who knows when the "creepy line" will shift?"

[1] http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=%2220120278904%22.PGNR.&OS=DN/20120278904&RS=DN/20120278904 [uspto.gov]

[2] http://www.zdnet.com/apple-patent-could-remotely-disable-protesters-phone-cameras-7000003640/ [zdnet.com]

© Copyright of Telegraph Media Group Limited 2012

###

= "People are aware that Windows has bad security but they are underestimating the problem because they are thinking about third parties. What about security against Microsoft? Every non-free program is a âjust trust me program'. âTrust me, we're a big corporation. Big corporations would never mistreat anybody, would we?' Of course they would! They do all the time, that's what they are known for. So basically you mustn't trust a non free programme."

"There are three kinds: those that spy on the user, those that restrict the user, and back doors. Windows has all three. Microsoft can install software changes without asking permission. Flash Player has malicious features, as do most mobile phones."

"Digital handcuffs are the most common malicious features. They restrict what you can do with the data in your own computer. Apple certainly has the digital handcuffs that are the tightest in history. The i-things, well, people found two spy features and Apple says it removed them and there might be more""

From:

Richard Stallman: 'Apple has tightest digital handcuffs in history'
http://newint.org/features/web-exclusive/2012/12/05/richard-stallman-interview/ [newint.org]

###

THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN ARCHIVED AT SEVERAL LOCATIONS, INCLUDING/NOT LIMITED TO:

http://anonymous.livelyblog.com/2012/08/27/the-microsoft-kinect-spy-system/ [livelyblog.com]
http://awkpaste.blisted.org/cgi/paste.cgi?id=5980 [blisted.org]
http://codepad.org/MrDg6dFr [codepad.org]
http://codepad.viper-7.com/rOF7S5 [viper-7.com]
http://crunchbanglinux.org/pastebin/2039 [crunchbanglinux.org]
http://dark-code.bulix.org/mew3mi-83250 [bulix.org]
http://demo.php-pastebin.com/NpgcmGlP [php-pastebin.com]
http://dumpz.org/492993/ [dumpz.org]
http://frugalware.org/paste/14164 [frugalware.org]
http://hpaste.org/85284 [hpaste.org]
http://kpaste.net/a2fca9b3 [kpaste.net]
http://ltx.im/xXK [ltx.im]
http://mathb.in/4614 [mathb.in]
http://mathbin.net/162687 [mathbin.net]
http://mysticpaste.com/view/gpCw8rrB7r?2 [mysticpaste.com]
http://nopaste.dk/p40957 [nopaste.dk]
http://nopaste.info/2a08d32b1a.html [nopaste.info]
http://oxynux.org/pastebin/dk6i5v-2021 [oxynux.org]
http://paste2.org/cNyO4G0B [paste2.org]
http://pastebin.anope.org/index.php?page=viewpaste&id=aaff119399 [anope.org]
http://pastebin.archlinux.fr/460758 [archlinux.fr]
http://pastebin.calculate-linux.org/en/show/5376 [calculate-linux.org]
http://pastebin.com/CJ6tBR3Z [pastebin.com]
http://pastebin.fr/26942 [pastebin.fr]
http://pastebin.jonasscholz.de/9731 [jonasscholz.de]
http://pastebin.mozilla.org/2277922 [mozilla.org]
http://pastebin.myrror.net/3351 [myrror.net]
http://pastebin.pandaboard.org/index.php/view/16082206 [pandaboard.org]
http://pastebin.pl/76300 [pastebin.pl]
http://pastebin.ro/NOUgwG1x [pastebin.ro]
http://pastebin.se/TBfdhbHG [pastebin.se]
http://pastebin.stonekeep.com/12648 [stonekeep.com]
http://pastebin.tlhiv.org/YXpCU2NO [tlhiv.org]
http://pastebin.ws/4cuv2a [pastebin.ws]
http://paste.chakra-project.org/4375/ [chakra-project.org]
http://paste.ee/p/aJbGL [paste.ee]
http://paste.kde.org/717146/ [kde.org]
http://paste.org.ru/?p7kc7n [paste.org.ru]
http://paste.roguecoders.com/p/47006d09d93aab6d8506d3193fe10a3f.txt [roguecoders.com]
http://paste.servut.us/q80e [servut.us]
http://paste.tbee-clan.de/KBXgw [tbee-clan.de]
http://paste.ubuntu.com/5681966/ [ubuntu.com]
http://paste.yt/p2652.html [paste.yt]
http://pbin.be/show/1167/ [pbin.be]
http://pgpboard.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=691 [pgpboard.com]
http://p.linode.com/7555 [linode.com]
https://cryptobin.org/c8b6q8f8 [cryptobin.org]
http://slexy.org/view/s202XkYCNE [slexy.org]
https://paste.debian.net/247754/ [debian.net]
https://pastee.org/gcjsb [pastee.org]
https://privatepaste.com/fd7cfd1de4 [privatepaste.com]
http://stirkbin.com/b18103 [stirkbin.com]
http://susepaste.org/2989021 [susepaste.org]
http://vpaste.net/4z7LJ [vpaste.net]
http://www.clippy.tk/index.php?show=1344 [clippy.tk]
http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?t=203207 [davidicke.com]
http://www.dcpubin.com/upO6UpWK1w [dcpubin.com]
http://www.inetpro.org/pastebin/11871 [inetpro.org]
http://www.megapastebin.com/DlJfi772 [megapastebin.com]
http://www.mpaste.com/p/RxeiN7LM9flOvSgw42 [mpaste.com]
http://www.pastepal.net/view/a237cfc6 [pastepal.net]
http://www.paste.to/MjU5NjY= [paste.to]

Re:Microsoft Kinect Spy System (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377755)

Please Microsoft, come scrub these inane posts from Slashdot.

no Windows fee, so costs more (4, Insightful)

dltaylor (7510) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377709)

http://www.dell.com/us/p/alienware-x51/pd [dell.com]

http://configure.us.dell.com/dellstore/config.aspx?oc=DPDOXP4u&model_id=alienware-x51&c=us&l=en&s=dhs&cs=19 [dell.com]

Ubuntu box gets lower spec' and fewer accessories:

Smaller hard drive 1 vs 2; no mouse or keyboard, ...

They're both 1049?

Re:no Windows fee, so costs more (2)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377777)

Sort of. If you look closely, you see that the Ubuntu is $100 cheaper list-price but has a $100 discount there. The Windows one has a $200 discount. So the final price comes to the same for each, $1049. The only hardware difference I see is the hard drive: Windows has 2TB, Ubuntu has 1TB. Which explains why the latter is $100 cheaper: Not license fee difference, but just that it has a cheaper drive. I'm not sure why this is, but perhaps Microsoft specifies 2TB as a minimum for a Windows 8 desktop. Just to speculate.

The whole thing might be just a bargaining ploy - give the appearance of seriously considering selling Linux OEM, and Microsoft may offer cheaper OEM licenses in order to reduce the appeal.

Re:no Windows fee, so costs more (4, Interesting)

johnkoer (163434) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377807)

Or Dell, like any other company, is trying to make a profit and sees an opportunity to get some additional markup. You could also speculate that if they make the Ubuntu boxes cheaper, more people would buy them not knowing what Ubuntu is. Then when they try and install their copy of The Sims they will call Dell and complain. This raises their support costs for the computers and thus has to be included in the base sale price.

Re:no Windows fee, so costs more (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377789)

http://www.dell.com/us/p/alienware-x51/pd [dell.com]

http://configure.us.dell.com/dellstore/config.aspx?oc=DPDOXP4u&model_id=alienware-x51&c=us&l=en&s=dhs&cs=19 [dell.com]

Ubuntu box gets lower spec' and fewer accessories:

Smaller hard drive 1 vs 2; no mouse or keyboard, ...

They're both 1049?

I read somewhere that the average cost of a single customer care call to Dell is higher than what they pay MS for their Windows license. So if Dell (for some reason only they can answer) expect to get more customer care calls when selling a Linux-PC (fx driver/compatibility questions, etc., and the odd user not knowing what s/he bought) then yes, it can be a more expensive machine to Dell even if the OS is free.

Re: no Windows fee, so costs more (1)

kenh (9056) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377801)

Until you have Linux software publishers willing to pay an OEM to load their trialware on the system and a Linux distro decides to help pay for Linux-based system advertising Windows-based systems will always be less.

For every enthusiastic Linux supporter there are several (I suspect) burned Linux netbook purchasers that vowed never again to buy a Linux system... The market share for Linux systems is very, very small & uncertain. Many Linux advocates like to talk about how Linux runs great on last generation hardware, which does not encourage OEMs to race out and offer high-end (expensive) systems, since many Linuxusers appear to prefer cheap last-gen hardware, not current-gen equipment.

Trialware in Wine (1)

tepples (727027) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378071)

Until you have Linux software publishers willing to pay an OEM to load their trialware on the system

Then try this: Install Wine. Download the trialware yourself onto a fresh Linux box. Try installing it. Make a report on Wine's AppDB. Tell the publisher whether it worked. Tell the publisher that PC makers are starting to sell PCs with GNU/Linux, and the company could get a few bucks from selling registered versions to people who buy these PCs.

Many Linux advocates like to talk about how Linux runs great on last generation hardware

Windows Vista failed because it ran poorly on machines that ran XP well, such as anything with less than 1 GB of RAM. So after the perceived failure of Windows Vista RTM, Microsoft fixed up the most glaring bugs for Mojave (Windows Vista Service Pack 1) and made sure to keep Windows 7 and 8 no more resource intensive than Vista. But now there comes a problem: a lot of XP machines are still deployed in businesses, and these PCs may get wiped and Linuxed after security patches end in April 2014. This includes a lot of corporate customers. Last time, Microsoft sold a special stripped-down XP called Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs (Windows FLP) to replace Windows 98 on PCs of volume licensing customers. I wonder what Microsoft will do this time to replace XP on PCs that aren't powerful enough to run more recent Windows.

Re: no Windows fee, so costs more (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378139)

No, it's not small. But many of us simply run Linux in virtualization on Windows systems, so we have access to MS Outlook and critical tools like VMware ESX or mandated IE browsers for corporate websites. With its lighter weight OS, far less intrusive security, and lack of vendor installed bloatware running at all times, it's usually far faster in virtualization than Windows is. So it's more likely to virtualize Linux on a Windows box than the reverse.

In fact, I just turned in my Macbook to get a Windows netbook. Not because Windows is better, but because I have to run VMware clients and Outlook. The Mac version of Outlook performs !@#$ on giant donkey !@#$, and the bloated VMware management tools in virtualization are almost as bad. Since I do code development for servers, I actually have *no use* for the Macbook except as a high quality notebook with virtualization capability. But for the repair costs of the Macbook for typical problems, I can replace my notebook every year and schedule upgrades.

Re: no Windows fee, so costs more (1)

jedidiah (1196) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378213)

> Many Linux advocates like to talk about how Linux runs great on last generation hardware, which does not encourage OEMs to race out and offer high-end (expensive) systems

No. Linux users are smart and demanding. That makes them harder marks for fraud and nonsense.

They understand the math and are less likely to pay a lot more for marginal improvements of little value. This can be paying too much for the CPU or the video card or paying the extra premium for a compact form factor when you don't really need it.

Linux users are probably a harder mark.

Of course American corporations don't want informed consumers.

Re:no Windows fee, so costs more (1)

Zimluura (2543412) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377803)

maybe they're rolling into the price what they think will be an increased tech support cost. but they probably won't offer tech support for ubuntu anyway. wait a sec, i haven't bought a whole system since 99, is tech support still a thing?

Re:no Windows fee, so costs more (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377877)

I'm not interested in purchasing a "gaming desktop" or any other type of desktop, but I certainly am willing to pay more for Linux bundled on a machine. Yes, not paying the "Microsoft tax" is so important to me that I'm willing to pay extra money to ensure that my dollars are not going to Redmond.

2002 (0)

stevens (84346) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377779)

The story might have been relevant to my interests in 2002. But it's clear now Linux is going to skip popularity on desktops and just do mobile instead.

Every year a growth year. (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378067)

The story might have been relevant to my interests in 2002. But it's clear now Linux is going to skip popularity on desktops and just do mobile instead.

Linux has been gaining market share on all platforms including the Desktop. The Desktop is just not sexy right now with, Windows Desktop users having a slight dip sales and Apple its a disaster on the Desktop...but Linux suddenly is checking all the boxes. Personally though I'm loving the support of having a shared kernel with its more successful market.

Why so negative? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377783)

I'm constantly surprised at how some people can only see the bad side to any news.

Finally we're seeing mainstream acceptance of Linux as an alternative to Windows and yet people still complain. This is a great first step, a major manufacturer is putting Linux onto machines designed to be sold to the home in a competitive way. It can only lead to good things, more game manufacturers taking notice and developing their games for the platform, which in turn will make the hardware vendors made decent drivers.

And yet all some people can focus on is the fact that this machine doesn't suit their own personal special snowflake situation. the mind boggles!

Re:Why so negative? (1)

UPZ (947916) | 1 year,17 days | (#43378795)

I'm constantly surprised at how some people can only see the bad side to any news.

Finally we're seeing mainstream acceptance of Linux as an alternative to Windows and yet people still complain. This is a great first step, a major manufacturer is putting Linux onto machines designed to be sold to the home in a competitive way. It can only lead to good things, more game manufacturers taking notice and developing their games for the platform, which in turn will make the hardware vendors made decent drivers.

And yet all some people can focus on is the fact that this machine doesn't suit their own personal special snowflake situation. the mind boggles!

Some people are unwilling to appreciate a "better" situation because it's not the "best" situation. An adult version of throwing temper tantrums.

Re:Why so negative? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43379809)

finally? where have you been, dell picks one token machine to offer ubuntu with every fucking year, then no one buys it, then they stop doing it 8 months later

finally, phht linux in the household has had more chances than a windows tablet, and for some odd reason, not many people want an OS thats a pain in the ass to use with none of the software they want.

Steam has 97 Linux games and 1952 Windows games (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377795)

And most of the commercial Linux games are pretty expensive. That's going to be a tough sell as a Steam box.

Modern Gaming is about Linux (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377965)

And most of the commercial Linux games are pretty expensive. That's going to be a tough sell as a Steam box.

Your talking about legacy gaming, Modern gaming is cross-platform, with Windows being a shrinking platform [Microsoft treating the the Windows Desktop as an xbox ugly stepchild; its gamers like its prison bitches DRM victims; child only games], with Linux/Android being a massive groth industry [and a refuge for Valves business model :)]

Dell still doesn't get it (3, Insightful)

loufoque (1400831) | 1 year,18 days | (#43377829)

Why is Dell making stupid Linux offerings?
Either they're providing Linux on shit hardware or on gaming hardware. Neither is the right target.

People want Linux on good hardware, but not for games, they want it for work.
And they want it to be part of the main offerings, not hidden on some special section of the website.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (1)

loosescrews (1916996) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378089)

More specifically, they should offer it on their business computers. My school has a whole lab full of OptiPlex desktops with Windows 7 Pro CAs running CentOS.

They also have another lab full of OptiPlex desktops with Windows 7 Pro CAs running Windows 7 Enterprise.

Either way, making it easier to buy business computers without Windows licenses would save organizations a lot of money.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (2)

BenJury (977929) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378385)

You might, but I'd like it on a decent gaming machine which would force the hardware companies to provide decent drivers. And guess what, all the kids who buy a Linux gaming machine will grow up using Linux along with things like Open Office, so when they get to the work place the Microsoft stranglehold will be loosened.

Though you're right, I'd like the offering to be more prominent (and available in the UK!) but its still a good start and not to be scoffed at.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (1)

loufoque (1400831) | 1 year,17 days | (#43378955)

You'll need to run Windows to get any serious gaming done anyway, so it is stupid.
If you're just doing basic gaming, then you don't need an Alienware, you can just buy an Inspiron or something.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (1)

BenJury (977929) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379699)

This sort of attitude really annoys me. People have always said crap like this, like "why would anyone need this automobile? there are no petrol stations so where would I be able to go", or "who is ever going to need more than 640k of RAM?" its all just so short sighted.

In the near term maybe people have to use Wine to get access to the latest games, however the fact that this is being sold might wake games developers up to that they're missing out on a market. And once they start developing, everyone else starts noticing. Its a positive cycle.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (1)

loufoque (1400831) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379915)

If you're interested in Linux, then you probably have better things to do with your computer than gaming.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (1)

BenJury (977929) | 1 year,17 days | (#43379931)

If you don't know about Linux, buying a Linux gaming machine is a good way to start.

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378397)

No, not all people. Some people. I think this is a good step in the right direction. When/if other manufacturers follow suite, prices will come down a bit. Gamers tend to know more about technology and will have a better idea as to what they're getting themselves into. Its a first step. You can't expect a full blown Ubuntu adoption.

You're looking at this and saying "well this isn't tailored to me so it sucks." Instead of seeing the big picture. Its a step. Not a huge step, but a step nevertheleas

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43378897)

Dell offers their top of the line XPS 13 laptop with ubuntu. They call it the Developer Edition and is targeted at business segment.
link [dell.com]

Re:Dell still doesn't get it (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,17 days | (#43379877)

I bought a Dell with Redhat workstation on it in 2001. Less than 30 days after the purchase they dropped support for it and refunded me $1 as they were no longer supporting open source. Bastards!

!!!??? LOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43377993)

hahahhhhahahahahahahhhahahaaaaaahhahahahahahahahhahahahha

Linux gaming, aaaaaaaahhhhhh

I mean I really need some beefy hardware to play angry bird on chrome LOL

Whats their plan for Switchable Gfx? (2)

JC61990 (2653877) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378019)

This is cool and all being that linux is slowly starting to take off in the world of the gamers. But my bigger concern is, what is dell/alienware doing about the IvyBridge switchable graphics? I have an Alienware M14x R2 with the 3rd gen i5 and a nvidia gtx650. BIOS doesn't let you enable just the video card you must run ivybridge at all times, so how do they plan to implement Bumblebee or maybe their own type of driver? I have ran ArchLinux on my alienware for a few months now, and i have barely been able to get bumblebee running nicely. Ive even switched my laptop over to Ubuntu at one point just to see if it was a difference in distros, which it wasn't. Unless nvidia has secretly been working on some kind of driver for the Optimus cards that i dont know about, then i would say this might be a bad move right now imho.

Why Bother (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,18 days | (#43378175)

Why bother? Linux does not run anything that a 'gamer' or most modern people would want.
Sure it runs like what 4 new games that this company 'steam' arranged..oh wow.

Honestly, while nothing against Linux, it's about getting the job done more than romance for pretty much most people. People just want to run tons of random programs and heaps of games and I mean heaps.. they want to just buy a printer or scanner, joystick, heck even an iphone - and want it to just work. Hello it's not 1993 anymore these things are not hard to get working. Most people just want things to run and work - just like windows does NOW.

Sorry but using linux for the desktop is like trying to screw around with my mothers old Windows 98 computer..

It's crazy to have good hardware and a tinkery old OS that has half ass volunteer support for things that windows run with no trouble. - Its sorta like pretending that a retard is cool and amazing.... when everyone has gorn home, your left with the reality.

The usual marketing nonsense. (1)

jedidiah (1196) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378233)

I would not call this thing a gaming PC. I would call it an upscale low profile PC. It looks like it could be a very respectable HTPC for people who want something more than a $300 ION or $100 Roku.

It's less lame than a Mac Mini.

Really, it's just a Dell with a very Linux friendly video card.

In an alternate universe! (1)

kurt555gs (309278) | 1 year,18 days | (#43378443)

Well lookie here. Dell offering a high spec Linux laptop. I'm just shocked! Michael Dell who would normally have Steve Balmer's cock farther down his throat than would generally be considered comfortable must have come up for air long enough to allow this laptop to slip past. What is the world coming too? It does show that Microsoft's power is waining. Once people see how far advanced Ubuntu 13 is above Windows 8..... Well it is the preverbal camel's nose under the tent. If you have an M$ stock, I'd be selling it. The first Dell laptop I would ever conceder buying.

A good start. (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | 1 year,17 days | (#43380263)

Now, we need games written in OpenGL, not DirectX. Will benefit both Linux and OS X. I'm keeping Win7 on my main computer for games. For everything else, it's OS X. No, it's not a Mac. Apple doesn't sell the machine I need (mini-tower)

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...