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New OpenWRT Drops Support For Linux 2.4, Low-Mem Devices

timothy posted about a year and a half ago | from the don't-throw-tomatoes dept.

Operating Systems 194

hypnosec writes with word that the OpenWRT team a few days ago released the final version of the project's newest iteration, version 12.09 (codenamed "Attitude Adjustment"). "The final version doesn't support Linux 2.4, because of which the distribution wouldn't run on old router models, for example the Linksys WRT54G models, which have 16MB of RAM and CPUs clocked at 200MHz. The distribution is now based on Linux 3.3 and there is good news for the Raspberry Pi fans as the distribution now supports the credit card-sized computer, along with Ramips routers."

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Time for a rename? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590271)

So the OpenWRT project is dropping support for the very device that gave it its name.
Time for a new name?

Re:Time for a rename? (2)

petteyg359 (1847514) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590331)

Why? Did the WRT350N cease to exist?

Re:Time for a rename? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590389)

Why? Did the existing versions of the software cease to exist?

Keep using the old version (most-likely to be forked real soon now), if you want to continue to use archaic hardware.

Re:Time for a rename? (5, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590433)

I suggest The Distribution Formerly Known As OpenWRT.

Re:Time for a rename? (0)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590437)

I thought it was a short form for Wireless Router? I know it's in the names of many routers from many manufacturers, not just the old blue-face Linksys.

Re:Time for a rename? (1)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590451)

OpenLART?

But... but... but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590279)

But Linux runs old older, slower hardware, right??? I can avoid throwing away my old stuff by installing Linux and putting it to good use, right? RIGHT????

Re:But... but... but... (2, Informative)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590323)

well technically yes. I am sure that some other pissed off people out there will fork the revision and continue support for the version that is officially no longer supported. you see it happen all the time for example mySQL - MARIADB

Re:But... but... but... (0)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590887)

Since when is MySQL no longer supported?

Brilliant (5, Funny)

Holi (250190) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590283)

So they drop support for the routers everyone has and want you to build your own router from a raspberry. Sounds like a plan for success.

Re:Brilliant (-1, Flamebait)

Microlith (54737) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590333)

What a completely ridiculous comment.

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590439)

Sure it is, I guess when you don't want your software to be used you right it for devices most people don't have.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Microlith (54737) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590683)

I don't know, 11 year old routers might be pretty uncommon. Hell, I'd suggest that it'd be a good time to upgrade. My Netgear WNDR-3700 has 64MB of RAM and 8MB of flash, so this will work fine for me. I'll be upgrading from 10.03.1 so the lack of an ancient, obsolete kernel like Linux 2.4 means nothing to me.

But hey, the older images are still there.

AR430W (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590745)

As well as various other airlink hardware may still have 4 meg flash and 16-32 megs of RAM.

Additionally: Why does changing the kernel require that much more memory for the same featureset?

Kinda makes you wonder...

Re:AR430W (1)

Microlith (54737) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590945)

Kinda makes you wonder

Not really. 2.4 didn't have an IPv6 stack last I recall. Combined with the fact that 2.4 and 3.3 have little in common (hell 2.6.0 and 2.6.39 had little in common) and 3.3 has way more in terms of features, I'm not surprised that 16MB of RAM was a little too constraining.

Re:AR430W (2)

armanox (826486) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591301)

Kernel 2.4 is a completely different beast then version >= 2.6.0. That was why the version went from 2.4 to 2.6 - back then the second number incremented for super major changes.

Re:Brilliant (4, Insightful)

tlhIngan (30335) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591149)

I don't know, 11 year old routers might be pretty uncommon. Hell, I'd suggest that it'd be a good time to upgrade. My Netgear WNDR-3700 has 64MB of RAM and 8MB of flash, so this will work fine for me. I'll be upgrading from 10.03.1 so the lack of an ancient, obsolete kernel like Linux 2.4 means nothing to me.

Well, a bigger reason is that if you're on the faster internet service, ye olde WRT54GL is no longer fast enough. I think it's routing speed is fast for when it was released (50Mbps?) but it's no longer adequate in this age where a startling number are getting 25, 50, 100Mbps service (indeed, it's become the bottleneck). Even using it for 25Mbps might get iffy due to the low headroom available.

It was stupidly fast on release when few had 10Mbps service, but it seems the availability of faster service has rendered it out of date.

Especially with modern high end routers getting 750+Mbps speeds. Not fast enough for Google Fiber, but definitely enough with headroom for the top tier 250Mbps service available in some areas.

It's time for it to be retired. There are new generations of open routers available nowadays. Though, router power consumption is creeping upwards a bit - I'm sure you can build a PC that can do full wirespeed GigE routing and consumes under 50W, plus handle wifi and everything else and be pretty much fanless and quiet.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591359)

Lol. The fastest net I can get is 3.0 mbsp dsl. Not everyone lives in fucking new england.

Re:Brilliant (1)

kenh (9056) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591347)

Amazon is still selling them new for $50/each [amazon.com]

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590969)

Sure it is, I guess when you don't want your software to be used you write it for devices most people don't have.

FTFY

Re:Brilliant (0)

CRiMSON (3495) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590355)

Sounds like you need an attitude adjustment.

Re:Brilliant (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590359)

You still demand php4 support, don't you? The WRT54G was first released in December 2002. That's 11 years ago, back when XP was fairly new. Upgrade.

Re:Brilliant (1)

sunking2 (521698) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590435)

And here I thought we were supposed to take all the people loving linux because it kept their old machines useful seriously.

there's a solution for all us with older hardware (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590501)

it's called BSD

Re:Brilliant (1)

Microlith (54737) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590957)

I don't see how those old systems suddenly became useless. And not everyone feels compelled to stay on ancient kernels with crusty, old hardware.

Re:Brilliant (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590449)

Why upgrade? Seriously? Shit works. Shit is faster than my cable modem service? Why poison the planet with another piece of expendable?

Re:Brilliant (4, Insightful)

Lothsahn (221388) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591115)

Well, my WRT54G maxed out at 30Mb down/10Mb up. Given I have 62/15 service, I was severely bottlenecked by my router. Also, it doesn't have wireless N or 5Ghz, so my wireless transfer rates were capped at about 8-12Mbit. My new RT-N66U has far more range (at default power levels) than the WRT54G does, even at boosted power levels. I use my router for a VPN server, and the 200Mhz processor in the WRT54G was really struggling at that.

In general, I agree with you--I keep devices for a very long time to be environmentally friendly. I still use my WRT54G's as wireless bridges. But there is a reason to upgrade your router if you have tangible needs for the additional speed/range. Especially one from 2002.

Re:Brilliant (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590977)

If it works, why upgrade it?

Re:Brilliant (3, Interesting)

Hadlock (143607) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591329)

I bought one last year. They're still for sale and being manufactured. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Re:Brilliant (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590371)

I KNEW IT!!! I knew I should be writing code for the apple ][ instead of IOS ....

From IIGS to 3GS (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590605)

I knew I should be writing code for the apple ][ instead of IOS

The first hint might have been when Apple named the iPhone 3GS after the Apple IIGS.

Re:From IIGS to 3GS (3, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591101)

They named most of their products after the IIGS

Re:Brilliant (4, Informative)

morcego (260031) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590387)

Pretty much par of course for them.
For years now OpenWRT is becoming more and more bloated, to a point it is hard to make it run smoothly in the standard base device (WRT54GL). I haven't been able to use the standard image for at least 3 years now, having to build my own removing as much bloat as I can...

Re:Brilliant (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590523)

Just a thought, but perhaps your time is more valuable than you are giving yourself credit for? I would imagine a new router would be much cheaper than the time you've had to spend compiling new images with less bloat. (Unless you are just doing it for fun, hobby, etc. and enjoy the effort and learning - in which case, please do continue).

Re:Brilliant (3, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591469)

Yes. it's called quit playing with toys and run iPCop or other real firewall. I can do a lot more easier and it is brain dead easy to update myself. Built a nice mico ITX box with two ethernet ports into a router/firewall that is fantastic in every way and does not suck up all my time to manage it.

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590397)

OpenWRT was never founded on core business models.

Besides, those that are capable of installing and running OpenWRT are likely just as capable of building their own router from a rasberry pi.

Re:Brilliant (5, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590421)

I sense a great disturbance in the fork.

Re:Brilliant (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590423)

Using the Pi as a router does have it's interesting advantages and the price point is pretty close in that application as the smaller cheaper Pi would serve well in that capacity. Shame to drop support for the smaller devices, but you can beat yourself to death trying to support too many platforms.

By the way, the Pi offerings are not the only options out there. I'm seeing a lot of similar cards popping up out there.

Re:Brilliant (2)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590561)

A R Pi has a single 10/100 Ethernet that's connected to USB 2.0. That does not seem like much of a router to me it might be useful for encryption bit it's can not handle current upper tier broadband speeds.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Narishma (822073) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590747)

That's the model B. The model A the parent is talking about doesn't have ethernet support at all.

Re:Brilliant (1)

silas_moeckel (234313) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591089)

Well it supports USB to Ethernet and USB wifi adapters, adding them to the cost though.

Re:Brilliant (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591275)

I said that it would serve fairly well in some applications as compared to the WRT hardware that got dropped. The Pi sure has limitations, but it's a pretty cheap platform that comes at a similar price point to what you can get WRT hardware for.

My real interest would be in the *other* cards out there at similar price points to the Pi. I think the Pi has at least spurred on the development of similar cards which are more capable (memory, CPU etc) and hopefully will lower the prices of such cards.

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591525)

Router on a stick if it supports vlan

Re:Brilliant (0)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590459)

You're still using an old-ass B router? You should be on an N router and considering switching to an AC router.

You'd have trouble finding tires for a Model T too.

Re:Brilliant (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590661)

It took me all of 10 seconds to find tires for a Model T:
http://www.modeltford.com/item/TIRE2.aspx [modeltford.com]

They even come in white to:
http://www.modeltford.com/item/TIRE1WSR.aspx [modeltford.com]

As someone who has several WRT54G routers that are perfectly capable devices, this is sad news.

Re:Brilliant (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590853)

Perfectly capable of reaching a one-generation-old bandwidth standard (at best) on both the wireless and wired LAN sides...you can still run the older firmwares on these devices. It's hardly sad news.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590929)

Yes, which is still probably more than 10 times faster than most people's Internet connection.

Re:Brilliant (3, Informative)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591011)

My cable internet is only 2Mbps. I'm not upgrading because it's enough for me and going with 5Mbps or 10Mbps would double or triple my monthly fee.

No, there's no other options where I live, the company has a real monopoly.

Re:Brilliant (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591049)

But still a small fraction of their wired LAN bandwidth. If you often transfer large files or stream HD video within your home network like I do, you can't afford to be generations behind or wired or wireless speed. There are still other maintained older OpenWRT firmwares that can work on these routers, dropping support for these relics in the latest release is no big loss.

Re:Brilliant (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591019)

Great, so I can get these immediately at my local Tire place?

Not too likely, unless by chance they know I'm a customer already or they have them in stock by sheer chance of somebody else's order.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591499)

Yes you can. if you pull your head out of your ass and call them first they will order from Coker and have them there the next day. Why you got a rally race in 4 hours and you need tires?

But you seem to be the type that has his head firmly shoved up his rectum and likes it that way..

Re:Brilliant (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591137)

so... if you dont feel the need of hardware hupgrades and are perfectly satisfed of your routers, why do you feel the need of -software- upgrades?

Re:Brilliant (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591389)

Security vulnerabilities?

Re:Brilliant (2)

fast turtle (1118037) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591061)

why in hell should I use an "N" router when everybody and their clan has one in my neighborhood? I've found that sticking with the "B" band works better, gives me a longer range and I don't suffer all the stinking interference that everyone using "N" does. Hell it's the same reason I switched back to a 900Mhz cordless phone. Better range and a lack of interference from all the other hardware crapping on the 5Ghz band (shit N routers).

Re:Brilliant (4, Insightful)

operagost (62405) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591509)

802.11b uses the same 2.4 GHz band that G and N does. Yes, N uses both 5 and 2.4 GHz. In fact, from my experience most of your neighbors are probably NOT "crapping on the 5GHz band" because the low-end routers, notebooks, and tablets don't support it.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Holi (250190) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591187)

Gee I thought the WRT54G was a G router.

Re:Brilliant (2)

TheoMurpse (729043) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591211)

WRT54G is, as you might assume from the "G" at the end, a G router. In the United States, G is faster than the connection to the house. An order of magnitude faster, actually.

Re:Brilliant (1)

armanox (826486) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591377)

Depends on your area. I currently have 15/2 Mb/s D/U, and that's being phased out for 50/25 (a friend of mine has 150/65, and is probably going to jump to 300 soon).

Re:Brilliant (2)

Lumpy (12016) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591483)

"You'd have trouble finding tires for a Model T too."

Nope : http://www.cokertire.com/ [cokertire.com] Easy as pie. They even carry Model A tires.

Re:Brilliant (1)

BenBoy (615230) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590557)

Raspberry Pi? Sounds like a plan for a rather cheap, capable repeater bridge to me, even if I don't feel like replacing my dinosaur 54GL. And if temperature is any indication (hint: it is), it's a heck of a lot more power efficient too.

The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (3, Interesting)

Above (100351) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590599)

The WRT54G came out in 2002. The newer WRT54GL version was released in 2005. While these were phenomenal products with a long lifespan, they are obsolete by any standard. Things like no N support, no Gigabit Ethernet, and the lack of CPU and Memory to do cool things have been huge issues for a while.

Serious users have already moved on. Platforms like the Netgear WNDR3700v2 are cheap, easy to find, and offer modern features. No one is suggesting rolling your own from a Raspberry will be the most popular option, but that enabling it will be a cool option for many hackers.

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (3, Interesting)

Nimey (114278) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590709)

I'm still using my 54GL with Tomato Firmware on it. Tomato seems to have died (last update for the mainline was in June 2010) but it seems fine, aside from not supporting newer things like IPv6 (software limitation), 802.11n, or GigE (hardware limitations), all of which are merely "nice to have" right now.

I do plan to replace the old beast, but will wait until my ISP finally brings out IPv6 support so that I can have the best possible router within my budget when that finally happens.

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (1)

synapse7 (1075571) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590805)

I'm using this [groov.pl] flavor of tomato and it has been great for me and sees quite regular updates.

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (1)

Nimey (114278) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591241)

Hmm. OK, I'm seeing several builds for routers in that family but no guidelines as to which will work on a real 54GL with 4MB of flash storage.

I'm interested in these features from build.png: IPv6, OpenVPN, kernel 2.6 if possible. That points me to using either the Max, miniVPN, or VPN-nousb builds. Of those, the MIPSR1 Max build is 5.8MB so too big. MiniVPN is 3.7MB so I suppose it'd fit, and for kernel 2.4 there's the VPN-nousb build at 3.4 MB.

Am I on the right track here?

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591557)

Independent of the actual flavour of your preferred router OS, once you want IPv6, you also want kernel >>2.6 - which in turn needs more than 16 MB RAM. 4 MB flash and IPv6 is, due to the additional userspace requirements also getting tight, but possible - once you add VPN into the mix, 4 MB flash won't be sufficient - and neither are 200 MHz mips or 16 MB RAM.

Yes, you might be able to make it fit (probably either IPv6 or OpenVPN), but not comfortably - and at serious performance implications. The WRT-54GL is really obsolete by now, the baseline pretty much is ~400 MHz mips32, 32 MB RAM and 8 MB flash (with significantly better specs not being much more expensive, plus the added benefits of GBit/s Ethernet, dual-radio, etc.) - selling for less than the WRT-54GL now.

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591015)

Tomato seems to have died (last update for the mainline was in June 2010) but it seems fine

On the same basis, OpenWRT backfire 10.03.1 will continue to exist for users needing to use 54GL devices

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (5, Informative)

Lothsahn (221388) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591035)

Tomato isn't dead... The main site isn't being updated--the devs either don't have access or don't update the site.

The two main branches of Tomato are:
Toastman: (What I use) http://www.4shared.com/dir/v1BuINP3/Toastman_Builds.html#dir=zBnbpdpY [4shared.com]
Shibby: http://tomato.groov.pl/ [groov.pl]

I've been using Toastman tomato on a WNR3500Lv1 and a ASUS RT-N66U for months now. If you're going to get a new router, I'd strongly recommend the RT-N66U, because the WNR3500L has a v2 which is totally different hardware. In addition, the RT-N66U is very fast, stable (never crashed), nearly impossible to brick and is dual-band. The RT-N66U is $170, and it's been worth every penny. Signal output is very strong--I can pick up my internet in my neighbor's house, without adjusting transmitter output power. In addition, the devs appear to use the RT-N66U's personally, so it has the most testing.

Tomato has been rock solid, stable, and an excellent daily driver for me for the last 5 years or so. I strongly recommend it, and my friends and neighbors use it and have been very happy with it. Do update to Toastman or Shibby--they're doing an excellent job fixing issues and keeping things current.

I still use my WRT54G's as wireless bridges throughout my house, but they do show performance issues when I go above 10MBps Upload/30MB Download.

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590721)

WNDR3700v1 running 24/7 for the last 4 years - first year on stock firmware, another 2 years on DD-WRT, then a month on OpenWRT, then switched back to DD-WRT (openwrt would hang after running for a couple of days)

Re:The WRT54G had a good run, but it's obsolete. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591271)

...Serious users have already moved on. ...

Don't s'pose you have some kind of reference on this statement?

Or, perhaps you are, in all your glory, the definer of "serious"? :-)

Re:Brilliant (0)

dj245 (732906) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590611)

So they drop support for the routers everyone has and want you to build your own router from a raspberry. Sounds like a plan for success.

The WRT54G and its derivatives [wikipedia.org] are positively ancient in computer terms. They date to 2002- over 11 years ago. They can't really keep up with modern demands on routers. Gigabit ethernet is a really good thing if you have a file server in your LAN, and it is becoming increasingly worthwhile to have it on the WAN side also. The processor is slow and chokes on modern loads. There are a number of other routers out there that will run OpenWRT and have modern features and processing power. If you have one of the WRT54G series now, do you really need frequent updates on the firmware? The only computing equipment I even have from 2002 is my model M keyboard, some VGA cables, and some computer power cables [wikipedia.org] - everything else from that era was obsolete a long time ago. Running a WRT54G nowadays is like using an Intel Pentium III with 256MB of RAM and a 30GB hard drive. Networking equipment generally has a longer lifetime than general computing equipment, but the WRT54G just doesn't cut it anymore.

Re:Brilliant (1)

c (8461) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590999)

The WRT54G and its derivatives are positively ancient in computer terms. They date to 2002- over 11 years ago. They can't really keep up with modern demands on routers.

It depends on your demands. My WRT54G is fine for 95% of the things I throw at it... about the only thing it chokes on is streaming 1080p video over wireless. Since my main media player is on ethernet, that's mostly a non-issue.

Admittedly, I'm in a very rural area and my ISP is over a fixed wireless connection which maxes out at 90's era DSL speeds, so I'm not exactly hammering on it like city folks would and I don't have to fight with 2.4GHz congestion.

Eventually I'll get around to replacing it. The added range of the newer wireless standards would be nice, and I'd love a USB port or two. But it's no hurry.

If you have one of the WRT54G series now, do you really need frequent updates on the firmware?

That's a legit argument. The only thing I've really wanted beyond the original Linksys firmware is QoS, sshd, and some of the security enhancements/fixes. Tomato from 2010 gives me everything I need.

Re:Brilliant (1)

Altanar (56809) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591029)

The main problem I've had is that every newer router I've tried in the 3 or 4 years have has had horrible reliability problems... dropped connections and the like. I got tired of messing with them and spent the $50 on the WRT54GL (which is what it's still going for on Newegg [newegg.com] : and haven't had an issue like that since. Sure, the wireless is slower, but my WRT54GL's been running stably and consistently despite not having been rebooted in over 2 months. whereas the newest router I had required a full router reboot every couple days. That wasn't my doing. That wasn't a faulty hardware. That was the default setting in the router's setup page under its "maintenance" page. The default setting had the router set to reboot on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Do they make new routers that can maintain a stable connection for under $100?

Re:Brilliant (3, Informative)

Lothsahn (221388) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591221)

The ASUS RT-N66U is rock solid stable using Toastman Tomato. I've been running it for 3 months with no crashes, lockups, dropped connections, or other problems. Unfortunately, it's $170, not under your $100 pricepoint. I got mine on sale with a free USB HD, so it was really like $120 at the time. It's also nearly impossible to brick.

I also have experience with the WNR3500Lv1, which has worked great for me (stable for years with no lockups). I see it's listed for $60 at Amazon, however, there is a new v2 hardware out which is VERY different from the v1, and software support is radically different. If you could get your hands on an old WNR3500Lv1, it'll work great. If you order a new one, you'll probably get a v2, which is NOT what you want. It's not dual-band, though.

The RT-N66U appears to be what most of the Tomato devs use, so that's what I would recommend. To me, it's worth the extra $$, as I plan on keeping it for many years and the 5Ghz gives me great speeds in my house (62Mbit reliable at pings only 2ms slower than wired).

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591097)

I will give up my trusty WRT54GL and Intel Pentium III with 256MB of RAM and a 30GB hard drive system when they pry them from my cold dead hands, or my mom kicks me out of her basement. Interweb is a fad. A P3 is more then enough power for slashdot. Crap, I have to go chase some kids off the front lawn..

Re:Brilliant (2)

knarf (34928) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591253)

Running a WRT54G nowadays is like using an Intel Pentium III with 256MB of RAM and a 30GB hard drive. Networking equipment generally has a longer lifetime than general computing equipment, but the WRT54G just doesn't cut it anymore.

Funny that, I still use a few Thinkpad T23's, Pentium IIIm inside. I upped the RAM to 768MB a long time ago - it would be expensive to do that nowadays - but they do indeed contain 20GB and 30GB drives. They are very usable machines, running some form of Linux (one Debian, two Ubuntu).

It was not that long ago they connected to the 'net using a WRT54GL. The wrath of Thor was a bit to much for that router so it got replaced by an Asus RT-N16 which, again, was killed by lightning not that long after. I'm now on my second RT-N16...

In other words, don't discount 'old' computer equipment just because it is old. Don't throw around nonsensical terms like 'modern loads' either, it makes your post sound like marketing drivel. While this older equipment is not suitable for playing more recent games, it still works fine for many other tasks.

Re:Brilliant (1)

armanox (826486) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591429)

I'm going to assume it's a Tualtin P3? As long as it doesn't have the Intel graphics you should be running fine. I've got a Dell C400 that I use as a netbook (P3 1.2GHz, 1GB RAM) that does great until something tries to use the GPU (which also excludes modern Linux. Still runing RHEL 5 on that thing).

Re:Brilliant (4, Informative)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591261)

Gigabit ethernet is a really good thing if you have a file server in your LAN

yeah, but if you count up the 90th percentile, people use wireless AP's to connect their laptops to their cable or DSL connection to reach servers where the total link speed is less than real-world 802.11g performance. And Backfire will work just fine for that. Internet connection speeds aren't much different than they were in 2002 for most people; a 200MHz MIPS is plenty to handle 7Mbps.

I have a wndr3700v2 running Attitude Adjustment with wpad and luci-ssl installed, but that's me.

There is at least one exception: I was trying to help my folks get out from behind their double-NAT situation on FiOS and realized that the TV gets routed through IP, so the packet processing speed of their 54g will be insufficient, so I needed to turn back on that one. BTW, what a massive pain FiOS is to use your own router.

You should drop them anyway... (1)

gQuigs (913879) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591361)

Below are the speedtests of two different routers using a wired connection.

Actiontec (about 2011) – 53.22 MB (down) 8.23 (up)
Linksys WRT54G v2 (about 2004) – 23 MB (down) 7.76 (up)

http://bryanquigley.com/libre-software/on-upgrading-routers [bryanquigley.com]

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591433)

Parent comment sponsored by Fox News.

Blogspam (4, Informative)

Nimey (114278) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590373)

And now for some karma whoring^W^W^Wthe actual details:

The OpenWrt Release Team would like to announce the final Attitude Adjustment Release (12.09).

Highlights since Backfire 10.03.1:
Dropped support for legacy Broadcom target (brcm-2.4)
Switched to Kernel 3.3
Switched to uClibc 0.9.33.2
Switched x86 images from ext2 to ext4 filesystem
Improved parallel building support
New netifd implementation to replace the old script based network configuration system
Switched to shadow passwords
Support for external overlay filesystems in release images
Various firewall enhancements
Wireless driver updates and stability improvements
Experimential support for 5 and 10 MHz channels in ath5k and ath9k
Package updates and dependency fixes
New target support: ramips, bcm2708 (Raspberry Pi) and others
Support for further router models
Support for building with eglic instead of uClibc
Support for 6RD configuration
Support for bridge firewalling in release images

Known Issues:
Most open tickets at the time of the final builds
Lower end devices with only 16 MiB RAM will easily run out of Memory, for bcm47xx based devices is Backfire with brcm-2.4 recommended

More detailed information: https://dev.openwrt.org/query?status=closed&group=resolution&milestone=Attitude+Adjustment+12.09 [openwrt.org]
Detailed core changelog at: https://dev.openwrt.org/log/branches/attitude_adjustment [openwrt.org]
Detailed packages changelog at: https://dev.openwrt.org/log/branches/packages_12.09 [openwrt.org]
Binaries can be downloaded at http://downloads.openwrt.org/attitude_adjustment/12.09/ [openwrt.org]

Re:Blogspam (4, Informative)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590601)

And now for some karma whoring^W^W^Wthe actual details:

You left out the most important part [openwrt.org] :

ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT (12.09, r36088)
    * 1/4 oz Vodka
    * 1/4 oz Gin
    * 1/4 oz Amaretto
    * 1/4 oz Triple sec
    * 1/4 oz Peach schnapps
    * 1/4 oz Sour mix
    * 1 splash Cranberry juice
Pour all ingredients into mixing
tin with ice, strain into glass.

(Reformatted to please Slashdot's filters.)

Re:Blogspam (1)

Holi (250190) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590835)

If that's the attitude adjustment someone else said I need, I am down for it.

for bcm47xx ... Backfire with brcm-2.4 recommended (3, Informative)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591383)

Right there in the release note, folks - if you have a 54G, use Backfire.

Newer hardware gets better kernels.

Next story.

Rasberry Pi (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590377)

So now it runs on Rasberry Pi?
Just what I needed, a router with a single network interface!

Hype (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590461)

Yes, you have to support the RaPi because that's where the attention is. It's still a complete mismatch. The cheap RaPi doesn't even have an ethernet port and the less cheap one has a single network port, but it's connected via a buggy USB port and shares bandwidth with any other network device you add on and, more importantly, with USB attached disks. There are much cheaper routers available which have much more flexible network peripherals, like 5 port switches that allow each port to be a separate network, or you know, gigabit ethernet. And those come with a case, wireless lan and a power supply.

Sigh... (2, Informative)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590543)

A few seconds at openwrt.org will reveal that OpenWRT is a specialized Linux distribution, and they've simply migrated to the 3.3 kernel. Kind of like Ubuntu 10 migrated to 2.6, lo those many years ago.

Maybe this qualifies as news for some people, but it's certainly not something to get your panties in a bunch over.

Artifact title (2)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590645)

People have their underwear in a bunch over the fact that "OpenWRT" has become an artifact title [tvtropes.org] . It no longer supports the appliance after which it was named (the WRT54G).

Re:Artifact title (1)

Microlith (54737) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590713)

So the original device is being retired and the name lives on. If you're insistent, the Linksys WRT160NL and Linksys WRT350N v2 are supported still as they have 32MB of RAM each. But it's supported on such a wide array of other devices, I still don't see why this is any reason to throw up a fuss.

Re:Sigh... (1)

hobarrera (2008506) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591233)

It's not just the linux kernel upgrade that matters here, but also the end-of-support for "low memory devices". IMHO, though, 16MB is a pretty large amount of memory for a home router.

Pi? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590625)

Even if I could put this on a Pi, why? It only has one NIC on board. A router requires a minimum of two NICS to function as a router.

So for a Pi to be used as a firewall\router, you would need to purchase a USB NIC and take up one of the USB ports. While not impossible, it could lead to configuration issues.

Now, if they were to release a Pi with two onboard NICS, I would be all over this.

Re:Pi? (2)

Nimey (114278) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590733)

So the Pi could be a wireless access point. Those only need 1x Ethernet + wireless.

Some people don't use wired Ethernet anymore.

Re:Pi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590877)

And we call those people idiots

Re:Pi? (0)

Nimey (114278) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590959)

Your mother is a whore.

Re:Pi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43590775)

The USB hub chip integrates an ethernet port, so the "onboard" NIC is a USB-NIC as well.

Re:Pi? (1)

kwark (512736) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590799)

"A router requires a minimum of two NICS to function as a router."

No it doesn't. There are things like aliases and vlans that make routing possible with 1 nic.

Post the link (1)

hduff (570443) | about a year and a half ago | (#43590791)

Somebody post the link to the latest version that uses the 2.4 kernel, so this can be a useful Slashdot bookmark.

Does it support HFS+ now? (1)

jbssm (961115) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591059)

For me and many Mac users the question is: Does it support HFS+ for a connected external drive now?

Previous versions didn't (neither does DDWRT), although you could find the drivers in some obscure place you could not make it work because of kernel support (you could use the HFS, minus +, in some way just to read tough). So far, as I'm lead to believe, only Tomato firmware correctly supports HFS+. I didn't' test it myself tough, so I still take that with a bit of salt.

Re:Does it support HFS+ now? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43591249)

Fuck off Mac fag. Format your shit ext3 and use MacFUSE.

Lack of 2.4 isn't the problem (1)

Guspaz (556486) | about a year and a half ago | (#43591481)

Tomato RAF for the WRT54G uses the 2.6.22 kernel, and can push 80 Mbps of routed throughput (not sure why. Optimizations? Performance improvements in 2.6 versus the 2.4 used by most other WRT54G firmwares?) The things are still ancient, though, and should be retired.

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