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Most Companies Will Require You To Bring Your Own Mobile Device By 2017

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the get-your-own dept.

Businesses 381

Lucas123 writes "Half of all employers will require workers to supply their own mobile devices for work purposes by 2017, according to a new Gartner study. Enterprises that offer only corporately-owned smartphones or stipends to buy your own will soon become the exception to the rule in the next few years. As enterprise BYOD programs proliferate, 38% of companies expect to stop providing devices to workers by 2016 and let them use their own, according to a global survey of CIOs by Gartner. At the same time, security remains the top BYOD concern. 'What happens if you buy a device for an employee and they leave the job a month later? How are you going to settle up? Better to keep it simple. The employee owns the device, and the company helps to cover usage costs,' said David Willis, a distinguished analyst at Gartner."

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Video of Bagram 747 crash (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43605989)

This is so sad, and scary. Perhaps the cargo shifted, causing the weight to slide to the back of the plane?

Re:Video of Bagram 747 crash (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606033)

Huh? Are you talking about this? [theatlantic.com] I'm sure they'll retrieve the black boxes and figure it out. This is a fully modern aircraft that crashed on land.

So.... (5, Interesting)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year ago | (#43605997)

As enterprise BYOD programs proliferate, 38% of companies expect to stop providing devices to workers by 2016 and let them use their own

Do they get to monitor communications or wipe my own device now if anything goes wrong?

Re:So.... (5, Interesting)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606027)

Yeah, there's software [mobileiron.com] out there to do exactly that, that a lot of employers (I'm in the network security field) already require to be installed if you want to connect to work resources.

Re:So.... (5, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | about a year ago | (#43606083)

I see the future of BYOD being running another OS instance for the work apps, or possibly a separate easily switched profile with encrypted storage. One of the biggest hurdles right now with iOS and BYOD is that the end user can easily recover the wiped data from their last icloud backup. There are similar concerns with personal Dropbox accounts, how do you regain control of your corporate data once it's on an account that the user controls? There are solutions to the problem like windows rights management server (DRM for corporate documents) but they don't tend to play well with machines that aren't part of the central infrastructure, and are especially poor at support non-PC platforms.

Re:So.... (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606135)

Agreed, although the Dropbox-related concern has already existed on regular work machines (assuming you're able to install software, which many people in technical roles are allowed to do).

Re:So.... (1)

NemosomeN (670035) | about a year ago | (#43606149)

I have a separate hard drive on my personal computer to boot from when I work from home, and I would love to be able to seamlessly use my phone to connect to work as well. Given the choice between my employer's giving me a non-android device (Given that my current phone is android based) and my bringing my own device, I would much rather bring my own device.

Re:So.... (4, Informative)

ArhcAngel (247594) | about a year ago | (#43606259)

I see the future of BYOD being running another OS instance for the work apps, or possibly a separate easily switched profile with encrypted storage.

So...BlackBerry Balance [informationweek.com] then

Re:So.... (4, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | about a year ago | (#43606303)

Yes, and VMWare ready for Android devices, and the user profiles from Android 4.2 refined, and the encrypted partition and app space from Good, and a whole host of other existing solutions, but if BYOD is going to become pervasive it's going to need to be built in at the system level and be easy to manage (I have to give RIM credit, balance does a pretty good job of meeting all these needs, it's just a second tier platform at this point).

Re:So.... (2)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#43606451)

I expect to get the living hell modded out of me when I say the iPhone has been a secure platform for BYOD for awhile now (I don't remember if it's the 3GS or 4 where security was tightened up). Besides the Configurator, something as humble as ActiveSync can manage them. Same goes for many of the latest Android devices. The point is it's easy to natively get strong security on a mobile device. How good it meets your needs depends on your needs.

BYOD policy...so I quit BYOD'ing (2)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about a year ago | (#43606087)

>> there's software out there to (monitor communications or wipe my own device)

My current employer has a BYOD policy and software for this. My solution: never use a personal device for work purposes, especially never company email. Instead, I use a company-resident mail forwarding application to read my company email and to send alerts to a personal email address if it finds something that looks interesting enough and I've been out of the office long enough (e.g., more than a day). If I do get such an alert, I might VPN in to read the full email, or usually I'll just text or call someone. (They can also text me.)

Re:BYOD policy...so I quit BYOD'ing (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606129)

Yup, I'd agree, and if/when my employer implements such software I will likely disable work email on my phone.

Re:BYOD policy...so I quit BYOD'ing (2)

anarcobra (1551067) | about a year ago | (#43606265)

I just don't check work email when at home.
You want to reach me after work?
They have my phone number.
If they really want me to check email they can give me a phone or whatever.

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606305)

Perfect! I won't be using my devices for their communication then.

I already don't. I don't sync my e-mail to my phone. People say it makes work easier, but why would I want being able to work to be any easier than it already is after hours?

If I'm working, I'm generally in front of a PC or near one wherein I can read e-mail, I can receive texts if I desire and the people who need to know my number know it.

There is no wiping and reloading required, or allowed due to this.

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606515)

If the company owns the device, and the employee leaves, the employee must return the device. Nice and simple.

If the employee wants a device for personal use, that should be a separate device that the employee owns.

I think that is simpler and better all around.

Re:So.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606081)

Yes and yes. Don't like it, move to fucking CUBA, you statist dipshit.

Ron Paul 2016. Take back America from the liberals and the statists!

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606269)

EEEWAT? Half of all people who buy what they read in computer magazines will still be wanking to pr0n in the restroom stall at work on their very own smart phone. This number already approaches 38% of all male employees.( the women are smart enough to do the boss or discreet enough to do a train in the mailroom)
Employers of fragile companies need to watch their egos before their employees abandon ship for the competitor. Hard to hire a lawyer to file suits for breech of trade secrets, when you haven't got a pot to piss in.

        Just more garbage from a writer paid by the word to tickle your worry bone.

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606347)

Yes. My company's policy is you can totally use your own device; they're just going to install some remote-wipe software on it for you.

Re:So.... (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606407)

They can't. You can freeze the remote app if it is your own phone. You can even script to disconnect remote a wipe app from connecting. Remote wipe apps have been defeated so many times. You can use a firewall for mobile device and block that app from connecting. You can even uninstall a remote wipe app if you like if you search on-line. There is always an airplane mode too.

Re:So.... (1)

mysidia (191772) | about a year ago | (#43606421)

Do they get to monitor communications or wipe my own device now if anything goes wrong?

If you're connected using Active Sync, your employer can already wipe your device, using an Active Sync wipe request.

Manufacturers that license the ActiveSync protocol are required to implement this as specified, on their device, so the device must honor the wipe request.

Don't associate your device with your org's Exchange server, if you don't want your employer to be able to wipe it.

and then your phone gets confiscated... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43605999)

...when it gets tied up in legal proceedings. This brings its own set of complications.

The following comment is TRUE (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about a year ago | (#43606011)

Slashdort buttgoat potatop fartbeanire, FALSE

Do what they do to hourly workers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606013)

'What happens if you buy a device for an employee and they leave the job a month later? How are you going to settle up?

Deduct it from their paycheck.

That is what's done to hourly (especially to min wage workers) workers all the time. They deduct for background checks, uniforms, etc ....

Re:Do what they do to hourly workers. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606177)

You transfer the device to the employee's replacement?

I have a cell phone that is probably 11 years old. I got it maybe six years ago-- it's owned by my employer. It works just fine for sms alerts and waking me at 3 am to fix something that's shutting down the night shift.

Re:Do what they do to hourly workers. (2)

jcr (53032) | about a year ago | (#43606413)

You transfer the device to the employee's replacement?

Congratulations, you have shown the modicum of common sense that appears to consistently elude the staff at Gartner.

-jcr

Re:Do what they do to hourly workers. (4, Informative)

mysidia (191772) | about a year ago | (#43606489)

That is what's done to hourly (especially to min wage workers) workers all the time. They deduct for background checks, uniforms, etc ....

Not generally lawful [ca.gov]

An employer can lawfully withhold amounts from an employee’s wages only: (1) when required or empowered to do so by state or federal law, or (2) when a deduction is expressly authorized in writing by the employee to cover insurance premiums, benefit plan contributions or other deductions not amounting to a rebate on the employee’s wages, or (3) when a deduction to cover health, welfare, or pension contributions is expressly authorized by a wage or collective bargaining agreement.
Some common payroll deductions often made by employers that are unlawful include: ...
Gratuities. An employer cannot collect, take, or receive any gratuity or part thereof given or left for an employee, or deduct any amount from wages due an employee on account of a gratuity given or left for an employee.
Bond. If an employer requires a bond of an applicant or employee, the employer must pay the cost of the bond.
Uniforms. If an employer requires that an employee wear a uniform, the employer must pay the cost of the uniform.
Business Expenses. An employee is entitled to be reimbursed by his or her employer for all expenses or losses incurred in the direct consequence of the discharge of the employee’s work duties. ....

....
...
Q. If I break or damage company property or lose company money while performing my job, can my employer deduct the cost/loss from my wages?
A. No, your employer cannot legally make such a deduction from your wages if, by reason of mistake or accident a cash shortage, breakage, or loss of company property/equipment occurs.
..
Labor Code Section 224 clearly prohibits any deduction from an employee’s wages which is not either authorized by the employee in writing or permitted by law, and any employer who resorts to self-help does so at its own risk

Who owns the data on it? (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#43606019)

Can they remote wipe? Pull your GPS data? contacts? logs?

Re:Who owns the data on it? (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606123)

Depending on the software they force employees to install: yes, not sure/maybe, yes, and yes.

Re:Who owns the data on it? (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#43606483)

To answer the question in your subject, the company owns the company data and you own your data. Unfortunately, on most devices without a third party solution your personal data is wiped along with the company's. The capabilities of Mobile Device Management software are very intrusive.

Commodore 64 (1)

puddingebola (2036796) | about a year ago | (#43606025)

I've got my Commodore 64 right here and all I need is someway to connect to the Company network with my 1200 baud modem.

Re:Commodore 64 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606085)

I can't believe you have enough money for a 1670 modem. Wow! Someday I'll be able to afford one too.

Just Say No to BYOD (5, Insightful)

MarioMax (907837) | about a year ago | (#43606045)

At my company there is a lot of internal chatter about BYOD, along with the security concerns (especially in terms of IP).

My stance: Just say no to BYOD. If my company deems it necessary for me to use a portable electronic device to perform my job, then either:
a) They supply it, and it remains company property, or
b) There is no option b

Re:Just Say No to BYOD (4, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | about a year ago | (#43606185)

Option b) is that it's my device and all that entails, I control it, not them. No different than my car, if I leave the company it's still mine. If something belonging to them is in the trunk, they can politely ask that it be returned, but they don't get a set of keys, or have permission to enter it.

If they don't like these terms, well... then its back to your option "a)"

BYOD is no different than using a personal car, or a breifcase, and having company documents in either.

Re:Just Say No to BYOD (4, Insightful)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#43606299)

BYOD is no different than using a personal car, or a breifcase, and having company documents in either.

It's very different. There are regulations about how different classifications of data can be moved around and stored. You can have things on your phone that you can't have in a briefcase in your car. And there is more opportunity for a phone to be lost or stolen.

Re:Just Say No to BYOD (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606339)

There are regulations about how different classifications of data can be moved around and stored.

Employers that follow those regulations/classifications probably won't require (or even allow) BYOD, so I would agree with vux984 that they aren't really different from other methods of taking company data off-site.

Re:Just Say No to BYOD (3, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#43606523)

If regulatory issues are a concern, then it really shouldn't be BYOD.

Re:Just Say No to BYOD (1)

cybrhippy (36730) | about a year ago | (#43606315)

Not really an IP issue... Whether their IP is on your device or theirs you still have "easy" access to it. Security is still the same for either for the most part.

The only real issue is support. To do BYOD you either need to specify EXACTLY what people can or can't use or your employee's have to be smart enough to understand the difference between getting their mail via OWA/ActiveSync vs. IMAP, What features in M$ Word don't work in Libre Office, AD vs LDAP w/ Kerberos, etc.

Re:Just Say No to BYOD (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606345)

To do BYOD you either need to specify EXACTLY what people can or can't use

A lot of the mobile remote software allows for this sort of control.

Yeah, right. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606049)

They had better give me a stipend to buy my own machine, then, because I'm only going to use it for working with their company. In fact, it will never leave the office. No way in HELL are they going to be able to lay a claim on my personal equipment just because they want to lower their parts and labor costs.

Re: Yeah, right. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606357)

BYOD is being driven by the employees asking for it, not management and certainly not most IT departments. People don't want to carry two phones, or they want to use their nice laptop and not the crappy one the company provides. Mostly though it has been driven by iPads. Execs with iPads to be precise.

wait what??! (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#43606053)

'What happens if you buy a device for an employee and they leave the job a month later? How are you going to settle up? Better to keep it simple.

ok so same situation, what happens when the same employee leaves in a month yet in this scenario, he has all your data on his personal phone, and you cant get it. Someone didnt fully think this through before opening their mouth.

Re:wait what??! (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606109)

Remote phone management software already exists and is already being used at places where employees can use their own devices; that software (among other things) allows for remote data wiping in the event the phone is lost or an employee is let go.

Re:wait what??! (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#43606125)

Oh I know, but I can think of situations where it would not matter, such as the employee leaving on his own without warning, the user turning off the cell signal etc. If the phone is a business phone the same is possible, but traceable by the owner (business)

Re:wait what??! (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606147)

Yeah, totally, although that's not much different than someone just storing data from their work machine to a USB stick, and keeping that stick in their possession after leaving/getting fired. I assume ultimately those sorts of situations where companies are seriously worried about that data "theft" result in legal action, or something something similar.

Re:wait what??! (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#43606157)

true, I just assume that it is much easier to log a machine that the business owns vs one that it does not even with such remote wipe tools

Re:wait what??! (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606173)

Yeah. I haven't used any of these remote tools myself, and I'm really curious to see if there will be some sort of 'backlash' once they become more common and people do exactly what you describe.

Re:wait what??! (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#43606323)

The remote tools only do what you've agreed to let them do in a BYOD agreement/policy, so someone who opted in doesn't have much room to complain.

Re:wait what??! (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606367)

Well, we're referring to different things. ganjadude and I were talking about effectively "taking" company data, and how useful mobile management tools are at preventing that, so I was using "backlash" to refer to *companies* having issues with employees that leave.

To your point - users may not have any legal or official room to complain, but that rarely stops people from actually complaining.

Subsidised phone is huge bargain for companies (1)

JoeyRox (2711699) | about a year ago | (#43606057)

A company paying $75 or so for monthly smartphone service pays for itself many times over in keeping employees tethered to the business and available for around-the-clock email and messaging. I expect companies will continue paying for service even for BYOD shops. If forcing employees to purchase a phone discourages them from using a phone for work then it will be a huge loss for companies.

Re:Subsidised phone is huge bargain for companies (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606127)

Perhaps, but even so, what is an employee who is told to provide their own phone going to do, say no and quit? Now for a company with 1000 employees, that's nearly a million dollars a year in savings with the same net result. That's a sweet little bonus for the CIO and CEO right there, will pay for a years worth of golf at Shadow Creek in Vegas. Only a poorly run company *wouldn't* do this.

Re:Subsidised phone is huge bargain for companies (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Psychopath (18031) | about a year ago | (#43606395)

A company paying $75 or so for monthly smartphone service pays for itself many times over in keeping employees tethered to the business and available for around-the-clock email and messaging. I expect companies will continue paying for service even for BYOD shops. If forcing employees to purchase a phone discourages them from using a phone for work then it will be a huge loss for companies.

This is how it works where I am (Fortune 500 technology company). The company pays all the service, including my personal calls and data use, and I pay for the phone. They negotiate shorter contract terms and lower up-front device costs. I get my choice of carriers and devices. They also negotiate discounted service pricing for my family.

The company does not wipe my entire device when I disconnect it from their system and remove their MDM, they just delete their content and leave everything else alone. They do enforce screen lock timeouts and require a PIN or password. They will wipe my device in its entirety if it's stolen.

This is a sane BYOD policy that balances the desire of the employees to have a choice in their electronic tether with their needs to secure their IP.

Don't bother getting ahold of me then (1)

Majestic Fear (82230) | about a year ago | (#43606059)

I support a large number of servers. I do not own a personal cellphone and so far the pricing schemes and poor service range for those with reasonable rates have not given me any reason to purchase one. So company if you decide not to provide one so I can support said equipment that is your choice, though not sure how you plan to get a hold of me after hours.

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606093)

I didn't RTFA, but generally I'd assume that positions that require on-call access to an employee would provide a phone to those without their own phones, or who just refuse to use theirs for work. Our IT staff already has an on-call phone that's either given to the on-call person, or is forwarded to their personal cell phone if they don't want to lug two around.

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (1)

Kittenman (971447) | about a year ago | (#43606151)

It'll be in your contract/employee agreement. "The staff member is expected to make themselves available out-of-hours". Read it carefully.

But I agree with your point - the worst I've seen is when I was expected to be available out of hours but not getting paid for it. How come, I asked the boss. The on-call allowance is factored into your salary, he said.

Factor THIS, was my reply. Well, it should have been.

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (5, Insightful)

Cryacin (657549) | about a year ago | (#43606225)

Yeah, this happened to me once too. My boss was quite personally hurt when I handed in my letter of resignation AND rejected his counter offer to pay. My reasoning:
1. Never accept counter offers - this means that your employer is not paying you what you're really worth, and means that you'll always have to threaten to leave to get paid a fair amount.
2. Never accept counter offers - it's just a method for them to change the timing of when you leave to something more convenient to them.

If more people had the guts to trust in their own abilities, we would all be better off.

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606295)

How did it work out for you?

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (2)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606445)

I've seen that same "never accept counter offers" reasoning before, and to some degree I agree with it, but that's assuming that the benefits of a job are entirely monetarily-based, which isn't a great way to look at employment. What if the employer giving you a counter offer is a smaller shop with less resources, but has a great work environment, your coworkers and boss are awesome, and the work you're doing is fun and interesting?

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606539)

if your job is so great, you shouldn't be taking offers from other companies. Do you have a wife? Would she give you a "counter offer" when you told her about your vacation plans with some girl you met who says you are so great? Same idea. Best to either not do it or do it and keep moving.

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606551)

No, but they now assume that you're only there for the check, and that you're mercenary for hire, waiting for a better offer - and so you are now on their list to get rid of when the time suits the. I wish it were otherwise, but it's not.

Re:Don't bother getting ahold of me then (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606191)

company if you decide not to provide one so I can support said equipment that is your choice, though not sure how you plan to get a hold of me after hours.

Don't worry, they'll get ahold of somebody else -- you will be freed of your obligation to provide after-hours support when you are fired.

Bad News (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606077)

Two issues.

Corps buy by the 'Container Ship Load'; good for Intel, M$ et al. but bad for employee ... One size fits all. Individuals buy on price point; Cheap Wins even if it is not quite functional.

Security: Corps insist on Max Security, i.e. employee is guilty at time of signing on to employment, whereas Individuals see security as the Wild Wild West, and seek Max entertainment at Min security.

Solution:
Employees become company property ! as in No rights, no freedoms, to constitutional protections not even the UN Rights of Prisoners of War will apply to hapless employee.

It's good to be da CEO.

Concientious objector (3, Interesting)

Kell Bengal (711123) | about a year ago | (#43606095)

I don't want a smart phone. I choose not to use one - I only care to have a simple phone that does the bare minimum. If they want me to have a smart phone, they'd better provide it for me because I will not spend my own money for a device I choose not to have. Under Australian law (to which I am subject) I don't believe a company can force you to provide your own equipment.

Re:Concientious objector (2)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606153)

Typically (in what I've seen in IT) they're not *forcing* people to bring their own devices, they're *allowing* them (or suggesting them) to do so. I highly doubt that a company that requires an employee to have a smart phone of some kind in their role would require them to use their own phone.

Re:Concientious objector (1)

Misagon (1135) | about a year ago | (#43606453)

While your current company may not be able to force you, the situation changes if you are laid off.
The next company you apply to could choose not to hire you because of your objection.

I choose not to use a cell phone at all, because of various reasons, the most important being that radiation kills brain cells. I find that some prospective employers don't want to hire me because of my objection, even though the work entails sitting at the same desk all the time.

Re: Concientious objector (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606561)

Actually, they're refusing to hire you because you reject logic and science in favor of fearmongering and confirmation bias.

Australian (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606545)

tl;dr: author is australian and doesn't want a fancy phone.

I don't want a smart phone. I choose not to use one - I only care to have a simple phone that does the bare minimum. If they want me to have a smart phone, they'd better provide it for me because I will not spend my own money for a device I choose not to have. Under Australian law (to which I am subject) I don't believe a company can force you to provide your own equipment.

What happens? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606103)

What happens is you keep the conpany paid device when the employee leaves... and give it to the next guy who takes the job. It is not that complicated.

However, if you don't own the device, you need a court order to read it. And if you are expensing or stipending the subscription, you can not legally read the usage! If the employee does something stupid while on the job related to that phone, the company is still liable.

So in summary, companies are exposing themselves to normal business liabilities, but don't have the cover they had before. Well done!

Gartner? Really? (2)

Ickyban (2713241) | about a year ago | (#43606145)

Is this the same Gartner who once said a web seminar that Apache and Linux would not have any significance in the web server market?

Gartner Lol (1)

multiben (1916126) | about a year ago | (#43606171)

You'd be better off looking at tea leaves than trusting anything that comes from that money hole.

Who owns the phone number (2)

rlh100 (695725) | about a year ago | (#43606183)

Not much of an issue for devops folks but a big issue in sales and marketing.
I wonder if companies allow a sales phone number be switch to a competitor when the sales person switches jobs. This is what happens when Jane changes jobs.

Customer of company A calls Jane who has just gone to company B:
Jane: "Hi Sam, I am glad you called. I now work for B and let me tell you how their product is much better for you..."

There are other jobs like customer support that have similar problems. In this case you want your customers when they call the cell phone to reach someone who works for the company.

The above problems also apply to IM handles.

Re:Who owns the phone number (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606227)

I wonder if companies allow a sales phone number be switch to a competitor when the sales person switches jobs.

If a company changes their procedures to allow employees to use their own phones instead of handing them out, they'll also change their procedures about phone numbers. My company simply uses internal numbers assigned to everyone (that they control), that we can forward to our personal phones if need be; this isn't an issue for companies already allowing BYOD.

Re:Who owns the phone number (1)

fatmatt_oz (680839) | about a year ago | (#43606377)

I've called sales people where exactly this has happened. Always seemed crazy to me that a company that depends on sales would be so cheap / dumb to let it happen.

Back in 2006 (1)

kilodelta (843627) | about a year ago | (#43606195)

I worked for a state office where the I.T. staff were all issued cell phones. They were issued because we had it set up to broadcast texts to us when something went wrong. A new administration comes in and the first thing they do is confiscate all cell phones.

I casually mention to our advance guy that all the notifications for server issues go out to said cell phones. We had them back the next day.

The old days... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606205)

Used to be you got a job, if you were good at it, the company would pay for your education to get even better.
Used to be, you got educated by your company, you could take a sabbatical.
Then things got a bit more competitive and those generous benefits went away.
Then you got loaded with debt just to get a degree just to get a job.
But if you needed it, your employer would pay for your basic infrastructure - phone, computer, network, printers.
But soon you'll be expected to bring everything yourself and you'll consider yourself lucky just to have a paycheck.

Re:The old days... (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#43606365)

Used to be you got a job, if you were good at it, the company would pay for your education to get even better.
Used to be, you got educated by your company, you could take a sabbatical.

The jobs you describe are still around. Hint: If there is a foosball table anywhere on company property you probably don't have one of these jobs. If you do it won't be for long.

Re:The old days... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606571)

Used to be you got a job, if you were good at it, the company would pay for your education to get even better.
Used to be, you got educated by your company, you could take a sabbatical.

The jobs you describe are still around. Hint: If there is a foosball table anywhere on company property you probably don't have one of these jobs. If you do it won't be for long.

At Ebay/PayPal in San Jose, we have foosball tables and also education and sabbaticals. It's actually a great place to work.

An interesting problem occurs with unlocked phones (2)

chromaexcursion (2047080) | about a year ago | (#43606219)

All of the mentioned restrictions only work if the phone is locked.
I refuse to sign a contract, or get a locked phone (at least that I pay for).
I have a N1 (never locked), and will probably upgrade before long to a new, never locked, phone. You don't need to unlock if it was never locked in the first place.
If my employer wants that control, they can pay for it.

I've saved the cost of my current phone with lower monthly bills. A single payment up front saves money in the end.
Freedom isn't free, but it doesn't have to cost a lot.

Re:An interesting problem occurs with unlocked pho (3, Informative)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606321)

All of the mentioned restrictions only work if the phone is locked.

The mobile management software that's out there (and used by some companies that allow BYOD) works just fine on unlocked/rooted phones.

Re:An interesting problem occurs with unlocked pho (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606373)

Do you realize none of that makes sense?

Airplane Mode (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606267)

Remote wipe? Try an airplane mode with wifi and Dropbox. If you own your device, you can image your device to your SD card.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606325)

Typically the remote management software will work with any connection, so if your wifi hits the internet (mild pedantry - airplane mode disables wifi too, but obviously you could just disable mobile data), and is consequently able to call 'home' to your employer, it'll still be able to perform a remote wipe.

That said, what you describe is functionally no different than simply backing up company documents from your work PC to an external drive, and then leaving with that information. Or, even lower tech, just taking physical documents with you when you leave.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606351)

Actually, that is totally incorrect. Even simple app like Avast can block that device from connecting.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606403)

can block that device from connecting.

In that case:

what you describe is functionally no different than simply backing up company documents from your work PC to an external drive, and then leaving with that information. Or, even lower tech, just taking physical documents with you when you leave.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606417)

Most real companies have tools to monitor your external devices. Ask your IT guy. If a firm is a large enough, they probably a security policy to maintain your printer pool.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606455)

Troll printer salesman.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606469)

I guess you are very NEW to IT. You do know your printers are "NETWORKED" at work. You seem you got lot to learn. There are plenty of USB policy apps that enterprises buy.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606543)

*Networked* printers? Like, that use paper? For what, exactly?

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606557)

Are you a college student and just bought a new computer? Some maintain copies of your files printed or they maintain the name of print jobs forever.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#43606391)

Remote wipe? Try an airplane mode with wifi and Dropbox. If you own your device, you can image your device to your SD card.

What's your point? I didn't buy a phone to keep it in Airplane Mode.

Re:Airplane Mode (1)

requiemnoise (1550609) | about a year ago | (#43606429)

You are not getting it. Block the app from deleting until the IT calls you to stop. During that time, you image your phone to SD and unblock the phone. Let the IT wipe, then re-image your phone back from your SD.

roaming costs? big plans can have good data rates (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#43606293)

roaming costs? big plans can have good data rates your own not so much.

Re:roaming costs? big plans can have good data rat (1)

tompaulco (629533) | about a year ago | (#43606425)

roaming costs? big plans can have good data rates your own not so much.

My previous company owned the phones and gave them out to individuals. Project Managers, who tended to stay at the office, got 1200 minutes, while technical staff, who tended to have to go out to client sites for two weeks at a stretch, got 500 minutes. I ended up going over a time or two, and was called in to explain myself. On those occasions, I discovered that the corporate plan that the company subscribed to cost about double what an individuals plan would cost with the same minutes. I guess AT&Ts motto is "Buy in bulk and !save".
Anyway, at some point, the company decided to save money by having the employees BYOD and also PAY for said device. No raises were given in coincidence with this change in policy. The company did require that the employee had to have a phone and make the number available, especially when on the road, but did not pay for it in any way shape or form.

what a load of bullshit (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about a year ago | (#43606349)

And who exactly pulled that out of their ass? No personal devices at my work, period. Same everywhere that has an IT dept worth half a shit.

Re:what a load of bullshit (2)

admdrew (782761) | about a year ago | (#43606399)

I don't know what your work does, but this is definitely starting to become common at many places. While I certainly don't want to relinquish admin control over my personal phone, I also like the the ability to remotely connect to work resources without needing to carry around two phones.

Employment truth. (4, Funny)

kurt555gs (309278) | about a year ago | (#43606385)

I remember talking with a very successful businessman a long time ago. He asked me if I knew the diference between a job and a career? I said no. He said, it's simple, in a career you get screwed out of your overtime.

They can (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606433)

FUCK OFF AND DIE!!! If I need a cell phone for work, my employer will provide it. No device of mine will ever be used for work purposes. EVER! I paid for it, its my PRIVATE property. I (and ONLY I ) will decide where and how it gets used. Employers wanting employees to use their own devices for work is just another way to increase profits at the expense of employees!

If Your Employer Owns Your Cellphone, They Own You (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606505)

Cellphones are one of the absolute most personal things ever created. Imagine if there's a legal dispute, and your company subpoena's your cellphone, or because you are using it for work, naturally asume they have the right to look at everything you've done. Oh, you're carefully protected friends list?, theirs. Your banking information?, theirs. Your pornography collection, (whether or not you've actually used it for such at work), theirs. Wife sends you a teasing pic during the day, which your forgot to delete, Manager looks at it, fired for sexual harassment.

In an ideal world, they wouldn't have access to anything on your phone, but the way things are going, anything used for work is considered fair game.

Also, yes, security, but that's nothing compared to the privacy implications.

Usual nonsense (4, Insightful)

russotto (537200) | about a year ago | (#43606519)

1) Take a short and small trend.
2) Do a linear extrapolation that shows a ridiculous result.
3) ????
4) Profit

ObXKCD [xkcd.com]

Re:Usual nonsense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606541)

Mod this up. By the way, why does /. still hold back mod points like they were pieces of gold? Every other site lets you upvote/downvote on a regular basis...

No. Enterprise security will... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43606527)

...require that specific devices that are enterprise ready will be used in 2017. Unfortunately, the devices with the proper enterprise security will not be as cheap as personal devices so they will be provided by companies.

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