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The Internet Archive Is Now the Largest Collection of Historical Software Online

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the biggest-there-is dept.

Software 94

hypnosec writes "The Internet Archive has a great collection of books, music, visual items and websites but, it had one thing lacking up until now – software. This has changed recently as The Internet Archive now claims to hold the largest collection of software in the world. The expansion at the Internet Archive has come through collaboration with other independent archives like the Disk Drives collection, the FTP site boneyard, Shareware CD Archive, and the TOSEC archive. The archive doesn't hold just the software – it also holds documentation as well."

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PirateBay (1, Redundant)

BlackPignouf (1017012) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450385)

How does it compare to PirateBay?

Re:PirateBay (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450547)

The links don't stop working if nobody is seeding.

Re:PirateBay (2)

CastrTroy (595695) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451197)

Actually, There is only 1 seeder. And if that seeder stops, it's all over. Bit-torrent is probably a better method of keeping certain things active than the Internet Archive. At least for things that people are about. I think it's noble that there's some organization willing to try to maintain an archive of everything, but I somehow I question the usefulness of keeping old copies of GetRight download manager lying around (Even though I may have loved it when I had a dial-up connection that would take an hour to download a megabyte, and would constant get disconnected).

Re:PirateBay (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43454597)

Indeed, why is archive.org hosting lots of warez now? Lots of commercial ROMs in the TOSEC archive, lots of russian warez compilations and fullgam cover cds for magazines in the "Shareware" archive, etc.

"and websites" (4, Interesting)

xushi (740195) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450387)

Out of curiosity, how is this even legal?

legally should/would they be held liable if one of those millions of sites has illegal content, like say child pornography or pedophilia? Or can any user use `mass archiving` as an excuse should they ever get caught with any illegal porn, copyrighted material, et al..

Or what if they archived a copyrighted site without asking the owners for permission, such as a personal site, or one of those news sites that keep complaining about others who link to them - or even those persons who link to them...

There are many more examples, but it looks like this should cause more issues rather than good use.

Re:"and websites" (2)

djsmiley (752149) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450401)

Apart from the oddities such as CP, which laws exactly is copying a website breaking?

Everything presented by the wayback machine - which is how the websites are presented are clearly marked as archives and not live sites.

Re:"and websites" (0)

xushi (740195) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450433)

So all I or TBP have to do is clearly mark my pages as "archives" and legally get away with hosting child porn, TBP meta links, torrents and PDF books ? (Note to the Feds.. I don't and am not looking for an excuse to..) :)

Yes sounds a bit silly but that's the point I was trying to make.. To many it looks like an organisation is getting away with that simply by playing with words or playing with a form of `political grammar`, while an average Joe who tries to do the same can get done for it - and other malicious Joes might get away with it if they were smart/big enough.

Re:"and websites" (5, Interesting)

djsmiley (752149) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450451)

Hmmmm - well I help out with ArchiveTeam, we grab some of the sites which go in.

Anyway.... as far as I understand is that the IA have a special licence/cause/getout agreement which lets them do this as a charity. Of course if CP or other illegal items were found, they are blacked out - they still are archived but aren't accessable by the public (I don't know exactly what happens to CP, but other stuff just goes away). The same for other works which companies request blacking out. Apparently this happens with _a lot_ of nintendo materials, and with a 100 year history you can imagine this is a large selection of material.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450633)

> the IA have a special licence/cause/getout agreement which lets them do this as a charity

How is this legal again?

> they are blacked out - they still are archived

I hope you're joking, that's highly illegal, you are not cops. Anyway, you must be mistaken because that can't be true.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450917)

Well since you seem to know maybe you should answer the questions rather than just repeating yours until you get the answer you want.

Re:"and websites" (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451955)

with a 100 year history you can imagine this is a large selection of material.

What year are you from, and can I borrow your time machine? I promise not to screw with history too much.

Re:"and websites" (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | about a year and a half ago | (#43452185)

with a 100 year history you can imagine this is a large selection of material.

What year are you from, and can I borrow your time machine? I promise not to screw with history too much.

He meant that Nintendo has a 100 year history, which as a company it does (actually 124 years, it was founded in 1889). Certainly not 100 years worth of internet content, but 100+ years worth of historical information, any amount of which could have been committed to the 'tubes.

Re:"and websites" (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450543)

So all I or TBP have to do is clearly mark my pages as "archives" and legally get away with hosting child porn, TBP meta links, torrents and PDF books ?

Who cares? Our laws against all of those things are insane and anti-freedom.

Re:"and websites" (-1, Troll)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451091)

So all I or TBP have to do is clearly mark my pages as "archives" and legally get away with hosting child porn, TBP meta links, torrents and PDF books ?

Who cares? Our laws against all of those things are insane and anti-freedom.

Oh yes, things would be much better with Sharia law [wikiislam.net] .

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43453967)

Great analogy! Decapitation is better than slowly bleeding to death as well.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450503)

Apart from the oddities such as CP, which laws exactly is copying a website breaking?

Everything presented by the wayback machine - which is how the websites are presented are clearly marked as archives and not live sites.

What baffles me is how they get around copyright laws? They take copyrighted content and then spread it, often against the copyright owners' wishes, so why is it legal for them and not for e.g. me?

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450691)

Ever heard of a library? They have special rights also.

Re:"and websites" (2)

wylf (657051) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450739)

Ever heard of a library? They have special rights also.

Special rights afforded by your Copyright Act (or equivalent). IA have no such (direct) provision.

afaik, IA are covered on the basis all archived material is publicly accessible, coupled with a straightforward removal process for copyright holders.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450905)

afaik, IA are covered on the basis all archived material is publicly accessible, coupled with a straightforward removal process for copyright holders.

That still doesn't explain things here. If I started to crawl through stuff and then proceeded to share it I would quite quickly find myself at the other end of a list of lawsuits. Sharing it publicly is exactly the part that is the illegal part, yet IA is given free hands to do so for now; I wonder how long it'll take before MAFIAA sees an opportunity for profit here.

Re:"and websites" (2)

RobertLTux (260313) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451045)

a couple things are in play

1 IA is a part of the LOC
2 if you really as a copyright holder want to have your stuff dropped out all you have to do is put a robots.txt in place and then they drop you from the archive.

http://faq.web.archive.org/how-can-i-have-my-site-removed-from-the-wayback-machine/ [archive.org]

Re:"and websites" (1)

magic maverick (2615475) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451361)

"1 IA is not a part of the LOC"
FTFY

If for some reason you think they are, maybe you should provide some documentation. The IA does work with the LoC, and also other national libraries, but are an independent organization.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43454641)

That won't do you any good if your website is in the bulk of some big torrent archive.

About your sig ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43469179)

Any person using FTFY or editing my postings agrees to a US$50.00 charge

Any person using "FTFY", or editing my postings, agrees to a US$50.00 charge.

FTFY. Where's my US$50.00?

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451123)

IA does have similar provisions. They're a registered library of California and a partner of the LoC.

Re:"and websites" (2)

jovius (974690) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450817)

Consider for example 10 freely usable computers in a public space. Now open the same website yearly in each of the computers and leave the session open. Random visitor can then have a glance of 10 years of a website's history, and the action is approved by the content holders.

Re:"and websites" (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450893)

Alas, that is not how it works. IA clearly downloads the material to their servers and shares the content from there to other peers -- something quite a few websites have been brought down for by MAFIAA and friends.

Re:"and websites" (1)

datapharmer (1099455) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451295)

Actually they are pretty good about following copyright owner's wishes. They follow robots.txt and even remove past content from public view if you add them to robots.txt. They have always been happy to remove anything my clients have asked them to (and we've had to unfortunately request removal of a few things for legal reasons - due to 3rd parties threatening our clients in the publishing industry, public safety, etc)

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451743)

What baffles me is how they get around copyright laws?

They don't. If you don't want your page archived they'll take it down.

Re:"and websites" (4, Informative)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450785)

Out of curiosity, how is this even legal?

The Librarian of Congress granted a DMCA exemption for collections of obselete computer software archived for purposes of preservation. Not sure if it would apply to scanned manuals and documentation.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450851)

How is the bible even legal?

It advocates genocide.

It glorifies pedophilia and incest.

I'd like to see every copy burned.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451055)

Let's outlaw fiction in general while we're at it, and action films that glorify killing, and everything else that might possibly be less than politically correct or offend someone's sensibilities.

You think you're far more clever than you really are.

Re:"and websites" (1)

djsmiley (752149) | about a year and a half ago | (#43452819)

Most fiction doesn't tell you the genocide was "ok".

The bible does.

Your move.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43453143)

So, you want to pick and choose what fiction is allowed? I seem to recall a party from the 1930s that would be right up your alley.

Re:"and websites" (0)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450921)

Out of curiosity, how is this even legal?

legally should/would they be held liable if one of those millions of sites has illegal content, ...
Or what if they archived a copyrighted site without asking the owners for permission, such as a personal site, or one of those news sites that keep complaining about others who link to them - or even those persons who link to them...

There are many more examples, but it looks like this should cause more issues rather than good use.

I agree. We should abolish Copyrights. They are very problematic non-rights that benefit no one, really.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450991)

They are very problematic non-rights that benefit no one, really.

When did authors stop being people?

Re:"and websites" (2)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451071)

copyright doesn't protect authors, it protects publishers.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451445)

It protects publishers... to whom the authors have signed away exclusive publishing rights. If the publishers didn't have exclusive publishing rights, they wouldn't pay the authors. If the authors weren't getting paid, there wouldn't be many books. Like it or not, copyright is an essential part of the system.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451813)

You do realize you're describing a "protection racket" business, right?

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452891)

Authors get paid for work performed by a publisher, typically a lump sum and residuals. Publishers get paid based purely on sales. At what point does "anyone should be able to copy and distribute the work because I hate copyright" fit into the equation? Without copyrights, there wouldn't be publishers. Without publishers, the only authors would be ones that could maintain a lifestyle doing something else and willing to give away their work for free.

Unless, by protection racket, you mean protecting the literature industry. Then, yes, I'm describing that.

Re:"and websites" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43454019)

Some of the best books I've ever read were freely available on the internet. It works great for the distribution mechanism, not so much for the generated artificial scarcity for massive profits and power to censor angle.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452469)

It protects authors by making sure publishers pay them. When the US first instituted copyright, only US works were covered, so US publishers simply didn't publish any American authors; they could publish Dickens for free. If there were no copyrights, you would have no way to keep Doubleday from selling copies of anything you wrote, and the only writing that would get done would be hobbyists' writing.

However, they last way too long for their constitutionally stated purpose. How are you going to convince Isaac Asimov to write any more books?

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452539)

copyright doesn't protect authors, it protects publishers.

No, it protects the copyright holder.

Re:"and websites" (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43458203)

...who is invariably NOT THE AUTHOR.

Re:"and websites" (1)

Netssansfrontieres (214626) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451227)

"How is this even legal?"
Because the Internet Archive received a waiver from the DMCA for the purposes of archiving software that is no longer commercially available.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43454661)

I'll bet you the majority of that "Super Famicom" collection in TOSEC is commercially available.

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452457)

Everything on http://archive.org/ [archive.org] is public domain.

My friend showed me that there's just been a really amazing iPad app released to access all the archive.org content [apple.com] , and hopefully an android version is coming soon!

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43453251)

No, it isn't all "public domain."

Re:"and websites" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43457075)

No, it's not all public domain, but a HUGE amount of content on there is public domain - each item on there lists its own licensing conditions... and archive.org's terms of use [archive.org] provide a mechanism for getting things removed if you believe the copyright to be infringed. I do believe archive.org have some kind exemption from the DMCA for archival purposes?

Re:"and websites" (3, Insightful)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | about a year and a half ago | (#43452717)

If copyright holders don't like it they can setup their robots file correctly or go cry about it.

Bit late for an April fool. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450477)

Believed it till you said there was documentation.

Re:Bit late for an April fool. (2, Informative)

webmistressrachel (903577) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450833)

I thought that this comment was sarcasm until I looked into the "Shareware CD-ROM archive". For the Computer Gaming World stuff, there's no way to even get an IDEA of what MIGHT be on each disc without actually downloading the 600MB+ ISO's in blind faith and hoping for the best.

All the "metadata" just points to more "metadata", which points to the previously mentioned "metadata". All in XML, just to add to the annoyance.

Re:Bit late for an April fool. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451109)

You can browse the contents (and directly download!) from within the ISO by appending a slash to the end of the download filename. This works with ISOs, ZIPs, and TARs.

http://archive.org/download/Computer_Gaming_World_Extra_October_1995/Computer_Gaming_World_Extra_October_1995.iso/

Re:Bit late for an April fool. (1)

webmistressrachel (903577) | about a year and a half ago | (#43453485)

This is extremely informative, thank you, and sorry for not digging hard enough!

Re:Bit late for an April fool. (1)

Inda (580031) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451595)

600mb is a 48 second download, for some of us.

I'm not bragging. I understand most people don't get my download speeds but the point is the same: 600mb isn't a lot these days.

There's another post in this thread where some games are mentioned. I remember downloading those games back in the day too. 65 x 1.44mb = 94mb, and that set of files had the game minus the videos and the audio was compressed flat. 94mb would have taken me about 4 hours to download and yet I still did it. I did it a lot.

Just imagine it's your birthday and you're unwrapping the present, and it's going to take 4 hours, but the wait could be worth it.

10 GB/mo cap (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43452041)

600mb isn't a lot these days.

If you happen to be stuck on satellite or microwave for your home ISP, it's 6 percent of your 10 GB/mo cap.

Just imagine it's your birthday and you're unwrapping the present, and it's going to take 4 hours, but the wait could be worth it.

And you have to make up for it by not doing anything else with your Internet for 1.8 days.

Re:Bit late for an April fool. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43453203)

So far, the focus has been on just getting the data into the archive before anything happens to it. The metadata will come, and will come faster with some help.

Some more info on the current state of the file collections mentioned in the summary [textfiles.com]

Dream on (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43454473)

What you've done to the bitsavers content is shit. At least you can do a text search with Google to bitsavers.org. IA has no search.

Is there an age when software is considered... (1)

ron-l-j (1725874) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450521)

Public domain? I understand that software that is released under license contains residual rights. But in the speed of application development, and version changes, should there be a public domain age placed on software or web pages?

Re:Is there an age when software is considered... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450551)

There is. It's 70 years after the authors death or 95 years if the work was created as work for hire. Just like everything else.

And yes, it's bat shit crazy. Richard Stallman has posted a view of the subject in http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/pirate-party.html [gnu.org]

Re:Is there an age when software is considered... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450605)

There is. It's 70 years after the authors death or 95 years if the work was created as work for hire. Just like everything else.

And yes, it's bat shit crazy. Richard Stallman has posted a view of the subject in http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/pirate-party.html [gnu.org]

I agree that it is crazy. But so is Stallman.

Re:Is there an age when software is considered... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450695)

And you are an idiot. I mean now that we started with the namecalling.

Re:Is there an age when software is considered... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450725)

Welcome to the club.

Re:Is there an age when software is considered... (2)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450913)

Hey! I never agreed to let you two in on my club!

Re:Is there an age when software is considered... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452321)

...but there's also the possibility to extend the copyright by another 5 years; for FOSS it doesn't matter what strings are attached (DRM-free version, source code, etc.).

This would mean it would become available after 10 years. I'd say, of a closed-source developer wants to skip 10 years of security fixes, updates, enhancements, etc. go ahead. Just because "the linux kernel" would be PD, that will be a 10 year old kernel.

On the other hand, TOSEC's archive would be mostly in the public domain. This means you can make modern versions of e.g. Star Raiders for the Atari 800 without paying a lawyer thousands of dollars to track down copyright holders, obtaining clearances, licenses, etc. etc. without having a single line of code written.

Quit handy sometimes for old free apps (2)

WillAdams (45638) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450671)

Needed install files for the following and got them from The Wayback Machine:

  - Corel Grafigo 1 (v2 and later aren't free like v1) --- useful sketching tool
  - NCPlot 1.1 (v2 and later aren't free like v1.2 and earlier) --- primitive G-code editor but much faster than NC Corrector

a couple of others which I can't recall --- anyone else got a list of forgotten treasures?

William

Re:Quit handy sometimes for old free apps (2)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450771)

FractINT (I use version 18, the last major update was 20)
FlashGet (formerly JetCar, used to be free as in beer, now nagware - I use the old version)
Satori PhotoXL 2.2 with NetObjects Fusion 2 - good tools for building rolling slideshows with photos
SonicStage CP (versions prior to 4.3 are always good, 4.3 and later kind of didn't work in XP and I NEED this for my Minidisc gear!)
First Page 2000 - WYSIWYG site building tool, outputs in html, php, js, vba...

Serif Movieplus 4
Games: 7th Guest, Simon the Sorcerer, USS Ticonderoga, Warbirds, GTA, Worms, Homeworld Cataclysm, Red Alert, Angel Devoid, Crimson Skies, Air Warrior III, Tomb Raider Chronicles, F22 DID, Dark Reign, Tachyon: The Fringe...

I have original CD media for all this software and most of it won't run on current platforms, so I have to run it on a virtual machine.

Re:Quit handy sometimes for old free apps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450773)

Both Grafigo and NCPlot sound especially useful. Do you have a pointer?

Re:Quit handy sometimes for old free apps (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450909)

sweet (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450727)

saves me a lot of time archiving old CDROMs... ...and yes, there is software around that I'm still using after nearly 20 years...

Re:sweet (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year and a half ago | (#43454481)

Just curious. Which software?

Re:sweet (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43458193)

FractINT, for one. It's a fractal engine.

Re:sweet (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year and a half ago | (#43458339)

Ah. Aren't there newer versions/others?

Re:sweet (1)

Tastecicles (1153671) | about a year and a half ago | (#43467243)

the latest version I use is from about 1992 (version 18.21), the latest bugfix release (20.something) is from 2012, a patch on the major release from 2008(?)

How about Aminet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450783)

Are they collaborating with them and their collection, too?

TOSEC (-1)

Cassiel1137 (1444251) | about a year and a half ago | (#43450843)

We're very excited to be supporting The Internet Archive. Please come and visit us at www.tosecdev.org to check out what we're all about and join the discussion! - The TOSEC Team

IE LARGEST COLLECTION OF CRAP OUTSIDE OF CHINA !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43450907)

Because China has all that shit and even more shit !! If it is one thing Sinos like it is their shit !! More shit for China !! How ??

Re:IE LARGEST COLLECTION OF CRAP OUTSIDE OF CHINA (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451099)

Because China has all that shit and even more shit !! If it is one thing Sinos like it is their shit !! More shit for China !! How ??

Well with over 1.3 billion people I cant deny they must have an impressive sewerage system

Abuse (2)

Jason Levine (196982) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451149)

Thanks to this, I finally found a text-based game that I remember as a kid, but nobody else seemed to recall. It was a "game" called Abuse. You typed in insults to the computer and it insulted you back. I couldn't track it down (the term "abuse" is just too vague), but this Internet Archive link [archive.org] listed it. It even helped me find another site [atari8.info] with screenshots.

Re:Abuse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452575)

So fire up the emulator and play it again... other great titles are Star Raiders, Rescue on Fractalus, The Last Starfighter (proto), Agent USA (geography game), Pitfall II - The Lost Caverns, etc.

Re:Abuse (1)

Tanath (2639157) | about a year and a half ago | (#43467249)

Protip: If you can't find what you're looking for directly, look for a site that will have it or link to it.

Too bad (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451273)

then that their software sucks so much the archive is more or less completely unusable. Not entirely strange when perl scripts get "upgraded" to php because that's a nice opportunity for that nice coder girl to learn php (and kick out that annoying perl bod brewster doesn't like). It doesn't stop there, unfortunately. The meta-data is fucked up worse, far worse, so it's just about a miracle you can find anything at all.

Yes, there is far more in their archives they don't present you, because they can't retrieve it. It's there, but the meta-data is indecipherable. As such, their intentions may be good but the end result isn't as good as it could be, nor as good as it should be. Thank you so much for your mismanagement, brewster.

It sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451609)

Their website is cryptic and hard to navigate. It's one of those that looks easy, but when you actually try it, you can't find anything specific.

What About the Source Code? (1)

organgtool (966989) | about a year and a half ago | (#43451615)

So they are currently archiving the binaries, but what about the source code? Oh, that's right - companies get copyright protection on source code AND they get to treat the source code as a trade secret. How convenient for them!

Re:What About the Source Code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451839)

Yeah, how dare they keep for themselves things they paid good money to be developed?

Re:What About the Source Code? (2)

organgtool (966989) | about a year and a half ago | (#43452345)

I never said that they should be forced to disclose their source. My point was that if they choose not to disclose the source, then the source code should be treated as a trade secret and receive absolutely no copyright protection. That means that the company would have protection on their code indefinitely assuming they were capable of preventing a leak. But in the event of a leak, they would have little recourse. If they choose to release the source code instead, then the code should receive full copyright protection. However, what we have today is a system that rewards companies with copyright protection on their source code without getting the benefit of actually EVER seeing that source code. This violates the intent of intellectual property laws which is to have the creators release their work in exchange for a government-granted, time-limited monopoly. Right now, the companies are getting the benefit of the monopoly without ever having to disclose the actual intellectual property and that's just wrong.

No search ability. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43451757)

The Internet Archive is a really cool project, with one giant drawback.

Unless you remember the address of an old and deceased web page, then you're going to have a really hard time finding anything.

At one point, they offered an experimental non-linear search engine which would look for items within the archive based on key words. They pulled it after a brief test period because it was too difficult to maintain, apparently.

If they implemented something like that now, then they would have a powerful resource, but as it stands, you're going to have to wear an archeologist's hat in order to find anything you might be looking for. It's possible, (I've done it), but it's a great way to feel spoiled by Google!

Turbo Gameworks (1)

figleaf (672550) | about a year and a half ago | (#43452175)

Searched for Turbo Gameworks and only thing it came up was a scanned pdf. No disk images. I had it but my parents threw it away with other junk. Would love to have it back.

Y u no disclose the information? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452305)

The Internet Archive demands to merge with it's creator. Kirk unit, y u no disclose the information?

Some large material seems not to be there (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43452521)

Old collections like those on DECUS sigtapes (which run to a few tens of GB) seem not to be there, based on some quick looking in their search. That material is elsewhere on the net (some of it anyway; most all the VMS material and possibly all the RSX material, and decent chunks of RT11, RSTS, and Languages.)
So rthe archive might have a copy also. There are some bits that are of interest (e.g. the old DECUS catalogs from 1978, before "old" material got
trimmed out of those catalogs), but many individual DECUS library programs are not easily findable if they are there at all.

I looked a bit at Amiga material, failed to find all the Fish disks. While I have a complete collection of them on floppies (direct from Fred), it is hard to
read them any more. The hardware format Amiga used is not the same as PCs use (and the file structure is completely different).

So the collection may be the largest, but it does not appear to exhaust what exists.

As for legality, there has been a tremendous amount of material written and distributed freely over the years, distributed by the authors, and there continues
to be. Not only is it good to see it available, but I should add that it is often helpful in keeping Johhny-come-latelies from succeeding in patenting
obvious or old ideas, by demonstrating prior publication of the "inventions". Many of us who have published software that way have disapproved of
patenting such things. Archives like this are places that troll-victims can go to find ammunition with which to defend themselves.

Distribution freely to the world implies what it says: anyone can distribute. Internet archive is a subset of "anyone". Nuff said.

I think the Magazine section is facinating (2)

joeflies (529536) | about a year and a half ago | (#43453025)

I don't know of any other place to get most of these nowadays. Lots of memories and magazines that I miss

http://archive.org/details/computermagazines [archive.org]

Re:I think the Magazine section is facinating (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43472733)

I can't even remember how much time I "wasted" typing the machine code listing on Compute's Gazette. I know I could have sent it money for the disk, but when you're 14 you have more time than money.

oldversion.com (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43453345)

is also nice, but much less software.

Great now I can finally finish . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43453693)

typing in Speedscript. I was missing a page until now. Finally a word processor I can use.

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