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New Pirate Bay Greenland Domains Suspended

samzenpus posted 1 year,13 days | from the get-off-my-domain dept.

Piracy 193

The Pirate Bay switched to two Greenland-based domains Tuesday morning but it looks like the party is already over. The company responsible for .GL TLD registrations said they would not allow the domains to be put to illegal use. “Tele-Post has today decided to block access to two domains operated by file-sharing network The Pirate Bay,” the company said. According to TorrentFreak: "Queries to the .GL domain registry now confirm that both the domains in question have been officially suspended."

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193 comments

Well shit (0)

Cosgrach (1737088) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417613)

That just sucks!

.liberty (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418585)

Time for a .liberty gTLD, with a simple charter: we accept everybody unless order by court to do otherwise (ok, except cp for pr reasons). It should have multiple US, EU, China etc. servers and representatives with free roaming amongst them so censors would need to obtain an injuction in all of these jurisdictions to sieze a domain. The initial ICANN fee is 185.000 and 25.000/year after that, but I would imagine an unsiezable cool domain is worth at least a few hundred bucks a year for the right owners. So you can actually make a profit from 400 or so .liberty domains.

(I know, .free is nicer but Google or Amazon [uniteddomains.com] have their filthy paws on it already; the irony)

TPB trackers down for days (2)

jupiterssj4 (801031) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417631)

I've had some TPB torrents open for 48 hrs now and 4 default trackers have been down the entire time. I can't even download the hash-data to get the torrent info.

Re:TPB trackers down for days (2)

drkstr1 (2072368) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417643)

tpb.se seems just fine here. Try using the magnet links instead of trackers.

Re:TPB trackers down for days (1)

jupiterssj4 (801031) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417675)

I am using the magnet links... they don't have torrent files anymore... the magnet files are looking for hashdata but all of the trackers are down

Re:TPB trackers down for days (5, Informative)

The Mighty Buzzard (878441) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418141)

Magnet links do not NEED trackers and tpb hasn't run its own trackers in quite a while. Your issue is something else.

Re:TPB trackers down for days (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418983)

Clearly you don't understand how Bittorrent works. All torrents still need trackers. All a magnet link does is cut out the need to download the .torrent file.

Check out this "Magnet URL" of ubuntu I pulled from The Pirate Bay:

magnet:?xt=urn:btih:e6b5183f3195e14051ed6d477a9f70df2b5866c4&dn=Ubuntu-raring+desktop&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.istole.it%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.ccc.de%3A80

You can see very clearly that it lists 4 different trackers.

Re:TPB trackers down for days (5, Insightful)

The Mighty Buzzard (878441) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419219)

Scuse me, that magnet link? It does not need trackers, it supplies them. Even they are not necessary if you have a client that supports DHT. Every single one of those (non-tpb) trackers could be down and the link would still function fine. Of course DHT has only been built into every major client for several years now, so why should that be assumed, eh?

Re:TPB trackers down for days (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419765)

Magnet links NEED an active connection to the DHT network. You aren't going to get a torrent from a magnet link -- nor are you going to find peers when all the trackers are down -- without a connection to the DHT network. (I was mentioning this back when TPB announced that they'd ditch their trackers...)

Basically, the user needs to bootstrap his connection with a torrent from a non-TPB source with working trackers to get a few peers, through which he can get DHT peers within a few minutes.

Re:TPB trackers down for days (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417677)

Just got on thepriatebay.se (via thepiratebay.org which has always worked and redirected just fine for me) and am downloading something at 6MB/sec just fine using a magnet link

Re:TPB trackers down for days (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419099)

How do they work?

What were they thinking? (2)

fustakrakich (1673220) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417649)

That Greenland wants to be 'liberated'? All we have here is another reason to abandon DNS, or at last find a way to make local name caching more feasible. After all, this is the internet. It's supposed to be robust, able to circumvent all blockages.

Re:What were they thinking? (1)

fsterman (519061) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417883)

Seriously! Greenland is still an autonomous country, they should be able to make that decision, not a domain name broker.

Re:What were they thinking? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418507)

It is easy to abandon DNS. Just start memorizing 32 bit addresses. Done.

Another resolution layer? (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417681)

So, is it time to come up with a new system for distributing IP addresses, other than DNS? Or a new means of configuring DNS to make queries to more than just a couple of servers, based on the hosts being queried?

Re:Another resolution layer? (4, Insightful)

muphin (842524) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417711)

Or take them to the courts, as the website isnt illegal, its not like child porn or anything... its a search engine... no content is hosted, get a precedent set?
or find a country with better laws, dont just give up and move on.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0, Troll)

Fluffeh (1273756) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417739)

no content is hosted

That's not entirely true. From my experience when I seed a torrent on the sute (legal ones by the way), it normally offers a direct download to the torrent file until a certain number of seeders become available. Then it only gives the magnet/hash. If the seeder count drops below a ce3rtain criteria, it again gives the link for the torrent file.

Just sayin.

Re:Another resolution layer? (4, Interesting)

muphin (842524) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417781)

Is the data you are downloading saved to the PB servers? no
only the .torrent files (which is legal) shows a link to the tracker which hosts the data that shows the peers, the people who HAVE all or part of the files stored, they are just acting like an ISP, connecting the dots.
the infringing content is not physically on their servers not does the data being transferred pass through their servers, just like google links to bad sites, they arent responsible for the content within those sites.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

fsterman (519061) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417857)

It's all just based on perception, TPB thought that by changing the torrent into a link everything would be okay. Turns out, it's still called The Pirate Bay.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

SpectreBlofeld (886224) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417961)

They really should rename it "The Open Information Initiative' or something.

Re:Another resolution layer? (5, Insightful)

Ralph Spoilsport (673134) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418201)

I agree. I tihnk one of the biggest problems with TPB is its irony and intellectual dishonesty. File sharing is file sharing. CALL IT FILE SHARING YOU STUPID FUCKS. It is not Piracy. Piracy is a naval thing where people from one boat invade another, rape the women, then kill everyone, take anything of value and then set the boat on fire and send it and anyone left alive down to Davy Jone's Locker (and I ain't talkin' about David Bowie or the singer from the Monkees). THAT is Piracy. Some 12 year old in his mom's basement sharing files of crappy mp3s by Katy Perry is NOT A PIRATE. He is sharing files. He cares enough about the stuff that he wants to share it. Sharing is an act of generosity and and affiliation. When TPB and the Pirate Party took a page from the LGBT movement and adopted epithets as their badge, they made a critical fumble, as the ability to philosophically shift to a position of genrosity and giving is basically impossible when you've taken on such a deeply violent and ugly title as Pirate.

So, yes, they need to come up with a positive name that gets at the heart of the matter, that sharing is caring, and digital data is fundamentally different in nature from analogue.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

ScentCone (795499) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418407)

Piracy is a naval thing where people from one boat invade another

You're forgetting (deliberately, of course - a post as shrill as yours is always disingenuous) that the term "piracy" has been used to describe copyright violation for over 400 years. The reason everyone who hears that word used in this context knows exactly what it means is because it's been used in that context for longer than a whole lot of other commonly used words have existed. Stamping your feet and being mad that people are still using the word today the way they used it four centuries ago is pretty silly. Almost as silly as calling ripping off someone's creative work to avoid spending a couple of bucks "sharing."

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Zaelath (2588189) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418479)

You're forgetting that the term "piracy" has been used to describe copyright violation for over 400 years. [citation required]

Yes?

Re:Another resolution layer? (5, Informative)

maxwell demon (590494) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419821)

You're forgetting that the term "piracy" has been used to describe copyright violation for over 400 years. [citation required]

Yes?

From Wikipedia: [wikipedia.org]

The practice of labelling the infringement of exclusive rights in creative works as "piracy" predates statutory copyright law. Prior to the Statute of Anne in 1710, the Stationers' Company of London in 1557 received a Royal Charter giving the company a monopoly on publication and tasking it with enforcing the charter. Those who violated the charter were labelled pirates as early as 1603.[2]

1603 is 410 years ago, thus it's over 400 years.

Re:Another resolution layer? (2)

king neckbeard (1801738) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418747)

In all fairness, the people behind the first wave of the propoganda that used 'piracy' in that way were undeniably evil cunts. This was the old iteration of copyright that was implemented as a form of state censorship rooted in the Stationer's Company.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418595)

Just curious. Do you really not know your idea of maritime piracy is the ludicrously overblown tall-tale version? Or that the word itself at its source simply means 'taking what isn't yours'?

No kidding. Do a little research.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419819)

just like google links to bad sites, they arent responsible for the content within those sites.

The key difference is that when someone points out to Google that they're linking to resources that infringe their copyright, Google removes the link, while Pirate Bay makes fun of the person who asked.

Thus, the Pirate Bay ends up illegal, as it's knowingly and deliberately contributing to copyright infringement, while Google remains legal.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

akanouras (1431981) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417845)

From my experience when I seed a torrent on the sute [sic] (legal ones by the way)...

Good job declaring that, you should be safe from the boogeyman now.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417853)

Oh! Now a torrent file is illegal? Since when? A torrent files is not much more than a bunch of hashes/URI.

The law is immaterial (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418405)

The courts make the so-called "law" up as they go along, to suit the desired outcome. We don't live in a democracy under the rule of law, but in a tyranny under the rule of power elites.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

multiben (1916126) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417797)

So it is legal for me to set up a website with links to child porn and how to make bombs? Even the Pirate Bay themselves acknowledge what they do is not legal - the PIRATE bay!? If they want to be treated as a legitimate enterprise then the very least they should do is change their name to something less provocative.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417873)

By your logic the political Pirate Party is illegal too. And the definition PIRATE requires someone to commit piracy, which the website in question does not do. So how is The Pirate Party illegal again?

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

muphin (842524) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417921)

well sorry but no, the dictionary states otherwise.
pirate
/prt/
Noun
A person who attacks and robs ships at sea.
Verb
Rob or plunder (a ship).
Synonyms
noun. buccaneer - corsair - freebooter - filibuster - picaroon
verb. rob

i think they should change their name to the IntellectualPropertyTheftBay or the CopyrightInfringmentBay

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

multiben (1916126) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417967)

That's a fantastic selective quote from the free online dictionary. I have just one question: Why did you leave off the 3rd and 4th definition?
3. One who makes use of or reproduces the work of another without authorization.
4. One that operates an unlicensed, illegal television or radio station.

Re:Another resolution layer? (2)

KiloByte (825081) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418027)

i think they should change their name to the IntellectualPropertyTheftBay

It's pretty hard to steal intellectual property, the few cases that succeeded are aptly-named AFACT and RIAA. Without means to deprive a rightful owner of their rights, the "worst" (best actually) the rest of us mere mortals can do is copy.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

mark-t (151149) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418235)

Considering part of the copyright holder's rights are supposed to be the right to exclusively control who else will be allowed to make copies in the first place (ie, literally the "right to copy"), the mere act of making any unauthorized copies of copyrighted works at all deprives the rights holder of at least some of their so-called rights.

But because such rights are not typically valued by the person who might make an unauthorized copy, one who does so will generally not perceive it as being similar to theft in any way.

One who is inclined to produce excuses for such activity might argue that because such rights are not natural rights, they should have no value,. except that much of the concept of property itself, and the very meaning of ownership that does not necessarily involve physical possession of something is actually entirely an artificial one, or else I could not, for example, claim that the car I drive when I leave it legally parked in a public place still actually belongs to me... even if I leave the doors unlocked, or forget the keys on the front seat (granted, for such an oversight, I'd be practically publicly announcing that I want it to be stolen, and if I were to have actually done this, it would probably affect whether or not theft insurance would cover my loss, but the thief, if any, would still be a thief, and culpable for the crime).

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418683)

It's not deprivation of the right, it's infringement. If you want an example of someone stealing a copyright, a possible example would be Bridgeport music in their dealings with George Clinton. Even then, fraud is probably more accurate.

And no, saying that infringement is not theft doesn't in any way imply that it is just, just that it is not theft. Murder is not the theft. Jaywalking is not theft. Adultery is not theft. Slander is not theft. Believe it or not, something can be bad and not be theft.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

mark-t (151149) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419025)

As the entire concept of copyright revolves around what is supposed to be an exclusive right to control who makes copies, usurping some of that control by taking matters into ones own hands and making an unauthorized copy *DOES* deprive the copyright holder of some of their rights.

The only way you can argue otherwise is to suggest that the copyright holder shouldn't have had such rights in the first place, but since that's entirely what copyright is, literally, as I said, the right to copy, you may as well be advocating copyright abolition.

Re:Another resolution layer? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419733)

If they were truly deprived of their rights, they would have no basis to sue anyone. But they're not truly deprived of any rights, now are they?

That said, I'm of the opinion that no one is entitled to a government-enforced monopoly, and saying otherwise is anti-freedom.

you may as well be advocating copyright abolition.

I am.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

cheater512 (783349) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417969)

Actually it is legal to link to child porn and how to make bombs.
What law exactly do you think forbids links?

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418149)

Linking to it is considered distribution which they also consider "making" (because copies are "made").

Stupid, unreasonable, but they get away with doing it.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418009)

If they want to be treated as a legitimate enterprise then the very least they should do is change their name to something less provocative.

Glass houses polygamist Ben, glass houses.

Re:Another resolution layer? (2)

Opportunist (166417) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418465)

Yes, that would be legal. Not so sure about the child porn thing (laws get a bit overboard when it comes to that matter too, even worse than what's surrounding copyright), but linking to bomb building information is not illegal. Last time I checked, information was not outlawed... yet.

I know that our legislators have this pressing urge to make knowledge and information that may harm them illegal, but I sincerely hope that we'll manage to keep it open. Yes, that does of course entail danger. That's a given. Freedom always comes at a price. Despite the name, it's rarely free. But why should knowing how to build a bomb be illegal? Building one maybe should be illegal, using it where people can be harmed should most certainly be illegal, but why should the information be?

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419549)

Somebody better tell Pittsburgh's baseball team...

Devil's advocate here (1)

gagol (583737) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418069)

Do you think it would be legal to run ads for drug dealers? I mean, you don't deal drugs, just list the dealers and their pagers! Some of them may just de dealing crummy homeopathetic medicine, but you know damn well most of them would be selling coke and meth. I think it still sucks the balls off a dead moose, but we have to really think about the moral implications instead of just crying "Not fair! I liked it!".

Re:Devil's advocate here (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418375)

Do you think it would be legal to run ads for drug dealers?

Used to be done in phone books, I don't know if they still do that. You can still find prostitutes (and some other things) in city specific rags.

Re:Devil's advocate here (1)

Opportunist (166417) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418495)

Actually a pretty good idea. Why not? Sure, it might be a tad bit dumb for people to do so since the police will most likely use that list as well to kick down a few doors to meth labs, but hey, what's wrong with advertising them?

It's legal to sell coke and meth (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418971)

"I mean, you don't deal drugs, just list the dealers and their pagers! Some of them may just de dealing crummy homeopathetic medicine, but you know damn well most of them would be selling coke and meth."

Thankfully the world isn't censored according to your perception of it. Whether you think they're selling coke or not, they're entitled to a trial and evidence. But you should also realize that cocaine, opiates etc. are legally sold, even in the USA as medicines. The only difference is the valid license and valid doctors license. Valid is a relative term, a valid doctors license in USA is not valid for Mexico.

In some countries, they've decriminalized drugs, Columbia, and Portugal for example, it resulted in a drop in HIV and a drop in related crimes.

See, in your head is an absolute measure of good and bad based on what you've been told is true, but you've been misled. Thankfully, we don't rely on individuals prejudice to make these decision, and this is why the admin at .GL is wrong. No matter what his personal opinion is, its wrong for him to misuse his position to force that opinion on others.

It would be like the RIAA stopping iPods because of the copy, they tried, they failed, as a result music sales are at their highest level ever recorded. Yet they claimed it would destroy music!

Re:It's legal to sell coke and meth (0)

gagol (583737) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419323)

Ok, I will bite. I experienced the good stuff when I went through surgery. The stuff I had was far from addictive, really tuned for killing pain and not addictive at all. For your information, it was from the hydromorphone family. On the other hand I had some friends from my childhood kill themselves after being addicted to powerful illegal drugs. I cannot wait to see how it will help those societies in the long run. That being said, I fail to see how you really responded to my marketing moral analogy. Good luck being a troll, let me know how it turns out for you.

Search 'addicted to prescription drugs" (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419517)

"The stuff I had was far from addictive, really tuned for killing pain and not addictive at all. For your information, it was from the hydromorphone family"

Here's how to kick addiction to hydromorphones,
http://www.drugs.com/forum/featured-drugs/hydromorphone-dilaudid-addiction-35799.html

Coke is psychologically addictive, not chemically, users take it for the effect, not a chemical dependency. You magically separate these into two groups:

1. Medicines, magic non addictive, good, legal, and totally different from
2. Drugs, addictive, evil, illegal,

The distinction really isn't there. All of item 1) is also in the set of item 2. Those opiates for pain killing are as addictive as opiates for mellowing out, amphetamines are speed or E, or Ritalin, or the drugs used to treat obesity. The primary effect of the drug heroin, the chemical effect not the crime, or the costs, or the withdrawal symptoms, the actual measurable effect is 'constipation'.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/emotional_health/addictions/heroin.shtml

"I fail to see how you really responded to my marketing moral analogy"
And here we are, *you* don't understand why the world doesn't set rules based on what *you* think is right and wrong, and when challenged on your black and white, right and wrong (and demonstrably false) views, *you* quote *yourself* as evidence.

The registrar is wrong to apply his arbitrary and incorrect judgement to his job. His job is to issue the domains, not decide moral arguments.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419461)

Whether TPB is legal depends on the local law. That you think it's not doing anything wrong, doesn't mean the rest of the world or their laws agree with that.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419589)

You don't get it. In a democracy, the people with the money make the laws. You ain't them. Got it?

Re:Another resolution layer? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417715)

This it. This is THE SOLUTION.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417735)

No. DNS is not the problem. DNS is decentralized... the root servers will accept any info. The problem is the registrar won't accept them. But there are plenty of other TLDs. also, what happened to just using an IP address? They could have multiple ones...

--Sam

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417887)

Or .42 or .onion or just use a catchy IPv4/IPv6, or a browser plugin.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417757)

Just start distributing hosts files over Pastebin.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417809)

So, is it time to come up with a new system for distributing IP addresses, other than DNS?

Ahem: jntlesnev5o7zysa.onion

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

KiloByte (825081) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418051)

This is not a good reason to do so: a corrupt and oppressive law is still law, you can work around it by using a different TLD.

A good reason to abandon current DNS scheme is ICANN's recent TLD idea.

Just put it in the hosts file (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418111)

I think we should just hard code it in the hosts file. My reasoning:

thepiratebay.gl is owned by thepiratebay,
Tele-Post have fallen for the manipulation of the copyright law, and prejudged this, they are in the wrong.
So simply point thepiratebay.gl at 194.71.107.15 or whatever,
Tele-post loses the ability to sell thepiratebay.gl , the pirate bay become the rightful owners of that domain (forever) .

Really they just sell names, but they act like they control what you do with the name, that's very dangerous. It would only be a matter of time before speech is the reason you lose a domain name. The prosecution of pirate bay was driven by US politics, we saw that from the leaked Wikileaks memos. That can't be permitted.

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418191)

Its call freenet. Or I2P.

It exists now, nothing to 'come up with'.

Re:Another resolution layer? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419455)

To keep it from becoming a mess, we NEED an authoritative entity that keeps track of all the names and numbers. Otherwise, sooner or later, two names will start pointing to the same address. Or, depending on where in the world you are, a name points to different addresses.

Already this has been split into multiple authoritative entities, one for each TLD, and a pool of addresses for each those authorities, and numerous registrars that manage the individual registrations on behalf of those authorities. This allows such domain-shopping like TPB is doing. I doubt you can split it up much further or it's really going to become a mess, it's enough of a mess as it is already.

If, as you suggest, you start questioning multiple DNS servers and get different answers, you have a big problem. Which one is the legitimate site, which one is a scammer?

Re:Another resolution layer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43419509)

I don't know why someone hasn't come up with an alternative. Is there any reason why we can't have a peer-to-peer alternative name resolution service? And instead of this silly name system we have now that's twenty years obsolete, why not have names like uri://domain-name.unique-id-string/?

Not surprising. (-1, Flamebait)

houbou (1097327) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417799)

Which ISP wants the heat of illegal downloads going through their networks? PIrate Bay's days will soon end.. E-Mule and these other Peer-to-peer will be targetted next. It's just a matter of time before the 'Wild Wild West' internet, becomes.. uh.. civilized :)

Re:Not surprising. (1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417937)

eventually it'll be all inside tor (for the web portion), with a system like bittorrent for the data transfer, but every user possibly hosting small percentages of many files in the swarm, so instead of 200,000 people seeding (or partially) some blockbuster movie and only 100 hosting some indie freeware, everybody in the swarm will do some lifting without specific knowledge for deniability sake. it'll always be possible at some point to stop it, but start encrypting every block and spread it out.

Re:Not surprising. (2)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417983)

People will just move to tor or other undernets(i2p, freenet, etc,) and what they will do then

Re:Not surprising. (1)

Opportunist (166417) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418523)

This is pretty much what law enforcement worries about. When darknets become the norm, it becomes a lot harder to crack down on real criminals who now use similar services. Should they cease to exist and they have to "go deeper", it will become a lot more troublesome to keep track of them.

Re:Not surprising. (2)

muphin (842524) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418067)

ACTUALLY, heres a little bit of secret info
the police prefer NOT to shutdown these P2P networks as it allows them to easily track people who download it.
its a very valuable key for their child porn fight, pretty much says name of file people are downloading and ip address of people downloading... they then grab a search warrant and nab you...
you notice how its always the "content" industry complaining... not the government or police? why? BECAUSE IT ISNT ILLEGAL

Re:Not surprising. (2)

akanouras (1431981) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418273)

Search for any given infohash on Google and see for yourself how many indexers there are other than TPB (with many more appearing every day). Somehow I feel they won't all disappear, not until we get a World Government, or something. ;-)

Now, in case they all disappear before we get the aforementioned government, DHT [wikipedia.org] can still do the job, even if it's a bit slow. It also is kinda searchable [btdigg.org] by the way, and expect to see supernode-based structures for fast in-client searching in the future (if they don't already exist, I'm not up to date on the subject).

Re:Not surprising. (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419475)

The big trick remains to get your hands on that infohash. It's not like it's easy to guess or so.

Re:Not surprising. (4, Insightful)

MadMaverick9 (1470565) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419263)

And do you really believe that this kind of behavior by the "entertainment" industry is going to make me buy more of their crap?

Keep dreaming ...

If I buy something then I decide where and how I will use it. Not you, not the "entertainment" industry can and should decide and control what I can or can not do with the stuff I paid money for. Get it?

And after I bought the movie or music, stop treating me like a damn criminal with your stupid FBI messages about piracy.

But No - you have to control each and every aspect of your crap with drm, region code and other technology crap.

Nowadays copyright and "intellectual" property is one big mechanism to control what users can or can not do. And I will not participate in that!

Until things change, piracy will not go away.

Go to jail thieves!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43417835)

Medusa is all up in your grill, bitchtard.

Wait a minute (0, Troll)

hsmith (818216) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417841)

Greenland has a TLD?

Re:Wait a minute (1)

Narrowband (2602733) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418021)

Heck, TUVALU had a TLD, until they decided they could get more out of selling ".tv" than having one themselves.

Re:Wait a minute (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418047)

A ccTLD is still a TLD you pedantic cunt.

Re:Wait a minute (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418089)

Almost every country does. Were you expecting +5 Funny? Too bad there's no -1 Unfunny idiot

May be it's time to run own pirate's dns ? (1)

ctype_007 (2836657) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417875)

people already used to setup 8.8.8.8 and opendns in resolv.conf so it's easy to run separate services and create separate dns table

Re:May be it's time to run own pirate's dns ? (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417997)

or just encourage people to install there own dns servers.

Re:May be it's time to run own pirate's dns ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418905)

Maybe they're working on their servers there. You should continue you work on English as your second (or more) language, you're doing well. If you're a native speaker, head back to elementary school because you were clearly too busy diddling yourself to learn the basics of the language you're attempting (and failing) to use.

Time to go .bit (2)

fsterman (519061) | 1 year,13 days | (#43417973)

It's about time we started investing in the decentralized name server alternatives. .P2P fizzled because they couldn't figure out a decentralized distribution mechanism. Thankfully, Namecoin [dot-bit.org] is at v3.5 and only requires adding a DNS resolver to the system.

Re:Time to go .bit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418297)

The only thing you should worry bout investing in is a lawyer. Thieves like you deserve jail time with Medusa as a cell mate.
 
Those snakes will bite your ass.

Re:Time to go .bit (0)

Anonymous Coward | 1 year,13 days | (#43418541)

Thieves like you deserve jail time with Medusa as a cell mate.

Those snakes will bite your ass.

Medusa had a stare that turned people to stone. I'll just tell her to get in the kitchen and BAM! no snake bites for me!

Could just say fuck it (2)

Arancaytar (966377) | 1 year,13 days | (#43418429)

And serve it through Tor. Darknets aren't suited for BitTorrent traffic, but they're perfect for trackers and search engines.

What I don't get. (3, Interesting)

MadMaverick9 (1470565) | 1 year,13 days | (#43419123)

They've had the name since 2011 and suddenly today it's a problem?

Domain Information
Query: thepiratebay.gl
Status: Suspended
Created: 16 Mar 2011
Modified: 10 Apr 2013
Expires: 16 Mar 2015

Looks to me like somebody exerted pressure onto somebody else. Same as in 2006 when the US threatened Sweden with trade sanctions if they wouldn't do something about TPB.

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