Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Icelandic Pirate Party Wins 3 seats In Parliament

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the scuttle-the-vote dept.

Piracy 92

First time accepted submitter Thorhs writes "According to preliminary results (all votes counted, no official word yet) the Icelandic Pirate Party was able to secure 3 members of the national Parliament, the first PP to reach a national Parliament. Things were hairy election night, the PP lost all their MPs when they dropped below the 5% barrier 'needed' in the somewhat complex election system. Thankfully they managed to slip back up above, with 5.1% of the total votes. The old 'crash parties', the ones in charge before our epic financial crash, (Independent and Progressive parties) are the prime candidates to form a new government with just over 51% of the votes, getting 40 of 63 seats. RUV (Icelandic) has good coverage."

cancel ×

92 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

opinber yfirlýsing (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573689)

rista punktur rassinn sjóræningjar

Re:opinber yfirlýsing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573721)

How dare you say that about my mother! I challenge you to a duel!

Re: official statement (3, Informative)

dunkmark (1761936) | about a year ago | (#43573753)

rista punktur rassinn sjóræningjar

Google translate: slash dot butt pirates

Re: official statement (3, Funny)

mrclisdue (1321513) | about a year ago | (#43573833)

rista punktur rassinn sjóræningjar

Google translate: slash dot butt pirates

Certainly! You just go straight until the grey brick house, turn left, 100 metres, and it's there on your right by the maple tree.

cheers,

Re: official statement (1, Funny)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43573935)

rista punktur rassinn sjóræningjar

Google translate: slash dot butt pirates

Certainly! You just go straight until the grey brick house, turn left, 100 metres, and it's there on your right by the maple tree.

cheers,

His eyes widened as he made the sudden horrific realization, "My, what a cavernous bum you have!" said little brown posting hood...

Re:opinber yfirlýsing (3, Funny)

Alain Williams (2972) | about a year ago | (#43573885)

How boring, maybe you could have said: ''fyrsta færslan'' :-)

Re:opinber yfirlýsing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573905)

Your comment reminds me of a certain quote by the late George Carlin: "Only dinosaurs remain; the very end of the cool used to cool."

Re:opinber yfirlýsing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575925)

Hlaðinn rassinn sjóræningjar

FTFY

Irrelevant (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about a year ago | (#43573691)

Iceland is too cold, electrons do not move at those temperatures and so piricy is impossible in the Arctic Circle. I tell you, the quality of Slashdort journalism has really been declining lately. I prefer HAM.

ever sucked your own penis? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573747)

well tell us

ever sucked your own penis? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573779)

ever sucked your own penis? @(#*&$

ever sucked your own penis? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573785)

ever sucked your own penis? qbert

ever sucked your own penis? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573791)

ever sucked your own penis?

the name of my ship is the lollipop - it's a good ship!

Does Europe have talk radio? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573793)

It seems that in America all the losers are on the right, and in Europe they're on the left.

Re:Does Europe have talk radio? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573947)

Haha, sorry. I'm from Europe and I love this comment.

Re:Does Europe have talk radio? (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#43574433)

America all the losers are on the right, and in Europe they're on the left

That's because if you get into deep water, it means that you've gone a bit too much to the right if you're American and a bit too much to the left if you're European.

ever sucked your own penis? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573809)

Ever danced with your penis in the pale moonlight?

i ask that of all my hand puppets

What's so complex about it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573965)

Is it actually complex, or is this one of those americanizations where anything with more than two possible outcomes is considered complex?

Re:What's so complex about it? (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about a year ago | (#43574333)

Yes all PR systems are complex when compared to FPTP - Iceland uses the D'Hondt method. The problem you have with PR is you get fringe "nut job" or extremist parties holding the balance of power more often EG golden dawn in Greece.

Re:What's so complex about it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43576721)

The problem you have with PR is you get fringe "nut job" or extremist parties holding the balance of power more often EG golden dawn in Greece.

"more often" isn't exactly true here. It only happens if the larger parties are willing to trade away their ideology for power...

oh...

Re:What's so complex about it? (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about a year ago | (#43581887)

You seem to be implying that the US doesn't isn't stuck with a perpetual set of "nut jobs" holding the balance of power.

Re:What's so complex about it? (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about a year ago | (#43585785)

Different problem the US haven't moved beyond an 18th century model with weak parties that are more like lose coalitions.

A real Pirate party would not win seats (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43573971)

they would steal them!

Re:A real Pirate party would not win seats (5, Funny)

NonUniqueNickname (1459477) | about a year ago | (#43574671)

they would steal them!

*sigh*

We've been over this before... making exact replicas of PM Seats is not "stealing".

Re:A real Pirate party would not win seats (1)

sconeu (64226) | about a year ago | (#43575071)

He meant steal as in "Plunder".

Arrr, me hearties!!!

Re:A real Pirate party would not win seats (1)

jamstar7 (694492) | about a year ago | (#43575505)

they would steal them!

*sigh* We've been over this before... making exact replicas of PM Seats is not "stealing".

Exactly. It's 'unauthorised copyright infringement'. After all these years, you'd think they'd get it right for once...

Great! (-1, Flamebait)

lennier1 (264730) | about a year ago | (#43574011)

Now that the German one has turned into a complete waste of time (taken over by all the nutjobs the Greens, Left Party and others were only too happy to get rid of) it's nice to see at least one country make more progress in the original direction.

Re:Great! (4, Interesting)

JanneM (7445) | about a year ago | (#43574033)

Actually, not too many years ago, the Greens in Sweden (and, I strongly suspect, Germany) were the dumping grounds for nutjobs no other party wanted to do with. I strongly suspect that is a phase any new party has to go through on the way to become a long-term viable political force.

Re:Great! (1)

Yaotzin (827566) | about a year ago | (#43574933)

I don't really like politics but speaking of environmental nutjobs (not about to bash AGW)... IMO, the Greens in Sweden are more left than the Left (formerly known as the Left Party Communists) judging from their debates. The Centrist Party (formerly the Farmers' Union) who tried to be a more balanced green party have gone more or less neo-liberal, completely alienating their core voters. So neither of them are long-term viable political forces at the moment. I don't know anything about Germany though.

The Swedish Pirate Party are fairly sane as far as I can tell, but since their victory in the EU elections people seem to have forgotten about them.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575419)

Actually, not too many years ago, the Greens in Sweden (and, I strongly suspect, Germany) were the dumping grounds for nutjobs no other party wanted to do with. I strongly suspect that is a phase any new party has to go through on the way to become a long-term viable political force.

Not only that, they have no stance on issues other than the Internet, copyright, and 'transparency', they want a free Internet, a transparent society and from the sound of it they don't want to abolish IP but they want to drop most if not all restriction on copying and distributing IP which pretty much boils down to abolishing IP. Ask them about anything else, environmental issues, the economy, their stance on defence and you get the sort of nebulous answers one expects from people who haven't really thought about those 'other' things all that much. For a while there they even had a discussion on their policy forum about demanding that laws should be passed mandating that 25% of rental housing should be run without any consideration of profitability. In some ways the Icelandic Pirates remind me of the Anarchists of the early 20th century (and I'm not talking about the bomb throwing ones, I mean the Anarchist movements like the ones in Spain that opposed all forms of aggression except in self defence, who wanted everything to be communally owned and who wanted to abolish central government and money).

Re:Great! (3, Interesting)

LordLucless (582312) | about a year ago | (#43576791)

Single-issue parties are not unusual; they use the fact that they have no commitment to other policies to engage in political horse-trading in favour of their issue of choice. Everyone in Iceland now knows where to go to get three votes for their policy du jour, and what it's going to cost them.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43576449)

How is this limited to new parties? The Republicans in the US have recently been taken over by *religious* nutjobs - is it that much different?

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574307)

What? In what kind of lala-Land do you live? Merkel's CDU is projected to win with more than 40%, the centre-left SPD will loose with just above 20%.
I already ordered a suicide booth as the prospect of yet another 4 torturing years under Mrs. Teflon watching in agony while she does nothing worthwhile makes me want to vomit.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574393)

So you plan to vomit into a suicide booth? Why not just get a vomiting booth instead?

Re:Great! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574451)

1. Vomit
2. Commit Suicide as the vomiting would never stop.

Merkel is worst chancellor Germany had in decades. All talk, nothing gets really done except making our neighbours very angry.
She is the George W. Bush of Germany. Albeit a lot more intelligent. Which isn't difficult.
And all mistakes are blamed and deflected on someone else.

Re:Great! (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#43574455)

Haven't you heard? Vomiting into suicide booths is a part of a federal plan that the Bundesministerium für Gesundheit drafted and enacted to keep suicide rated down in Germany.

Re:Great! (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about a year ago | (#43577995)

And what has how the major parties have become a US-like collection of corrupt scum where only the name on the door is different have to do with the fact that the German Pirate Party has turned into its own parody?

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574557)

That's right bro'. Serious people vote for the Republocrats or the Democrans. That way, your vote really means something.

Re:Great! (2)

lennier1 (264730) | about a year ago | (#43578005)

Since you don't even have the slightest idea what you're talking about, do us both a favor and go back to play with your sand molds.

Re:Great! (1)

CanEHdian (1098955) | about a year ago | (#43576395)

The German one at one point in time polled at 13% of the popular vote. [www.welt.de]

What happened? Some vested business interests got scared and started "digging up some dirt" on candidates? Insert moles/saboteurs in the party?

Re:Great! (1, Flamebait)

lennier1 (264730) | about a year ago | (#43577973)

When all the nutjobs came streaming into the party it basically imploded.

Nowadays they're basically just arguing over gender equality (the usual feminazis turned it from a valid objective into an insane obsession), basic income guarantees (without any idea beyond "money for nothing") and useless infighting by some self-obsessed idiots.

At the same time they're getting ass-raped by the government (new laws, selling out people's right to privacy and presumption of innocence more and more with every new week) and corporations (e.g., Deutsche Telekom's online branch recently laid the groundwork for a move away from actual flatrates to throttling beyond ridiculously outdated volume caps even though there's no technical need for it) and they don't even notice it because they've long since left behind their original goals.

Nowadays, they mainly just post press releases online where nobody but their own people will read them and they make themselves obsolete by outdoing the fringe wings of other parties.

When they do show up in the press it's members' dirty laundry dragged into the public, party-sponsored gender equality "discussion" events where you first have to sign that you won't support any opinions other than what the event organizers (the party's feminist fringe) deems acceptable (they even kicked a rather active member of the party out of the event because he dared to disagree) and inquiries whether the city state of Berlin is ready for the zombie apocalypse. But, my favorite example is a recent "online protest" where they met in some obscure voice chat to demonstrate against some cause in a place where absolutely nobody even gives a shit.

As a former supporter, I nowadays actually hope for someone to nuke that sorry mess from orbit so something useful can take its place again.
Right now, what they've become is pretty much their own worst enemy.

Old/New Norse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574129)

If you learned your Beowulf well in school, you shouldn't have trouble with modern Icelandic.

Europe is insane (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574247)

Golden Dawn which is basically the Nazi party in Greece once had 21 seats Parliament. With fringe elements like that being elected to power in Europe, it is not surprising if anyone can get in. U.S. politics looks tame by comparison.

Re:Europe is insane (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574331)

What? Having two parties you can choose from doing exactly the same (except in equality questions) is sane????
In what world? That's not democracy.

Articles with more info on Icelandic Pirate Party (4, Informative)

De Lemming (227104) | about a year ago | (#43574535)

The Pirate Times introduces the 3 elected representatives: Iceland Report #4 : History Made by a Hair’s Breadth [piratetimes.net]

Rick Falkvinge, founder of the original (Swedish) Pirate Party, comments: celandic Pirate Party WINS, Enters Parliament [falkvinge.net]

Another article on TorrentFreak: Pirate Party Enters Iceland’s National Parliament After Historic Election Win [torrentfreak.com]

vote and vote often! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574553)

I'm glad my vote made a difference...

EU looses. Iceland wins. (0, Troll)

u64 (1450711) | about a year ago | (#43574769)

The BBC: "The two leading parties, which will now enter coalition negotiations, are also seen as
Eurosceptic, and their poll success could slow down Iceland's efforts to become a member of the European Union."

What does the BBC mean by "slow down". Why should anyone *want* to join a farce such as the EU,
and then even worse, the Euro? As if joining the EU was inevitable.

What the BBC could have said,
"The majority of the Icelandic population wants to remain free from the EU, and the Euro."

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43574833)

I am guessing you're British ? The point of Europe : go to flanders fields, please. hondreds of thousands of reasons lie buried there.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

In hydraulis (1318473) | about a year ago | (#43574941)

The WWI Western front is the point of Europe?

That's what you said just then.

Where's Iceland fit into this?

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (5, Interesting)

theVarangian (1948970) | about a year ago | (#43575577)

The WWI Western front is the point of Europe? That's what you said just then.

Yes, WWI and the Sequel WWII are some of the prime motivators behind the European Union. It has grown far beyond that but the people who originated the EU were partially motivated by the idea of preventing future wars by increasing economic integration to the point where war had become a sport that was to expensive to indulge in. and for what little it seems to be worth to conservative anti EU tossers these days, hundreds of thousands of those reasons that are buried in Flanders, and whom the GP spoke of, are British.

Where's Iceland fit into this?

Iceland exports in excess of 70% of it's manufactured goods to the EU. Iceland has enacted about 75-80% of the laws needed to join the EU and Icelandic politicians have proven them selves to be a bunch of incompetent nepotistic tosspots who cant keep the inflation graphs from looking like a set of sharks teeth. If you want to have a laugh compare the inflation graph for Iceland to that of Germany:

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/iceland/inflation-cpi [tradingeconomics.com]
http://www.tradingeconomics.com/germany/inflation-cpi [tradingeconomics.com]

Notice how the German figure hovers between 0 and 5%, now compare it to the Icelandic graph. You would laugh even harder if you could see data from before 1989. Inflation in Iceland since 1944 fluctuated between ~3% to as high as 25-30% and occasionally topped 100%. In 1979, these wankers that make up the Icelandic political class, finally had to index-link loans to inflation to motivate capital owners to start loaning money. What that means is that if your loan carries 6% interest and there is 8% inflation you are effectively paying 14% interests. Now try to imagine what happens when inflation hits 20% and you will understand why Icelanders are so angry they are spitting acid. Joining the EU would force their brainless politicos to... well... behave. And additionally when you export 70% of your manufactured goods to the EU it's kind of dumb to want to have no say in how the EU's inner market evolves which makes me wonder why the British, who depend on the EU for 50% or so of their exports want to leave the EU. It's kind of like robbing yourself of the ability to influence how your country is begin governed by voluntarily relinquishing your right to vote.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43576209)

Interesting, I wonder if CPI is more accurate for smaller countries. I know that the US numbers are detached from my own experience.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (3, Insightful)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about a year ago | (#43576605)

Having your econony changed to fit into the German a model isn't going to be nice just ask the Greeks and Cypriots how that is turning out for them.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43578815)

That's fine, medicine rarely is nice.

But compare, how successful was their previous non-German economic model? At least the German model is proven to work, so are you advocating that they should've stayed with models that collapsed and demonstrably did not work?

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43579341)

I'd love to know what was flamebait about this. Are there people in countries like Greece who honestly believe their economy was sustainable in the face of the fact that it obviously by definition wasn't given that it collapsed? Are there people who believe the German economic model doesn't work even though it does?

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about a year ago | (#43579383)

Having your own currency would help with restructuring in a recession - being stuck with the euro which is run to benefit France and Germany means you cant use devaluation to get out of the hole.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (2)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43579453)

Countries like Greece could easily pull out of the euro but they want to stay in it because it benefits them - to say it benefits Germany/France doesn't make a lot of sense as it's mutually beneficial - it's devalued by the economically weak countries making German exports cheaper outside the EU, but increased in value by countries like France and Germany which increases their spending power. Also, the option of pulling out has always been on the ballot but pro-euro parties have always won out - the Greek people have consistently voted to keep the euro.

The problems are far deeper, an unsustainably low retirement age, high public spending, absurd levels of debt, falsified public accounts, and a tax system that is fiddled by the general public en-mass is never going to work. Blaming Germany for wanting to change that towards a more sustainable model like theirs if they stay in the euro is fucking nuts.

I can't really understand why people would bitch about the German model when it's clearly successful and when Germany has a fairly healthy, happy, populace. Most countries would absolutely love to have an economic model as healthy as Germany's, but yes, that does mean you'll have to retire after 60, you will have to pay taxes, and you will have to be able to balance your budget. How awful.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about a year ago | (#43579565)

Oh true but Germany benefited from having Greece fiddle the figures to get into the euro they sold a metric fuckton of BMW's and Porsches - but now they don't want to pay the piper.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43579707)

I'm not sure that's true, it's not as if that's a big enough export area to justify such problems.

More likely I think Germany simply believed Greece when the Greek government told them it was all okay.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43579121)

That's essentially a one-off cost. Icelands economic problems can hardly be described as one-off. Greece hasn't been an economic powerhouse either for the last 22 centuries.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

Kjella (173770) | about a year ago | (#43576783)

And additionally when you export 70% of your manufactured goods to the EU it's kind of dumb to want to have no say in how the EU's inner market evolves which makes me wonder why the British, who depend on the EU for 50% or so of their exports want to leave the EU. It's kind of like robbing yourself of the ability to influence how your country is begin governed by voluntarily relinquishing your right to vote.

Because you're giving up your freedom to manage your own country? Yes, you do get a small stake in where EU is going but it comes at the expense of jumping when Brussels says jump. Just because 75% of Canada's exports go to the US doesn't mean that Canada wants to apply to become the 51st US state and answer to Washington DC. Besides, it doesn't follow from size who needs who, here in Norway I wish we'd exit the EEC and get a free trade agreement like Switzerland, if the EU don't want to offer us a fair deal we could always sell our oil and gas elsewhere. Another example of excessive fear is Schengen, yes it would be bad if we'd need passports to cross into Sweden but it would be horribly expensive for Sweden to build thousands of kilometers of exterior border control too, it's not like we need to beg the EU because it's in their best interest too.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (2)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43578853)

"Because you're giving up your freedom to manage your own country? Yes, you do get a small stake in where EU is going but it comes at the expense of jumping when Brussels says jump."

But you do that anyway. Because you want the trade.

"Just because 75% of Canada's exports go to the US doesn't mean that Canada wants to apply to become the 51st US state and answer to Washington DC."

Sure, but it has signed up to NAFTA etc. and fulfilled it's obligations under that which is a similar thing. Canada will still often follow the will of the US because there's far too much to lose in not doing so.

"if the EU don't want to offer us a fair deal we could always sell our oil and gas elsewhere."

Therein lies the problem with Euroscepticism, it's higher the more successful a country is, but when your oil and gas runs out? You'll be desperate to be a member of the EU. The UK has always been the same, when our economy tanked and we needed an IMF bailout most the country was behind EU membership, but now it's other EU members that are struggling the eurosceptics want out. It's horribly selfish and horribly pathetic. It's also stupidly short sighted - if we pull out of the EU in the UK and our economy goes down the pan again, do those real eurosceptics think the EU would help pull us out of the shit again? That's a rhetorical question, they've not even considered the possibility because they're too stupid and short sighted.

But on another know, who will you sell your oil and gas to exactly? China? Africa? The US? Why would any of these countries want to buy your oil and gas when you'd have to ship it via sea in limited amounts when they can just buy it from other countries that can get it to them much more cheaply via pipeline? Or do you expect EU nations to let you build a pipeline through their countries after you shunned them with selfishness?

"Another example of excessive fear is Schengen, yes it would be bad if we'd need passports to cross into Sweden but it would be horribly expensive for Sweden to build thousands of kilometers of exterior border control too, it's not like we need to beg the EU because it's in their best interest too."

As an interesting aside, your country has no border controls outside of the Shengen zone anyway in my experience.

When I flew into Narvik from the UK which isn't a Shengen country they let me just walk straight off the plane and out the airport without a passport check or anything anyway. Flying out was the same.

I figured this was possibly in part because they figure no one in their right mind would want to smuggle themselves somewhere so far north so just assume anyone that's going up there must be there legitimately. Maybe they're a bit more careful with that sort of thing in places like Oslo. That or maybe they just work on the principle that British airport security is so anal that anyone getting through there must be okay and anyone heading back there will get caught by them if there's a problem.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

In hydraulis (1318473) | about a year ago | (#43578153)

Very nice reply Varangian. Thanks for taking the time.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about a year ago | (#43579151)

Germany is a somewhat bad example.
The hyperinflation of the Weimar Republic is still in the collective subconciousness so any government that allows high inflation would be lynched instantly.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

JockTroll (996521) | about a year ago | (#43574951)

Yes, because if the EU fails there's going to be WW1 Reloaded. How stupid can you be?

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575017)

since the founding of europe, no war has occured in Western europe, which essentially has been a warzone for more than a thousand years, up to the end of WW2.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575057)

and by europe, i mean e.u. / e.c. / e.c.s.c. / e.e.c. ...

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

JockTroll (996521) | about a year ago | (#43578647)

Wrong. There's been no war since WW2 because Europe had been divided in two sphere of influences and any country stupid enough to try anything foolish would have been whacked by either the US or the USSR. "Europe" back there was the "European Coal and Steel Community", it hasn't turned into the EU until the last 20 years. It must hurt a lot for euro pride, but it's not that construct that prevented war, but a lack of a casus belli and the virtual impossibility for any state to wage war on the other without getting whacked a lot. As of now, no country has the means to wage war against another for merely economical reasons. Of course, you can't tell that to the citizens, better to lie to them and instill the fear that without the Brussels boyards, the continent would immediately get back into a warzone - which can't happen. And even if it should, there's nothing the EU can do about it. They haven't been able to do squat about the wars in former Yugoslavia which occurred right on their doorstep except huff, puff and look powerless. Get a clue.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575031)

Bullshit. There were 50 years of peace before the EU. The EU is an economic pact and system first of all. The peace is already guaranteed by the NATO and other organisations. No need whatsoever for a EURO as currency to have peace. That's propaganda.

Do we have war with Scandinavia (no Euro, except in Finland)? Do we have war with Britain? Or Switzerland. No Euro either. Yet peace.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575107)

from wikipedia :
The ECSC was first proposed by French foreign minister Robert Schuman on 9 May 1950 as a way to prevent further war between France and Germany. He declared his aim was to "make war not only unthinkable but materially impossible.
ec, eec and eu are just the current iterations of ecsc.

NATO ? That's a tool of the americans to drag us into wars into the middle east. I would like to get out of it NOW.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

ewibble (1655195) | about a year ago | (#43577733)

I think Nuclear weapons are also reason for peace, A common enemy for a long time USSR. Sure economic integration helps peace as well but you can do that without a EU, just more trade between countries is fine.

Other reasons from Wikipedia that are relevant:
The Schuman Declaration that created the ECSC had several distinct aims:
- It would mark the birth of a united Europe.
- It would encourage world peace.
- It would transform Europe by a 'step by step' process (building through sectoral supranational communities) leading to the unification of Europe democratically, unifying two political blocks separated by the Iron Curtain.
- It would make war between member states impossible.
- It would create the world's first international anti-cartel agency.
- It would create a single market across the Community.
- It would, starting with the coal and steel sector, revitalise the whole European economy by similar community processes.
- It would improve the world economy and the developing countries, such as Africa

Stating reason that supports your arguments but missing the reasons that support the opponent is a bit disingenuous.

War is always possible, The peace was brought about by may factors, how much one has contributed as opposed to others is hard to say.

Not just the British, German mood too! (4, Interesting)

mha (1305) | about a year ago | (#43575339)

I just read the comments in the FAZ (a major German newspaper) to the article about that election. Overwhelmingly BY FAR the comments were AGAINST the EU and they congratulated Iceland.

It is NOT just Britain! I am most certainly not "backwards", "anti-Europe" (in fact I prefer to see myself as "European", not German) or "right-wing", neither are those comments. Quite the opposite, actually! The point is, the EU is the LEAST democratic thing that Europe has come up with since WWII ended, and it gets worse and worse. Anyone who dares to raise any objection is immediately branded "right-wing" and "anti-Europe". It's like trying to criticize the role (and all the money for) of the military in the US - you just don't want to do that, unless you are a nobody in an Internet forum, because of the (sh..)storm.

Re:Not just the British, German mood too! (2)

dwsobw (2723483) | about a year ago | (#43576659)

I think most of the people pro-EU will not defend it on FAZ because they are also unhappy with it. E.g. would like it to be more democratic.

Re:Not just the British, German mood too! (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about a year ago | (#43578029)

Most of those people aren't "anti-Europe" either. They're just against the bureaucratic cancer the "EU" has become.

Re:Not just the British, German mood too! (3, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43578869)

"The point is, the EU is the LEAST democratic thing that Europe has come up with since WWII ended"

Technically as a British citizen I have more of a say in the EU than I do my own country due to the fact the EP uses proportional representation whilst the UK uses FPTP and I live in a safe-seat area.

This means no matter how small, my vote in the EP still has more effect and more relevance than my vote in British national elections.

"and it gets worse and worse"

It does? The Lisbon treaty and a number of others have actually decreased the powers of the unelected bodies of the EU whilst increasing the powers of the elected bodies, so how is this the case? It still has some way to go, but it's certainly not getting worse in this respect.

People are just pissy at the EU right now because they're looking at anything to blame other than themselves. Yes, I'm talking about people like the Greeks who thought it was a good idea to protest to maintain the ability to retire in their 50s, work a short working week, and have a tax system that was in effect pretty much just optional. Euroscepticism in the UK has the same problem, eurosceptics forget that EU membership was instrumental in pulling us out of the shit after our economy crashed in the 70s.

But perhaps more importantly, people also forget how bad Europe was before the EU - if you think things are bad now...

A very limited view (1)

mha (1305) | about a year ago | (#43579171)

So, according to your very specific situation all others are wrong. Hmm, great way to form an opinion, I guess, makes your life very simple.

From other people's point of view, for example, me (German), our politicians over the last few decades (not just years) have gotten very good at this kind of game:

Whenever they want to achieve something that their population does not want, they let the EU do [insert whatever], then they explain "we cannot do anything, the EU dictates this", so the blame goes to the EU. This seems to support YOUR point of view - but actually it doesn't. This little "game" is possible only because the EU parliament is very weak (compared to the EU bureaucracy and the EU commission, neither of them accountable to an electorate), and VERY far removed from the population of the EU countries (how often do you even read anything about the parliament in your newspaper?). The EU is designed to achieve things that the people don't want, whether that happened on purpose or by accident I cannot tell (but it does not matter for the result).

Re:A very limited view (2)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43579215)

"So, according to your very specific situation all others are wrong. Hmm, great way to form an opinion, I guess, makes your life very simple."

AFAIK far more countries in the EU use a less democratic voting system than that used for electing the EP, so it's not exactly a vary specific situation - it's relevant to the majority of UK voters (well over 70% live in safe-seat areas) and I believe the majority of EU citizens in general.

The irony in your comment though is that Germany is one of the few countries that does have a decent, healthy democracy, so it's ironically your situation that is relatively unique. Countries like here in the UK our government isn't accountable to the electorate either for the most part, because they're usually only elected by circa 30% - 40% of the population and certainly not a majority.

"and VERY far removed from the population of the EU countries (how often do you even read anything about the parliament in your newspaper?)"

This is always going to be the case because it represents so many different countries. The chance of it hence just happening to align with any one country is pretty much nil.

"The EU is designed to achieve things that the people don't want, whether that happened on purpose or by accident I cannot tell (but it does not matter for the result)."

It was designed that way partly on purpose, because there was a will to avoid a situation whereby the population of a country like Germany ended up screwing the rest of Europe ever again. It was designed to create some kind of accountability to nations that go to far in some direction and bring them back in to line to keep Europe stable. That might suck when you have a country that's going too far in some direction, but it's actually better for everyone in general even if they don't realise it at the time. A stable Europe that protects human rights, keeps countries afloat, makes it easier to do business, makes it easier to travel, creates accountability for governments and so forth is way better than the alternative - the complete mishmash of train wrecks we had before.

You've got to realise that however painful it is for countries like Germany propping up Greece and so forth that that's still better than what we had before, where failed European states were what led to fascism and Nazism across the continent. Even with the bailouts in Greece we've seen a rise of the likes of the far right Golden Dawn party, how do you think it would look if Europe wasn't there to keep it in line and to prop it up such that it collapsed and veered even further towards far-right nationalism?

The EU keeps Europe stable, it keeps Europe strong, it keeps wars out of the continent, and is the reason why the EU economic zone is the biggest economy in the world. Perhaps when you look at the bigger picture like this you'll understand why it's far better to try and improve the EU, than to destroy it.

Re:Not just the British, German mood too! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43583057)

The europeans are experiencing an important part of how life in the united states is under Federalism.

You aren't a New Yorker or Mississippian, you are an American. Our local cultures became completely consumed by the Pan American Culture, with only a few pockets remaining (my grandfather remembers when the different states were almost like different countries, and being from another state was considered exotic.).

Shoot, we even had states actively killing each other in the civil war, and if there wasn't a strong federal government, the US would probably be split into several smaller countries.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575413)

What does the BBC mean by "slow down". Why should anyone *want* to join a farce such as the EU,
and then even worse, the Euro? As if joining the EU was inevitable.

The BBC probably said "slow down" because Iceland has already applied to join the EU and negotiations are already underway. It's not inevitable but it is a process they have already started.

As for why anyone would *want* to be a member there are of course benefits. The question is whether or not the benefits justify the loss of national powers. Iceland is already fairly integrated with the EU (more so that Britain in some ways - e.g. they are already part of the Schengen Area) so the benefit of full membership for them would be having more of a voice in decisions that already affect them. This might not be worth joining for, which is up to them, but I don't think the EU would see that as much of a loss (or "looss"?) because Iceland is so small that it's not worth worrying about.

Re:EU looses. Iceland wins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43575517)

Let me guess you are british.

Cool (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#43574825)

It's International Talk Like a Pirate Day!

  Ég er frá Íslandi og eins lunda og spila Warcraft.

(Sorry, blame Google Translate.)

To put things in perspective... (2)

westlake (615356) | about a year ago | (#43574903)

Iceland has a 63 member parliament and a population of 319,000.

New York City has a population of 8.245 million and a city council of 51 members.

Re:To put things in perspective... (1)

Prof.Phreak (584152) | about a year ago | (#43575159)

so a much larger percentage of the population is doing beurocratic-busy-work? :-)

(j/k, nyc probably has 99% of the population doing beurocratic-busy-work).

Re:To put things in perspective... (3, Informative)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year ago | (#43575191)

And New Hampshire has a population of 1 million and a House of 435 representatives.

Areas with strong democratic traditions tend to have fewer constituents per politician. And Iceland has a very very long tradition of democracy.

Alingi / All-thing (1)

fritsd (924429) | about a year ago | (#43575923)

Areas with strong democratic traditions tend to have fewer constituents per politician. And Iceland has a very very long tradition of democracy.

You can say that again.. I like the way they called it the "Aling" meaning all-thing ("thing" here has the old connotation of law meeting; it doesn't mean object).
Althing [wikipedia.org] . Est. Anno Domini 930.
That's the essential core of democracy: everybody (well, only men in olden times) can go to the meeting and have their disputes settled and their plans discussed. On a grassy field. Preferably with some partying and quaffing going on afterwards.

Oops! My thorn has fallen off.. Slashdot, how to fix this? = U+00DE or (&#0xfe;) or þ or what..

Re:Alingi / All-thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43577083)

bare rolig, island tid: ú ert öruggur hér

Re:To put things in perspective... (1)

westlake (615356) | about a year ago | (#43576265)

And New Hampshire has a population of 1 million and a House of 435 representatives.

What New Hampshire has is a gerontocracy.

State legislators are paid $200 for their two-year term, plus mileage, effectively making them volunteers. The only other benefits are free use of toll roads and of state-owned resorts. A 2007 survey found that nearly half the members of the House are retired, with an average age over 60.

Government of New Hampshire [wikipedia.org]

A 91-year-old GOP state legislator in New Hampshire has resigned after saying people with mental illnesses should get a one-way trip to Siberia.

State Rep. Martin Harty, who turns 92 this month, made national news recently when he touted eugenics as a way to get rid of "defective people."

N.H. state legislator resigns after remark about mental illness [usatoday.com] [March 2011]

Re:To put things in perspective... (2)

Kjella (173770) | about a year ago | (#43575383)

Apples and oranges, the New York city council operates on a massive body of state and federal laws. And while you may have less regional issues you still need a full body of law whether you're governing 300,000 or 300,000,000. Yes, they're representing only some 319*5,1% = 16-17.000 people but that's not really the point. The point is that they're a sovereign nation, they're not part of the EU so if they want to change copyright law they can. With the Internet it really only takes one nation to make the whole system collapse, there's no way to protect the scarcity of bits if one nation decides to let the printing presses run free. So it's a small victory but a few pebbles can be a great way to start an avalanche.

Re:To put things in perspective... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43576759)

With the Internet it really only takes one nation to make the whole system collapse

China begs to differ.

Pirate party platform might suck for Free Software (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43578787)

Re:Pirate party platform might suck for Free Softw (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43587987)

If you read what Stallman has written as a note at the very top of the page, that's only relevant for the *SWEDISH* Pirate Party.

In fact when the UK Pirate Party were developing their policy they got approval from RMS...

How many seats went to Robbie Rotten? (1)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year ago | (#43578807)

This guy [google.com] .

That right? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43579903)

It is easy to check that all real-valued functions (with one real-valued argument) that are given by fy(x):= f(x,y) are continuous in x (for any fixed y). Similarly, all fx are continuous as f is symmetric with regards to x and y. However, f itself is not continuous as can be seen by considering the squence f(1/n,1/n) (for natural n) which should converge to f(0,0)=0 if f was continuous. However, lim f(1/n,1/n) = 1.

[edit [slashdot.org] ] Partial differentiation

Main article: Partial derivative [slashdot.org]

The partial derivative generalizes the notion of the derivative to higher dimensions. A partial derivative of a multivariable function is a derivative with respect to one variable with all other variables held constant.

Partial derivatives may be combined in interesting ways to create more complicated expressions of the derivative. In vector calculus [slashdot.org] , the del [slashdot.org] operator () is used to define the concepts of gradient [slashdot.org] , divergence [slashdot.org] , and curl [slashdot.org] in terms of partial derivatives. A matrix of partial derivatives, the Jacobian [slashdot.org] matrix, may be used to represent the derivative of a function between two spaces of arbitrary dimension. The derivative can thus be understood as a linear transformation [slashdot.org] which directly varies from point to point in the domain of the function.

Differential equations [slashdot.org] containing partial derivatives are called partial differential equations [slashdot.org] or PDEs. These equations are generally more difficult to solve than ordinary differential equations [slashdot.org] , which contain derivatives with respect to only one variable.

[edit [slashdot.org] ] Multiple integration

Main article: Multiple integral [slashdot.org]

The multiple integral expands the concept of the integral to functions of any variable. Double and triple integrals may be used to calculate areas and volumes of regions in the plane and in space. Fubini's theorem [slashdot.org] guarantees that a multiple integral may be evaluated as a repeated integral.

The surface integral [slashdot.org] and the line integral [slashdot.org] are used to integrate over curved manifolds [slashdot.org] such as surfaces [slashdot.org] and curves [slashdot.org] .

[edit [slashdot.org] ] Fundamental theorem of calculus in multiple dimensions

In single-variable calculus, the fundamental theorem of calculus establishes a link between the derivative and the integral. The link between the derivative and the integral in multivariable calculus is embodied by the famous integral theorems of vector calculus:

In a more advanced study of multivariable calculus, it is seen that these four theorems are specific incarnations of a more general theorem, the generalized Stokes' theorem [slashdot.org] , which applies to the integration of differential forms [slashdot.org] over manifolds [slashdot.org] .

[edit [slashdot.org] ] Applications and uses

Techniques of multivariable calculus are used to study many objects of interest in the mental world. In particular,

Domain/Range
Applicable techniques

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>