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Ask Slashdot: How To Track a Skype Account Hijacker?

timothy posted about a year ago | from the hi-from-indonesia dept.

Crime 152

An anonymous reader writes "My Skype account was hijacked, which I discovered after Skype suspended it for suspicious activity, including a number of paid calls and an attempt to debit my card. Now that I've secured the account again, I can see the call history — there are several numbers called in Senegal, Mali, Benin and Philippines. Obviously I could call them myself and create a bit of havoc in their lives, but ideally I'd like to trace the hijacker himself — perhaps with some kind of 'social engineering' approach. Or is it just a waste of time?" How would you do this, and would you bother?

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152 comments

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get a life (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508033)

Seriously

Re:get a life (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508219)

Which part of "Microsoft product" did you not understand?

Re:get a life (2, Insightful)

mendax (114116) | about a year ago | (#43508477)

Seriously

Surely you have better things to do in your life than troll around here and issue such nonsense. On that note, I'm going to get back to my life and go to sleep. You may continue to troll along as you choose.

Re:get a life (2)

sdreader (2893571) | about a year ago | (#43508603)

Seems like a lot of people agree with this "troll" if he's already gotten Score:5.

Re:get a life (1)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | about a year ago | (#43508649)

Myself included. There's almost certainly nothing to be gained from embarking on some CSI inspired e-detective work.

If AC is a troll, fair enough but by such a broad definition the same is true of Mendax. The only difference I see is that the AC opted for humour over Mendax's calling card for why he/she probably doesn't get invited to many parties - at least not a second time.

Re:get a life (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508811)

game theory, tit for tat. furthermore, it's at this stage a thought experiment which plenty of people are happy to engage in so there is expansion of the mind, exchange of ideas.

"get a life" was incredibly rude, and pure hypocrisy from a slashdot surfer. i would love to hear what you and the AC do with your sorry bitter lives...

i'm not joking. i would love to hear it, please spill for us

Re:get a life (1)

sdreader (2893571) | about a year ago | (#43508837)

You've have to be pretty short-sighted to believe that telling someone to "get a life" means that the accuser is a bitter person. Some people need to be put in their place, even the nicest people know when to put their foot down and tell it like it is.

Re:get a life (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509013)

he said "seriously", don't leave that out, but yes, we agree, that's why i put my foot down and told it like it is.

the best most famous magicians today started as kids with goofy magic tricks. there is nothing wrong with somebody being violated and thinking through how to crack the case and hunt down the perpetrator, even to the point of obsession as he might be able to figure it out. there is nothing wrong with that.

I'm still waiting to hear activities that you consider to be a life. Whatever you say is going to either sound silly or ridiculously lofty, and we'll make fun of you and ask you why if you have such a "life" you are prowling around slashdot, but you won't tell us will you, you bitter loser.

You're done. (-1, Troll)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43508035)

I would just call the FBI and tell them you're thinking about breaking the fucking law, so they should just put the cuffs on now.

Then, to ensure I had no plausible deniability, I would crow about finding the hijacker's info on Slashdot and ask for help hacking, like some kind of idiot who got the first post and doesn't know what to say.

Re:You're done. (1)

quantaman (517394) | about a year ago | (#43508357)

How would he be breaking the law? And where is he suggesting hacking?

I think the thought was he could somehow use the numbers the thief called (ie people the thief knew), but it sounds like those were scam toll numbers or something else that wouldn't be helpful.

Re:You're done. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508855)

OP's plan is exactly what the long distance companies did when phreakers would use found phone numbers to call friends around the country. You needed to have forgetful friends because the company would call them up and ask who called. Phreakers would usually use payphones, which were plentiful back then.

you're thinking about breaking the fucking law (1)

bakaohki (1206252) | about a year ago | (#43508401)

Minority report, precrime, congratulations.

Re:you're thinking about breaking the fucking law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508595)

Conspiracy to commit a crime IS a crime. If a legal department found out I had plans to kill someone and they could prove it they are in their power to arrest me and put me on trial for conspiracy to murder.

Re:you're thinking about breaking the fucking law (1)

skegg (666571) | about a year ago | (#43508615)

First up: IANAL.

I think in Australia what you state above is not a crime.
To my knowledge, conspiracy to commit a crime requires 2 or more people.

Re:you're thinking about breaking the fucking law (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#43508721)

I think he insinuated that random /. posters would be conspirators, in his sexually excited state.

Re:you're thinking about breaking the fucking law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508715)

If the legal dept. are all in the same room, a percussion grenade should take care of them, like we talked about last nite. --the little voice inside your head.

Re:You're done. (-1, Flamebait)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#43508695)

I was going to fuck with him about the same stuff, when I saw your post.
So I'll fuck with you instead.

What are you, some kind of geekey Jiminy Cricket? They should pull the waistband of your shorts over your forehead, now.

Then , to ensure no one will ever sex you up, put your glasses on over your underwear so you can wander around Slashdot flailing your arms and making noise like Jerry Lewis.

Re:You're done. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509551)

Then , to ensure no one will ever sex you up, put your glasses on over your underwear so you can wander around Slashdot flailing your arms and making noise like Jerry Lewis.

Rule 1 of /. -- if you're posting drunk, post anonymously.

Seriously, where are mod points when you need them?

No point (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508037)

Sadly there's no point in bothering. It could be that the numbers they called are 'premium' numbers and its possible that your account is gonna get charged a whole ton of money from those 'services' that were set up specifically for this kind of thing.

Re:No point (5, Interesting)

BrokenHalo (565198) | about a year ago | (#43508467)

Sadly there's no point in bothering.

In this instance, I might disagree. Given that those calls were (according to TFS) made to Senegal, Mali, Benin and Philippines, that in itself might be construed as suspicious. You could pass the information on to the FBI and tell them you are concerned your account could have been used for terrorist activity. Let them come down on the perps.

Re:No point (-1, Troll)

johanw (1001493) | about a year ago | (#43508511)

And then get arrested and waterboarded just te be sure he wasn't getting himself an alibi? Trusting the FBI... that seems as smart and much less safe as trusting Nigerian 419 scammers.

Re:No point (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508529)

Do you seriously live in such a paranoid delusion that you believe that crap?

Re:No point (-1, Troll)

Spamalope (91802) | about a year ago | (#43509159)

Do you seriously live in such a paranoid delusion that you believe that crap?

Are you really so sheltered you haven't personally witnessed 'I don't like the way you look' law enforcement? The variety I see most often is 'Your car looks fast so you must have been speeding sometime, here's your ticket for 10-15 over your actual speed'.

Do you really think annoying them with puffed up story about something they consider trivial will have a better outcome? I hope your first experience with the sad reality is as a witness instead of victim. As a photographer I was lucky that my first experience with actual law enforcement/photographer interaction was as a witness when a professional photographer was beaten bloody for pointing a camera at them while they 'tuned up' someone who refused a search.

Re:No point (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#43508709)

Sadly there's no point in bothering.

In this instance, I might disagree. Given that those calls were (according to TFS) made to Senegal, Mali, Benin and Philippines, that in itself might be construed as suspicious. You could pass the information on to the FBI and tell them you are concerned your account could have been used for terrorist activity. Let them come down on the perps.

well, sure, call those numbers them. give them more money.

Re:No point (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#43508737)

Now there's a good sense answer that requires little to do on the part of the violated. You can still make it out to be a huge thing , down at the bar, with you in the middle of an international incident.
Someone mod this guy up and get him a beer.

Re:No point (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508983)

Sadly there's no point in bothering.

In this instance, I might disagree. Given that those calls were (according to TFS) made to Senegal, Mali, Benin and Philippines, that in itself might be construed as suspicious. You could pass the information on to the FBI and tell them you are concerned your account could have been used for terrorist activity. Let them come down on the perps.

Lol, not likely. This is a common scam lately, not just by getting into Skype accounts but also by breaking into PBX systems, SIP phones, etc. They place calls to those numbers which are toll services, this generates a charge to the person's account. The scammer is somehow related to the people who get paid when those numbers get called, either directly involved or at least another branch of a criminal enterprise.
They've been up to this for years, so while I'm sure the FBI would be happy to add the OP's specific information to their case files, I highly doubt his involvement will get anybody locked up.

As for tracking the hijacker? Good luck with that. It's not likely to bear any fruit, and you'll probably end up breaking a few laws trying to do it.

Ask Reddit... (5, Funny)

JJJJust (908929) | about a year ago | (#43508047)

Reddit seems to be fantastic at finding people on the internet given the flimsiest leads to their identity... sure they may get it wrong now and then, but hey... them's the breaks.

get their ip (3, Informative)

ZeroNullVoid (886675) | about a year ago | (#43508057)

Set the password back to what they knew, wait for them to login and hijack it (another account friended) and use one of the sites that use the debug version of skype to obtain their ip.  Then contact the ISP and say that either this illegally hijacking accounts or their IP/systems have been compromised.  Don't forget to disassociate any cards prior.

Their ISP won't care (3, Insightful)

bradley13 (1118935) | about a year ago | (#43508205)

Look at the places they called. Likely the hijacker is somewhere in a developing country. Unlikely to be the same country where the poster lives. The ISP will not care, as long as their bills are paid.

Re:Their ISP won't care (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508253)

Look at the places they called. Likely the hijacker is somewhere in a developing country. Unlikely to be the same country where the poster lives. The ISP will not care, as long as their bills are paid.

Call and harass the people they contact. You know, passively at first, pretending to be other guy, then lay in.

Re:Their ISP won't care (5, Funny)

Joce640k (829181) | about a year ago | (#43508431)

First become fluent at harassing people in African-French and Filipino.

Re:Their ISP won't care (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43508957)

For a simple DoS you needn't even speak their language.

Re:Their ISP won't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509001)

Look at the places they called. Likely the hijacker is somewhere in a developing country. Unlikely to be the same country where the poster lives. The ISP will not care, as long as their bills are paid.

Call and harass the people they contact. You know, passively at first, pretending to be other guy, then lay in.

They want you to call those numbers, they get paid every time you do. There isn't a person on the other end, it's just a computer, so go right ahead and "lay in" all you want. I'm sure they'll get a good laugh listening to the call while they count their ill-gotten cash.

Re:Their ISP won't care (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508299)

If you are right about the ISP, they would hand over the information if you offered to pay an extra bill.

Post numbers (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508059)

1] Post the numbers dialed to 4chan
2] Wait for the onslaught of harassing calls
3] ???
4] Profit

Re:Post numbers (0)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year ago | (#43508129)

/b/ is Not Your Personal Army.

Re:Post numbers (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508225)

Neither is my cat. It still catches the mice though.

Re:Post numbers (1)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year ago | (#43508291)

Actually your cat IS your personal army.

Re:Post numbers (5, Funny)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | about a year ago | (#43508317)

Actually your cat IS your personal army.

It may seem like the cat belongs to you, but if it really was your personal army then it would actually have to obey your orders.

In reality, you are more like a squire to your cat; you attend to the cat's personal needs when it isn't off doing heroic battle against a mouse or bug.

Re:Post numbers (4, Insightful)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#43508425)

Cats don't belong to people. People belong to cats.

Re:Post numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508429)

Is your cat like the average MMO PvPer, griefing noobs?
My cat used to go after big dogs, and other cats.

Re:Post numbers (1)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year ago | (#43508493)

I am not saying that he has a good personal army.

Re:Post numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508925)

Your sig is wrong.

Re:Post numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509131)

do lizards count for doing battle with

Re:Post numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509045)

1] Post the numbers dialed to 4chan
2] Wait for the onslaught of harassing calls
3] ???
4] Profit

Those numbers are part of a toll calling scam, they WANT you to call, every time you do they make money.
Shit, if posting the numbers to 4chan, reddit, etc. does generate a lot of calls, then you just came up with another business model for them. Why hack phones when you can make a couple forum posts and have people call on their own?

Re:Post numbers (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | about a year ago | (#43509351)

What makes you think this isn't part of it...?

What about the IP (1)

Lorens (597774) | about a year ago | (#43508063)

Won't Skype tell you the IP that was used by the thief?

Re:What about the IP (4, Interesting)

ccguy (1116865) | about a year ago | (#43508209)

Won't Skype tell you the IP that was used by the thief?

No, they won't. In general companies tell you to contact the police, etc and go out of their way to be useless.

Some months ago I had someone purchase a plane ticket using my credit card. My bank sent me a SMS when the charge was made (usual alert system, they SMS each time there's a charge). I had the phone with me so I could do something instantly. This is what happened:

- The charge was made for a plane ticket on Airchile according to the SMS.
- I called the bank *inmediately* (as the SMS said) to notify them of the charge. Well, guess what, it was a Sunday at 23:00 or so and they were closed. So the bank couldn't help.
- I drove to the airport to talk to Airchile, which happened to be opened at the time because they was a flight leaving from Madrid to Santiago in a couple hours (I was hoping that the bastard was there). They couldn't help.
- I went to the police station in the airport and they couldn't help because I needed a bank statement before they could do anything. Really? I have to wait until the end of the month before I can file a report with the police?

You see - even if you are really willing to track things down and not demand your money back, the other parties involved rarely assist.

Eventually I got my statement, filed the report (useless at the time of course) and got my money. But I great chance to catch the guy was lost.

Re:What about the IP (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#43508321)

I find that idiotic.

"I'd like to know my IP, the one I used on Tuesday to call Somalia."
"No, we aren't allowed to tell you your own IP address for privacy reasons."

How exactly does that work? You are who you were last week, as far as they are concerned, right?

Re:What about the IP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509439)

You are who you were last week, as far as they are concerned, right?

No, you aren't. Well, you are - but only when it is the company accusing you. For example of pirating their software or uploading music or downloading videos. If it is you that are after someone else, an IP address is like a mailbox that moves between different front lawns. Who knows who had it last week? And even if you had it, was it you or someone else in your house? Or was it a wardriver parked in front of your neighbor's house?

Re:What about the IP (1)

Jstlook (1193309) | about a year ago | (#43508343)

The funny part is that's by design. Our American society cares more about protecting the right to make mistakes and the belief in second chances than it does in any right to privacy or integrity.
Congrats, and welcome to the queue. If you'd like to dispute this society, please press star, and an operator will be with you .. eventually.

Re:What about the IP (1)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year ago | (#43508501)

The funny part is that's by design. Our American society cares more about protecting the right to make mistakes and the belief in second chances than it does in any right to privacy or integrity.

Actually this is the implementation of "What if it's someone rich?" clause.

Re:What about the IP (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43508969)

It does? Gee, the prison and justice system in general would have suggested otherwise.

What airline was that again? (1)

voss (52565) | about a year ago | (#43508823)

airchile doesnt exist.

Re:What about the IP (4, Insightful)

markus_baertschi (259069) | about a year ago | (#43508847)

Your Bank/Credit card company has no 24h service number for such this ?

Time to change credit card company.

Re:What about the IP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509529)

..or cut the BS

I wouldn't start that journey from here (5, Insightful)

realitycheckplease (2487810) | about a year ago | (#43508071)

Is it possible that the hijacker was selling calls to other people, possibly immigrants, maybe even illegals. If so, the numbers called may have no direct connection to the hijacker, rather each olne of them may know a different someone who knows the hijacker. So you could be looking for the common factor between the people who made the calls to the numbers that you have. I'm not sure that it will be easy to find that common factor. After all, you have Jim and Bill and Fred's numbers; Sue called Jim, Anne called Bill, Jenny called Fred; Sue, Anne and Jenny all know Henry .... so if you have Jim and Bill and Fred's numbers, and don't even know whether Henry exists or not, how do you find Henry?

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508103)

Well, now that we got his name, walk around with a bat and beat up anyone named ``Hanry"?

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508121)

The answer is clear: The hijacker is Kevin Bacon.

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509145)

the real kevin bacon or the roger from american dad kevin bacon

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (4, Insightful)

tftp (111690) | about a year ago | (#43508131)

Sue called Jim, Anne called Bill, Jenny called Fred; Sue, Anne and Jenny all know Henry .... so if you have Jim and Bill and Fred's numbers, and don't even know whether Henry exists or not, how do you find Henry?

It's pretty much impossible; not mathematically but practically. First, Jim, Bill and Fred live in different foreign countries. They have no obligation to tell you anything, even if you are a police officer in your own country. But if for some reason they choose to endanger their relatives, they may not know where Sue, Anne and Jenny live. But if you manage to find them, those three are not required to tell you anything (if they are in the USA, at least.) But if you manage to make them talk and they point at Henry, Henry can always say that he used his own Skype account, but the OP "hacked" it to "frame him" because he is "raysis." (Well, that story is being tried by the Boston bomber's mother.) The OP may find himself on the receiving end of a counter-suit, if not of a criminal complaint (doesn't matter if it has merit or not - justice is not based on such trivial things.)

The OP should pick better passwords, write the loss off, and take this experience as a valuable lesson.

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (1)

Ceriel Nosforit (682174) | about a year ago | (#43508303)

They have no obligation to tell you anything, even if you are a police officer in your own country.

You must be new here. =)

Hello, I'm looking for my long lost brother. I'm 80 years old and we were together in Auschwitz. Have you heard about Auschwitz? No? Could you do me a favour and look it up? I'll call you back. By the way we only barely survived and have been separated ever since...

OP is probably right asking for help with this stuff. Social Engineering is fun, profitable and perfectly legal, but it certainly isn't easy for the uninitiated.

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (1)

s.petry (762400) | about a year ago | (#43509467)

Most ISPs, even in poor foreign sites, are trained for social engineering. Hell, they may reverse your tactic and have you crying about their 7 starving children by the time you hang up the phone.

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (1)

Ecuador (740021) | about a year ago | (#43508221)

It's not even that. I bet the numbers called were all premium-rate telephone numbers and that is how the hijacker makes his money. By calling them you will give them more of your money.

Re:I wouldn't start that journey from here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508259)

Is it possible that the hijacker was selling calls to other people, possibly immigrants, maybe even illegals. If so, the numbers called may have no direct connection to the hijacker, rather each olne of them may know a different someone who knows the hijacker. So you could be looking for the common factor between the people who made the calls to the numbers that you have. I'm not sure that it will be easy to find that common factor. After all, you have Jim and Bill and Fred's numbers; Sue called Jim, Anne called Bill, Jenny called Fred; Sue, Anne and Jenny all know Henry .... so if you have Jim and Bill and Fred's numbers, and don't even know whether Henry exists or not, how do you find Henry?

He should still harass all the people contacted with his account. The message will get across.
If anything, that's a few more people in the world who know better than to "buy" a skype call from someone next time.

voip fraud (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508113)

The account was possibly being used for voip fraud. Voip fraud is typically the practice of hijacking a VOIP account (sip/skype) and then calling some foreign country exchange that has a stupid high per minute rate (that the called party gets a cut of). The called party is usually in on the scam but good luck getting any realistic amount of cooperation due to local corruption at the called party end (almost always third world countries).

You're a fucking idiot (3, Insightful)

bucky0 (229117) | about a year ago | (#43508125)

Do you think someone broke into your Skype account to call 5 random countries? They're all toll numbers in Africa. The damage is done and you lost

Re:You're a fucking idiot (4, Informative)

macraig (621737) | about a year ago | (#43508197)

The last time I checked the Philippines was an island chain, not a territory in Africa. Don't you just sound credible?

Let it go. (4, Insightful)

six025 (714064) | about a year ago | (#43508167)

Just let it go. It's not worth the time or the hassle.

Re:Let it go. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509165)

pretty much sums it up, also who has a paid account with skype, use google talk

and why aren't all of you in church (j/k) (if your religion is jedi i count slashdot as religion time)

Use better logic (5, Insightful)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about a year ago | (#43508171)

You need to use the same kind logic as when buying a used car.

1. Do not assume you can outsmart them or that they have made glaring mistakes
2. Realize they do this professionally, that is, spend years eating and breathing this type of activity
3. Realize if there was some way to retaliate or gain an advantage, they wouldn't be doing this for a living.
4. Re-evaluate your position.

Re:Use better logic (5, Funny)

dkf (304284) | about a year ago | (#43508237)

3. Realize if there was some way to retaliate or gain an advantage, they wouldn't be doing this for a living.

I'm waiting for SIFPTP (Simple Internet Face-Punch Transfer Protocol) to be implemented.

Re:Use better logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508369)

That was funny.

Re:Use better logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508249)

Sometimes you can throw a wrench in their works pretty easily, and if that's the case then you should. Part of their plan is that the victims are all covered by insurance or willing to write off small losses, so they let the criminals get away. The criminals are counting on each single case being below the threshold where the victim causes them extra work. There are many victims, but relatively few criminals. So even if the victims need to invest more time than the criminals need to deal with the interference, the numbers are in favor of the victims. It only works out in favor of the criminals as long as people are complacent.

Re:Use better logic (4, Informative)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#43508257)

Yes, in Australia a "Bell" public phone would be taken over and a line of people would form to make at the time very expensive international calls.
This might be the same digital effort - an account with 'cash' is passed/sold around until it fails.

Re:Use better logic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508311)

The nigeria scammers do their thing professionally, yet there are some people out there who have hurt them pretty badly (even tricking one to buy a one way trip to the US with what little scrapings he could gather, thinking that he'd nail some poor sucker to buy a return ticket - only to find out that he was the sucker, and then ran off somewhere in a land he has zero familiarity with and no means of traveling halfway around the world to get home.)

Re:Use better logic (1)

ron-l-j (1725874) | about a year ago | (#43508571)

Good thinking.

Re: Do not assume you can outsmart them (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508701)

Right, because nobody ever.. oh, I dunno... tricked a 419er into hand-carving them a wooden C64 or anything like that?

Only revenge (2)

vikingpower (768921) | about a year ago | (#43508173)

If you are the type of person who get satisfaction out of revenge - well,hell yes, then go for it. In that case, even trying may get you some. Otherwise - forget it. You are not going to get any gain or benefit out of such an action. And forget about the author(s) being punished or even getting into mild trouble with the police or justicial apparatus of any country whatsoever.

You need professional help (2)

tlambert (566799) | about a year ago | (#43508227)

If you have a problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire the A-Team.

Call the numbers in Africa and say... (5, Funny)

CaptainOfSpray (1229754) | about a year ago | (#43508283)

"I am a lawyer representing a senior banking official in Nigeria, who recently died leaving $10 million untraceable... and I am able to pay you to help me find the rightful heir..."

Customer defined fraud (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508307)

I had a similar experience - my account was emptied of its five GBP of credit.

I emailed Skype - "there have been fradudent calls, I've changed my password".

Their reply? (slightly paraphrased)

"You must have been responsible for the breach, as our security is perfect. We do not refund fraudulent calls due to customer error. We've locked your account, so you'll need to send us proof of ID (passport copy, etc) for it to be unlocked."

The key problem with this reply is that a *customer* asserting an event is a fraudulent call does not make it a fraudulent call.

What if they have bugs in their billing software?

Skype only cared about not issuing compensation. Needless to say, I've never told anyone my skype password and my laptop at the time of the calls was in for repair, where I had removed the SSD drive before sending the unit off. Also needless to say, I've never unlocked that account or spent another cent with Skype. Thankfully, GoogleTalk came out just at the right time. Thank God for choice.

Re:Customer defined fraud (1)

Stormthirst (66538) | about a year ago | (#43508589)

They key thing to learn is to make sure Skype doesn't auto-recharge and delete your credit card details from your profile. It's a damage limitation exercise.

Re:Customer defined fraud: maybe not so redundant (1)

BeCre8iv (563502) | about a year ago | (#43509151)

Which part of "Microsoft product" did you not understand?

Dont get involved. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508309)

The hacker may have been involved in drug smuggling or terrorism or what not. Do not get involved. Be happy you got your Skype account back and move on.

Re:Dont get involved. (2, Insightful)

Psyborgue (699890) | about a year ago | (#43508323)

This. And contact the authorities. Those countries do have a lot of terrorist activity.

Don't call the numbers (4, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | about a year ago | (#43508325)

They're most likely either (1) disconnected numbers, (2) toll numbers that will rack up massive charges, OR (3) Numbers that the thief sold innocent 3rd parties "cheap long distance minutes" to, through fraudulent schemes.

Don't engage yourself in placing international harassing phone calls to "create havoc" in random people's lives; that would be you committing a crime. ,

Re:Don't call the numbers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509179)

(4) Numbers owns by a Telco to create traffic. Many Telcos in third world countries uses this scheme. They create random numbrers, when you call there it's playing music or a thanks message or something like that. They then pay people to call those phone number from overseas Telcos. When you deals for a better interconnection rate, the traffic you are generating is the major factor to determine the price...

scamming a scammer (4, Insightful)

Tom (822) | about a year ago | (#43508371)

Or is it just a waste of time?

That, at best.

Old saying: There's always a sucker in a game of poker. Look around the table. If you don't see him, it's you.

Never play criminals on their home turf. They are doing this for a living, you don't. Guess who's better at the game?

Re:scamming a scammer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508857)

It is a good test of your skills and who knows what will come out of this. Don't all inventions come from some need for something?

Re:scamming a scammer (2)

Technician (215283) | about a year ago | (#43509501)

You can tie up scammers on their home turf. It is called scam baiting. The scammer gets to spend time and money playing games with your bait instead of victims. I regularly write scammers back. I am most interested in my inheritance of 10.5 million.

I question my eligibility, write with a fake first name, no last name, and a bait email account with a free US DID phone number. They can email me, text me, call me, etc, while I continue to find out the name of the deceased before I fill out their form to file a claim. (the form is used to make a deceased you could be related to) By not filling it out and probing for the name of the ceceased first, you make them waste time trying to get your info first so the lawyer, barrister, etc can be hired..

Waste their time, if you have the time to waste on them. You can get free resources. A free email accout, a free VOIP SIP account, and a free DID phone number is a good start to make a fake persona.

Never send them any money.

Agree with everybody who said "give it up." (3, Interesting)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#43508449)

If you knew enough to solve this problem you wouldn't have this problem. Since you don't any attempt is just going to give you more new problems you are unable to resolve until you find yourself clad in latex and wearing a ball gag. Give it up.

Re:Agree with everybody who said "give it up." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508833)

have you concluded that you should never leave the house? mom's house. do you ever even come to the earth's surface level, or does any attempt just fill you with the fear that it will give you more new problems you will be unable to resolve...

The point of hijacking your account (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508515)

Was to on sell your Skype out credits, by social engineering some random pstn endpoints your just increasing the bad karma noise floor, and because we all live in a closed ecosystem, your only throwing it in your own face. Just be good johnny

Waste of time (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508585)

Look on this as hard earned experience to use better passwords in the future.

The tubes are the wild wild west, and anyone who thinks otherwise is delusional.

Just move on, and don't waste your time.

I recall many years ago being hacked by someone. Reformat, learn from the experience, and move on.

...a particular set of skills, acquired over... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43508841)

call the numbers. in each case, social engineer a meeting. travel to meet them, surprise them, and torture out of them what they know about the original caller. take their contact list, lather, rinse, repeat. it's not guaranteed success, but will be a hell of a lot of fun along the way.

bonus: you might get to meet kevin bacon.

Considerations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509093)

First ask yourself " What do I have to gain from this?" The answer I am sure is an overwhelming, Nothing. Be safe my friend.

Report the activity to the FBI or police (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43509113)

File a report with the FBI or police. With the bombing in Boston, you never know. Let the authorities look into it.

Easy Solution (2)

LifesABeach (234436) | about a year ago | (#43509409)

Get a job at the F.B.I., and then go out at night dressed like Batman. The rest I think you can figure out for yourself.
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