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LinkedIn Invites Gone Wild: How To Keep Close With Exes and Strangers

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the say-what-you-will-about-facebook-at-least-it's-an-ethos dept.

Social Networks 164

sholto writes "An aggressive expansion strategy by LinkedIn has backfired spectacularly amid accusations of identity fraud. Users complained the social network sent unrequested invites from their accounts to contacts and complete strangers, often with embarrassing results. One man claimed LinkedIn sent an invite from his account to an ex-girlfriend he broke up with 12 years ago who had moved state, changed her surname and her email address. ... 'This ex-girlfriend's Linked in profile has exactly ONE contact, ME. My wife keeps getting messages asking 'would you like to link to (her)? You have 1 contact in common!,' wrote Michael Caputo, a literary agent from Massachussetts."

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Fraud (3, Insightful)

schneidafunk (795759) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483541)

How is this not considered criminal activity? Could LinkedIn just be the target of a spoofing campaign? I have a hard time believing they could be so stupid.

Re:Fraud (4, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483581)

My previous employer made me get a linkedin account. It is the single most spammy thing I've ever signed up for.
"Do you know former employee of customer of previous previous employer?" Fuck. Off.

Re:Fraud (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483759)

Weird. I use LinkedIn both as a recruiting tool and as a connection tool with recruiters (I get between 3 and 5 calls a week from it) and I haven't seen anything of the sort.

Maybe this is because I took the time to disable such notifications? I don't know but I'd be willing to bet that's the cause.

LinkedIn is like any other social network; people must take the time to protect their online identities and communications from the tool.

Re:Fraud (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483869)

It's not reasonable to have to protect my "online identity and communications" from a tool that I have purposefully decided NOT to use.

Re:Fraud (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484435)

Your friends could give out your phone number or e-mail address to any third party marketers they choose. This is no different than that, LI just makes it easier for them your 'friends' to do so.

This is like having a contact use your e-mail address in a To: field instead of BCC:. *shrug*

Re:Fraud (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484779)

There's no way to change your preferences if you don't have an account. LinkedIn are relentless spammers, pure and simple. I'm not - ever - going get an account, but I'm going to continue to get invites, apparently, until the heat death of the universe. (Except, of course, I'll never see them again.)

Re:Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43485067)

Weird. I use LinkedIn both as a recruiting tool and as a connection tool with recruiters (I get between 3 and 5 calls a week from it) and I haven't seen anything of the sort.

Maybe this is because I took the time to disable such notifications? I don't know but I'd be willing to bet that's the cause.

LinkedIn is like any other social network; people must take the time to protect their online identities and communications from the tool.

I get a lot of email from LinkedIn, despite having never used their site. Most of the profiles are obvious sham accounts, created by some kind of bot which mines publicly available information on the internet.
Lately myself and several co-workers, all of us members in a particular email distribution list, have started getting LinkedIn invites from each other. Even though none of us has ever gone to the site, let alone signed up for it.

I don't know if LinkedIn is doing this on their own, or if they hired some kind of Marketing or Recruitment company who is being under-handed. But what I do know, is that these emails ARE legitimately coming from LinkedIn (I have full direct access to the company mail server), and enough of them are obvious enough bullshit that anything from them is now auto-flagged as spam/phishing and moved to /null.

maybe you could try turning off email notification (4, Informative)

SuperBanana (662181) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483911)

Second hit for "linkedin email preferences." You're on Slashdot, and you don't know how to do this?

http://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/67 [slashdot.org]

Email notifications can be added, changed, or stopped in the Email Preferences section of the Settings page [...] The following options are available:

        Individual Email
        Daily Digest Email
        Weekly Digest Email
      No Email

Re:maybe you could try turning off email notificat (4, Insightful)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484213)

Second hit for "linkedin email preferences." You're on Slashdot, and you don't know how to do this?

If he only joined LinkedIn because he was forced to, I can understand not caring enough to customize it to his liking. Especially since "his liking" would be "not having it at all". In that case, getting rid of the unwanted email by sending it to the spam bucket is a perfectly rational solution.

Re:maybe you could try turning off email notificat (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43485731)

I can think of an even more rational solution. Like: tell your 'employer' to go fuck himself *. And if he doesn't like it, find somewhere else to make coin **.

* Note to Asperger's-leaning slashdot readers: you don't literally have to use the words: "Go fuck yourself".

** Obviously if you're a poor corporate slave who finds the idea of changing your employer rather scary, because you have no technical and/or networking skills, you're probably better off just grabbing your ankles, doing whatever your employer asks you to do, even if it's a blatant intrusion into your so-called 'personal life'. Sorry dude, it must suck to be you, but rather you than me.

Re:maybe you could try turning off email notificat (1)

i kan reed (749298) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485871)

It was right after I was hired, and didn't think I'd be spammed to hell and back. I've since deleted the account.

Re:Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484345)

a) If your employer tries to "make you get a linkedin account", change employ
b) get some balls if you gave in
c) delete said account, click ONCE on the next mail "Don't send me invites"
d) If invites continue, sue their asses

Re: Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484387)

This is an unrealistic comment. A job has certain requirements, for example maybe attending sales dinners, to recruit clients. A requirement to participate in LinkedIn or other social media is the same. If you don't like it, you are in the wrong job. Good luck with that, because it is the future.

Re: Fraud (2)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484531)

It's a sad future. I've been thinking about joining LinkedIn as the entertainment value of building a career path that is a secret mockery of capitalism wears thin (I have no social media presence currently). I'm not ready to cave yet...but I'm thinking about it :-(

Re: Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484533)

A job ends where my personal data begins. An employer can require me to attend a sales dinner (in paid worktime), but he cannot require me to add my personal data to an uncontrollable social network.

Re: Fraud (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485655)

Good luck with that, because it is the future.

... of the dystopian kind...

I have no trouble believing this (4, Insightful)

gaudior (113467) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483611)

LinkedIn has always seemed shady to me. I joined a few years ago, and got inundated with requests from people who seemed to do nothing with their time but offer to show me how to accumulate linked-in followers. My ex and I were simultaneously suggested to each other as contacts, probably because we still share some friends in common. Neither of us requested anything. I think the whole thing is just another social-media wank-fest, like twitter or google+.

Re:Fraud (4, Interesting)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483681)

I knew something was up when I got an invite to connect with a guy I used to work for - dude was a royal dickhole as an executive, bad enough that I left the company specifically because of his craptastic management style.

Seeing an invite from him was enough to make my shudder in revulsion, and I'm sure the feeling would have been mutual.

Re:Fraud (2)

sribe (304414) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484515)

...and I'm sure the feeling would have been mutual.

Probably not, actually. People like that tend to have such restricted self-awareness and such finely-hone rationalization skills, that no matter how explicit you were when leaving that you hated his guts, he now thinks it was just a bad time for you and that you'd be glad to reconnect, having realized that you were being a bit overwrought at the time ;-)

Re:Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43485585)

I've been getting LinkedIn "requests" from people I'm already connected to

Re:Fraud (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483801)

Linkedin is exactly like the business culture it was meant to serve.

Sleazy, smarmy, greedy, dishonest, sycophantic, treacherous, fraudulent. Simply the core values of American business.

Re:Fraud (4, Insightful)

Raistlin77 (754120) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483887)

Linkedin is exactly like the business culture it was meant to serve.

Sleazy, smarmy, greedy, dishonest, sycophantic, treacherous, fraudulent. Simply the core values of global business.

FTFY

Re:Fraud (2)

arth1 (260657) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485251)

No, those are not global core values.

Not all businesses are in it to make as much profit as possible. Many older businesses in the old world are in it to provide continuity and a place to work, not just now, but decades down the road. Money is only a means to accomplish that.

Re:Fraud (1)

royallthefourth (1564389) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485315)

While the miser is merely a capitalist gone mad, the capitalist is a rational miser.

Re:Fraud (1)

phdscam (2901299) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485701)

Makes total sense!

Re:Fraud (1)

geirlk (171706) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484169)

Shame I'm out of mod points, I'd mod that insightful.

Re:Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484623)

Did it for you.

Re:Fraud (1)

Raistlin77 (754120) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483841)

Considering this is the same LinkedIn that REQUIRES you to unsubscribe repeatedly from getting their spam invite reminders every time someone thinks they know you, I find it completely likely that they are so stupid.

Re:Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484351)

I kept getting spammed by them due to a former associate listing my email address with them as someone he knew and I got tired of marking them as spam, so I looked for the unsubscribe link required by the CAN-SPAM Act it it wasn't there. So I checked the site for contact info, contacted them and threatened action as allowed by the Act if they didn't add my email address to their blacklist as required by the said Act, and I got one response apologizing for the error and never heard from them again (that was about 3 years ago now).

No (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483875)

Linked in & facebook are targets of their own mediocrity. If there's a way for these companies to f@*k up with your private information, they're working on it. They harvest human stupidity for the idiocracy.

Re:Fraud (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484397)

How funny, they've also been recently spamming me with my ex-gf's linked-in account from about 15 years ago!

Re:Fraud (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485105)

I have a hard time believing they could be so stupid.

You have a hard time believing that a organization* could be how stupid? :p

*Seriously, they're just machines and, as such, they tend to be at least as dumb as the dumbest components** they're assembled from.

**If you ever get out and about one of these days, you know, in public... take a look around you (but do not, I repeat, do not turn on your television, as that will skew the results too far in the other direction; sure, we're dumb... but we're not that dumb... okay, yes, we are.) :p

Not Random (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483579)

Linkedin found the connection somehow - maybe from your gmail account?

Re:Not Random (1)

hattig (47930) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483595)

Why would you ever let any social network trawl your email accounts (and other social networks)?

I'm annoyed that I can't "facet" my Facebook account into family, friends and work, and hide things from each of these. Google's thing can do that.

Last thing I want is exes popping up again.

Re:Not Random (1)

mpoulton (689851) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483641)

I'm annoyed that I can't "facet" my Facebook account into family, friends and work, and hide things from each of these.

You can. That's what "lists" are for. You add people to lists, and set default privacy settings for the lists.

Re:Not Random (1)

pnutjam (523990) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483669)

Yeah, then your lists disappear during an update, or won't load when you are trying to add someone.

Re:Not Random (1)

TWX (665546) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483609)

That would explain one linked-in invite that I keep getting. Funny enough, the guy works as an exec for a company that a friend of mine works at.

Re:Not Random (-1)

pnutjam (523990) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483665)

I have never given linkedin access to my google account, I think they scrape other tabs on your browser for email addresses.

Re:Not Random (2)

marsu_k (701360) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483819)

No browser would allow that, it would be completely retarded from a security viewpoint.

Re:Not Random (1)

pnutjam (523990) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484015)

Well, they are definitely doing something shady to link users.

Re:Not Random (1)

marsu_k (701360) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484089)

Oh, of that I have no doubt - and the fact that you don't allow access to your email account(s) doesn't mean someone you know and is on LinkedIn wouldn't do so. But (thankfully) web pages can't access other tabs in browsers.

Re:Not Random (2)

TwineLogic (1679802) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484115)

What they are doing is finding you in another person's email (which they voluntarily submitted to LinkedIn), recognizing your address(es), and then suggesting to you that you know this person who has your email address in the contacts they uploaded.

But others do give that permission. (1)

dutchwhizzman (817898) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485179)

Maybe *you* haven't given Linkedin permission to scrape your address book, but someone else did. If those other people have the email address you use for Linkedin in their contact list, Linkedin will still find a relationship between you two and suggest a connection. The right to be left alone should really apply to mail and other internet databases too, no opt out or anything, but default. Unless a company or person has explicit permission from you yourself, they should not be allowed to keep your information in their databases, regardless how they got it in the first place.

Re:Not Random (1)

steveg (55825) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484571)

I don't know. I have gotten several "invites" from people I have never heard of. I've also gotten invitations from some people I *do* know. There's always a slight tinge of guilt when I ignore them (especially when I got one from my sister) but not enough to cause me to respond.

Other than the invitations I get on a regular basis, I've never had anything to do with LinkedIn. I've no particular interest in it.

People are using the address book feature (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483605)

From what I can gather, people are using the "upload your contact list" / "connect to your email account" feature, without realizing that it automatically sends out invites to your contacts. I'm pretty sure it spells that out quite plainly, though; at least I vaguely recall that it did last time I decided not to use the feature.

Re:People are using the address book feature (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483705)

I'd like to file an exception to your hypothesis - I always left that stupid thing off, and yet I got an odd invite from a guy I positively detested (both as a manager and otherwise)

Re:People are using the address book feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483773)

Wait... what? It's the person who does the inviting that has used the feature, not the invitee. The other guy still probably had you on his contact list when he decided to upload it to LinkedIn.

Re:People are using the address book feature (2)

joe_frisch (1366229) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483827)

You may have been in his email list, or possibly both of you in a 3rd person's list. Has anyone absolutely verified that they received an invite from someone who didn't send one?

Re:People are using the address book feature (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484131)

That would make sense... I was reading it slightly backwards. :)

Re:People are using the address book feature (3, Insightful)

obarel (670863) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484503)

I'm pretty sure you're right.

I hardly pay attention to most of what I read online, especially when I'm on LinkedIn (I'm trying not to look at adverts, so I miss the content as well).

I found myself once entering my LinkedIn password into some "password" input box, which, as I wasn't paying much attention, I thought was LinkedIn's "your session has expired". However, it rejected the password, which made me look again. I was entering my password into the "we've got your email address, now just give us the password" box. As I have different passwords for different things, no problem. But I'm sure that some people use the same password for everything, and suddenly LinkedIn sends an email to every contact on their gmail account.

Re:People are using the address book feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484805)

Does it do that automatically now? When I used it, I had to pick through the 100 addresses it scraped from a particular email to get the dozen or so I was looking for.
On the other hand, I have a college acquaintance who is both so inept and desperate for a job that he's started trying to connect to every connection of his connections. I've got a form letter ready to the effect of "I went to college with Rob; I do not recall having introduced you to him.

Yahoo did this too (1)

girlinatrainingbra (2738457) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484895)

Yahoo did something similar to this a few (four? five?) years ago when it was also trying to roll out a "social media" flavor-of-the-year. When you logged in, you'd see a sidebar (on the right, if I remember correctly) saying "XYZZ has been trying to reach you." Now, remember kids, this is on the yahoo web-mail page when you log in, so it's not just spam mailed by someone's account which was hijacked by a virus. It was actually a notification on the web user interface for their webmail. I ended up getting a few random junk mails from people whom I'd emailed two years prior to that and had no interest in contacting anymore (bad middle-school friendships gone awry...) and who decided to restalk me probably based on yahoo telling them that I'd been interested in reaching/connecting with them.

I can't remember if it was Yahoo Buzz [wikipedia.org] or not...

Been wondering myself. (2)

wcrowe (94389) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483627)

I've been wondering about that for a while now. I get LinkedIn invites that seem unlikely. They have all the hallmarks of some automated process unknown to the user.

Re:Been wondering myself. (1)

mrbester (200927) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483671)

All the invites I receive are unlikely as I'm not on LinkedIn. Straight to spam they go...

Re:Been wondering myself. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483963)

Actually I got two notes from Linked in that were "invites" from a parent of my daughter's friend. We casually knew these people as our daughter's hung out together in High School and we would see them at orchestra events, etc. We never planned anything with them and now that our kids go to different colleges, we haven't seen these people in over a year. Yet I got two invites to LinkedIn from them. I am almost positive it is due to them allowing LinkedIn access to their contact list (as I had emailed them once or twice with some links to pictures or some such). There is just no way they would have invited me to LinkedIn purposely. After that I set a gmail filter rule - straight to delete if it comes from LinkedIn.

Re:Been wondering myself. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483959)

I would get introduced to family of a headhunter I used 8 years ago once.

Re:Been wondering myself. (4, Interesting)

DeBaas (470886) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484425)

Those are probably not from Linkedin. Spammers are sending mail that looks linkedin in now as well. Gmail seems very good in separating real Linkedin and spam looking like Linkedin.

My issue with Linkedin is that I keep on getting spam from them with an offer for a free month of premium access. Note to Linkedin: if I have to supply credit card details: IT AIN'T FREE!!

   

Mark as spam (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484529)

It is spam; mark it as spam.

Always been aggravating (4, Informative)

Quirkz (1206400) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483629)

They've always been aggressive and aggravating, as far as I'm concerned. When a family member signed up with them I got a request. And another. And another. And they kept coming. I finally followed a link and told them to shut up and stop bothering me, but then another associate signed up and it started all over again. I can understand one invite, but they sent far more than was warranted, or could be considered reasonable or polite. I refuse to use them, not just because of the grudge, but also because I don't want them spamming friends or family based on my registration.

wow (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483633)

This is exactly why I never let Linkedin access my contacts even though it bitches every single time I log on. Think it's time to delete my account now, it served its purpose and I'm employed.

The usual sloppy reporting (5, Interesting)

jtara (133429) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483653)

While I find the constant barrage of "do you know" messages annoying, it's pretty clear to me what they are: a message from LinkedIn (NOT the person you might or might not know) asking if you might know this person, and sugesting that you invite THEM.

Once you click through on one of these, you get the standard LinkedIn invitation request. You are asked to make a selection as to how you know this person. If you check "I don't know this person", then you need to know their email address in order to complete the invitation. AS WITH ANY Linked-In invitation.

The annoying messages are NOT invitations, though, you AREN'T automatically connected by responding to them (the other person would have to approve) and they AREN'T sent from the other person's account. It's pretty clear they are sent by LinkedIn, trying to drum-up more connections.

Re:The usual sloppy reporting (1)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483771)

Sloppy reporting, or just that other people have had different experiences with Linkedin? Isn't it possible, that while you've only gotten "do you know" messages, that the people interviewed in TFA have in fact had invites sent out on their behalf but without their knowledge or approval? TFA says that users are reporting that Linkedin is placing invite restrictions on their accounts for sending out too many invites to people they don't know when they swear they haven't sent them.

Re:The usual sloppy reporting (1)

religious freak (1005821) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483879)

It's obvious to me too, but I'm a computer nerd and odds are you are too. It irritates me to think people not familiar with computers think *I* am the one spamming them.

Re:The usual sloppy reporting (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483983)

I don't believe that's true. I keep getting messages supposedly from people asking me to "endorse" there experience in one way or another. But they are from people that wouldn't ask me such a thing.

Is there any actual point to LinkedIn? Does anyone actually ever do any networking that way? I haven't noticed any in the years that I've lazily had an account. It's about time I shut the account down.

Re:The usual sloppy reporting (3, Insightful)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484143)

Yes, it does have a point. That's how the Google recruiter found me, without me soliciting them first.

It's much like any other social media site, but it does have the one saving grace that you can actually find jobs with it. Thus, it is the only social media site that I put any effort into whatsoever.

Still, just like any other social media site, you would be a fool to give them anything but your most tailored information, and certainly not your raw contact list.

"endorse" is a different feature (4, Informative)

jtara (133429) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484177)

"endorse" is a completely different, new, feature.

The endorsement messages do not come from the individuals you might endorse. Again, these are generated by LinkedIn, and the language makes that clear. Did you actually read them?

LinkedIn is asking you to validate that one of your connections "knows" some skill that they have listed.

I like the feature myself. It's meant as a bit of a BS filter, to give some credibility to people's claims. If you've got 100 connections and say you know "x", and nobody endorses you for "x", there's a good chance you're just making it up.

It's actually fun. Whenever I go on LinkedIn (which isn't very often) I'll plink-off a few, knowing that I'm helping people I've worked with validate their skills. If I worked with a person who was doing "x" when I worked with them, and I'm asked to endorse them for "x", I endorse them for "x". If I know they are BSing or simply don't know, maybe because their experience with "x" was later, then I pass it by. It's the way it's supposed to work. (There is no negative endorsement.)

Obviously, though, it will take time for the system to work, since it is a fairly new feature.

Does anybody use LinkedIn? I do. It's replaced my resume'. However, I don't follow the standard resume' advice to keep it to recent history. I've been a developer for 30+ years. Every job I've ever had is listed.

Re:"endorse" is a different feature (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484269)

The endorsement messages do not come from the individuals you might endorse. Again, these are generated by LinkedIn, and the language makes that clear. Did you actually read them?

Here's one, only the names have been changed to protect the innocent. Needless to say there's no chance Roland wrote this.

"Roland Rat is requesting an endorsement for work

Dear Basil,
I'm sending this to ask you for a brief recommendation of my work that I can include in my LinkedIn profile. If you have any questions, let me know.

Thanks in advance for helping me out.

-Roland Rat"

LinkedIn are liars.

Re:"endorse" is a different feature (1)

jtara (133429) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485169)

OK, yes, that is different. You can request an endorsement as well. That's different from the "does so-and-so know "x"" messgaes.

So, did you ask Roland Rat if he made an endorsement request?

Re:The usual sloppy reporting (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484429)

I don't think they're talking about the "do you know" messages that everyone knows. They're talking about automatic invites to connect with someone else.

For instance, I was a Teaching Assistant when I was in grad school up until a few years ago, so hundreds of my former students have my e-mail address. As those students have been graduating and signing up for LinkedIn, one of the first things it does is ask them if they want to connect their Gmail contacts to LinkedIn, and many of them do that, resulting in LinkedIn sending out invites to all of their contacts, including me. This is different than what you've described, since in my case, it's an actual invitation that I can choose to Accept or Ignore, as opposed to your case, where you're being baited into initiating the connection yourself.

From what the summary says (who reads the article?), it sounds like they've expanded this practice in some way, perhaps by sending out those sorts of invites on behalf of the user, rather than merely sending out the "do you know" messages that we're both familiar with.

There's an easy solution... (3, Funny)

larry bagina (561269) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483661)

have a three-some!

God is just (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483683)

God is perfectly just.
If you could just get lucky... you'd regret it.
Great Joy and Great Sorrow

20 Looking at his disciples, he said:

“Blessed are you who are poor,
        for yours is the kingdom of God.
21 Blessed are you who hunger now,
        for you will be satisfied.
Blessed are you who weep now,
        for you will laugh.
22 Blessed are you when people hate you,
        when they exclude you and insult you
        and reject your name as evil,
                because of the Son of Man.

23 “Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their ancestors treated the prophets.

24 “But woe to you who are rich,
        for you have already received your comfort.
25 Woe to you who are well fed now,
        for you will go hungry.
Woe to you who laugh now,
        for you will mourn and weep.
26 Woe to you when everyone speaks well of you,
        for that is how their ancestors treated the false prophets.
---

Kurt Cobain

I stopped them. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483711)

I don't get these anymore. I get spam email which are dupes of LinkedIn emails, but the names are bogus and the links are all wrong, so I know they're not genuine.

What I did to stop stupid spam?

I put in my profile in clear words, that if someone contacts me without having any connections, or from an area far away from where I live, especially if they claim to represent a recruitment firm, I will promptly report them as a spammer. I flagged several accounts, and I haven't had any stupid requests from LinkedIn in months.

I still occasionally get the ones I would expect from people who have several connections in common, or current/former co-workers, but those are fine to me, as I understand that that's what the system is for.

simple solution (4, Insightful)

nimbius (983462) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483721)

:0
* H ?? ^From: .*@linkedin\.com
/dev/null
Linkedin is to employment as pakistani callcenters are to recruiting. I consider it another "social" site into which people excrete personal details and act perplexed when they receive an influx of redplum junkettes and robocalls. i save my "professional networking" for SCALE, LISA, and pertanent mailing lists.

Re:simple solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483829)

mailing whaaa?

As a subscriber of one gazillion university lists, I say: get rid of those spam machines!

Re:simple solution (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483975)

i save my "professional networking" for SCALE, LISA, and pertanent mailing lists.

Which one?

Acronym Definition
SCALE Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education
SCALE Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation
SCALE Secondary Collegiate Articulated Learning Experience
SCALE South Carolina Association of Law Enforcement Explorers
SCALE Shuttle Coherent Atmospheric LIDAR Experiment (NASA)
SCALE Short-term Commitment and Long-term Estimate
SCALE System Characteristics and Assurance Level Evaluation (IEEE)
SCALE Sustainable Community based Approaches for Livelihoods Enhancement (India)
SCALE Specialization in Culture and Language Education

Re:simple solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484631)

While it's highly unlikely that nimbius meant this version, there's also:

Somerville Center for Adult Learning and Education

Re:simple solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43485183)

SCALE -> perhaps Southern California Linux Expo.

A large community/volunteer run Open Source conference held once a year in Los Angeles.

more info:
www.socallinuxexpo.org
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_California_Linux_Expo

SCALE 11x had 90 presenters, 2300+ attendees, ran for 3 days, covered all sorts of Open Source related topics.. full price was only $70 for attendees.

SCALE 12x coming Feb 21-22-23 ( Fri, Sat, Sun ) 2012 at the LAX Hilton.

Come join us. We would love to see more people interested in Open Source / EFF to join us

LinkedIn is annoying (3, Insightful)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483867)

I attend an AI group [meetup.com] in Boston (for about two years ongoing) and I've learned to not give out my E-mail for this very reason.

Giving an E-mail address results in them entering it into LinkedIn, which results in me being spammed forever by that system. People I've never heard of send messages "I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn" (some store owner in a distant city).

The message has a convenient opt-out link, whose page is hilariously ambiguous:

"You're receiving these emails because a LinkedIn member invited you to become a part of their professional network. By clicking the "Unsubscribe" button, you will stop receiving these emails"

Two checkboxes below are labelled "Invitations to connect" and "Reminders to connect".

It took me awhile to realize that you have to *check* the boxes to stop receiving E-mails, instead of *uncheck* the boxes which is how pretty-much all other sites handle it.

I've never seen a compelling need for this LinkedIn service. Sure, if a member could manage their contacts effectively it might be useful, but the system auto-encourages bigger and more comprehensive webs... which are at the same time less and less useful.

My impression is that many of the people on the site are "salesmen" types, who think contact circles indicate how impressive they are. Professional networks just for the purpose of having professional networks.

Thanks, but no thanks. The address-book in my E-mail client works just fine. It even lets me add notes about the person - where I met them, what they do, &c.

It also doesn't hold my contact info up for everyone to see.

How it works (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43483881)

I guess most people aren't aware of how this actually works. Notice that if you visit LinkedIn on a computer that you normally use, it already knows who you are without having to sign in. So when you think you are casually using LinkedIn to look up an old girlfriend or co-worker that you detest, it logs that activity. Then it WAITS A FEW DAYS AND THEN ASKS THAT PERSON IF THEY KNOW YOU. Yes, it is that creepy.

Re:How it works (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484367)

Why wasn't this modded up??

I though those were some kind of spam (1)

Animats (122034) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483889)

I've been getting what I thought were phony LinkedIn invites. I thought they were some kind of spam, and set up a mail filter to drop them. Is LinkedIn itself sending those?

Re:I though those were some kind of spam (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484215)

That is my problem with LinkedIn. There are fake LinkedIn invites and messages that are sent and there are real ones as well. Because they are so spammy, it is hard to tell the difference without scrutinizing the headers to see if the chain goes back to LinkedIn or somewhere else. Luckily, I have a better solution for me. Since I wait until the message is almost a week old before I do anything about it, the real LinkedIn messages show, at the bottom, that I have messages in the 20s or so in my inbox and the fake ones are in the low single digits. The ratio of fake to real invites is around 2:1 and has been for some time, but I have to have my work email address publicly posted in such a way that it is a valid mailto link.

Re:I though those were some kind of spam (1)

safetyinnumbers (1770570) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485161)

Most of the spam I currently get is in the form of fake LinkedIn messages, so you're probably right.

Gmails filters them all out while letting real ones through. It's easy to check since I use a different address for LinkedIn that forwards to my gmail account.

I sometimes get link requests from recruiters who claim they've worked with me in the past. I don't know if there's some advantage to that over just asking to link to me (other than trying to fool me).

It's that stupid find contacts I bet ... (3, Informative)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483891)

So many of these sites do that "hey, give us your username and password and we'll find people for you".

No way no how would I give any of them my password for my email account to sift through and find people. If I want to put information in there, I'll do it myself.

Though, it wouldn't surprise me if they used some other annoying mechanism to do these invites the user didn't do.

Like all social networking, your contacts and friends are extremely valuable to them. They want to expand it as much as possible, and might get a little overzealous in doing that.

As it is, I periodically get invites from people I don't know in LinkedIn, but if I don't know you or haven't worked with you, it's not happening.

Linked in has gone way downhill (4, Insightful)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483947)

Early on, it was a good way to reconnect with old friends and the groups actually had decent discussions. Most groups have devolved into a few people arguing amongst themselves (one even has become one person talking to themselves)and a place for people to self promote. For a while there many posts I saw were form bogus job offers and SEO spammers. I still use it to search for old friends but if I get a request from an unknown person I refuse it.

Hope (1)

gatesstillborg (2633899) | about a year and a half ago | (#43483953)

The snake will always end up eating its tail. They will always find enough rope to hang themselves, etc.

Block their emails (1)

bobjr94 (1120555) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484019)

I had never signed with them up but after getting email invites almost daily to several email accounts, and unsubscribing many times, I finally added them to my blocked senders list. The people I get these invites from I already know on facebook and other sites anyway.

Great! (2)

kamapuaa (555446) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484059)

Now to convince my girlfriend that I wasn't looking through my ex's Facebook photo albums!

This happened to me as well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484121)

Was wondering what was going on...I added a few people from my contact list and then I started getting all these acceptances from everyone in my contact list along with some others who might have somehow been on an email cc list or just a random stranger.

Rare success story! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484209)

Without either of us attempting to contact each other, in any way - especially not Linked In, me and an old girlfriend became connected on Linked In. Fortunately, this was a really good thing. Both divorced, both have really good memories of our time together and now stay in regular contact. The only problem being that we live on different continents!

Linkedin is no better than Facebook (2)

Sydin (2598829) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484259)

Both of them are hungry for all the personal data they can get their hands on, so that they can turn around and sell anything to you, and sell you to anything. The problem is that while I'm completely in control of my choice to have a Facebook account (read: I don't have a facebook account), my most recent employer requires me to have a LinkedIn profile. Moreover, a lot of tech firms won't even consider you if they can't find you on LinkedIn. It's a horrible site, but unfortunately everybody expects you to play the game.

Re:Linkedin is no better than Facebook (2)

Rob the Bold (788862) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484389)

. . . my most recent employer requires me to have a LinkedIn profile. Moreover, a lot of tech firms won't even consider you if they can't find you on LinkedIn. It's a horrible site, but unfortunately everybody expects you to play the game.

I saw a story in Wired [wired.com] this week about that. I just can't do it, though. I was on LinkedIn for a while, saw no value to it. I really didn't want to know about people that I didn't like in the first place getting promoted. I killed my account a while back. If it hurts my prospects, so be it.

Re:Linkedin is no better than Facebook (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484979)

The one thing that makes LinkedIn not quite as bad as Facebook is that what's public on LinkedIn is exactly what you want to be public: Your professional accomplishments.

By contrast, Facebook wants you to give up information that's regularly stuff I'd want to be kept private, such as the names of all my ex's and exactly what I did with each of them.

Re:Linkedin is no better than Facebook (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43485089)

This has to be an American thing, here in Scandinavia Linkedin is about as mandatory as QR codes on your resume. (I'm a twentysomething working in energy research).

My question is how necessary is LI these days? (3, Insightful)

nblender (741424) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484485)

I still don't have a LI account (nor facebook nor twitter, nor g+)... I'm being told that being on LinkedIn is more or less obligatory if I want to have a reasonable chance of not being ignored by a hiring manager or HR drone. I'm being told this by colleagues and friends, a few of whom are hiring managers. I've been operating under the assumption that my reputation is enough to get me hired (as has been the case for at least 25 years) but what I'm hearing now is that if I don't show up on LinkedIn, my resume gets tossed.. I'm offended by the very idea and like to console myself that I probably don't want to work for anyone who filters resumes this way... Unfortunately, I'm approaching my sunset years and may not be able to afford to restrict my employment opportunities should I suddenly find myself unemployed.

Re:My question is how necessary is LI these days? (1)

Geek_Cop (930002) | about a year and a half ago | (#43485177)

I didn't want one either, but unfortunately I keep meeting more and more people that have found their next job using it.

Re:My question is how necessary is LI these days? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43485205)

There are recruiters that will toss your resume if they can't find information about you, but not all. I know several younger generation recruiters, including my sister-in-law, and they do use it heavily nowadays.

However, there is a value to it if you know how to restrict from the features that do not add value. The features that don't add value are individual to you however. I know several people who are involved with small businesses and startups in a marketing function, and many small companies want to know how social media savvy you are, so LinkedIn can be useful there. I'm an operations guy myself, and I have my LinkedIn page mimic my resume pretty closely; it's taking the place of Monster now. In terms of contacts, I add every person that i have met and worked with individually and refuse accepting people whom I've never met face to face; the nice thing there is you can tag them so 2-3 years down the road when you're looking to change jobs or need someone for some random project, you can look up your LinkedIn contacts and remember who you met and why, and there's your opening to call them for their assistance. In addition, if I do an exceptional job I ask someone to write a recommendation for me related to that job; their recommendation is usually glowing when it's near the time I did a great job and yet through LinkedIn it stays forever glowing; I don't have to have them dredge up that review 3-5 years later as a recruiter can already see it. Also, recruiters are now finding me for my LinkedIn resume, which means jobs are coming to me; not that i'm in the market looking but it never hurts.

I basically use it as an online, organic resume. I keep it up to date with various projects so that way when I'm looking to position myself for a promotion or a job change, it's already up to date. That matters to me because I'm in my early 30's and have decades of work ahead of me; for someone in the latter part of their career perhaps not so much, but it's worth looking into to see how you can utilize it.

I was going to just abandon it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484499)

I was just going to abandon LinkedIn, but I realized that I had actually been actively recruited (Stalked politely) by my current employer and would not have landed the awesomest job ever had I not had one...

So, I just put up with the spammyness by refusing any request of anyone I don't know personally.

Posting anon because ... just because.

LinkedIn's problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43484545)

I've thought for some time that LinkedIn has serious problems. The big problem is what to do when you get invites from people who aren't in your field. It started with real estate agents. Then friends or people with whom I exchanged business cards. Left unchecked, this reduces the value of the network. Bigger is not better. The end result is a reduction to one datum: "everybody is connected". We already knew that, so such a database adds nothing to our knowledge.

That might be by design or accident. Perhaps some people are annoyed by the privacy implications of LinkedIn and see filling it with noise as a way to make it more difficult for people to really figure out who their connections are. That can be defeated by using some sort of crawler that checks to see if you actually worked with the person, recommended them, etc. which brings us to another problem.

LinkedIn is always bothering me. Especially since IPO it's become more spammy. They're desperately trying to make you interact with it, because they need you to visit frequently so they can make money.

I'm sure it's being gamed too. It appears to be doing well now; but there's definitely trouble a brewin' there. It was a cool idea to focus on professional connections, but ultimately it may be just another social networking fad. We'll go back to simply, you know, talking to people we really know. I know I wouldn't miss it.

Stap my vitals! (0)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | about a year and a half ago | (#43484561)

Stap my vitals! Jolly rotten I say.
Still I hope he got to shag the old gal. You know, for old times sake and all that rot. And, of course, to sort of compensate for the troubles he went through. I mean, the old spouse will never believe him anyway, so he might as well. And with considerable vim I say!
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