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RCMP Says Terror Plot Against Canadian Trains Thwarted

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the trains-are-big-and-dangerous dept.

Canada 170

An anonymous reader writes "Two men were arrested in Canada, accused of conspiring to carry out an 'al-Qaeda supported' attack against a VIA passenger train in the Greater Toronto Area. The arrests were products of 'extensive' co-operation between Canadian and US intelligence agencies, who had been investigating the plot since August 2012." From this article, it's not clear whether any actual al-Qaeda support was forthcoming, or whether the accused plotters merely thought there was, by means of an FBI sting operation, as in the 2006 case in Florida.

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it's official (1)

nopainogain (1091795) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523813)

Canada's cops are smarter than ours.

Re:it's official (0)

SlickUSA (1749194) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523877)

So what article did you actually read???

Re:it's official (2)

nopainogain (1091795) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523987)

doesn't matter. the media lies to us.

Re:it's official (2)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525199)

There is no "Al Qaeda".

Perhaps there once was. Maybe.

But now it's like watching guys in ball caps and saying they're members of the Yankees or Dodgers.

Re:it's official (4, Funny)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524023)

This is aboot dignity! This is aboot justice!

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524127)

It's "abowt", not "aboot".

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524261)

You guys are dicks! Release Terrence and Phillip immediately!

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524295)

You bombed our Baldwins, you bastards!!!! You even killed Daniel!!

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524359)

You're welcome.

Re:it's official (2)

Talderas (1212466) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524837)

Don't forget about the traditional Royal Canadian wedding. It was such a shame that the traditional bowl of pudding was tipped.

Re:it's official (1)

Phrogman (80473) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524763)

Americans seem completely unable to hear the difference between our pronunciation of "About" as /abawt/ and instead hear /abu:t/
I can't understand how someone can't hear the difference of course, being Canadian myself, but I see the stupid "Aboot" thing spouted so many times by Americans, I have to assume its true.

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525081)

It's mostly a localized Maritimes pronounciation, but this is the accent most Americans who care about Canadians (read : Northeasterners) hear the most (roughly a 50/50 split with the god-awful "Tronno" torontonian speech).

Re:it's official (2)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524361)

Hahahaha, casual racism... *Wipes tear from eye*

Re:it's official (0)

Guinness Beaumont (2901413) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524543)

Captain Pedantic here, Anti-Canadian sentiment would be nationalist, not racist, as "Canadian" isn't a race. Excelsior!

Re:it's official (2)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524567)

It's not racism, unless Canadians are a race. I was poking fun at the way some of them talk by paraphrasing South Park.

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525033)

It doesn't matter how they talk if you're too stupid to hear it correctly even when they talk perfectly.

Re:it's official (2)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525111)

Quite so! I was poking fun at Americans by being ignorant.~

(I derped.)

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524585)

Everyone knows you can't be racist against white people.

Re:it's official (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525059)

There are no white people in Canada.

It's a great day for Dudley Doright! (-1)

sribe (304414) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523827)

I guess the new new prime minister let them have their horses back ;-)

Re:It's a great day for Dudley Doright! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524117)

Um, Canada has had the same prime minister for over five years.

Learn and Burn (4, Insightful)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523833)

Enjoy the fruits of a civilized guest country then try to blow it up.

Re:Learn and Burn (2)

microbox (704317) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525859)

Material success is proof that the infidel is soft, and (paradoxically) oppressing our glorious people! The best thing to do with this people is prove the vapidity of their narrative by treating them like criminals in a fair and transparent criminal justice system.

That title has quite a spin on it. (5, Informative)

patchouly (1755506) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523867)

The title fails to mention the fact that it was the Muslim community, up here, that turned the two guys in. Had nothing to do with the FBI. A few men, in the Mosque that they went to, heard about the plan and reported it to the RCMP.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Informative)

Annirak (181684) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523915)

That's not what it says. The article says this:

Toronto Imam Yusuf Badat, of the Islamic Foundation of Toronto, told CBC's Evan Solomon that RCMP officers said they received tips from the Muslim community that led to the arrests.

This is not the same as:

A few men, in the Mosque that they went to, heard about the plan and reported it to the RCMP.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (2)

tapspace (2368622) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523975)

I know this is /., but geez, split hairs much?

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

Annirak (181684) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524113)

Maybe I'm being pedantic, but "tips" != "heard about the plan". I'm just asserting that the OP's statement makes the whole thing sound a lot more cloak & dagger than it likely was.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525817)

Maybe I'm being pedantic, but "tips" != "heard about the plan". I'm just asserting that the OP's statement makes the whole thing sound a lot more cloak & dagger than it likely was.

well, if they heard about it and called 'em up then they were giving a tip when they were reporting them.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (3, Informative)

asylumx (881307) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524125)

I think the point is that the source of info for the article was the Imam, not the RCMP. Without RCMP confirmation, you have no idea if those tips were useful, let alone instrumental.

It is entirely possible (though not likely, IMO) that the Imam just said that to garner a better public view of his community.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (2)

Antipater (2053064) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525137)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/23/canada-arrests-idUSL6N0DA14O20130423 [reuters.com] Reuters has the police confirming that there was a tip from the Muslim community.

Police gave little detail about the alleged plotters, but said a tip from the Muslim community had helped their year-long investigation.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524797)

That's MUSLIM talk. I'm reporting you to the FBI.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524031)

OK, but the GP's explanation is certainly consistent with the article. You're not contradicting the GP, just explaining that the article itself doesn't go into detail.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525193)

That's not what it says. The article says this:

Toronto Imam Yusuf Badat, of the Islamic Foundation of Toronto, told CBC's Evan Solomon that RCMP officers said they received tips from the Muslim community that led to the arrests.

This is not the same as:

A few men, in the Mosque that they went to, heard about the plan and reported it to the RCMP.

We have enough assholes on the internet as it is, we don't need anymore.

I bet youre the kind of guy that if someone said "I drove through mcdonalds and got a burger" you would say "No you didn't. Youre wrong, you cant drive through mcdonalds that would mean you drove through the walls and you didn't get a burger, you got a big mac which is not just a burger".

He was paraphrasing but he still made the exact same damned point and said the exact same thing. FBI received a tip or some guys at a mosque heard what was going on and tipped off authorities, its the same god damned thing.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525799)

That's not what it says. The article says this:

Toronto Imam Yusuf Badat, of the Islamic Foundation of Toronto, told CBC's Evan Solomon that RCMP officers said they received tips from the Muslim community that led to the arrests.

This is not the same as:

A few men, in the Mosque that they went to, heard about the plan and reported it to the RCMP.

yeah the other one is more exact. the first quote can be true while the second is true. because people in the mosque are part of the muslim community...

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Interesting)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523977)

I don't get extremists maybe that is a good thing: but you have a couple nut jobs that want to blow stuff up ... okay. So why can't they keep their mouths shut until they do? I can see if they got caught trying to get supplies or someone to help them but running off their mouths about their plans is just silly. Good thing they do but just saying dumb as door knobs. I agree though the Muslim community deserves to share the credit for their help as they definitely (and wrongly) get their share of the blame every time a problem comes up involving a Muslim.

Also I agree RCMP != FBI though I guess I kind of get the mistake since the RCMP is often compared as the Canadian version of the FBI. It is quite different though in that a lot of rural areas have the RCMP as their primary law enforcement so they do have federal powers but sometimes are doing local policing too.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Insightful)

ravenswood1000 (543817) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524065)

So why can't they keep their mouths shut until they do? I can see if they got caught trying to get supplies or someone to help them but running off their mouths about their plans is just silly..

For the same reason idiots post crimes they commit up on Facebook or Youtube.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Funny)

Richy_T (111409) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524293)

Idiots. To be completely safe, I only post my crimes to myspace.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (3, Insightful)

tnk1 (899206) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524913)

Conspiracies are *very* difficult to do well, that's why they usually fail. Think about your group of friends, they may well believe that what you are saying is right and good, but once you go over the line, there is no way they are going to follow you over it, and they'll turn you in without you even realizing it.

When you are doing certain things, you're not even going to be able to trust your family and closest friends. Chances are, while some of them will not want to get you in trouble, they're probably not sociopaths and will eventually see what is happening and try to put a stop to it.

And it's not a simple matter of keeping your mouth shut: it is difficult to be a lone wolf attacker and most of them have some sort of support to get them the materials and skills they need to carry out attacks. That's why al-Queda does a lot of work to disseminate terrorism how-tos on the Internet, but of course, if you have those materials or access them, you could be tracked.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (2)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525295)

> in that a lot of rural areas have the RCMP as their primary law enforcement

So basically that's everything not within 20 miles of the border?

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (2)

CanadianMacFan (1900244) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525541)

Ha, ha. Funny.

We use kilometres up here.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525683)

> We use kilometres up here.

Then howcum Air Canada gave me Aeroplan Miles when I bought a ticket?

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

microbox (704317) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525899)

Miles make better ad jingles?

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

ceoyoyo (59147) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525935)

Those "miles" aren't like any miles you've ever heard of.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525793)

Mah closer to 200. There is rural and then there is Canada rural. My understanding is that northern territories and north part of BC is largely RCMP territory. There are low population areas of Ontario that are ~500mi from the border but as far as I know they still have regional/provincal police. Basically it is up to the province whether or not they end up policing themselves or contracting RCMP do it for them. Probably not a bad thing but I'm not really sure why contracting was an option: local policing is a local issue and protection of the people is the reason for a government monopoly of force so you'd think that the level of policing would match the level of government controlling the territory but ... mah.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (-1, Troll)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524021)

Why would they betray their own community? It can't be out of loyalty to the government - the same government that is guilty of genocide against the First Peoples. Personal grudge perhaps? In a multicultural country, citizens define themselves by which groups they belong to.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (5, Insightful)

plover (150551) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524087)

Why would they betray their own community?

There was no "betrayal of their own community" here, unless their community is a community of violent bombers. This was some human beings who heard of some criminals discussing a plot, and not wanting other innocent humans to die as a result of their inaction.

Not every Muslim prays for "death to the infidels", not even if they attend the same mosque.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Interesting)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524855)

Not every Muslim prays for "death to the infidels", not even if they attend the same mosque.

In fact, we can make this statement much stronger: There are about 1.2 billion Muslims in the world. There are estimated to be no more than about 10,000 Muslim terrorists in the world. So what you can actually say is that about 99.9% of Muslims do not in any way support terrorism (assuming that for every terrorist there about 1000 other people that support their actions). The Al Qaida types are a tiny minority.

To be clear, I'm talking about those that blow up civilians, not those that support what they see as wars against dictators and other oppressive powers, such as the people supporting the Syrian rebellion.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (0)

BubbaDave (1352535) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525015)

Not every Muslim prays for "death to the infidels", not even if they attend the same mosque.

In fact, we can make this statement much stronger: There are about 1.2 billion Muslims in the world. There are estimated to be no more than about 10,000 Muslim terrorists in the world. So what you can actually say is that about 99.9% of Muslims do not in any way support terrorism (assuming that for every terrorist there about 1000 other people that support their actions). The Al Qaida types are a tiny minority.

To be clear, I'm talking about those that blow up civilians, not those that support what they see as wars against dictators and other oppressive powers, such as the people supporting the Syrian rebellion.

Typical American: "OK, so there are 1.2 billion - 10,000 potential mooslim terrists, OMG, how many do we have to bomb so none of them decide to become terrists*?"

* In a country we care about

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

Jiro (131519) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525347)

Your number 1000 is pulled out of thin air. Countries are big places, and a heck of a lot more than 1000 people support each terrorist. If you assume that 10% of the population of Afghanistan supports terrorism, that's already 3 million people which is a lot more than a ratio of 1000 to 1 just from that one country.

Any way? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525917)

about 99.9% of Muslims do not in any way support terrorism

"any way" can be interpreted rather loosely, but if interpreted in the strictest sense, mosque donations to fake charities which are fronts for terrorist groups or donations to orgs like the PLO or Hamas are "supporting terrorism", as are chants of "death to America/Israel" (not all support has to be material support).

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524217)

Why would they betray their own community? It can't be out of loyalty to the government - the same government that is guilty of genocide against the First Peoples. Personal grudge perhaps? In a multicultural country, citizens define themselves by which groups they belong to.

Because in reality, a "multicultural country" doesn't operate the way it's portrayed at Stormfront.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524537)

Because we may be multicultural, but one of the things binding Canadians together is an abhorance of violence as a means to cause change. That doesn't mean "loyalty to the government", it means loyalty to the principles that Canada represents. That doesn't mean we don't have problems or that our history isn't riddled with plenty of violence, but in modern times once you resort to violence all popular support for your cause pretty much evaporates. There are other ways.

It doesn't matter if you're "in the same community", once you go down that violent path you're going to get marginalized. Start trying to shoot people or blow them up, and even the people who support your cause will ostracise you. It was true during the FLQ crisis (why do you think we had 2 referenda? Because *violent* overthrow was rejected by the Quebecois), the Oka Crisis (Native peoples still aren't properly treated, but there's a recognition that protest needs to be non-violent to maintain popular support for change, hence the Idle No More protest), and then this event (whatever statement these terrorist nutbars wanted to make, being a part of the Muslim community didn't mean people there would condone violence).

People want action, and people get frustrated when change doesn't happen, but generally they want to talk their way through an argument because they still have to live with the other people even if change is successful. We've got a three-way shotgun marriage via a history that all of us today have to deal with: Native peoples, English, and French. We tried solving things the shooting way in the past. It was bad news. We've moved on to arguing in more civilized ways. Most people who immigrate here learn soon enough that is the Canadian way. It's often why people come here from other countries, so of course they want to preserve it. You can't *be* a successful multicultural society if communities within it aren't looking for the rare nutbars who want to do violence to any of us.

You think radicals like this care if they're killing Muslims or non-Muslims? Do you think they'd check the passenger lists carefully before blowing up a train? Ratting these terrorists out is not "betraying their own community", it's preserving it. "Oh Canada, we stand on guard for thee" and all that patriotic crap isn't just a motto. The whole point about terrorists is that they are enemies of *everybody*, your community included, the moment they decide to attack random innocent people.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (2)

west (39918) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525615)

> Why would they betray their own community?

I think you've got it the wrong way around. The would-be terrorists are betraying the Muslim community in every possible way.

I'm certain that the immigrant communities understand that the extremists would be overjoyed to see them sacrificed to angry mobs in order to further the their agenda. There's not a lot of love lost between these groups.

(Of course, you're always going to be able to find some angry young men ready to sacrifice everything and everybody to their rage. But the community at large? No.)

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (4, Informative)

operagost (62405) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524141)

Had nothing to do with the FBI.

"The investigation was part of a cross-border operation involving Canadian law enforcement agencies, the FBI and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The two men arrested are accused of plotting to attack a passenger train in the Toronto area. The two men arrested are accused of plotting to attack a passenger train in the Toronto area.
The arrests Monday morning were co-ordinated and executed by a special joint task force of RCMP and CSIS anti-terrorism units, combined with provincial and municipal police forces in Ontario and Quebec.
Public Safety Minister Vic Toews congratulated the RCMP, CSIS and local law enforcement and thanked the FBI for their assistance."

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525397)

Which really probably just means the RCMP called up the FBI and asked "ever hear of these guys?". We tend not to keep huge databases on everybody like the police state south of us.

Re:That title has quite a spin on it. (2)

freezin fat guy (713417) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524363)

The title fails to mention the fact that it was the Muslim community, up here, that turned the two guys in. Had nothing to do with the FBI. A few men, in the Mosque that they went to, heard about the plan and reported it to the RCMP.

Also not the first time the Canadian Muslim community has played a central role in preventing terror.

It was the most polite arrest ever (4, Funny)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523933)

Or at least, that's how I picture it in my head.

Re:It was the most polite arrest ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524005)

Sorry, we're going to have to arrest you. Sorry about ruining your plot.

Re: It was the most polite arrest ever (1)

jxander (2605655) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524205)

My first thought :
Who the hell tries to bomb Canada? A country stereotyped by polite apologies and maple syrup.

Of course, the thought that immediately followed :
Freaking South Park.

Re: It was the most polite arrest ever (2)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524331)

It was probably someone looking to retaliate for Justin Bieber.

Re: It was the most polite arrest ever (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524419)

Or Bryan Adams. Although they have apologised for Bryan Adams on several occasions.

Re: It was the most polite arrest ever (3, Insightful)

Mashiki (184564) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524693)

Who the hell tries to bomb Canada? A country stereotyped by polite apologies and maple syrup.

Well that would be the same type of people as last time, and the time before that. Though not the same group as back in the 80's. The last dozen or so terrorist attempts have been attempted by "exceptionally devout muslims" back in the 80's we had two attempts by Sikh's, and back in the 60's and 70's it was the FLQ. [wikipedia.org] Despite what people think Canadians have a very thin skin when it comes to terrorism.

Re:It was the most polite arrest ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524241)

It went something like this...

Police: You are under arrest!
Bad Guy: NO
Police: We will take you on an AIRPLANE for a sightseeing tour.
Bad Guy: OK

Why take an airplane? I know the RCMP headquarters is in Newmarket. I guess they didn't want to drive him 3hrs in rush hour traffic.

Re:It was the most polite arrest ever (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525879)

Canadians really are polite and well behaved. When I was working in Ottawa a few years ago I was delighted to see lots of people thank driver for the ride when they got off the city buses. We don't have that where I come from. Oh, and when three Canadians walk side by side talking to each other and filling up the entire width of the sidewalk, and they meet a lone pedestrian coming the other way, one of them takes a step back behind his friends to make sure that there is space for passing them. That's unheard of in Stockholm, where the norm is to look up at you, then continue their conversation without yielding an inch, expecting you to jump out into the street.

Think of the beavers! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43523935)

Thankfully no beavers were harmed in the arrest.

Re:Think of the beavers! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524075)

CHICAGO—In what is being called the first conceptual terrorist attack on American soil, the landmark Sears Tower was encased in 18 million tons of strawberry gelatin early Monday morning, leaving thousands shocked, angry, and seriously confused.
The Sears Tower

Authorities called to the scene of the senseless attack said they could do little to control the large crowds of dangerously bewildered citizens, many of whom searched desperately for some semblance of meaning in what had just taken place. As of press time, 11 night security guards were still trapped inside the famous structure, their rescue unlikely until the Jell-O melts.

"My God, it's just awful," said commuter Nick Dawson, one of countless Chicago residents who struggled to comprehend what had occurred. "Why would anyone do something like this?"

Tentative speculation that the dessert enclosure was in fact an act of terrorism was quickly confirmed after a group known only as the Prophet's Collective took credit for the attack in a three-hour-long video that surfaced on the Internet.

"Your outdated ideas of what terrorism is have been challenged," an unidentified, disembodied voice announces following the video's first 45 minutes of random imagery set to minimalist techno music. "It is not your simple bourgeois notion of destructive explosions and weaponized biochemical agents. True terror lies in the futility of human existence."
The terrorists' video made their message clear.

According to a 2007 CIA executive summary, the terrorists responsible for masterminding the attack are likely hiding somewhere in Berlin's vast labyrinth of cafés. Though officials said they didn't know if any of those involved in carrying out the plot were still in Chicago, several dozen local performance artists and interpretive dancers have been brought in for questioning.

"We believe that this is the same group responsible for the 2005 Saran-wrapping of the American embassy in Paris," CIA director Michael Hayden said. "This is an extremely dangerous organization with absolutely no regard for American tastes and sensibilities. If left unchecked, it could forever change the face of contemporary terrorism."

Hayden said the CIA is working closely with the National Endowment for the Arts to cut off all grants that may serve as funding for the group. In addition, the Department of Homeland Security has begun monitoring any large purchases of gravy, tinfoil, pig's blood, and barbed wire in hopes of preventing another aesthetic tragedy.

"We are calling upon all citizens to remain vigilant during this difficult and utterly peculiar time," Chicago mayor Richard M. Daley said during a press conference earlier today. "The city needs your help to ensure that the disturbing message sent to us by these terrorists today, whatever it was, never happens again."
Shocked and slightly damp rescue workers.

"If you see something weird, say something," Daley added.

While officials have yet to determine the purpose of the attack, a number of potential theories have emerged, including the sudden deregulation of the U.S. economy, the destruction of culturally significant landmarks, and maybe the fact that man, in his essence, is no more than a collection of irrational fragments, incapable of finding reason where no reason exists.

A secret communiqué leaked by the Prophet's Collective, however, decries these theories and several others as being "completely off," and goes on to call the American people "cultural infidels."

Though many Chicago residents are still attempting to wrap their heads around the attack, some in the Windy City have refused to classify the Jell-O encasement as a terrorist act at all.

"I'm no expert, but I know terrorism when I see it," said Kathy Atwood, a Hyde Park mother of four. "Where is the devastating loss of life and massive destruction of infrastructure? This doesn't move me to run for my life at all."

She added: "Real terrorism takes years of training and meticulous planning. My 6-year-old kid can make Jell-O."

The DHS said it has taken additional measures to secure the Brooklyn Bridge following today's Jell-O attack, as initial evidence suggests that the New York landmark may or may not be the site of "found terrorism."

That's Brilliant! (4, Funny)

Greyfox (87712) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523973)

Step 1: Hijack Train

Step 2: Fly it into a buliding

They'll NEVER see it coming! (Except I guess Canada did)

Re:That's Brilliant! (1)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year and a half ago | (#43523999)

You forgot
Step 3: ???
Step 4: Profit!

Re:That's Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524289)

No, no, no. Step 4: 72 virgins!

Re:That's Brilliant! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524415)

72 virgins! And they plan on staying that way forever!

Re:That's Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524041)

FTFA:

"RCMP officials said the two accused were plotting to derail a passenger train."

Re:That's Brilliant! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524085)

Yes, very amusing. I expect the victims of the London Underground and Spanish train bombings think so too. Bombs on trains kill people just as dead as if they are on high rise buildings which have a plane flown into them. In the UK we respect the loss that we are so often reminded the USA suffered but the resiprocal respect is so often not apparent. You may, if your head was out of your ass, have noticed that respect was paid before the London Marathon for the atrocity in Boston to make the point.

Re:That's Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524697)

I was killed in the London bombings, but I still found it funny.

- Anonymous Corpse

Re:That's Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525115)

Fuck off. It's a joke.

Re:That's Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43525237)

Sorry to hear that your sense of humour was killed by a terrorist.

Re:That's Brilliant! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524715)

Embarrassed Canadian public works minister: "I KNEW we shouldn't have built those train tracks directly into that skyscraper!"

You fail It (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524015)

contaminated while Well-known to you by Penisbird

Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524027)

1) They mention "Al Queda in Iran."

So...exactly how powerful is a Wahabbi Sunni sect in an iron-fisted Shiite country? Think they have the bandwidth to help idiots in Canada (not the US) do some questionable damage?

2) Coincidence [www.cbc.ca] ?

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (4, Insightful)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524401)

I highly doubt it's coincidence. What is a bit baffling is why anyone thinks it's necessary. It appears that everyone did their job properly, citizens were vigilant without being vigilantes, no rights were violated and no one got hurt. Sounds like a win-win to me.

What's worrying is that after a single foiled event, some lawmakers are going batshit and scrambling to get it passed. Here's a little tip: any time a new law is proposed that would seek to remove certain rights to make a law enforcers job easier, alarm bells should go off in your head. Doubly so when the timing is suspiciously exploitative of a recent fear-inducing event.

Time to write your MPs, fellow Canadians.

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524429)

Iran has given sanctuary to several Al-Qaeda leaders. They may not like each other but they dislike others enough to have enough common ground to not be complete enemies.

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524613)

but but but but... Isamofacists!

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (2)

Motard (1553251) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524685)

"but but but but... Isamofacists!"

Mark my words. We'll get rid rid of this SQL plague and ISAM will again rule the world.

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (3, Insightful)

Xest (935314) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524475)

"So...exactly how powerful is a Wahabbi Sunni sect in an iron-fisted Shiite country? Think they have the bandwidth to help idiots in Canada (not the US) do some questionable damage?"

After 9/11 Iran actually offered to support the US for precisely this reason, but the US rejected the support and declared Iran part of the problem - part of the axis of evil.

The problem is, having been cast into this role, Iran then seemed to come to the conclusion that it may as well play up to it. Iran did give refuge to some senior members of Al Qaeda who fled Afghanistan, and by about 2005 there was evidence of both Iran, and it's ally Syria supporting some elements of Al Qaeda against the US.

It seems to be one of those rather misguided "The enemy of my enemy is my friend" scenarios, which Syria learnt to it's detriment given that many of the Al Qaeda affiliated militants it gave sanctuary, training, arms, and a base to launch attacks against the US and the new Iraqi administration to are now the same folks fighting the Syrian government.

Alliances change frequently and are odd things sometimes - don't forget that it was only about 25 - 30 years ago that America was funding, training, and equipping Al Qaeda against the Afghans and that even in Libya and now Syria America finds itself on the same side as Al Qaeda in wanting the overthrow of then Gaddafi, and now Assad.

So don't assume religious differences are enough to preclude any possibility of cooperation - all sides have shown they're willing to back the other when the situation suits. Al Qaeda and Iran have worked together in the past, and even if they weren't working together now, that doesn't preclude the possibility that they at least came from Iran, having gone idle there.

It's likely, as much as anything, that Iran at least still tolerates a presence of Al Qaeda in certain areas allowing them to retain a decent amount of strength on the off-chance that they become a useful tool in carrying out war by proxy, even if it doesn't give them active material assistance any more.

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525303)

Al Qaeda...

Imagine how a mother feels when her child turns against her.. and for money..

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525369)

One of the other lessons Iran learned from that "axis of evil" declaration:
- If you have nukes aimed at important US allies, like North Korea does, the US will probably leave you alone.
- If you don't have nukes, and have valuable resources like oil, the US may falsely claim you are trying to get nukes and invade your country.

Completely rational response: Do everything you can to acquire nukes and aim them at the nearest and most important US ally.

In other words, the Iraq War pretty much demands that the Iranian government become a nuclear threat to Tel Aviv. Which is why they're trying to do just that.

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525429)

Your bowels are immense.

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (2)

girlinatrainingbra (2738457) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524511)

reThey mention "Al Queda in Iran." --- So...exactly how powerful is a Wahabbi Sunni sect in an iron-fisted Shiite country?
.
It's because the idiots who believe these things make mistakes in what they believe and what they write in their scripts. If they want to provoke an incident in Iran, they create stories with their worst possible bogey-man in Iran: hence their choice of AQ, which logic would show would definitely not be in Iran, as your comment so correctly points out. But when you wants idiots to believes your stories, you tells them whats they wants to hearz.
.
Was there even a real plot in the first place? Or was there only a scenario scripted, funded, produced, and directed by "informants" and governmental agencies to further their own ends?
The Patriot Act extended the concept further, making it illegal to attempt or conspire to provide material support. Before, prosecutors had to prove you gave support. Now they just have to show you wanted to.
.
That change, along with other newly exploited vagueness in the existing material-support laws, opened up a whole new path for prosecutors. In the Padilla case and others, the government has argued successfully that a suspect is guilty of attempting to provide material support even if the plot he allegedly supported was purely a government concoction or, just as curious, even if the government hadn't said what group or plot the accused might have been supporting. -- from Department of Precrime [motherjones.com]

Re:Things That Make You Go "Hmmm..." (1)

Antipater (2053064) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525609)

Some security experts were surprised by the alleged link to al Qaeda factions in Iran, whose Shiite rulers have a generally hostile attitude toward the Sunni militant movement. Reuters explained: Iran did host some senior al Qaeda figures under a form of house arrest in the years following the September 11 attacks, but there has been little to no evidence to date of joint attempts to execute violence against the West. However, a U.S. government source said Iran is home to a little-known network of alleged al Qaeda fixers and "facilitators" based in the Iranian city of Zahedan, very close to Iran's borders with both Pakistan and Afghanistan. The source said the operatives serve as go-betweens, travel agents and financial intermediaries for al Qaeda operatives and cells operating in Pakistan and moving through the area. They do not operate under the protection of the Iranian government, which periodically launches crackdowns on the al Qaeda elements, though at other times appears to turn a blind eye to them.

Source [nbcnews.com]

Why Not to Get Dragged into the US' Stupid Wars (0)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524033)

Exhibit AS (legal exhibits follow Linux disk nomenclature right?)

FBI involvement means threat dubious (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43524073)

The investigation was part of a cross-border operation involving Canadian law enforcement agencies, the FBI and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

If the FBI was involved then it probably was not an actual terrorist plot. It was probably planned by the FBI so they could toot their own horn. http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/05/01/230223/ny-times-fbi-foils-its-own-terrorist-plots

Was it the Newfoundland Bullet? (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524109)

>> Terror Plot Against Canadian Trains Thwarted

Not against the Newfoundland Bullet, was it?

Re:Was it the Newfoundland Bullet? (1)

PoisOnouS (710605) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524633)

My grandfather was an engineer on the Newfie Bullet. He assures me that any saboteurs would have blown themselves up in frustration while waiting for their target to arrive. D.

Something needs to change (0)

Vince6791 (2639183) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524207)

Well, what the hell do you expect if the west is occupying the middle east, get the fuck out of there already and let the muslims deal with their own problems. Shit! U.S should give the Israeli's new jersey or hawaii and no more Israel vs Muslim nations. If nothing gets done this west vs middle east thing will never change and we in the north america will always be a target which means u.s citizen will lose more rights in the name of security. Another option, we just nuke the whole middle east including the Israeli's and be done with it. Something has to change drastically.

How convenient just when bill S-7 is being (2)

future assassin (639396) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524637)

debated. Which is funny because they got these guy using current laws so there's no need for new freedom removing laws. All the authorities have to do is do their fucking job.

So how hard is it to derail a train, anyway? (1)

RevWaldo (1186281) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524753)

These guys have been planning this since last year? What's to plan? What more would it take than a couple of guys with picks and sledgehammers to kink up the track? Perhaps a train buff out there could weigh in on this.

.

Context is everything (1)

rueger (210566) | about a year and a half ago | (#43524823)

The arrest of these supposedly dangerous terrists (as Vic Toews, Minister of Public Safety (and doesn't THAT sound Orwellian?) pronounces the previously three syllable word) was carefully timed to happen the same day that the government is pushing through a particularly nasty bit of spy legislation. [paroxysms.ca] The kind that lets the government lock you up for days at a time without charges just because you sort of fit some cop's definition of "terrist."

These guys have a very spotty record in terms of suppressing dissent, and arresting people for non-existent crimes, so I'd hold off until some actual evidence shows up. Cop press releases are not (yet) enough to prove anything. I actually wonder about how these guys can present a serious threat to public safety when the same goons are saying that at no time was any member of the public at risk.

Thought crimes anyone?

Via? (2)

crossmr (957846) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525243)

You mean the poor excuse for a rail system in Canada? Via has fallen into near non-existence in recent years. You might as well try and blow up a covered bridge out in the middle of nowhere to disrupt traffic flow.

Re:Via? (1)

Fr05t (69968) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525707)

You mean the poor excuse for a rail system in Canada? Via has fallen into near non-existence in recent years. You might as well try and blow up a covered bridge out in the middle of nowhere to disrupt traffic flow.

If anything were to happen to the covered bridge in Hartland, New Brunswick I assure you, it would be very disruptive to the flow of traffic.

"investigating the plot" (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | about a year and a half ago | (#43525903)

Anyone else having real problems not reading that as "instigating"?

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