Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

MS Office Tablet Delay Gives Google a Real Chance, and Not Just Google Apps

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the microsoft-working-hard-to-break-vendor-lock-in dept.

Android 108

rtfa-troll writes "Microsoft Office slideware for iOS and Android has been resisting many migrations to Google Apps. Although a number of the largest companies, from KLM to Disney, have already moved to Google Apps, most large companies are still using Microsoft Office heavily. The majority of current Google users are smaller businesses. Now Microsoft has been forced to admit that its office suite for Android will be delayed by at least a year and Zdnet tells us that Google will be the big winner from that. However, they also say QuickOffice, rather than Google Apps, will be the main winner. Other Android app suites will benefit too, though currently the Android version of LibreOffice is only available as a dev build for sideloading and is having some difficulties packaging for Google Play, so it may not benefit from this delay unless more volunteers step up to help. Microsoft relies heavily on Office for revenue, so this may represent a real, long-term threat to the company."

cancel ×

108 comments

Really? (5, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | about a year ago | (#43431577)

Is Google introducing some type of "uncloud" feature for Google Docs?

I like Google Docs but it sucks having confidential business materials out in the cloud somewhere.

Re:Really? (4, Insightful)

schnell (163007) | about a year ago | (#43431703)

I don't care as much about the cloud aspect - although I'm sure most large companies will. The issue for me is that I simply can't imagine doing a presentation or a spreadsheet on my tablet and not having it be a painful experience. Writing long e-mails on an iPad is already no fun; a document with formatting and tables seems practically like an exercise in masochism.

I can read Office documents on my iPad already. I still view it (other than short e-mails) as a content consumption device, not a content creation device... even if it had a snap-on keyboard. So I just don't get why the presence of an office suite on a tablet/mobile device is a big deal. Your mileage may vary.

Re:Really? (4, Insightful)

Covalent (1001277) | about a year ago | (#43431773)

This.

I am a chemistry teacher, which means my work involves symbols, sub- and superscripts, diagrams, etc. Creating that sort of work on a tablet / phone is painful. I don't see that changing any time soon, either. A dedicated keyboard allows multi-key commands (Ctrl-Shift-= for superscript, etc) that a tablet cannot do. A mouse allows for nested menus with thousands of options. That's a no-go for tablets.

For me, mobile = consumption and desktop = production.

Re:Really? (3, Informative)

OpenSourced (323149) | about a year ago | (#43431913)

You could try the Samsung Note tablet, with pencil. In the Notes app you can write formulae (although mainly math, which can be even resolved), squares, etc, and be recognized (mostly) by the software. Probably it won't be yet useful for you, but perhaps you want to keep an eye on it.

Chemistry Specific Keyboard? (3, Informative)

glennrrr (592457) | about a year ago | (#43431921)

One of the nice things about an onscreen keyboard is that they can be customized for the task at hand, thus the spreadsheet keyboard in Numbers for iPad. Now imagine a keyboard with C O H S P + - 1 2 3 4 5 6 and a subscript superscript lock button.

Re:Really? (1)

mmurphy000 (556983) | about a year ago | (#43431943)

A dedicated keyboard allows multi-key commands (Ctrl-Shift-= for superscript, etc) that a tablet cannot do.

A tablet with a keyboard can, whether that keyboard is a dedicated attachment (e.g., ASUS Transformers and their keyboard slices), via Bluetooth, etc. Over time, developers with apps needing complex input like this will support such keyboards, just as they do with desktop (and, to some extent, Web-based) app counterparts.

A mouse allows for nested menus with thousands of options. That's a no-go for tablets.

Ignoring the fact that "nested menus with thousands of options" is an awful UI on any platform, this is equally possible with a touch interface.

Re:Really? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43432165)

I am appalled that any teacher anywhere starts a forum post with the totally meaningless and grammatically incorrect single word sentence "This." I have noticed this practice is a growing habit here and never understood why. Please tell me what it is supposed to mean or add to your post?

Re:Really? (3, Informative)

hoggoth (414195) | about a year ago | (#43432545)

Why do you pretend to not understand common slang and shortcuts? Do you also talk like Data from Star Trek?

"This" is shorthand for "I agree very much with this statement". The implication is the statement you agree with is so strongly and obviously true that you don't need to say more than "this".

Sometimes it is followed by additional points you would like to add to the statement.

Re:Really? (1)

IANAAC (692242) | about a year ago | (#43434863)

"This" is shorthand for "I agree very much with this statement". The implication is the statement you agree with is so strongly and obviously true that you don't need to say more than "this".

Not defending the previous poster, but "This" is totally overused. Overused enough that it makes the person using it illiterate.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43435099)

This.

Nuff said.

Re:Really? (1)

Sardaukar86 (850333) | about a year ago | (#43435671)

Not defending the previous poster, but "This" is totally overused. Overused enough that it makes the person using it illiterate.

Not illiterate, lazy. When followed by actual content I've found some of the best posts I've read on Slashdot.

Used alone it's just lame.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43435205)

The implication is the statement you agree with is so strongly and obviously true that you don't need to say more than "this".

Sometimes it is followed by additional points you would like to add to the statement.

Oh, bullshit. That's the same sort of backwards shoehorn sophistry that people claim for using "I could care less."

If you're adding or rephrasing the parent post, you apparently do need to say more than "this." Or if "this" is the entirety of your response, you're just a +1 me-too waste of space in the thread who thinks that a statement which is obviously and inherently unassailable won't be recognized until you to stick a grammatical pin in it.

Re:Really? (1)

hoggoth (414195) | about a year ago | (#43435401)

That would be true if it weren't for one of the unspoken sub-rules of "this", which is the first poster of "this" is stating that the group-think agrees with the statement. Any post stating "this" after the first "this" is uncalled for, repetitive, adds nothing, and goes against the customs and practices of "this" posting.

There can only be one "this", is only slightly less true than there can only be one "first post".

Re:Really? (1)

thunderclap (972782) | about a year ago | (#43432577)

My aren't we the grammar Nazi. His 'this' referenced the previous post which is what most 'this' do. He stated he was a chemistry teacher.

Re:Really? (1)

Hunter Shoptaw (2655515) | about a year ago | (#43432725)

Apparently someone doesn't teach Computer or Social Sciences.

Re:Really? (1)

sootman (158191) | about a year ago | (#43433907)

This.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43434905)

I despise this ridiculous trend. For the love of god, if you agree with a post, say "I agree."

At least the GP had the wherewithal to actually elaborate, unlike the majority of "me, too" posters who add nothing at all to a discussion by presenting their one-word response.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43432311)

This.

I am a chemistry teacher, which means my work involves symbols, sub- and superscripts, diagrams, etc. Creating that sort of work on a tablet / phone is painful. I don't see that changing any time soon, either. A dedicated keyboard allows multi-key commands (Ctrl-Shift-= for superscript, etc) that a tablet cannot do. A mouse allows for nested menus with thousands of options. That's a no-go for tablets.

For me, mobile = consumption and desktop = production.

Not just that. Try writing a scientific paper in Google Docs. There's no decent reference manager or plugin (like, for example, Bibtex for LaTeX documents or Zotero/Mendeley for Word of LibreOffice documents), so doing any scientific writing in Google Docs is a non-starter.

Re:Really? (4, Informative)

kidgenius (704962) | about a year ago | (#43432705)

As an engineer, let me recommend one way of improving your speed at writing out superscripted/subscripted formulas, along with other mathematical symbols; use LibreOffice. It has a built-in equation editor that works quite well. You can just type in and it will automatically reformat. For instance, typing "H_2 O" would subscript the 2. Doing "x^2+x+1" would superscript the 2.

Re:Really? (1)

Covalent (1001277) | about a year ago | (#43434537)

Thanks! I have just started using LibreOffice (at the suggestion of another teacher) and have been very impressed.

Re:Really? (1)

geekoid (135745) | about a year ago | (#43433633)

That may just be because no one has written a good interface to do that.

Lets say you are a chemistry teacher in a 3rd world country and all you have are tablets.
How What would yo need to do? What would te interface need to support?

You are tied to the complexity of the PC. Tied so tightly you can't imagine there could ab another way.

What if you hit a spot on the screen and just said 'Superscript'?

Why do you think you can have hotkeys on a PC and not on a tablet?

Re:Really? (1)

Lussarn (105276) | about a year ago | (#43434639)

You are tied to the complexity of the PC. Tied so tightly you can't imagine there could ab another way.

A tablet just isn't up to the task of serious content creation. You can barely write on them (yes you can, but it isn't exactly fun) and your fingers are just too clumsy compared to a mouse pointer. This will not change until the next tablet revolution comes with completely overhauled interfaces, this will probably take some time if it will ever happen.

This has nothing to do with "complexity", tablets and PCs are two very different things as it stands today. Tablets are great for consumption.

Re:Really? (1)

sootman (158191) | about a year ago | (#43433973)

Ten years ago, when Windows XP tablets first started coming out, there was a sketching/diagramming app that took your shapes and "fixed" them -- you draw a kind-of circle and *poof* it would snap into a perfectly round, evenly-stroked circle. We have handwriting recognition now -- it should be pretty easy to write software to parse a hand-written equation to something properly set in TeX or MathML or whatever -- potentially MUCH better than key combinations. Or imagine a tool that let you build equations by dragging the characters around, or at the very least, a custom software keyboard -- that's what they're great at, after all.

That said, I agree about not wanting to type long-form things on a touchscreen, but kids today are evidently into it.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43434743)

Hello Heisemberg, on the other hand tablets are great to cut this blue, high purity stuff you produce!

Re:Really? (1)

njnnja (2833511) | about a year ago | (#43434757)

This is the kind of thing that touchscreens should be perfect for. It's basically just context-switching UI, such that when the program knows that you want to write a formula, it should switch from a virtual querty keyboard to a more appropriate input device. Maybe a virtual, periodic table keyboard, with two or three rows of numeric input corresponding to normal, superscript, and subscript. Or whatever. The point is that a customizable input device (like a touchscreen) is only better than a non-customizable one if it in fact, gets customized.

Re:Really? (1)

extra88 (1003) | about a year ago | (#43435855)

Google Docs, like LibreOffice, can insert equations written using LaTeX notation.
http://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=160749 [google.com]
I don't think you can write while never having your hands leave the keyboard (you must at least tap/click the "New Equation" button) but I don't know how easy it is to operate that way in any desktop program that renders input.

BTW, MS Word's Equation Editor lets you enter LaTeX also, it's not some superpower only open source software has.

I'm not promoting any one of these choices, just pointing that by writing math & notation as TeX is useful feature in a number of document creation programs, online and offline.

Re:Really? (4, Funny)

theskipper (461997) | about a year ago | (#43431895)

According to the Microsoft pad-thingy commercials, you can create content while hand-walking across a desk or dancing as an angry cheerleader. So toughen up soldier, if they can do it you can too.

Re:Really? (2)

ChronoFish (948067) | about a year ago | (#43432257)

I am still trying to figure out why the angry cheerleader triggers a "grotesque" response from me. It's kind-of like something from Uncanny Valley. All the parts are there... it's just not quite right.

-CF

Re:Really? (1)

thunderclap (972782) | about a year ago | (#43432601)

Simple, Its all CGI with two people. There was a special that showed the choreographing of it. Angry cheerleader is all computer generated falseness. You have to be more astute than most.

Re:Really? (1)

larry bagina (561269) | about a year ago | (#43432605)

That's the problem -- all the parts are there. Including the penis and testicles. It's a transvestite cheerleader..

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43433507)

Does someone have a link to this commercial? I'd like to see it.

Re:Really? (1)

steelfood (895457) | about a year ago | (#43433261)

Funny, that sounds just like every other pad commercial I've seen on TV.

Re:Really? (1)

rs1n (1867908) | about a year ago | (#43431967)

Indeed your mileage may vary. I think that there is a significant number of business folks who would love to travel even lighter. So rather than lugging their laptop (for work) onto the plane as a carry-on in addition to their iPad or Android tablet (for play -- i.e. media consumption and basic gaming), they can opt for just the tablet to do minimal office work on a smaller device.

Re:Really? (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | about a year ago | (#43432301)

The issue for me is that I simply can't imagine doing a presentation or a spreadsheet on my tablet and not having it be a painful experience.

I do these things on my tablets all the time and find them completely unchallenging. Spreadsheets in particular benefit from touch and pinch to zoom.

Which part of it scares you?

Re:Really? (1)

schnell (163007) | about a year ago | (#43432687)

Which part of it scares you?

Fair question. When I work with Excel spreadsheets, much or most of my time is spent doing things that involve "right-click" menus or menu options from the Ribbon. The right-click stuff could be easily enough emulated with a contextual press, but most tablet apps don't have a menu bar and I have a hard time seeing how to make activities like advanced formatting, data filtering, sorting and grouping/ungrouping easy to do on a tablet. Even if it were easy, I still can't see it being as easy as it is with a mouse.

Kinda like my experience with some games on a tablet. I got Dead Space for the iPad, and I think they did a great job of making that control scheme usable on a touchscreen. But it's still not nearly as nice as it is with a keyboard and mouse - so I went back to playing those games on a PC and never played the iPad game more than once or twice. (I also had the same experience with GTA: Chinatown Wars on the iPad.) So for me, I guess I'm just stuck in the idea that some things on a tablet can be workable on a tablet but I'll always prefer them with a WiMP GUI.

Re:Really? (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | about a year ago | (#43433091)

but most tablet apps don't have a menu bar and I have a hard time seeing how to make activities like advanced formatting, data filtering, sorting and grouping/ungrouping easy to do on a tablet.

Why don't you just borrow an Android tablet and try it.

Even the free Kingsoft Office would give you a pretty good idea of what you can do. It most certainly has a menu bar and a context-aware ribbon. Once you're used to it, it's faster than WIMP.

Tablets could be good for drawing and note taking (3, Insightful)

sjbe (173966) | about a year ago | (#43432845)

I still view it (other than short e-mails) as a content consumption device, not a content creation device... even if it had a snap-on keyboard.

There is one type of content creation a tablet could in theory be good for, namely anything requiring a pen. We all still use lots of pens so the need is obviously there. A tablet could be great for drawing and note taking (think equations or diagrams which are nearly impossible on a keyboard or with fingers) if the interface was done right. There is a reason most students still take notes on paper. Problem is that we are stuck finger-painting on our tablets which doesn't work for those purposes. A tablet should be the perfect device for students to take notes on but no one makes them right now with that task in mind. A tablet could be a great content creation device for the right applications.

The problem with using a stylus on a tablet is that the software designers invariably and wrongly try to use the stylus for navigation or as a keyboard instead of just using it for what it is actually good for which is ONLY drawing. The fact that you can draw alpha-numerics or point at navigation buttons is just a bonus but they get all excited and try to use the stylus for things it does do well. They (historically) have tried to use a stylus like a mouse pointer which demonstrably doesn't work well since the interfaces were designed for keyboards/mice combos. Or they try to turn it into a keyboard for text input which doesn't work either (too slow and character recognition generally sucks). A stylus/pen is for drawing and only for drawing. Even interfaces which are designed for fingers don't really translate well to a pen - pens are for drawing thin lines, not pushing buttons. You don't (typically) use a pen to push a button when you hold a real pen so why would you do it on a tablet?

Re:Tablets could be good for drawing and note taki (1)

Boycott BMG (1147385) | about a year ago | (#43434855)

You may be looking for the galaxy note series from samsung. The whole series (note 1, note 2, note 10.1, note 8) have features like formula match, which reads your handwritten equations and tries to guess what the formula was, shape match for diagrams, and handwriting recognition.

Re:Really? (1)

mcrbids (148650) | about a year ago | (#43434429)

Bluetooth keyboards for the win! I have a Dell iGo Stowaway bluetooth keyboard and it turns my Android Razr Maxx HD phone into a mini-laptop in seconds.

Re:Really? (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#43435179)

Bluetooth keyboards for the win! I have a Dell iGo Stowaway bluetooth keyboard and it turns my Android Razr Maxx HD phone into a mini-laptop in seconds.

Or a dock like with the ASUS Transformer. Love it.

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43435027)

I think they are thinking about chromebooks and 'laptop lite' devices like it. The application is in the cloud, but (at least this is how I would do it), the data is stored on a memory stick I have attached to the computer. The app. is in the cloud, and my data is mine, and I have it right here. Its up to them to look after the app. and what it does or not. I don't want to have access to my data (at all).

Re:Really? (4, Informative)

technomom (444378) | about a year ago | (#43431811)

There's already an offline feature for Google Apps, it's called Offline Docs. But yeah, it's still not quite there yet.

Re:Really? (2)

obarthelemy (160321) | about a year ago | (#43431863)

Actually, yes, in 2 ways:

1- Google Docs works offline in a number of OSes (Chomre OS...)

2- QuickOffice, from Google, is a regular, client-side Office suite.

Re:Really? (1)

Cid Highwind (9258) | about a year ago | (#43432457)

QuickOffice - Which Google bought 2 years ago and promptly quit updating (possibly to kill off a rival to GDocs pathetic offline capabilities) is a slow and rather dated looking, regular client-side Office suite.

T,FTFM

Re:Really? (1)

ottothecow (600101) | about a year ago | (#43434617)

It seems ok to me.

I have Docs to Go as well on my phone (got both docs to go and quickoffice free from amazon as apps of the day). Each one has pros and cons. IIRC quickoffice is faster but there are things that it doesn't do a good job with that Docs to Go can do better.

Have always had to hesitate when I open a doc and cant decide which tool to use (especially now that my phone also has "Document Viewer" from google...but maybe that is just read-only quickoffice).

Re:Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43435053)

Quick office was bought 9 months back, so you must be thinking of something else.

Re:Really? (5, Interesting)

mabhatter654 (561290) | about a year ago | (#43431925)

QuickOffice is their offline product. It has been floating around since the Palm days to read MS Office docs. The only problem is that QuickOffice never picked up OpenOffice file types... And that is what Google Docs are built on natively.

If Google would move on the OpenOffice compatibility they could grab a bunch of Linux Desktop offices as well that use LibreOffice included in lots of distros. And LibreOffice is free for Macs and PCs so google could do a Google Docs plugin.

Microsoft has allowed too much NIH from MS Office management and they are about to lose their Monopoly money. They were supposed to have a native Dot Net version of Office 3-5 years ago.. They could have been running it on Xboxes... But the Office team couldn't do the job. They couldn't deliver a Native Metro Office either... So the Office team not doing their homework means Windows RT has to run a "fake desktop" for MICROSOFT'S FLAGSHIP PRODUCT. That's not Winning. So is it a surprise that MS can't get an iOS or Android version out? Microsoft has lashed their shops together so tightly they can't pick them apart... They can't even keep up a MAC version of Office without a year lead time.

So while the FOJ was utterly ineffective in intro long Microsoft's behavior with the law, at least Microsoft's 10 year focus on bending and weaseling out of the DOJ rules took their collective eyeballs off MAKING SOFTWARE. (Kin and Courier could have won them back share YEARS ago) And now the little ships like Apple and Google have paddled far enough away on different directions Microsoft can't hurt them anymore.

Re:Really? (2, Insightful)

steelfood (895457) | about a year ago | (#43434493)

Wait, what? Do you even know what you're talking about?

Metro is just a fancy desktop replacement. It offers little to no functional purpose. Why do you think it failed? It's not because Microsoft's own products couldn't support it. It's because it was a useless waste of screen space and mouse clicks. Office runs "natively" on Metro as far as it can, i.e. there's a button to start Office apps through Metro. That's it. There's no other requirement to being "native". Metro is not an architecture thing, it's just window dressing replacing the desktop. It's like replacing the glass panes of your greenhouse with fancy curtains. Well, you still need those glass panes, hence the neutered "desktop" that still ships with Windows 8 and RT. Only now, you can't let sunlight in without first brushing aside those damn curtains every time.

The DOJ did squat. Microsoft had so much cash in its vaults in preparation for the antitrust sentence that they ended up paying their shareholders a ton of dividend afterwards because the fine was so small. Do you really think that if the DOJ's actions hurt Microsoft in any way, they would have left over cash to spread to their shareholders afterwards?

No, Microsoft's failures are due to incompetence at the top. Like all other large, made companies, they got soft and stopped taking risks. They encouraged their senior management to fight and jostle among each other for the CEO's good graces. They let people with vision and talent go, while refusing to "retire" the useless, good-for-nothings that are even now still fighting over their standings with Ballmer.

Cream rises to the top. So does shit. Large companies accumulate a lot of shit, and all it takes is for one chunk to stain the cream brown and turn it into shit too. Most companies try to keep their shit from rising, but Microsoft funnily enough promoted one to CEO.

Re:Really? (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | about a year ago | (#43435181)

You just explained why people don't understand that Apple revolutionized tablets as much as Palm before them. That Microsoft's "solution" for having Office on Metro was just an Icon to open a normal desktop shows that they DON'T UNDERSTAND TABLETS. We already had that... And customers REJECTED desktop GUI metaphors on a finger-based device... Microsoft added nothing of value to the RT version of Office that the XP version from 2002 didn't have.

Microsoft's entire Office Product is tied to a giant GUI kit, right down to the engine that renders a document on a page.. Microsoft has known since Dot Net (more than 5 years) that they needed to REFACTOR Office to run on leaner machines with leaner APIs and lower hardware requirements. But they failed to execute. We EXPECTED Microsoft to design a NEW WAY to work with complex spreadsheets on a finger-based OS that didn't involve just copying what they already rehashed to us TEN YEARS ago. Apple's Numbers at least attempts to invent a new interface... It's Microsoft's show, they have "unlimited" funds, and "unlimited" access to the smartest programmers on the wirld at Microsoft Research.... And they refused to accept that the public REJECTED their take on Tablet apps for the third time in a DECADE.

Re:Really? (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#43435207)

If Google would move on the OpenOffice compatibility they could grab a bunch of Linux Desktop offices as well that use LibreOffice included in lots of distros. And LibreOffice is free for Macs and PCs so google could do a Google Docs plugin.

Very true. I'm still looking for one. Everything that has read/write functionality seems to be all MS Office format oriented. While its nice for getting the occasional docs from others, I primarily use ODF formats. AndrOffice will read 'em, but not write 'em. And LibreOffice isn't quite there yet. First to support ODF will gain a huge market share.

Re:Really? (1)

fermion (181285) | about a year ago | (#43432111)

As has been said, if I am a small company I might like the free nature of Google for creating memos and the simultaneous editing of other documents. It is better than $400 a pop for each machine running MS Office. If I am a bigger, the uncertainty that my documents are going to available on Google(peoples accounts have been mysteriously shut down) and have the confidential information for other to mine online would not be worth the risk.

That combined with the fact that a tablet is not a great way to develop documents, and this is not a big issue yet. I have written on my tablet, and even with a keyboard is does not seem as fast as on my laptop. There may be value in going to a conference, pulling down the presentation from the cloud, and having some ability to edit, but if i am going to a prevention I am not going to depend on the ability to pull it from the cloud. I want a local copy.

Then is the fact that really, as a office suite, Google Docs is still a toy. I use it, but there are others reasons that I use it and I can work around the toy aspect. What the shortcomings? The presentation software is not flexible with page sizes and what can be done with the presentation. The spreadsheet has no extended features. The word processor has trouble with table. I mean this is really 1990s technology. Which is fine. It works online. But I can see why MS is not willing to take a 10 year step backwards to get it's stuff online.

how hard is it to make a word processor? (3, Insightful)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43431617)

there are dozens in the iOS app store. Pages is the closest thing to word and some are nothing more than text editors.

either way you don't need the entire MS Office on a mobile device. just a few features to use on the road or train

Multi-hour travel (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#43431669)

either way you don't need the entire MS Office on a mobile device. just a few features to use on the road or train

That works well when commuting within a city, but it breaks down when taking several hours to travel between cities in different states/provinces. That's why I still carry a 10" laptop.

Re:Multi-hour travel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43431757)

Im in the same boat...the Surface looks like the best option for me going forward but I am still hanging out on two things before I buy one:

1 - in built 3g or 4g connectivity - obviously I'll have to wait for v2 for this
2 - A connector for my PowerGorilla or any external battery accessory

Re:Multi-hour travel (0)

DogDude (805747) | about a year ago | (#43432015)

...or, you can just get a Windows Phone. That's what I do, Works great.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43431753)

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor?

About as hard as it is to make a web browser... But once you have one of those, it's a piece of cake.

Supporting all the RETARDING document formats (other than HTML) is what's hard. Really, WTF people. We solved this problem and everyone just ignores the fact.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43431813)

we solved this problem and everyone just ignores the fact.

Now go make every web browser render your html exactly the same. OH and with 0 hints from the html. Oh and it has to work with COM/OLE and legacy VBScript.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43431825)

Pages on ios will NATIVELY export to PDF and MS Word if you ask it to. how hard can it be to support different formats?

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

obarthelemy (160321) | about a year ago | (#43431899)

natively export ?

and.. .what features are supported ? export is not a yes/no situation. some features export well, others not well, others not at all, others don't even exist in the exporting WP....

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | about a year ago | (#43431767)

either way you don't need the entire MS Office on a mobile device. just a few features to use on the road or train

Depends on the mobile device. I have Numbers for my iPhone, and it's a complete pain in the neck to do any editing on it. The only redeeming quality is that it uses iCloud, so I only use it to view documents I've created on my Mac, making only minor corrections as necessary. But if you're using a tablet with a Bluetooth keyboard, you'd definitely want more features than many of the light-weight word processors that are available can offer.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43431933)

isn't that the whole point of a tablet? light use on the road?

it was never meant to replace a Mac, PC or desktop software

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (2)

XxtraLarGe (551297) | about a year ago | (#43432531)

isn't that the whole point of a tablet? light use on the road? it was never meant to replace a Mac, PC or desktop software

It all depends. You definitely need light-weight on a phone, which was kind of my point. Some places are using iPads and other tables as PC replacements, so some of those features that aren't included in the current crop are definitely needed.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

postbigbang (761081) | about a year ago | (#43431805)

Mobile devices (phones, tablets) are great consumption/reading devices. If you do actual work product on them, as in type serious documents, add tables of numbers, do graphics, you're not going to get much speed or productivity on them. The delay is exaggerated in terms of its effect on the marketplace.

There are tons of iOS and Android (and even handful of BB) apps that do rudimentary "office" work, and do them pretty well. You're not going to get 55wpm with your effing thumbs, however.

And when it finally arrives, Office will probably dominate the storage on your mobile device anyway. There's not a fat demand, IMHO.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (2)

obarthelemy (160321) | about a year ago | (#43431887)

and then you got to work with others, who use Office, and you can't edit their docs, or you can, but the layout is all screwed up, or you can, but then you screw the layout for everyone else

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43432045)

A word processor? Not hard at all...
A WP that can read the Microsoft format, and display it correctly? Almost impossible - Evidence all the other ones that tried (Open office / libra office, among many others, have been trying for years now).
    Good laugh - Code according to the published "Standards".... Hah Hah, burning them now....

Even with the source code, it's almost impossible to backward engineer from the source to what it's supposed to do, and all the little "Quirks" that have grown over it's existence

And there just isn't enough room to run the same code, since it just kept getting bigger, and mobile devices all seem to want to run more than just one app, despite MS's best intentions.....

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about a year ago | (#43432173)

Does it really surprise you that MS has problems with execution? I mean they had tablets long before Apple. And they were little more than laptops with touchscreens and styluses. They cost more than regular laptops, but you could use a stylus [yipee]! Well, you had to use a stylus because MS never changed Windows for Tablets enough to where it really made use of touch with your fingers. The iPhone didn't succeed because Apple put OS X onto a phone and called it done. Apple actually created a new UI to work with multitouch. Layout and workflow are different than a user than on a desktop. It'll never replace a desktop completely but it has enough for most people to be able to actually use it.

MS is not short on ideas; their problem has been executing on them. For example, the Zune. Questionable color choices aside, it was the best MP3 player when it was released. Squirting would have been a great feature if it had not been so crippled with DRM as to be useless. Without squirting, the WiFi feature of the feature was also practically useless. Later when they added direct store purchasing over WiFi did it have a real use. On the other hand, when Apple released the iPod Touch, it moved the goal posts. See it wasn't just an MP3 player. It was a portable computer than had WiFi and a media player in it. You could do email, surf the web, and use thousands of third party apps. WiFi wasn't just a useless feature.

Re:how hard is it to make a word processor? (1)

thunderclap (972782) | about a year ago | (#43432627)

The problem with Microsoft's execution is they confused 'Finish then run' with 'Kill violently'. Zune is the perfect example of this followed by Windows 8.

What office apps do you use? (1)

schivvers (823289) | about a year ago | (#43431723)

I use Kingsoft on my tablet, and it works ok. I've been able to develop a powerpoint, read documents and even edit lightly some documents. It has some cloud integration but also keeps documents on the tablet. Now on my phone I use Google drive, mainly because I have an old smartphone and don't have the resources to load another application. So what does slashdot use?

Re:What office apps do you use? (1)

chowdahhead (1618447) | about a year ago | (#43431845)

My transformer came with Polaris and I also own Quickoffice. They're both pretty good for document compatibility, but the interfaces take a little getting used to. That's the main gripe I have. However, with the tablet is docked in the keyboard, it's much more intuitive--like running an office suite on a laptop.

Re:What office apps do you use? (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#43435509)

My transformer came with Polaris and I also own Quickoffice. They're both pretty good for document compatibility, but the interfaces take a little getting used to. That's the main gripe I have. However, with the tablet is docked in the keyboard, it's much more intuitive--like running an office suite on a laptop.

Very much agree, though I wish they would support ODF.

Re:What office apps do you use? (1)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about a year ago | (#43431939)

Like this man said, "Kingsoft Office", available in Google's PlayStore.

Zoho (2)

paugq (443696) | about a year ago | (#43431831)

In my experience, Zoho Docs [zoho.com] is years ahead of Google Docs. Very few columnists talk about it but it's the only serious "office for web" I would consider for my business. It does everything Google Docs, Hangouts, Drive, etc do, plus a few more things.

Office work on tablets/Phones.. (3, Insightful)

AdmV0rl0n (98366) | about a year ago | (#43431957)

A really really dumb idea. Its one of those areas where people need to comprehend what a tablet is good and not good at. Reading office documents is viable, but actually doing office level work? No no no.

Re: Office work on tablets/Phones.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43432069)

Put a keyboard/mouse on it and its ready to do some heavy lifting. Why is a portable display only good for your narrow definition of things.

Re:Office work on tablets/Phones.. (1)

geekoid (135745) | about a year ago | (#43433715)

I see people using them for work all the time. They're quite successful at it.

Re:Office work on tablets/Phones.. (2)

sootman (158191) | about a year ago | (#43434101)

Wow, what a lame attitude. Sure, maybe I don't want to write a hundred-page doc or build a hundred-slide presentation from scratch, but why wouldn't I want to be able to make little fixes as needed? I comprehend exactly what a tablet is good at -- doing things quickly and easily, anywhere, without having to unfold a laptop, find a seat, wait for it to come up, etc etc etc. I can be anywhere, any time, and think of something and *poof* -- open, edit, close. Done. Which, by the way, is exactly what I currently do with Google Docs and my phone. Big work from my desk, little adjustments when the muse strikes. (And no, this does not mean I am chained to my job and expected to work every hour of every day. The docs I edit are not even for work -- it's just my own stuff and I like being able to have instant access to it whenever.)

It's not like anyone is forcing you or anyone else to use it. If google wants to write the software, let them!

Re:Office work on tablets/Phones.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43434737)

without having to unfold a laptop, find a seat, wait for it to come up, etc etc etc

Sure, like the guy in work today whose iPad was low on charge. Apparently it cannot charge when the screen is on, so he could just use it in short bursts and call-out what he needed the rest of us to look-up on our antiquated laptops.

Re:Office work on tablets/Phones.. (1)

sootman (158191) | about a year ago | (#43435647)

Yeah, because laptops never run out of juice. :-|

For some models of iPad with certain methods of charging and using, it can be on OR build up charge. For the most part, with a proper iPad charger, it can be on AND charging. He must have been running a first-gen Retina iPad on a low-power USB port or charger with the screen brightness way up and radios on, OR he was turning it off and taking turns between charging and using.

http://www.macworld.com/article/1150356/ipadcharging.html [macworld.com]

Slowly losing relevance? (4, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#43432017)

Microsoft has more or less relied on Office and upgrades of Windows for years for revenue, and have for the most part kept it as a Windows-only piece.

As other office suites come along, and other OSes as well, Microsoft seems to be now finding themselves trying to remain relevant.

Would most people with an Android tablet even *want* Microsoft Office for it? It seems that if you wanted the full Microsoft experience, you'd have bought one of their tablets. And if you didn't want the Microsoft experience, you won't be looking for this software.

I don't really see Microsoft as a company who really innovates -- I'm hard pressed to think of a single product which Microsoft invented/pioneered, and which is what people want.

The OS took years to catch up to what others were already doing. Office is certainly a feature rich mature piece of software, but many of us don't find ourselves needing Excel and PowerPoint in our non-work lives. Moving the Start button or some of the changes lately have been mostly decorative and not revolutionary.

The Kinect is neat, but like so many products someone else innovated and Microsoft purchased.

A late delayed release of Office for Android? I suspect there's an awful lot of yawns which accompany that news.

As to innovating anything new and groundbreaking, we'll see if Microsoft ever does that. I'm hard pressed to come up with any examples, current or past, of stuff that they've released which was truly 'new' and lasting -- mostly it's been clones of products other companies have already been shipping, and many of them weren't exactly huge successes (like the Zune for instance).

Re:Slowly losing relevance? (2)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#43435549)

Microsoft has more or less relied on Office and upgrades of Windows for years for revenue, and have for the most part kept it as a Windows-only piece.

Those two products support the entire company. The remainder of the company has thus far either barely broken even or lost money. Windows and Office profits have been declining lately with the rise of smart phones, tablets, Android, iOS, and the advent of mobile computing in ways Microsoft cannot fathom.

Incomplete feature set == breakage (1)

arielCo (995647) | about a year ago | (#43432029)

The prevailing opinion seems to be that mobile apps only need to "support" a subset of features, and that's fine for authoring from scratch. But when you edit existing documents, it can break or drop unsupported features.

For a random example, take http://docbox.etsi.org/usergroup/usergroup/70-drafts/00019/etsi_dtr00019v113.doc [etsi.org] . LibreOffice mucks up the first two pages. The version of Polaris Office in my tab just crashes.

The (sad) alternative right now is RDP/VNC into a real PC and struggle with virtual mice and whatnot. You will likely have to do it for other apps anyway.

What does the delay really mean? (1)

houbou (1097327) | about a year ago | (#43432183)

Microsoft Office is probably even more popular than Windows itself.
Those who use LibreOffice or any other variants, for the most part, come back to Microsoft Office.
Especially when they have to work with complex documents.
So, while the perception is that Microsoft will be losing market share over Google Apps for mobile devices, the truth is, unless Google Apps come to be on-par with Microsoft Word, Excel, etc.., then the moment Office is an option for Android/iOS, it will grab some of the market share back.
That's for the casual users anyways.
Some of the deciding factor towards losing market share comes from companies and corporations who are in the market for a platform for their offices. They can purchase Google Apps and install it on their servers, which has pros and cons, or stick with Microsoft, which has pros and cons.
To me, that's the market share Microsoft could be losing, if these companies have requirements for mobile tablets for their employees for their Android and iOS devices, they may favor Google Apps now, which will be an investment and for which the odds of rolling back to Microsoft will be slight to none.

Re:What does the delay really mean? (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#43435601)

Microsoft Office is probably even more popular than Windows itself.

While I agree there...

Those who use LibreOffice or any other variants, for the most part, come back to Microsoft Office. Especially when they have to work with complex documents.

You go off to the wrong conclusions thereafter.

The folks that use LibreOffice/OpenOffice either don't want to spend the money for MS Office, or want to be free of Microsoft.

And honestly, when I need to author a complex document I first do it in OpenOffice/LibreOffice; then I export to DOC, and check it in MS Word before distributing it to others. Why? B/c many only have Word, and OpenOffice/LO makes better DOC/DOCX files than MS Word does - and its far easier to keep the formatting consistent. The only reason I check it in MS Word is b/c the conversion screws up the cross-referencing so I have to rebuild the cross-references under MS Word before distributing it.

The only use for MS Office is when your existing documents rely on custom functionality that is dependent on MS Office. Even there, most of it can probably be migrated away other products if you chose to; but most don't want to reinvest in the process of doing so until they're forced to.

Winning! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43432215)

Google will be the big winner from that. However, they also say QuickOffice, rather than Google Apps, will be the main winner. Other Android app suites will benefit too.

Oh, I get it. This is in an alternate universe where Android tablets are winning.

Microsoft (2)

Hickory Dichotomy (2836451) | about a year ago | (#43432321)

Microsoft just seems totally disconnected from the market and their customer base. Once again it seems to me as if they want "everything" but cannot focus on "one good thing", whether it be an OS, Office, Phone, Media player, Gamming Console or whatever. Instead of controlling everything, focus on something and make it really, really awesome that your customer base cannot live without. If not, prepare for irrelevance, kind of like what happened to Novell in the 90s (remember that one MS).

Re:Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43432567)

This would be viable if you had a relevant structure that could, in a blink of an eye, divert all creative efforts to a single point.
Microsoft has a huge amount of resources to devote to all of those projects you listed anyway, so they would either just
waste capital by letting it idle or admit defeat and just fire the teams they no longer need (and you can imagine the effect to
their stock because of this).

In my opinion Microsoft is just a cancerous giant that is slowly drifting to irrelevance. The fall might take a while but I think the
structural cancer they have inflicted to themselves has done it's part and now it is too late to go back.

Re:Microsoft (1)

gtall (79522) | about a year ago | (#43433185)

Microsoft succeeded in part by tying all their products together. This is how they kept the competition out of their business. So for them to concentrate on one thing would be anathema to them. Once those tie-ups get broken, they have tough row to hoe since nothing they do in any of their individual markets is very good.

Re:Microsoft (1)

TemporalBeing (803363) | about a year ago | (#43435883)

Microsoft just seems totally disconnected from the market and their customer base

They may very well be disconnected from their market, but they are probably listening to their customers. Problem is, their customers are not whom they should be - they're primarily corporate IT, the OEMs, and a few others. Not the people that actually use their software. Meanwhile their market is the people that actually use their software...or may be it's just as badly defined (quite likely).

Softmaker Office for Android 2012 (1)

temcat (873475) | about a year ago | (#43432515)

This is another contender that has not been mentioned yet. Softmaker's file format filters are excellent. No iOS support though as of yet.

It's hard to get mid size businesses to change (2)

sandytaru (1158959) | about a year ago | (#43432519)

I think the market is really there for the very small organizations (we're moving lots of folks to Google apps - if they have 4 people in the office it's not hard) and for the very largest organizations that have the clout to enforce change from the top down and do their own software in house, but I don't foresee the midsize businesses changing over from Office any time soon. It's integrated into certain ERP applications - for example, the medical software SRS relies on Excel and has a toolbar built right in. Getting software vendors to change their ways is going to be required before those mid size businesses can even consider breaking off the Microsoft teat.

What is, and where is Microsoft's vision? (2)

Bearhouse (1034238) | about a year ago | (#43433035)

I'm not a MS-basher, (typing this on my Win7 PC running MS Office; works very well, and needs to, because all my corporate customers send me...MS Office docs...and no, sorry, whilst I have LibreOffice installed, and think it's great, there's plenty of documents I receive that it just won't work/display as the author intended. Idem for Pages etc. on my iDevices).

Anyway, MS have tons of cash, and presumably plenty of talented people, but they seem to be playing 'catch-up' all the time; perhaps they are influenced by their "closed/NIH" mentality. (Reminds me of when I was working with IBM in the 1980s & 90s- they reacted to the 'opening' of the PC architecture they created by trying to 're-close' it with the PS/2; yeah, that worked well).

Once the genie is out of the bottle, then the game has changed, and you need to change with it. It's no longer good enough to try and 'punish' other platforms by denying them MS Office. (For this is the real reason for Office non-availability on Android etc., make no mistake. "Don't want to buy our Windows OS? Well f*ck you buddy, you're obviously not looking for 'enterprise-level' software, and good luck with LibreOffice running your weird XL macros and PPTs!")

Sure, PCs will always have a role, especially for heavy content creation, but where the heck is MS Office for iOS, Linux (Yeah,yeah, WINE, I know, but that's missing the point) and Android? You can bet your ass that if MS Office was run as a separate company, they would not be taking *years* to get their products out on these platforms where penetration is high and growing.

In the meantime, I'm sure Google and others will soon get their act together and we'll (finally!) have seemless document creation & modification across platforms.
I can't wait, and I'm sure I'm not alone. This would knock a far bigger nail into MS's coffin than the supposed 'failure' of Windows 8.
(Oh yeah, while you're at it G-men, can we have a 100%-compatible substitue for Outllook, please?)

Re:What is, and where is Microsoft's vision? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43433399)

There are plenty of MS Office documents that MS Office won't display properly either (due to different versions, different installed fonts, etc.). The fact is they are not display formats. Use PDF for that. Office documents should only be sent if they need to be edited. (Now as to whether or not MS Office is good at doing that...)

100% Compatible is the game (1)

snadrus (930168) | about a year ago | (#43434047)

These aren't published formats. Everything is guesswork, so you can't be 100% compatible. And MS raises the bar instead of publishing anything helpful. So no, you'll never get MS Office XLS/X 100% compatible or MS Outlook 100% (what does that mean anyway, Exchange compatible?). Go with other standards like OpenDocument, PDF, etc and Groupware*(zimbra, open x-change).

*from osalt.com

Re:What is, and where is Microsoft's vision? (1)

steelfood (895457) | about a year ago | (#43434337)

The internal politics of MS are keeping it from progressing quickly. The lack of a vision from up top is keeping it from moving in a single, unified dimension.

MS is like an amoeba still running on a large chunk of food it was lucky to happen upon and consumed a long time ago. It has since blindly stretched out to its surroundings in an attempt to find the next big chunk of sustinence, but it has not been able to find anything, and pulls back almost immediately in trepidation.

The reason it hasn't been able to find anything is because they are slow to move (most of the other chunks have been eaten already by the competition), and because they lack one focus (they are feeling around in all directions, and thus cannot extend too far in any particular direction). Google is fast-moving and constantly pioneering new places to go, while Apple has a strong focus and sense of direction. As is demonstrated by the two companies, only one quality is really necessary to grow. Microsoft unfortunately has neither.

Something has to give. Either Ballmer needs to go, the culture of infighting among senior management needs to go, or Microsoft will slowly waste itself away. That crap like Windows 8 was allowed to even come out of them is indicative of this decay. XBox 720 will be yet another failure when Valve comes out with their console.

Office apps, like the OS, should be free (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43433097)

All software cost (a lot) of money to develop, one way or another. However, like most IP, across time the value of the IP tends to fall to zero. In the IT world, this factor is (sometimes) countered by the need for the software to be continuously updated to take advantages in hardware improvements, or to support new standards in file types.

Sooner or later, computers reach the point of 'good enough' for a given task. This has happened to the OS and certainly to office apps. Worse even for those that which to make money by selling such products, a legion of open-source developers take advantage of the stability to create 'free' versions of such software, where 'free' is the initial 'price', not the effective price because of ageing.

Put simply, by now Microsoft's Office apps, OSes, and development products should all by 'free'. By now, Microsoft should be making its money from 'services'. This isn't the case, and likely it is too late for Microsoft to successfully migrate to the correct business strategy. All MS can do is use FUD and a legion of paid shills to push the idea that paying a fortune to use Office still makes sense.

Of course, unlike in the browser space, Microsoft's Office competitors have been largely incompetent up to now. Big open source projects tend to attract very poor but very enthusiastic programmers who spam the project with hyper-abstracted programming models. In other words, code that needs processors hundreds of times more powerful than if C/C++ was used for ALL the heavy lifting. Code that needs tens of times more RAM than if proper memory management and other proper algorithms were used. Current versions of Firefox and Libre Office are both horrific nightmares for any other than simple use on powerful hardware for these reasons.

Android is changing everything. To the metal programming is back in fashion on the new platforms, even though they now have the same CPU/GPU/RAM facilities as a perfectly good desktop Wintel PC. The reason for this is summed up in one word- 'battery'. Crappy coding means vastly more power use. Google NEEDS very good coding on the Android and ChromeOS platforms.

Now I may seem to have changed the subject, but haven't. Google has just forked Webkit because the open-source project was crap. We are now seeing the important open-source projects being targeted by proper programmers who will NOT tolerate the use of languages that are interpreters running on interpreters running on interpreters just so hopeless enthusiasts can contribute WITHOUT learning how to code properly by using the putrid mickey-mouse languages that have arisen as the Internet grew.

Microsoft's products are terrible compared to the time, effort and cost Microsoft spent creating them, but they do tend to be better than the current free alternatives. However, now Google and others desire to make open-source 'grow up', this situation will change very quickly indeed. Microsoft cannot improve its game- its best versions of Office and Visual Studio are now more than 10 years ago. Current MS products contain the same dreadful abstracted interpreted language bloat that requires a quad core CPU, and 8GB of RAM to give the same performance 2 much slower cores, and 1GB of RAM gave years ago. If anything, Microsoft is certain to release WORSE versions of its key products in the future (either more resource hungry, or horribly crippled ARM versions).

Intel is DEAD because no-one has a sane reason to continue paying the Intel-tax, and without the Intel-tax, Intel cannot compete. In the same way, why should anyone pay the Microsoft-tax (the selling price of its software products), when the free alternatives will soon be as good or better? Of course, we all think MS could have a future in services, finally eliminating IT departments in most companies, and moving the same onto the cloud. The age of the thin-client, per-seat cloud licence is finally possible and probably desirable (long after Sun attempted to 'own' this market) but Microsoft is run by retarded repulsive s**t-heads who resemble the heads of a giant dying old-school Hollywood film studio. These Microsoft leeches stumble from programmer to programmer within the company desperately hoping to discover the 'next great thing'. When they latch onto an idea ("lets dump Intel, and move to ARM now"), internal warfare between different powerful mangers leads to the creation of competing internal 'armies', and the complete neutering of original bold proposals (Windows on ARM becomes crippled and useless RT).

Microsoft, as it fades from the market, can only suffer greater internal warfare, accelerating its decline. Google can utterly destroy Microsoft by the end of 2014 by releasing the desktop version of Android with a revamped and perfected Libre Office. Intel's death properly begins when Apple switches entirely to ARM, and AMD's new Jaguar-based APU products start to decimate Intel in the mobile x86 space. Never forget, there were idiot losers who stated the Z80 and CP/M would last forever too, based on the success this platform enjoyed. Microsoft and Intel have had an amazing run. but their time is well and truly over.

This isn't THAT big a factor (1)

KapUSMC (1812044) | about a year ago | (#43433211)

While I use Google docs / Libre Office for personal stuff all the time and can't justify the cost of MS Office for personal use, you are going to require expensive third party software and more complex management to meet PCI / FIPS / SOX / etc... for the corporate world to migrate to Google Docs environment. Sure its let another chink in Microsoft's armor, but I wouldn't be holding off for the going out of business sale from this.

Slideware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43433519)

I'm not up on the lingo the kids are using these days. What the dick is 'slideware'? Is that to do with using your smartphone as a puck on an air-hockey table?

Web Apps/Docs on some company's servers? (1)

BoRegardless (721219) | about a year ago | (#43433581)

I still don't get it for content creation and access where you need web access.

What the cloud delivers the cloud can take away; deliberately or otherwise.

Is this a terrible summary or do I not understand? (1)

nothings (597917) | about a year ago | (#43435277)

"Microsoft Office slideware for iOS and Android has been resisting many migrations to Google Apps."

Isn't "slideware" a reference to PowerPoint, not the whole Office suite?

How does software "resist a migration"?

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...