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Turbulenz HTML5 Games Engine Goes Open Source

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the go-forth-and-gamificate dept.

Open Source 27

New submitter JoeKilner writes "The Turbulenz HTML5 games engine has been released as open source under the MIT license. The engine is a full 3D engine written in TypeScript and using WebGL. To see what the engine is capable off, check out this video of a full 3D FPS running in the browser using the Turbulenz engine and Quake 4 assets. You can see some of the games already developed with the engine at Turbulenz.com. (Note — to try the games without registering, hit the big blue 'Play as Guest' button.) Also, IE doesn't have WebGL support yet, so to play without a plugin try Chrome or FIrefox."

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27 comments

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What? No IE 6 support?! (4, Funny)

Billly Gates (198444) | about a year ago | (#43623039)

Why? Ask any phb and they will tell you it is a must for any client. All corporate sites continue to function so the issue must be the developer!

Re:What? No IE 6 support?! (3, Interesting)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43623169)

Well, it's WebGL, so all they have to do is compile Turbulenz for OpenGL and release it as a native client.

:-P <- This is the straight face I'm not able to keep.

Seriously though, for your IE6 crowd if they can just release the game with a Firefox or Chrome redistributable runtime...

Re:What? No IE 6 support?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623417)

I have become a snap dancer!

Re:What? No IE 6 support?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623477)

Wooshing seems to be working quite well on whatever browser you're currently using.

Re:What? No IE 6 support?! (1)

narcc (412956) | about a year ago | (#43623771)

for your IE6 crowd if they can just release the game with a Firefox or Chrome redistributable runtime...

Any chance you can clarify this? The closest thing I could find was TideSDK [tidesdk.org] , though it won't have WebGL or web audio API support until the next release.

Re:What? No IE 6 support?! (1)

jakykong (1474957) | about a year ago | (#43626851)

I'm pretty sure the parent post was thinking that we could thereby get Chrome and/or Firefox onto the IE6 user's machine.

those that we do not speak of (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623407)

"Also, IE doesn't have WebGL support yet, so to play without a plugin try Chrome or FIrefox."

that's nice of you but can we just get a media blackout on all things MS, please? Thanks-a-bunch...

Re:those that we do not speak of (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year ago | (#43623439)

No. Grow up.

Re:those that we do not speak of (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623583)

"Grow up," says the guy that got all pissy about a joke on the internet.

Pot. Kettle.

Finally, some open source HTML (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623505)

I've always despised how closed source HTML has been.

Nice to see someone giving us permission to "view source."

Re:Finally, some open source HTML (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623585)

Under stupid laws such a DMCA, I bet it's illegal to disable javascript so that you can right-click as select "view page source".

Re:Finally, some open source HTML (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623981)

Ever tried to understand code of any substantial complexity that gone through obfuscator?

Would rather play games *outside* the browser (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623569)

I love me a browser game, sure, but only if they're text based (Ogame, AAA, etc).

Like java applets, you're always left wondering "how much better would this experience have been if it was a stand-alone app..."

The experience is almost exactly the same as Flash: long load times, bad frame rates, incredibly high CPU usage. The demo game is definitely neat and fun, but the controls are slow to respond and I get a lot of tearing and frame skipping when the screen is full of action, and I'm on a high-end gaming rig.

I *really* hope this doesn't catch on, or at most that it takes the place of those shitty Flash games we all knew and loved and forgot about 10 years ago.

Yeah, I know the tech is new and will be iterated and improved upon, but I still don't see why any game developer would take HTML5 games seriously (no, Zynga is not a game developer--they're a social media company). My guess is that we'll see a game like Runescape, with better graphics, as the pinnacle of HTML5 gaming. In other words, the best HTML5 game will be a crummy ripoff of some triple-A title that doesn't do anything well, but it'll be free and playable by kids wasting time in their schools' computer labs.

Re:Would rather play games *outside* the browser (1)

DuckDodgers (541817) | about a year ago | (#43623835)

I like the idea of HTML5 games in concept because it makes the game more platform-independent. As a fan of open source software, I think that's good - one less bit of incentive for people to buy something running a proprietary operating system.

The devil is in the details, of course.

Re:Would rather play games *outside* the browser (1)

You're All Wrong (573825) | about a year ago | (#43628291)

The problem in the past was that there were 14 incompatible platforms for writing games.
http://xkcd.com/927/

Re:Would rather play games *outside* the browser (1)

DuckDodgers (541817) | about a year ago | (#43635163)

I think compatibility is more likely for Javascript than most other cross-platform methods. The browser vendors are in a race for performance and standards-compliance. I follow the Tom's Hardware "Browser Grand Prix" tests with interest. The most recent is: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/web-browser-chrome-25-firefox-19,3459.html [tomshardware.com]

Re:Would rather play games *outside* the browser (1)

davidgaleano (2912229) | about a year ago | (#43623837)

What "demo game" are you having performance problems with?

WebGL is not part of HTML5 (1)

Assmasher (456699) | about a year ago | (#43623617)

Just for the sake of clarity.

It would be nice if a low level audio system WAS part of HTML5 though.

Then we could really game game game away...

Re:WebGL is not part of HTML5 (1)

davidgaleano (2912229) | about a year ago | (#43623721)

Is Web Audio [w3.org] not good enough for you?

Re:WebGL is not part of HTML5 (1)

Assmasher (456699) | about a year ago | (#43623909)

Yay! They picked one :).

I was wondering if it would be Google's (which it is) or Mozilla's (they had a good low level proposal as well.)

Thanks, I haven't evaluated it for a year, great to know I can finally manage the buffers myself.

Cheers!

WebGL is not part of HTML5? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43624753)

Since "HTML5" is basically a buzz word anyway (and actual HTML5 is just the markup language, parsing rules and DOM interfaces), how is it that WebGL can't be included as part of "HTML5"? It's a standard from a nonprofit standards organization (the Khronos Group) that's implemented multiple browsers, and the Web Audio APIs aren't HTML either, so I don't know what "clarity" you are actually purporting to bring to this conversation.

Why Not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43623633)

Javascript(!) crushing your quad core i7 battlestation PC.

How 'bout no! [youtube.com]

source available by nature? (1)

inputdev (1252080) | about a year ago | (#43623943)

First off, I admire this effort and the choice of MIT license, but I am also wondering whether the source is already available to anyone who plays the games, since they are run on the client? Am I missing something?

Re:source available by nature? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43624101)

The source would be available, though it might be obfuscated and/or minified. However, even if you have the source code, you can't legally copy it or otherwise redistribute it if it's not under a license that allows you to do so. Copyright still applies, even if you can see the source code--you can see the source of a book, after all, but that doesn't mean you can sell copies of it without getting permission.

Re:source available by nature? (1)

Zacqary Adam Green (2914329) | about a year ago | (#43626843)

The source was already "open" before today, but under a non-free license. It was permissive, just requiring you to give Turbulenz Ltd. the option to publish your game on Turbulenz.com, and letting you do whatever else you wanted. Problem is, that would legally require you to use the Turbulenz.com API in your game's asset pipeline, even if your game didn't really need any of its features. So the MIT license gets around this restriction, with the added benefit of Slashdot coverage because OMG FOSS.

demos require what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43626661)

faceplant , being a twit , or using a cia+ er g+ account
FAIL

Re:demos require what? (1)

davidgaleano (2912229) | about a year ago | (#43627853)

You do not need any of that to play the games. You can either play as a guest, OR if you want to save your progress, just create a regular Turbulenz account, there is no need to connect with other accounts if you do not want.
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