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Today Is International Day Against DRM

Soulskill posted about a year and a half ago | from the give-me-what-i-paid-for dept.

DRM 256

jrepin writes "Digital restrictions management (DRM) creates damaged goods that users cannot control or use freely. It requires users to give-up control of their computers and restricts access to digital data and media. Device manufacturers and corporate copyrights holders have already been massively infecting their products with user-hostile DRM. Tablets, mobile phones and other minicomputers are sold with numerous restrictions embedded that cripple users freedom. The proposal at table in W3C to put DRM into HTML goes even further. Fight it: use today's today is international Day Against DRM, so spread the word and make yourself heard!" The EFF suggests making every day a day against DRM.

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I remember when google (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619367)

would have made a front page image for something like this...
 
crickets

Re: I remember when google (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619415)

Well it sounds like they were drunk when they made it up colluding rights to restrictions har very clever and what is "use today's today is" what? Anyway. Tis true though. Don't digitally restrict my music and wares man (really). Top Romulan

Re: I remember when google (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619517)

I'm pretty sure you were drunk when you wrote that.

Re: I remember when google ...apk (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619757)

Naw, he was just APK.
The lack of four-cornered HOSTS file rhetoric is a red herring of omission.

APK

PS ==> chicken butt
...apk

Re:I remember when google (0)

sticks_us (150624) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619547)

Agreed. Google have turned into major scumbags on this.

It's a testament to the power of corporate brainwashing ("Do no evil! Lol") that most "geeks" give them a pass on this and the rest of their shenanigans.

http://www.geek.com/microsoft/google-netflix-and-microsoft-propose-drm-for-html5-1537974/ [geek.com]

If we can put an end to DRM (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619383)

Just think of all the other amazing things we could do.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619473)

If you don't like a product with DRM, don't buy it.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619553)

And/Or get the t-shirt [cafepress.com] .

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (1)

Krojack (575051) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619637)

And become Ted Kaczynski v2.0 in the process. Pretty much every electronic device will have some sort of DRM in it soon if it doesn't already.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619825)

Don't buy Televisions from Westinghouse. They're using DRM to restrict over-the-air broadcast reception - the primary purpose of a TV! You have to get a special code from them just to use your TV.

Products with DRM have become necessities of life (2)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619643)

In some countries, products with digital restrictions management have become necessities of life. For example, some countries require citizens to file income tax returns using software that runs only on Windows, an operating system that ships with media players supporting MPAA-approved video DRM. And with payphones being retired in many areas, it's becoming more and more of a necessity to own a cellphone, and the vast majority of cellphones ship with bootloader DRM or MPAA-approved video DRM or both.

Re:Products with DRM have become necessities of li (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619963)

For example, some countries require citizens to file income tax returns using software that runs only on Windows, an operating system that ships with media players supporting MPAA-approved video DRM.

Which countries are these?

it's becoming more and more of a necessity to own a cellphone, and the vast majority of cellphones ship with bootloader DRM or MPAA-approved video DRM or both.

The vast majority of cellphones have neither of those things and are not smartphones.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620283)

No, I find that circumvention is the more innovative approach and how real progress is made.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (5, Interesting)

Bigby (659157) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619523)

There is nothing wrong with DRM. Personally, I think it is not a good idea for music or games. Those are things that should exist perpetually and for your own personal use.

However, it is short sighted to say that DRM should not exist. I brought this up in the previous DRM related thread, but people don't think of its best possible uses.

- When a doctor is sharing your medical information to another doctor, wouldn't you want control over when/where that medical information can be viewed? Wouldn't you want it to self destruct?

- When you work under SEC rules and have to provide your financial statements to management for compliance, wouldn't you want control over where/when those can be viewed?

Yes, it is a bad idea to treat your customers like thieves. But it isn't a bad idea when 3rd parties are distributing your private information to other 3rd parties.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (1)

gQuigs (913879) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619697)

There are legitimate uses of similar technologies for some of the above purposes, INSIDE of a company/government/or similar.

When you get to 3rd parties using DRM it completely breaks down. DRM is not the right tactic there. I don't want an intricate mess of 3rd parties restricting other 3rd parties in what they can do. That is a security nightmare.

> Wouldn't you want it to self destruct?
No. How would you do that? Embed executable code in my medical records? Once someone has my medical records I would prefer assuming that they have them (could have taken screen shots or with an actual camera). Auditing is used quite effectively to find who accessed medical records and fire them.

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (5, Insightful)

femtobyte (710429) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619803)

Except, in your examples, existing regulatory/enforcement methods seem to work reasonably well already (like HIPAA regulations). Unlike mass media content being sold to (and potentially copied by) zillions of people, it's pretty trivial to determine who is responsible when your medical records show up on the Pirate Bay. Medical and financial professionals might want to build automated compliance safeguards into their own computer systems to, e.g., automatically delete expired "borrowed" files --- but, unlike DRM, such systems can be *entirely under the control of the computer user* (not forced on them by third parties).

Re:If we can put an end to DRM (4, Insightful)

cellocgw (617879) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620169)

However, it is short sighted to say that DRM should not exist.

- When a doctor is sharing your medical information to another doctor, wouldn't you want control over when/where that medical information can be viewed?

I think you're confusing encryption (a Good Thing) with DRM (a Bad Thing). If encrypted, only authorized doctors would have the decryption key. They can access the data when needed. If DRM'd , the moment the controlling body -- think online gaming server -- dies or is obsoleted, no doctor will ever again be able to access your records. Not an ideal situation.

And Yet ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619387)

And yet there's nothing we can do to stop the ridiculous attempts at draconian DRM. Anything to prevent used games? Always On? Sell a game then require DLC in order for it to live up to the ads for the game?

Fuck 'em all. Torrents ahoy!

EA retaliates (5, Insightful)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619395)

EA retaliates with International "Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway" Day.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619419)

Every day for me is 'do not buy DRM day'. Except when there is a steam sale :)

Re:EA retaliates (1)

cheatch (1713998) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619527)

Do you consider steam as DRM?

Re:EA retaliates (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619787)

yes; but bloody Skyrim, Batman (bought whilst drunk - makes me sick to see the microsoft DRM load up too) and dishonored at a great price. All made me falter from the pure path i'd kept on it for so long.
I don't like being tracked and having your games progress shared. I don't like to see the amount of time wasted when I log in. Single player only.
HOWEVER, I used to spend a fortune on games and now I've only bought a few. and as consoles have held back the PC games minimum spec, I've not bought new hardware either.

I don't torrent a thing. It really is a lost sale and i'm better off for it.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619981)

Guess what the publishers have decided on as one of the costs for their games?

Again, if you dont like it, dont buy it. But you dont get to set the rules on games that someone else writes and publishes.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

jitterman (987991) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619791)

Yes, actually. When I bought Skyrim on DVD, it would NOT install directly - it *always* downloaded from Steam. In playing many games (Bioshock: Infinite being the most recent) it logs into Steam prior to launch no matter what I do. Again, I bought retail rather than via Steam. I haven't tested trying to run either in a disconnected state, so I don't know if the login failing would cause either not to launch, but even just automatically logging in bugs me.

Steam offline mode (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619949)

[Some game] logs into Steam prior to launch no matter what I do. Again, I bought retail rather than via Steam. I haven't tested trying to run either in a disconnected state

After you log in to Steam, it downloads the receipts for the games that you've "licensed" and caches them for at least a few weeks. Then whenever you run Steam in offline mode, Steam uses the cached receipts to validate games' licenses. There were some pretty nasty defects in offline mode when Half-Life 2 introduced Steam in 2004, but those have been mostly worked out over the better part of a decade. The ServerManagedPolicy in the Google Play Licensing service [android.com] works similarly.

Re:EA retaliates (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619953)

Shhhh, remember to not break the circlejerk.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

fast turtle (1118037) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619689)

I'm the same way but I've gone even further. I no longer buy anything at all due since I'm one of those FLOSS Neck Beards - Yep I don't even buy shaving cream/soap/blades anymore and the main reason, I can't afford them due to health reasons. God Damn Health care in the states. If you aint rich or covered by some type of health plan, you damn well better not get sick because it'll cost you over $100k for anything serious (requires ambulance/paramedics)

Re:EA retaliates (1, Troll)

SengirV (203400) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619437)

Not anymore. Stick to your guns.

Is it legal to even SAY guns anymore? Pointed sticks perhaps?

Re:EA retaliates (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619575)

LOOK OUT!! He's got a pointed stick!!!

Re:EA retaliates (1)

Guinness Beaumont (2901413) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619631)

Won't someone think of the children?!

Re:EA retaliates (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619841)

^ Arrest that man he's thinking about children.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

MitchDev (2526834) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619951)

Only if they're cooked over an open flame and basted in BBQ-teriyaki sauce...

Re:EA retaliates (5, Insightful)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619445)

EA makes every day "Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway" Day.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

BobNET (119675) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619877)

Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway

Yeah, probably, [gog.com]

Re:EA retaliates (2)

westlake (615356) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620279)

EA makes every day "Fuck You, You're Going To Buy Our Games Anyway" Day.

Exhibit A:

Best Sellers in PC-compatible Games [amazon.com]

We begin with the Slashdot tradition of promoting an event on the day of the event.

There are four events scheduled, one in Bangladesh.

The FOSS Bangladesh are suspending their website (www.fossbd.org) with an image banner, focusing the Day Against DRM-2013 and its cruel effects on IT world, activated from today, 30 April, 2013. Join us on a roadside stands as a Human ties with banners, plackerds and festoons in front of the TSC area at "Raju Circle". As it to exposes the Day Aganists DRM and why we are against DRM and DRM on HTML5.

Day Against DRM - May 3rd, 2013 [libreplanet.org]

You cannot make this stuff up.

There will be the inevitable petitions to the W3C and handouts outside the Microsoft Store in Seattle and that is pretty much it.

I was pleased to discover that the EFF page for the International Day Against DRM links to 2009's Windows7 Sins. [windows7sins.org] campaign.

Who can forget --- Windows 7 Sins --- The Video [youtube.com] ?

Re:EA retaliates (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619449)

I'm not sure they limit that to just one day.

Re:EA retaliates (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619467)

No, no I am not...
Doesn't mean I won't play them. And these days i prefer to actually buy my games.

Re:EA retaliates (1)

Phrogman (80473) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619483)

Ah but for me, every day is "Don't buy an EA game day" already. Likewise anything from SOE :P

Re:EA retaliates (1)

cornicefire (610241) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619849)

And the public says, "I would rather have a cool game built by people who are paid and given health coverage than pirate something." So EA wins. People are willing to pay for content and if DRM stops the freeloaders, DRM helps the legit customers who pay full freight.

Re:EA retaliates (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619999)

if DRM stops the freeloaders

I was not sure whether you were serious but after looking for a few seconds at your comment history, you seem to be.

Please, can you name one bigger game from the last years that was not available cracked few days after the release?

The only thing that is not cracked is multiplayer and this doesn't need DRM as it can simply be secured server side by a simple number the user has to enter once at install time.

US-centric (3, Interesting)

codeButcher (223668) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619429)

I agree with the EFF's stance in the last sentence of the summary, because by the time it is "today" in the US, the day is pretty much over in the rest of the world (depending on). Especially on a Friday....

But if one wants to have a specific day to agitate for something, maybe give some advance warning? Also, a better though-out plan than "spread the word and make yourself heard" might also be useful.

Let's get meta (4, Funny)

Nidi62 (1525137) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619493)

There are too many awareness days to keep track of, and most of the time you don't even hear about them until the day is almost over. What we need is an International Day Day, so that we can let people know what days are the international awareness days for what topics.

Re:Let's get meta (1, Redundant)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619589)

Obviously, we need to create an awareness day for awareness days.

Re:Let's get meta (0)

N0Man74 (1620447) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619745)

There already is one. Obviously it needs more awareness... Perhaps we can make a day for that too.

Re:Let's get meta (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619853)

That was two weeks ago.

Need DRM Labeling Law (5, Insightful)

n2hightech (1170183) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619459)

Simple solution that politicians would have a hard time saying no to. All products that have DRM should be forced to display a DRM warning message on the outside of the packaging in print, TV and on line advertising. The message should explain in simple terms what the DRM does. IE - requires on line connection all the times, Requires Disk in drive all the time, prevents back up copies...etc. There should be stiff fines for selling products with DRM and no warning label. Then let the market decide. DRM is toxic to computers and users. So the proper warning is the right thing to do.

Re:Need DRM Labeling Law (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619505)

Simple solution that politicians would have a hard time saying no to

Politicians say no to labeling laws all the time. Seems that for all the "gung ho capitalism is awesome" types, they'd rather all the customers be kept in the dark about what they're buying.

Re:Need DRM Labeling Law (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619585)

Seems that for all the "gung ho capitalism is awesome" types, they'd rather all the customers be kept in the dark about what they're buying.

Which is really a shame, as the only way capitalism actually works as intended is when the individual customer is sufficiently intelligent and informed to act as the regulating force in the market, and only take actions that are in their long term best interest.

Re:Need DRM Labeling Law (1)

femtobyte (710429) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619985)

Which is one of the reasons capitalism *doesn't* work. Information and disinformation are both products with value to different parties. Information helps the consumer and working class. Disinformation helps the wealthy and powerful. Guess which one gets produced the most, when production levels are set by the wealthy and powerful?

Re:Need DRM Labeling Law (1)

WizardFusion (989563) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619509)

This should be the first step.

ERROR! (5, Funny)

Guinness Beaumont (2901413) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619479)

A required security module can not be activated. Your comment can not be posted.
SecuROM has determined a debugging or an emulation tool is running. Please refer to the following procedure to remedy:

  • Please deactivate these tools before starting the program. It's not necessary to uninstall them.
  • If the problem persists, please send a SecuROM analysis file to...

Re:ERROR! (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620077)

We only see scrambled mess of characters in place of your message.

Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (0)

cornicefire (610241) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619511)

The EFF is heavily supported by Google and DRM breaks Google's business model. Is it any surprise that the EFF is saying this. But as Linus Torvalds says, DRM is just the same problem as cryptography and secure communication. If we want to have privacy and cryptography, DRM is just an extension of it.

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (2)

ledow (319597) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619569)

That's like saying that the OpenGL group is heavily supported by ATI and nVidia, and the suggestion to remove GPU's from computers in favour of a little man who draws the screen for you breaks their business model.

It doesn't mean that having the little man ISN'T a stupid idea, or that ATI/nVidia should be ignored for their opinion.

Assume for a second that Google *are* anti-DRM. Assume it has nothing to do with their business or (equally) is SOLELY because it affects their way to make money. Who are they going to support? Probably groups that are anti-DRM. Who listens to the EFF? People who want the opinion of an anti-DRM organisation.

Thus is Google support for EFF something that should be expected anyway, or is the EFF some huge front to push on Google's behalf? You can't really draw any conclusion from the facts given.

If two linked items seem unfairly biased or somehow malicious, try to reverse the positions and see what happens.

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (2)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619573)

The EFF is heavily supported by Google and DRM breaks Google's business model. Is it any surprise that the EFF is saying this.

Really, you're being silly. The EFF is older than google and has always been against this sort of thing. If you're going to make wild claims then you need to provide evidence to back it up.

Merely relying on an over developed sense of cynicism isn't actually evidence.

ut as Linus Torvalds says, DRM is just the same problem as cryptography and secure communication.

Linus Torvalds has said many silly things. I have no idea if he said this, but either way associating his name to it does not increase its credibility.

DRM is not the same as secure communication. In secure communication you're trying to prevent eavesdroppers listening in. With DRM you're trying to get unencrypted data to your target without them being able to intercept it.

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (0)

cornicefire (610241) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619747)

1) So what if it's older. They get huge bushels of cash from Google and the Brin foundation today. And so they dance like any hired gun. http://boingboing.net/2011/12/10/give-to-eff-today-and-your-do.html [boingboing.net] 2) Maybe the reason you don't know this is because your invite got lost: https://www.eff.org/event/eff-mixer-google [eff.org] 3) DRM is secure communication. The pirates are the eavesdroppers. Get a frickin clue. And Torvalds's logic is solid. Locking up my love letter so only my spouse can read it is the exact technological challenge as locking up my artistic creation so only the non-pirates can view it. http://www.linuxtoday.com/developer/2003042401126OSKNLL [linuxtoday.com] http://news.cnet.com/Torvalds-says-DRM-isnt-necessarily-bad/2100-7344_3-6034964.html [cnet.com] Quit being a sap for leeching business models. The EFF and Google just want to manipulate you into hating DRM so the money will keep flowing to them. DRM doesn't break the Internet, it breaks Google's business model. They're not the same thing.

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (3, Interesting)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620101)

1) So what if it's older.

Well it means that they were provably against such things before google came on the scene. Therefore google appear to have not modified the EFF's behaviour.

And so they dance like any hired gun.

[citation needed]

i.e. put up or shut up.

Show one thing where the EFF have gone against their stated goals as a result of google's influence.

3) DRM is secure communication. The pirates are the eavesdroppers.

There's no notion of "pirate" in the cryptography world. Please make some attempt to stick to established terminology otherwise understanding you is quite difficult.

The eavesdropper is the same as the recipient. That's the difference. Eve and Bob are the same person.

Locking up my love letter so only my spouse can read it is the exact technological challenge as locking up my artistic creation so only the non-pirates can view it.Locking up my love letter so only my spouse can read it is the exact technological challenge as locking up my artistic creation so only the non-pirates can view it.

Not even slightly. Pirates aren't eavesdroppers. Your spouse is the pirate. DRM is an attempt to make it readable but not copyable by your spouse.

Quit being a sap for leeching business models

That's an odd allegation.

Quit being a sap for leeching business models. The EFF and Google just want to manipulate you into hating DRM so the money will keep flowing to them.

I disliked DRM before google even existed. It was called copy protection then.

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (2)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619891)

So, the EFF is Google, which is why we're talking about the EFF opposing a Google-backed extension to the HTML5 spec? Google is really messed up, in that case...

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620007)

I can't decide of you're being sarcastic, or are just a massive troll for big content aggregators/owners.

Cryptography for private communication is keeping private things private. Cryptography for DRM is artificially limiting a commercial product in an attempt to maximize profit. Very, very different applications

Google's desire to limit/oppose DRM is somewhat perpendicular to either of these - they want access so they can provide search services that are as comprehensive as possible, and offer content-relevant advertising. They don't actually care what is in the content, as long as they can align their advertising services with whatever it happens to be.

Re:Of course the EFF hates DRM-- They're Google (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620045)

If we want to have privacy and cryptography, DRM is just an extension of it.

It isn't really the same thing, though.

Privacy and cryptography: Alice uses Alice's computer to securely communicate with Bob's computer (and presumably Bob on the other end), without Eve listening in on the conversation. For example, the goal of key-based cryptography is that only Bob can understand Alice's messages and be sure they're from Alice, while only Alice understands Bob's messages and is sure they're from Bob.

DRM: Bob uses Alice's computer to securely talk to Bob's computer, without Alice listening in on the conversation. To completely prevent Alice from listening in, Bob has to cooperate with the hardware manufacturer and OS author to prevent Alice from knowing or controlling what her own computer is doing.

It's that last part that makes DRM a problem. And to make it even more of a problem: What could be used by MediaCorp to force Alice's computer to communicate information to them about her computer's activities could just as easily be used by Russian mobsters to do the same thing.

Kept that one quiet didn't you. (2)

oobayly (1056050) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619535)

At least IPv6 day was mentioned before hand.

It was in the terms of use (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620021)

Rights restrictions on recognition of the day limited dissemination of the announcement until the day of the event.

Nice summary, a bit misleading (1)

cjjjer (530715) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619555)

Digital restrictions management (DRM) creates damaged goods that users cannot control or use freely

The last movie I watched via XBox Video probably had DRM up the ying-yang but it seemed to work ok, what damage are you talking about?

Re:Nice summary, a bit misleading (2)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619593)

what damage are you talking about?

May I borrow that video?

Re:Nice summary, a bit misleading (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619799)

Were you able to copy that movie to your tablet to watch it on an airplane?

Re:Nice summary, a bit misleading (1)

Technician (215283) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619831)

Now load that video onto your kid's ipad so he can watch it on your next long road trip.

Ever try to play your instant queue videos from Netflix on a road trip? Sorry, must stick to simple copy protection instead and take DVD's.

Tethering (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620001)

Now load that video onto your kid's ipad so he can watch it on your next long road trip.

PROTIP: You can use online-only iPad applications on a road trip if you have a mobile hotspot or a smartphone with a tethering plan.

Re:Nice summary, a bit misleading (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619923)

Will it still work when you want to play it on another device? Or when you (or someone who compromises your account) do something that annoys Microsoft and your XBox Live account is deleted? Can you watch it when you're bored because your Internet connection is down? Can you watch it while you're travelling on a train or a plane on your tablet or laptop? What about on the next tablet or laptop you buy, from a different vendor?

DRM? (1)

Tvingo (229109) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619557)

I can't say I've ever been affected by DRM because I just don't buy software or games anymore. Why complain about all these things having DRM, just don't buy it. Simple enough solution. If you aren't buying crap with DRM why complain about it? They'll figure out DRM is a problem real quick if no one is buying their shit.

Re:DRM? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619587)

Except they won't. Any declines in sales are blamed on piracy, and used as an excuse for strong copyright laws.

Re:DRM? (1)

Desler (1608317) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619613)

Well, yes, that's because they can point to the 10,000+ active peers on a torrent for their good. You whine abouy DRM then pirate it then wonder why they blame piracy. It's the perfect scapegoat. If the people against DRM would stop downloading the goods they'd have no way to blame piracy.

Re:DRM? (1)

jitterman (987991) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619905)

The GP was not claiming to be pirating, they just stated they don't buy any of it any longer. In this case, they're doing exactly what you suggest people do.

Re:DRM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619597)

Entitlement complex. That's why.

Re:DRM? (2)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619695)

If you aren't buying crap with DRM why complain about it?

Because manufacturers make affordable products only for the majority of users, not the minority of users. If only a slim minority of users abstain from works and devices that use digital restrictions management, manufacturers of devices and publishers of works won't see DRM-free as a selling point. Eventually, it'll become impossible to publish a work to a wide audience without DRM, as has been the case for TV video games since the mid-1980s when Atari introduced code signing on the 7800 and Nintendo introduced the CIC on the NES.

BTW O'Reilly offers (DRM-free eBooks) -50% today! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619583)

I know, this a shameless plug, but I'm not otherwise associated to them but just being a very happy customer and thought that someone here would be also if they just knew real benefits they offer for anyone who doesn't like to buy books with DRM-strings attached. Check the site details about the offer :)

Alternatively... (4, Informative)

Darth_brooks (180756) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619591)

You could go to O'Reilly [oreilly.com] and celebrate by buying any of their 50% ebooks. It jumps to 60% if you're like me and load up your shopping cart like a madman whenever their stuff goes on sale...

Isn't an Xbox a DRM system? (0)

cellurl (906920) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619611)

This is bogus. As others have said, "DRM done right doesn't get in the way". I don't see how anyone can build any software without DRM. Sure, I love Open Source, but businesses need stuff that works the way they want. We want to pay some money, have lots of competition and plan our businesses. I publish all kinds of free stuff, I pirate [some] movies, but I understand the balance here and don't advocate Anarchy (no DRM, steal everything) mentality.

Pirate our Speed Limit App. I am sure its out somewhere. We planned for it... [wikispeedia.org]

A PC isn't (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619775)

Isn't an Xbox a DRM system?

The idea as I see it is to use a PC instead of an Xbox 360. Like an Xbox 360, a PC can use Xbox 360 controllers and output video to an HDTV. But unlike an Xbox 360, a PC can run software that respects the user's freedom.

Re:A PC isn't (1)

cellurl (906920) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619967)

ok, lets see, I may agree with you. You want the PC and HTML to not have DRM. If thats what you mean, I agree with you. Keep the pipe open.
So, if I choose DRM model, I must use Silverlight or something outside the browser....
So maybe we agree.

Release.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619627)

Release.... THE STALLMAN

happy to see this day. (1)

nimbius (983462) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619635)

but saddened it doesnt carry the same clout on websites like SOPA did.

today you might want to check out the open source app store for android (https://www.F-Droid.org) and kick your facebook account to the curb.
LinkedIn is a recruiters dream, not an employment tool and is mostly spam anyhow.
http://www.freeshell.org/ [freeshell.org] offers affordable email and web storage so you can start to ditch google.
godaddy.com doesnt care about your privacy (but we all know this.) maybe check out places like http://www.dreamhost.com/ [dreamhost.com]
your local book store will be more than willing to sell you a fresh paperback or luxurious hardbook copy of that e-book amazon just nicked from your device.
Lastly, maybe try linux if you havent? just search for it (https://www.duckduckgo.com is a good alternative engine that doesnt spy on you) and find a flavour you like.
while youre browsing, you might want to check out the EFF's suggestions to make sure you limit tracking and increase security
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/04/4-simple-changes-protect-your-privacy-online [eff.org]

How to recoup development costs? (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620087)

today you might want to check out the open source app store for android (https://www.F-Droid.org)

What's the best way to recoup the expenses of developing a video game or other application that is distributed under a free software license? F-Droid considers the usual revenue sources for free software in home environments, namely advertisements and non-free add-ons, to be anti-features [f-droid.org] .

Lastly, maybe try linux if you havent?

Provided your Internet connection isn't capped to single-digit GB per month, you can download and try a live USB image. Just make sure to try all your peripherals and a suspend/resume cycle before committing to using GNU/Linux full-time.

Digitl Rights Management (1)

Whatanut (203397) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619649)

How has nobody pointed out yet that DRM stands for Digital Rights Management? Or did I just woosh it?

Restrictions explained (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619823)

How has nobody pointed out yet that DRM stands for Digital Rights Management?

As you correctly guessed, whoosh. To understand why you whooshed, ask yourself whose "rights" DRM protects. Then see Words to Avoid [gnu.org] to see why DRM opponents expand the R to "restrictions".

Re:Restrictions explained (1)

schnell (163007) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620201)

Then see Words to Avoid [gnu.org]

RMS lost his credibility in trying to define anybody else's lexicon with his irritating, self-aggrandizing "GNU/Linux" campaign. You can use his approved NewSpeak if you'd like, but I think the arrogance of anyone trying to tell me "Words to Avoid" is more likely to make me reject their suggestions out of hand.

The Right to Read (2)

SCHecklerX (229973) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619661)

Always the visionary:

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-to-read.html [gnu.org]

Re:The Right to Read (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43620089)

There is no "slshdot" in your email address...

Re:The Right to Read (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43620263)

It's just extremely well obfuscated. Spammer-bots can't even see the hidden ninja 'slshdot' in the first place.

Translation Today is whiny brats against rules day (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619671)

"Digital restrictions management (DRM) creates damaged goods that users cannot control or use freely."
Then DON'T BUY THEM. No one has forced you at gunpoint to use iTunes. Buy DRM free good.

"It requires users to give-up control of their computers and restricts access to digital data and media."
But also allows you to buy product at prices significantly lower than would be possibly if piracy could not be checked. Essentially effective DRM makes it so people like me can pay $1 for something instead of $20 because it keeps people like you from pirating it.

"Device manufacturers and corporate copyrights holders have already been massively infecting their products with user-hostile DRM."

THAT's not inflammatory (or accurate) at all. SOME people have done that (i.e. Sony rootkit). They should be sanctioned.

" Tablets, mobile phones and other minicomputers are sold with numerous restrictions embedded that cripple users freedom."

THEN DON'T BUY THEM. Buy a Linux laptop instead. No one has forced you at gunpoint to buy an iPad. BUT, don't be shocked when you can't buy "Awesome software product X" for your Linux laptop. The software manufacturer is in BUSINESS to make money and employ computer programmers like me and you. They are naturally going to release where they make the most money. That may be a DRM controlled platform. If you don't like it, go into business against them and release "Amazing Software Product Y" and release it for Linux. Good luck,

" The proposal at table in W3C to put DRM into HTML goes even further. "

FINALLY. Maybe this will mean my company can finally release its software using HTML5. Until we are able to release to HTML5 and protect our IP we refuse to participate in that market.

Signed,

A 20 year veteran software developer and business owner that employs 70 software engineers

IP is a seductive mirage (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619865)

Then DON'T BUY THEM. No one has forced you at gunpoint to use iTunes.

Countries do force their citizens at gunpoint to file income tax returns. Some of these countries require that tax returns be filed electronically using software that runs only on Windows.

Tablets, mobile phones and other minicomputers are sold with numerous restrictions embedded that cripple users freedom.

THEN DON'T BUY THEM. Buy a Linux laptop instead.

Good luck making a telephone call from a Linux laptop.

protect our IP

To protect your Internet Protocol address, use a firewall. For other meanings of "IP", see "Seductive Mirage" [gnu.org] .

Re:Translation Today is whiny brats against rules (1)

alexo (9335) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620249)

"Digital restrictions management (DRM) creates damaged goods that users cannot control or use freely."
Then DON'T BUY THEM. No one has forced you at gunpoint to use iTunes. Buy DRM free good.

What do you do when the following happens?

(a) DRM-free products become illegal (due to captured regulation)

or

(b) DRM-free products become unavailable (due to corporations realizing that 90% of the population are similar to the AC parent: either ignorant of the issue or are happy to give up their rights for a discount at the cash register)

a rose by any other name (1)

RichardJenkins (1362463) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619675)

calling it 'restrictions' is petulent and confusing. without a verbose disclaimer about what you mean and why youve corrupted the name it becomes confusing.

arguments against DRM are just as valid whilst avoiding cheap shots.

Re:a rose by any other name (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620141)

calling it 'restrictions' is petulent and confusing.

Why? It doesn't actually manage rights it manages restrictions.

Rights are things you are allowed to do legally. A software program cannot affect what you are legally allowed to do.

Restrictions are things which you are prevented from doing: precisely what DRM does.

It is a far more informitive name.

Re:a rose by any other name (2)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#43620219)

calling it 'restrictions' is petulent and confusing. without a verbose disclaimer about what you mean and why youve corrupted the name it becomes confusing.

arguments against DRM are just as valid whilst avoiding cheap shots.

What an ignorant Pirate!

Seriously, "When. In. Rome."
Really, we're showing a massive amount of restraint here, instead of just calling out anyone using DRM. For example: If you use DRM, then you're actively raping our childrens' and grandchildrens' and great-grandchildrens' minds. DRM is a Disgusting Racist Movement that aims to set Greedy Corporate Publishers apart as an artificial race of self entitled elitists to the detriment of all the real humans who create content: DRM permanently steals the public domain that all those lazy bastards got rich by exploiting. They didn't invent English, or Humor or ANY Literary Element, or Musical Themes or the concept of Instruments or even Movies -- Hell Hollywood is in California because the Movie industry wanted to STEAL Movie camera technology without Paying Patent fees to New England businesses! We give you copyright laws that last for THREE Generations of Humans! And this is the thanks we get from You Immortal Amoral Ingrates?! You give us DRM to ensure that even after 70 years or more beyond the author's life -- A time when EVERYONE alive now will be dead -- when the copies should finally be legally able to be remixed and added back into culture, that no copies will be able to be made at all thanks to your bullshit Digital Racist Movement?! I guess Immortals don't have to worry about having Kids labeled as FELONS because they shared cartoon clips with different backing music to their friends for a laugh.

You see, they're fighting dirty. Equating copyright infringement with theft -- "you wouldn't steal a car" -- and calling us the equivalent of Murderous Pillaging Rapists. We're beyond rational discourse here buddy. You must not do politics much. Whomever has the catchiest mud to sling wins. It's not about stooping to their level. We've got high-minded arguments too for the intellectuals, but we DO NEED simple antagonistic and UGLY comparisons to help sway the common man's mind and spark discussion.

"Oh, you've corrupted the name of Digital Rights Management, ehuuuue." You low down yellow bellied good for nothing Theif. Get bent Pirate. Bend right over as they steal your culture, and squeal your pathetic high minded complaints as they forcibly screw you from behind all the while demonizing you and your friends and family and children, and give the fascists fuel for the police state.

You might think that's the right thing to do, but it's not me. If they fight dirty, I fight dirtier.

On a side note (3, Informative)

rk (6314) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619693)

I'm old enough to remember when the term "minicomputer" was used to describe a computer that fit in a single room. Our desktops were "microcomputers" and our phones and tablets were "science fiction". :-)

Minicomputers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43619721)

These are not the minicomputers you're looking for. Minicomputers are bigger than PCs (microcomputers) but smaller than mainframe or supercomputers. Maybe handhelds should be called nanocomputers?

In response (2)

DiEx-15 (959602) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619793)

MPAA, RIAA, EA, Sony and all DRM users and makers demand congress to declare a "Piracy Day" where everybody on Earth must pay $1,000 in order to live or face a gabillionzillion dollar fine and eternity in prison.

Whether you use their products or not is immaterial. By God EVERYBODY steals! Everybody is a pirate and must be punished with extreme prejudice! Them dirty Hobbits are stealing our preciousss!!!!

The bill is expected to pass with 100% support and be signed into law since these groups were "nice" enough to pay for their run for office.

Another "day" (1)

Dunge (922521) | about a year and a half ago | (#43619895)

I'm against DRM as everyone else, but this is just another made up "day" who mean nothings.

Still don't have Diablo 3. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43620059)

I've boycotted this game since it came out. I'd love to play it, but I will not play any "always online" game.

DRM=Robbert Baron Tactics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43620123)

DRM is nothing more than modern-day robber baron tactics. Companies seem to be given a higher form of recognition than end users.

One of the reasons I'm a heavy non-commercial Linux/BSD user is because I want to be a Morlock and not an Eloi. I want to control my own digital destiny, not some company do it for me.

The Internet is slowly turning into walled gardens what with all the major companies creating little fiefdoms they want users to align themselves with. I would rather create my own services despite it being a bit more expensive and time consuming. I don't like being tracked for monetary purposes. I don't like being told what I can and cannot have on my computer for which I paid good money.

I refuse to own an Apple product, a Google device, anything that relies on a "locked in" marketplace. I'll do without the "cool" tech to have my freedom, thanks.

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