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Iranians, Russians, and Chinese Hackers Are After You, Says Lawmaker

Unknown Lamer posted about a year and a half ago | from the they're-after-our-tubes dept.

The Military 211

Velcroman1 writes "The House Intelligence Committee is warning that 'time is running out' before the next major cyberattack: The Russians, Iranians, Chinese, and others are likely already on your computer. 'You have criminal organizations trying to get into your personal computer and steal your personal stuff. And by the way, the Chinese are probably on your computer, the Russians are probably on your personal computer, the Iranians are already there,' House Intelligence Committee chairman Mike Rogers (R.-MI) said. 'They're trying to steal things that they think are valuable or use your computer to help them steal from someone else,' he said. 'That's a real problem.'"

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lol (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412889)

1999 called, wants its headline back. You also left out the us government.

Re:lol (3, Insightful)

cusco (717999) | about a year and a half ago | (#43412951)

Amazing. A lawmaker from Michigan learned to read a newspaper headline.

Oh, wait, that's a lawmaker from Michigan. He's just spouting what the lobbyists from Symantec and McAfee are whispering in his year. False alarm.

Re:lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413359)

"the Chinese are probably on your computer, the Russians are probably on your personal computer, the Iranians are already there"

That's a relief. I was worried it might be the Americans...

Re:lol (1)

Vlad_the_Inhaler (32958) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413429)

My case is worse - the FSF have software on my computer. The horror of it all.

Re:lol (1)

desdinova 216 (2000908) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413725)

Amazing. A lawmaker learned to read a newspaper headline. Oh, wait, that's a lawmaker. He's just spouting what the lobbyists from Symantec and McAfee are whispering in his year. False alarm.

FTFA

Re:lol (3, Interesting)

yurtinus (1590157) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413171)

Oh 1999, how I miss you. Back then I was working at the local CompUSA and had a lady come in looking for security software:

her: "I have a hacker in my computer"
me: "Oh, you mean a virus?"
her: "No, it's my neighbor. He's gotten in there and I need a program to get him out"
me: (head explode)

I do wish I had recorded the entire conversation, but I couldn't convince her that if the her modem wasn't connected to the internet, nobody could do anything with her computer from the outside. She'd gone as far as turning off and unplugging the computer. He was coming through the power lines, through the TV, he was already *in there* hacking away even with the power turned off... I eventually gave up and sent her off with some firewall software. These are the kinds of people we need to get some rational thought into, Gods help us.

Re:lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413437)

How soon was that after "Ghost in the Machine" came out?

Re:lol (1)

Xphile101361 (1017774) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413587)

1999 - 1967 = 32 years

Re:lol (1)

mattizzle2013 (2889461) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413601)

Schizophrenia. I've met a woman who thought the same things. She was actually Schizophrenic. It's a terrible disease. She also thought her neighbours were breaking into her home and planting bugs, etc.

Re:lol (1)

IWantMoreSpamPlease (571972) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413843)

A very close friend of mine's sister suffers from that. Came on in her mid to late 20s, she threw away her entire life as she spiraled down the path of insanity. It really is heartbreaking to watch

Re:lol (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413723)

I thought that good salesmanship was to sell that lady the most comprehensive product you can without balking at the price.

The logic is the store gets paid and the lady gets peace of mind.

Sounds shitty right? Thus I won't be doing retail sales ever again.

Re:lol (2, Funny)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413197)

They think we won't notice the elephant (and the donkey) in the room.

Re:lol (-1, Troll)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413265)

NSA, CIA, FBI.

"Waiter, there a fusion center in my soup!"

Re:lol (2)

FatdogHaiku (978357) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413859)

"Waiter, there a fusion center in my soup!"

Did you order the Spicy Dumpling Borscht with Arde?

Not me! (4, Funny)

Endo13 (1000782) | about a year and a half ago | (#43412891)

I'm wearing my trusty tin-foil hat!

Re:Not me! (1)

Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413689)

Alluminum doesn't rust.

Re:Not me! (3, Funny)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413831)

He said 'trusty' not 'rusty'.

That's the problem with aluminum, all the noise it makes as it rattles around inside your head.

So we need to snoop on your PC too (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412903)

just to make sure they aren't and for your own protection.....

Re:So we need to snoop on your PC too (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413727)

I was about to say that this is the launching speech by which to regulate IT under the Executive branch. Pass a law that stays all IT personnel (devs and support) must have security clearance. Training and certification will be available. And you must renew upon expiration.

Of course, this is all to create more jobs and "tax" the wealthy IT industry all while maintaining national security. Oh, but Facebook will be excluded. Naturally.

Nothing, no matter how cynical surprises me anymore.

Welcome to 10 years ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412907)

Except for the iranian part.

The danger of hyperbole... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412923)

"They're already ON your computer."
"The Red Menace is already AMONG us."

The desire to motivate people to take something seriously is admirable, the problem is that this kind of fear-mongering that will allow people to legally mandate restricted boot features and other lock-ins in the name of "security from the Red Menace."

Given that NK's best attempt at hacking Unix systems requires that you already gave root access keys to a Windows system, I can't say I'm that worried. There are lots of eyes on the keys with which my RedHat distros are signed, especially since they were social-engineered once. When [$bogeyman] can compromise those, I'll worry.

Re:The danger of hyperbole... (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413793)

No, fear-mongering of this intensity probably targets passing things like SOPA and CISPA, so that homeland security can protect us from our squinty eyed, dark colored, vodka loving enemies from somewhere abroad thus ensuring jobs for them and plenty of racy private photos & videos for their dicks.

Something like making computers come with an AV solution out of the box is almost incomprehensible to these people because they can't tell apart a computer from a washing machine.

Re:The danger of hyperbole... (1)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413801)

There are lots of eyes on the keys with which my RedHat distros are signed, especially since they were social-engineered once. When [$bogeyman] can compromise those, I'll worry.

Per your own reply, you should start worrying right now. You actually should have been worrying for a while. As you point out, even the securest of secrets can be compromised, all it takes is dedication; Well that and knowing that there is a secret to know.

don't put all computers online (0)

k6mfw (1182893) | about a year and a half ago | (#43412935)

I have a couple computers that I never connect to the internet. Besides hackers and viruses, you also have to worry about corporations penetrating your computer to gather information for sales and marketing profiles.

Re:don't put all computers online (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413077)

How to you transfer files to those computers. USB drives? That's how hackers breach company networks.

Corporations penetrating my computer for data mining? No. Corporations tracking me every way they can without directly hacking? Yes.

What do you do with your never connected computers? The best I can come up with is watching movies or playing old games. Or do you have both side by side with your bank account open in the online computer and your other finical documents open of the offline computer? Though in that case criminals would be more interested in your banking password anyway. No one is going to manually look through your personal financial spreadsheets.

Re:don't put all computers online (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413821)

Let me put it as simply as possible for everybody here:

Your data as an individual isn't worth a buck. Security professionals on the other hand cost much much more. Enjoy your tin-foil hat though, I'm sure it'll save you when shit actually hits the fan on the internet.

Re:don't put all computers online (2)

hackula (2596247) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413837)

But Captain Adama, we haven't seen the Cylons in over 40 years!!!

Wow..... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412945)

The linked article says it all. Nothing but more fearmongering from Fox News, and promotion of CISPA. Someone needs to have their editor's permissions revoked. oh wait....

Re:Wow..... (2)

Zemran (3101) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413229)

The idea that any Russian hacker would want to steal the ID of some poor US guy is a little dreamy...

2 Computers per Person? (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | about a year and a half ago | (#43412947)

One is for non-critical communications. Other is offline permanently.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

BoRegardless (721219) | about a year and a half ago | (#43412977)

Obviously, we can run "2 computers" in one box, so...?

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413013)

What is the use of an offline computer these days (I assume you mean no ethernet no usb no wifi no bluetooth, never plug external data)?

Re:2 Computers per Person? (1)

CannonballHead (842625) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413203)

Minesweeper.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413315)

pR0n archive. Fill it up, disconnect it permanently, collection safe.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413643)

But they keep making more every day!!1!

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413755)

After awhile, fake tits all look the same.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413849)

To demonstrate human stupidity and a non-understanding of basic computer security.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (1)

hackula (2596247) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413863)

Writing a Mystery novel... Duh!

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413065)

Yes, I do the same. The one online gets re-imaged at least once a day, and I keep multiple images of the other one as well. Additionally, I have a third machine used for other experiments and it has no network connection at all.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (1)

Tx (96709) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413327)

How many layers does your tinfoil hat have exactly, if you don't mind my asking?

Re:2 Computers per Person? (2)

DogDude (805747) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413407)

Each one has four, but he changes them at least once a day, because everybody knows that tinfoil that's too full of Omega waves is useless.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413607)

You're not supposed to reused foil that's been wrapped in fish. All hats need to be made directly from pure, fresh tins (excluding tuna fish tins). Compress those tins into rolls of foil. Shape the foil to fit your head, leaving room for expansion as your brain grows bigger. Normal people's brains don't get bigger because the radio waves halt their growth. Yours my friend shall increase as your new hat will block the waves. Important: avoid beaches. Close sources told me there's more waves near beaches.

captcha: conquers. I think they've found me. Pass on my knowledge. Don't let my life be in vain. Take my hat: _/^\_

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413559)

Its not the layers, its the material. The US government changed the composition of tin foil to use aluminum instead after they collected their nazi scientists at the end of WWII.

Re:2 Computers per Person? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413451)

How do you do critical communications? Everything by a wired, land-line phone?

The house intelligence committee (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412957)

is a real problem.

Re:The house intelligence committee (1)

ChrisC1234 (953285) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413161)

And it's an oxymoron.

Re:The house intelligence committee (2)

Zemran (3101) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413163)

an oxymoron...

Re:The house intelligence committee (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413411)

Close relation to the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.

Bunch of macaroons.

Oh noes... (5, Insightful)

SmSlDoo (414128) | about a year and a half ago | (#43412967)

The real problem is normal users that do not really know what is happening on their computers and really do not care.
It always brings me back to images of windows users with 20 different toolbars loaded in to IE.

Re:Oh noes... (1)

gandhi_2 (1108023) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413391)

Just looking at my spam filter, boggling at all the RoadRunner, Comcast, Cox Cable, and Verizon Fios users I see sending more virus spam on behalf of one botnet or another.

There really are quite a few of them at any one time.

Re:Oh noes... (1)

SmSlDoo (414128) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413487)

I agree, when I look in to spam on servers I do notice quite a bit coming from residential ISPs.

Hate to see what these computers are being used for that we are not seeing.

But we've got the solution! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412971)

I'm betting his comments will be followed in the coming days by a new piece of legislation authorizing any and all branches of the U.S. government to conduct 'security audits' of your computers and other devices. For your protection, of course.

fox news (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412981)

enough said

Re:faux news (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413043)

FTFY

I have the Chinese convinced I'm a Russian hacker (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43412993)

targeting Iran.

Uhm yeah (2)

lesincompetent (2836253) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413005)

Lame attempt at distraction there uncle Sam!

No Surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413007)

I do have a sweet pr0n collection. I'm sure lots of hackers would love it too.

"criminal organizations" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413027)

You have criminal organizations trying to get into your personal computer and steal your personal stuff.

You mean like the RIAA/MPAA and the Federal government?

BULLSHIT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413031)

The last thing I am going to do is believe one of our lawmakers that skirt their own responsibilities, and spread the propaganda of the NWO.

big brother anti virus incoming (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413039)

Effective immediately: government mandated state controlled anti-virus. Fuck off lawmakers, my PC is clean I don't need your help.

Welcome. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413051)

Welcome to TEN YEARS AGO!

Let the Fear Mongering Begin (2)

Laebshade (643478) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413055)

What's wrong, Republican Rogers? Has the physical terrorism boogeyman waned to so little that you must now bring out a new candidate?

Re:Let the Fear Mongering Begin (1)

mi (197448) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413395)

My own server gets dozens of ssh-probes per day -- if I were running Windows or even an older BSD or Linux distribution out of the box, some of them might have had succeeded by now. Popular PHP software packages hosted by major providers are exploited regularly. There is no doubt, criminals are doing it.

And some (most?) of such criminals are sufficiently "patriotic" to be usable by their governments for cyber-warfare, when they see fit. This happened before [howstuffworks.com] and will happen again.

Thank you (1)

Ghjnut (1843450) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413063)

Was able to get a month's worth of FUD out of the way with that single quote.

republican shill (4, Interesting)

nimbius (983462) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413079)

banging his wardrum. this is the same asshole who thought iraq was trying to kill us all. how'd that turn out for ya mike? http://www.nbcnews.com/id/17707705/39591107 [nbcnews.com]

Re:republican shill (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413421)

Isn't there a report yet to tell us that the current baddies have the capability to be on our computer within 45 minutes after the order is given?
Will there UN presentation?

Re:republican shill (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413431)

the same asshole who thought iraq was trying to kill us

The two are unrelated. We've known that Russian Mafia has been running commercial botnets for, what, a decade? He's hopelessly behind the entire security industry, but he's not proposing a wild, unproven theory.

It's a mistake to choose politicians based upon who you agree with 100% of the time and who you disagree with 0% of the time. Support them when they're right, rain down righteous indignation when they're not. It's policy, not tribal warfare.

Re:republican shill (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413565)

banging his wardrum. this is the same asshole who thought iraq was trying to kill us all. how'd that turn out for ya mike? http://www.nbcnews.com/id/17707705/39591107 [nbcnews.com]

Well, I guess it worked out OK for him because he's been re-elected every election since then. This illustrates exactly what is wrong with the House of Representatives - at the House district level, voting is often about party affiliation only and nobody asks "Is this person deserving of my vote?" Voters just vote based on party affiliation. This does illustrate exactly why I abandoned the Republican Party a few years ago. I couldn't take the willful embrace of idiocy any more. Stupid people used to be Democratic voters, but somebody (Rove maybe?) realized around 2004 that the Republicans could tap into this "constituency" and make it their own. By 2008 the full on embrace of stupidity began by the Republican Party and I abandoned it, probably never to return.

ISP Egress Filtering... (3, Interesting)

sillivalley (411349) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413107)

How much of the crap we put up with would go away if ISPs instituted egress filtering?

Oh, that's not a panacea; it's not going to cure all the interweb's problems overnight, but it would sure as hell eliminate a lot of the low-level crap that goes on.

(grumble grumble grumble)

Re:ISP Egress Filtering... (1)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413351)

Comcast egress filters SMTP and CIFS, at least where I live. What sort of low level crap are you thinking of?

Re:ISP Egress Filtering... (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413685)

It would fix nearly all DNS-based DOSes if they filtered source addresses of outbound packets to eliminate spoofed UDP packets. If it's leaving their network, the packet should say it came from their network.

FUD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413165)

Yeah, Mr "House Intelligence Committee chairman Mike Rogers (R.-MI)", where's the technical data supporting the claim that they are already there?

Consider: Microsoft is the majority operating system in the US, they want more H1B visas i.e. more foreigners programming for them meaning what? Less security than there is now? More malware/virus entry points & exploits? & where is all the security that Bill Gates tried to pound into them back in the 90's? I mean, do they even consider security an issue? Oh, yeah, right, they have a "Patch Tuesday" to fix all the holes.

So how upset should I get about all these individuals & businesses that end up with hundreds of viruses (virii?) & malwares on their computers, when no technical information is available to support "lessons learned". Or is it *all* FUD? Is it all click-trolling?

Re:FUD (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413625)

Yeah, Mr "House Intelligence Committee chairman Mike Rogers (R.-MI)", where's the technical data supporting the claim that they are already there?

Well, the answer to that question is classified, meaning "We looked all over your computer and saw traces that they had been there."

My concerns (3, Insightful)

xs650 (741277) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413187)

As a USian, I'm more concerned about US corporations and US government agencies being after me, they are the ones that can do and are most likely to do me some harm. And, I'm not even concerned enough about them to wear a tinfoil hat.

Re:My concerns (3, Insightful)

jc42 (318812) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413541)

As a USian, I'm more concerned about US corporations and US government agencies being after me, they are the ones that can do and are most likely to do me some harm.

This is probably the most important thing to get across. The US population has been far more damaged by the likes of HUAC and the various secretive "intelligence" agencies than by any foreign bogeymen.

This isn't just a US problem, either. I've read a few comments from historians on the topic, saying that the data shows that during the last century, far more people (in the world as a whole) died due to their own government's actions than from any foreign soldiers or other attackers.

The data isn't nearly as good for previous centuries, but what data there is supports the claim for the rest of our history. The biggest danger everywhere comes from our own rulers, who rarely have our interests at heart.

In the on-topic case of network security, it's fairly clear that the primary interest of the US and all other governments is in controlling the communication of their own citizens.

Macs don't get viruses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413237)

I use a Mac so there's no way Iranian viruses would work on it.

Others? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413257)

"The Russians, Iranians, Chinese, and others". So what your really saying is that the whole world has access to all our personal information and we should be afriad, very afraid. This guy should be careful or he might be look at like Ted Stevens was after the series of tubes comment.

or to put it another way:

case $attacker in
Russians)
youreScrewed()
;;
Iranians)
youreScrewed()
;;
Chinese)
youreScrewed()
;;
default
youreScrewed()
;;
esac
 
 

Nothing new (1)

Chance Phelps (2880963) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413279)

The Russians and the Chinese have been at it for decades. Also, they couldn't care less about the computers used by the general public; they're after military nets, defense contractors, and other high tech companies. As for the Iranians, I dunno. Its not as if the U.S. broke into their facilities and wreaked havoc..

Re:Nothing new (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413675)

The Russians and the Chinese have been at it for decades. Also, they couldn't care less about the computers used by the general public; they're after military nets, defense contractors, and other high tech companies. As for the Iranians, I dunno. Its not as if the U.S. broke into their facilities and wreaked havoc..

What the politician was saying amid the hubris was that these groups' methods for getting into the sensitive stuff is to go after the general public. Once they've graphed the data gathered from the public and co-opted their computers, they have an attack platform they can use to more intelligently go after the intended targets.

This really does happen on a regular basis. Of course, there's not all that much that an individual has to fear from this, other than the fact that they use the same techniques to break in that the Ransomware gangs etc. use.

Sure, laugh... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413287)

But he's right, in a sense much broader than he intended. Distributed attacks rely on compromised personal computers, and many of those attacks originate from China and Russia. Between that and the way they can fill up a SQL log with repeated break-in attempts, I've found that my life is much easier if I just block most IPs based out of those two countries. You may lose one or two customers, but the enhancement to security and performance is worth it a thousand fold.

Wait a minute (1)

lbmouse (473316) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413297)

How did they get through the tubes?

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413709)

As Americans increased, we've had to widen the tubes. Sometimes there's room to sneak in behind another person.

ZOMG!!!!!! (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413303)

Unplug that sucker and throw it out the windows, now! Oh wait, it's a Linux box lol.

For the record, MyWebSearch and Yontoo and Freeze and Babylon are after "you" too and since "you" are an idiot, "you" probably have them on your computer as well. They could have added that to the message too.

TFA Didn't even mention the real threats- (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413321)

Microsoft, Facebook, Google, RIAA/MPAA, FBI, CIA, NSA, US Government (in case there are other shadow entities).

Far more to fear from THEM then foreign hackers.... cc fraud and id theft are issues but impact fewer people than the criminal organizations* listed above.

*No they are not strictly speaking criminal but the definitely commit criminal acts and they all have/can have a far more detrimental impact on the average US computer user than the groups in the article. Never mind those computer users who are NOT US citizens...

Always need boogeymen (4, Insightful)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413331)

It could be worse. What if they started flying remote controlled drones around the world killing people with impunity?

Yawn if you've heard this before (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413365)

From TFA in April 2013

You have criminal organizations trying to get into your personal computer and steal your personal stuff. And by the way, the Chinese are probably on your computer, the Russians are probably on your personal computer, the Iranians are already there,” House Intelligence Committee chairman Mike Rogers (R.-MI). told Fox News.

From a June 1998 prepared statement by former Senator Fred Thompson, then chairman of Governmental Affairs Committee, given during the 1998 Congressional Hearings on Intelligence and Security [fas.org]

This Is well understood by our potential adversaries, whether it be other nations, terrorists, drug cartels, or organized crime groups. They can reach deep into our homeland from the sanctity of their's This is not just a theory. We know for a fact that terrorist and organized crime groups are developing information weapons. A recent Newsweek article claims there are about ten countries, in addition to China and Russia, with Information warfare programs, including Libya, Iraq and Iran -- none of which are considered friends of the U.S., and all of which sponsor anti-American terrorists.

Well, as far as the ME goes, two down, one to go.

captcha:avenge

Whatever shall we do!!?!?!???!!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413399)

Oh, PLEASE save us Government! You do so well understanding personal-level technology with your warrantless searching and tracking of so many things. I want nobody but you to have backdoor access!

Won't somebody THINK of the Children???

make everyone personally responsible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413433)

If your computer is infected by malware, a virus, or even an evil hacker; You are responsible for your portion of the damage done. Therefore it would be in your best interest to make sure your computer is secured. It might even make sense to shut off your high speed pr0n connection when you are not actively downloading images from goatse. No need for big brother oversight...

Robots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413435)

Robots are everywhere and they eat old peoples medicine for fuel. You need to feel safe, and that's harder and harder to do these days because robots could strike at any time. And when they grab you with those claws you can't break free. Because they're are made of metal, and robots are strong.

http://www.digyourowngrave.com/saturday-night-live-old-glory-robot-insurance/

Run the Microsoft Malicious Software Removal Tool (1)

Animats (122034) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413473)

Microsoft offers the Malicious Software Removal Tool (IA32 version) [microsoft.com] , (AMD64 version) [microsoft.com] which they update monthly. It's not perfect, but it's worth running on Windows machines.

If Congress wants to apply pressure to somebody, it might be worthwhile to investigate how well that's working, and what it's missing.

Another Blowhard (1)

gcerullo (1573093) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413481)

Trying to be the Joseph McCarthy of the 21st century.

Did I miss something? (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413501)

In order for there to be a next major cyberattack, there must have been a last major cyberattack. When was that?

Seriously, what constitutes a "cyberattack"? Does it have to be nation-state sponsored, or does a lone script kiddie count? What is the threshold to make it "major"? Does it have to kill more people than 9/11, or is installing an unwanted browser toolbar enough?

Depending on what your definitions are, a "major cyberattack" might be unlikely to ever happen, or it could be happening *right now*! :-)

One solution for a lot of the ID theft parts ... (3, Insightful)

Skapare (16644) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413503)

... is to require businesses to do a better job of distinguishing between mere identity, and actual authenticated authorization. For example, your SSN is just some numbers that can refer to you. Having an SSN is absolutely not authorization. If someone uses you SSN and a business chooses to charge your or open accounts to allow such charges, then they have failed to obtain authorization. In such a case, it should be required by new sensible law that if you state for the record that you did not authorize the transactions or whatever, then that business may not take any action whatsoever unless and until they can prove that you actually did authorize it. The "not take any action" means they cannot collect on debts, cannot place debts with a debt collector, cannot put it on your credit report (must take it off if already did). It has to be like it never happened.

The big problem with ID theft is that these businesses are not checking authorization. They need to start checking authorization or simply eat the loss.

but (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413519)

The NSA was there first.

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413563)

What was wrong with the headline: "Iranian, Russian ,and Chinese Hackers Are After You, Says Lawmaker"?

Should I be upset? (1)

Xcott Craver (615642) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413575)

If they don't email me a phone number attached as a word document, then they're more welcome than the usual idiots I have to see on my computer.

Just more Xenophobic alarmism (1)

PhamNguyen (2695929) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413619)

Just more xenophobic alarmism. I'm surprised they didn't mention Israel's spying on the US, since crazy xenophobes also tend to be antisemitic too.

Ah, here it is! (1)

ThatsNotPudding (1045640) | about a year and a half ago | (#43413737)

The beginning of justifications to monitor all communications and online activities of all Americans at all times.

It's For Your Safety, Loyal Citizen. After all: if you have nothing to hide...

The only intruders on my PC are.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43413823)

..EA, Blizzard, Microsoft, and by extension the US government plus probably some agencies from allied states as well. Who's doing anything about that?

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