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Russia Captures Alleged American CIA Agent In Moscow

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the don't-put-your-faith-in-offbrand-fake-mustaches dept.

Government 195

wiredmikey tips this AFP report: "Russia on Tuesday said it had detained an alleged American CIA agent working undercover at the U.S. embassy who was discovered with a large stash of money as he was trying to recruit a Russian intelligence officer. Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB, ex-KGB) identified the man as Ryan C. Fogle — third secretary of the political section of Washington's embassy in Moscow — and said he had been handed back to the embassy after his detention. Photographs published show his alleged espionage equipment including wigs, a compass, torch and even a mundane atlas of Moscow as well as a somewhat old fashioned mobile phone. Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB) said Fogle was carrying 'special technical equipment, written instructions for recruiting a Russian citizen, a large sum of money and means for changing a person's appearance.' The FSB also said the U.S. intelligence service has made repeated attempts to recruit the staff of Russian law enforcement agencies and special services. The incident comes amid a new chill in Russian-U.S. relations sparked by the Syrian crisis and concern in Washington over what it sees as President Vladimir Putin's crackdown on human rights."

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195 comments

In Soviet Russian (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726551)

First post posts YOU!!

Bitcoins (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726583)

What if he would have been secretly paid Bitcoins?

Re:Bitcoins (1)

flyneye (84093) | about a year ago | (#43727053)

In Soviet Union, you don't come from U.S. embassy to buy large amount of hemp from undercover FSB officer, ..dude.

Re:Bitcoins (1)

elucido (870205) | about a year ago | (#43727219)

What if he would have been secretly paid Bitcoins?

He is the officer. The people he wanted to recruit should have been paid in Bitcoins.

Meh (1, Insightful)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43726587)

Turnabout is fair play.

How the FBI Busted Anna Chapman and the Russian Spy Ring [go.com]

No surprise - Putin has been trying to drag the US - Russian relationship back to Cold War times. He has become much more provocative with military probes around US territory, and has been dismissive of US diplomats. Apparently it plays well in Russia.

It looks like he is getting his wish. So much for the "reset" in relations.

   

Re:Meh (1)

lesincompetent (2836253) | about a year ago | (#43726655)

Putin has been trying to drag the US - Russian relationship back to Cold War times

Yes please, i love the cold war romantic atmosphere.

Re:Meh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726733)

Yes please, i love the cold war romantic atmosphere.

Protip: Look, but don't touch!

Sexy russian spy Anna Chapman [nypost.com]

Re:Meh (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | about a year ago | (#43726911)

Yep, i agree with you, it is better to have Russia as arch-devil, than,....what, North Korea? Don't make me laugh.

Re:Meh (5, Funny)

BarbambiaKirgudu (2578457) | about a year ago | (#43726713)

Let's call it CWII.

Re:Meh (2)

Aaron B Lingwood (1288412) | about a year ago | (#43727319)

Let's call it CWII.

We have already had a Second Cold War [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Meh (1)

BambarbiaKirgudu (2876515) | about a year ago | (#43728893)

That was "Second Cold War" / "Second" Cold War.

Re:Meh (1)

BambarbiaKirgudu (2876515) | about a year ago | (#43728969)

ColdWar within ColdWar (almost like a Matryoshka Doll) ... Hmm. Would 'nested' or 'recursive' be a better description?

BFD (5, Insightful)

CapOblivious2010 (1731402) | about a year ago | (#43727571)

I really don't understand all the outrage about spying. OF COURSE the CIA is spying on Russia - it's their fucking job to spy on Russia! And of course Russia is spying on us - it's their job, too. Once in a while somebody gets caught - but so what? You shrug your shoulders, say "OK, you won this round", and then you get right back to business. It doesn't mean either side is being "bad guys"; we shouldn't be surprised or upset when we catch one of theirs, and we shouldn't feel embarrassed when they catch one of ours (OK, maybe we should be embarrassed about being so inept we were caught, but not embarrassed about what we were caught doing).

News flash: the CIA spies on Russia and occasionally gets caught! In other news, water remains wet and rocks remain hard.

Re:BFD (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729007)

The issue is when you cross the line a little too far, i.e. you start bribing or buying off government officials as is being suggested here. Once that happens you are crossing from just spying to out and out corruption.

Re:Meh (1)

Nyder (754090) | about a year ago | (#43727775)

Turnabout is fair play.

How the FBI Busted Anna Chapman and the Russian Spy Ring [go.com]

No surprise - Putin has been trying to drag the US - Russian relationship back to Cold War times. He has become much more provocative with military probes around US territory, and has been dismissive of US diplomats. Apparently it plays well in Russia.

It looks like he is getting his wish. So much for the "reset" in relations.

 

This time it will be confusing. Our local policies are reading too much like Russia's local cold war policies.

Amateur (5, Interesting)

quarterbuck (1268694) | about a year ago | (#43726605)

This spy seems to have all the marks of an made-up-Amateur or a set-up. The guy is wearing a wig, has a hat over it (not dyed hair) even when he is on a diplomatic passport and is openly approaching Russians. Then the Russians have a camera crew and policemen waiting in the street to arrest him and oddly enough he is found to be carrying money, maps and more wigs in his bag. This seems like Americans set-up a honeypot and the Russians jumped on it. Probably the guy had been told already that this is his last assignment in Russia.
Either that, or the CIA decided to have some fun with a Rookie and set him up with a couple of wigs and told him to go on a "Top Secret Assignment" and the poor slob got caught.

Re:Amateur (4, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about a year ago | (#43726663)

Yeah he sounds a bit like Ben Zygier [wikipedia.org] to be honest.

Re:Amateur (5, Funny)

TWX (665546) | about a year ago | (#43726679)

Maybe Dan Aykroyd and Chevy Chase can make a movie about it...

Re:Amateur (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728905)

"Maybe your dick's not so dumb."

"Got me through high school."

Re:Amateur (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726735)

I'm not sure I see the tech angle on this /. story but I find it interesting that he had a plastic bag that says RFID Shielded.

Here's a picture of the blue RFID bag:
http://admin.new.rt.com/files/news/1f/11/50/00/48.jpg [rt.com]

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726893)

Did he have a CIA Id with him (or whatever they are supposedly using for identification, with big American eagle on it)? You forgot to mention an instruction how to recruit Russians, just in case he forgets what questions to ask, and an example of a contract to sign.
He is more like a clown who got lost in a big city.

Re:Amateur (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | about a year ago | (#43726923)

I would agree with you, but after watching the movie "Pain & Gain", i tend to disagree with you :D

Re:Amateur (5, Informative)

lgw (121541) | about a year ago | (#43726955)

"Russia on Tuesday said it had detained an alleged American CIA agent working undercover at the U.S. embassy

This spy seems to have all the marks of an made-up-Amateur or a set-up.

There are two kinds of CIA employees: "undercover agents" and those who have ever entered a US embassy. This separation is required by US law (after some casualness about this lead to many deaths, IIRC). If you've ever walked into an US embassy, you can never be an undercover agent, simple as that.

A goodly amount of "spying" is simply being in-country and collecting the local media and the local mood and reporting it back. What the government is telling the people and how the people are reacting. Research into local public records. That sort of non-secret intelligence gathering is still the CIAs job, and is probably what most of their employees abroad do.

It's also worth remembering that, unlike what movies might have you believe, the undercover agents don't personally "spy" in the sense of sneaking into government buildings and such. They develop relationships with people who are authorized to be in those buildings, or with "freedom fighters" who are shooting at those people, or whatever. Their job is to convince others to do the stuff you'd make a movie about.

Re:Amateur (5, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year ago | (#43727195)

You're assuming that:
A. Our federal government isn't totally fucking retarded.
B. Our federal government follows any of their own rules/laws/policies.
Both of which have been proven about as false as possible after this past week.
I've always wondered if our government was actually bad... or just inept boobs. You know, never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence... color me surprised to find out they are both malicious AND incompetent.

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728459)

"Russia on Tuesday said it had detained an alleged American CIA agent working undercover at the U.S. embassy

This spy seems to have all the marks of an made-up-Amateur or a set-up.

There are two kinds of CIA employees: "undercover agents" and those who have ever entered a US embassy. This separation is required by US law (after some casualness about this lead to many deaths, IIRC). If you've ever walked into an US embassy, you can never be an undercover agent, simple as that.

This cannot possibly be true, at least not in the way you've phrased it. This would disqualify from clandestine work anyone who lost their passport as a 14yo high school student in Paris. Perhaps you mean to suggest that clandestine operations are not meant to be run out of the embassy which would be correct and why we set up front companies around the world to replace the functions the embassy once served.

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728625)

If you've ever walked into an US embassy, you can never be an undercover agent, simple as that.

So all the Russians need to do, is to collect Passport/Visa photos from entry points of Americans entering the Country, and compare it with CCTV from outside the US Embassy, and they can figure out who is likely to be undercover? Seems way too easy.

Re:Amateur (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726997)

Or CIA had such success in their recruitment of Russian agents, they needed a dupe to make the FSB feel like their anti-espionage operations are working.

Re:Amateur (2)

SolitaryMan (538416) | about a year ago | (#43727001)

If this was some serious spy, this is not how FSB would have cashed on the catch. This thing would have been quietly dealt with between agencies or they would have just kept an eye on him as on a "known spy" to use for spreading misinformation or something.

Since he is some entry position diplomat, the only thing this catch is good for, is to get some anti-US outrage inside the country going.

No biggie, really.

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727015)

Meh. The unglamorous fact about real-life espionage is that it's a depressingly low-budget business. The CIA tries to avoid publicizing the fact, because it's not a good look when your budget is as big as theirs... but this is exactly the level of equipment used on real missions, more often than not. It wouldn't surprise me if this guy was exactly what the Russians claim he was.

Big whoop, really. We all know there are hundreds of CIA agents currently in Russia. At least this guy was lucky enough to have a diplomatic stamp in his passport.

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727203)

He's not a spy. He's simply poor bold man, who can't afford a smartphone with Google map. Therefore he has to resort to maps and compass.

Also interesting wording from AFP "CIA agent working undercover". Do CIA agents work in foreign country not undercover ?

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727235)

I was thinking EXACTLY the same thing - probably trying to flush out some other individual, mission accomplished

The Slashdot shill telling you NTSH (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727443)

The Slashdot shill telling you "nothing to see here". The same scum that told you American troops were NOT guarding and helping opium production in Afghanistan. The same scum that told you war-mongering psychopath Obama 'deserved' his Nobel Peace Prize. The same scum that tell you it is a GOOD thing that America mass murders Humans across the globe with its drone program. The same scum that tell you how excellent it is that Obama orders drone targets hit twice- the second time a few minutes later to slaughter the first responders helping the injured from the first strike.

Slashdot's owners ensure such shill comments are ALWAYS promoted to '5', knowing that they won't fool any informed person, but will certainly help the sheep here maintain the 'correct' outlook.

Re:Amateur (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727933)

One of the CIA's biggest secrets is that not all of them are fucking Jedi masters of spycraft. At the end of the day, they're a pack of government employees, after all.

Re:Amateur (1)

a_hanso (1891616) | about a year ago | (#43728601)

Also, he was caught with "written instructions for recruiting a Russian citizen"??

Protip: Leave double agent recruiting manual (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726621)

at home!

Does not sound like they got Jason Bourne on this one. In the good old days he would have been chopped up and thrown in the Moskva.

captcha: indolent

So in the absence of official denials... (2, Interesting)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year ago | (#43726653)

... is this bloke some kind of amateur Walter Mitty type, or is he for real?

Re:So in the absence of official denials... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726831)

doesn't matter he's going home on your dollar

When do we get the ... (3, Interesting)

Kittenman (971447) | about a year ago | (#43726671)

tit-for-tat expulsions that usually follow someone (innocent or guilty) getting nabbed? How long before the CIA nab a Russian agent in Washington DC?

Lopsided war (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726693)

Their spies are hot redheads, ours look like dimwitted fratboys. I can't tell if we're losing or winning.

Re:Lopsided war (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726757)

Their spies are hot redheads, ours look like dimwitted fratboys. I can't tell if we're losing or winning.

Who do you mean by our spies, comrade?

Re:Lopsided war (0)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#43726841)

I heard communists had no souls, but that takes it to a whole new level.

Re:Lopsided war (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726859)

Their spies are hot redheads, ours look like dimwitted fratboys. I can't tell if we're losing or winning.

Which would YOU rather be recruited by?

Re:Lopsided war (5, Interesting)

cusco (717999) | about a year ago | (#43727485)

I realize that was meant to be a frivolous statement, but there's an actual reason for that. The CIA has traditionally recruited from within the 'old boy network' of Ivy League fraternities and secret societies, people whose loyalty to the existing power structure they can pretty much guarantee because they were born into it.

Re:Lopsided war (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728541)

The Russians used 'swallows' (beautiful female operatives trained to use seduction to co-opt an intelligence target), so in a sense they do have an actual tradition of using "hot redheads" as spies.

Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#43726705)

Seems that way from the number of comments posted so far.

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726795)

The slashdot hivemind, like the rest of the internet, prefers bickering over political, religious, social, and occasionally tech issues over discussing things of long reaching consequences or unusual occurrence. Everything else, no matter how important or newsworthy, is ignored by the vast majority.

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year ago | (#43726885)

Except that this isn't unusual and won't have any long-reaching consequences.

A better explanation is that the GP hasn't noticed that Slashdot posts slow down around this time of day (GMT).

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (3, Interesting)

Areyoukiddingme (1289470) | about a year ago | (#43726839)

What's to talk about? The remarks about the blindingly amateurish nature of this guy have already been made. Honey pot or patsy, either way, we know damn well that Russians aren't recruited by the American Third Secretary of the embassy who toddles around with a bag full of wigs. Sounds like Putin called up Obama and said, "I need a Big Bad America thing in the news. What can you do for me?" and Obama responded with, "Hey Rob! Who do we not like in the embassy?" and there you go. Or vice versa. Does it really matter?

In short, we're bored with this story. It's "news" only for particularly lame values of manufactured news. We're so bored with it nobody is even bothering to generate conspiracy theories about this being a calibration test of fake spy stories, to see who reacts and how.

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (3, Interesting)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#43726999)

If you read a bit about the history of the CIA you'll see a lot of blindingly amateurish stuff. They still trust that "polygraph" voodoo which was a scam that came from the guy that wrote the Wonder Woman comic (no I am not joking).

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728355)

You might not be joking but you're wrong. William Marston created wonder woman John Larson invented the polygraph....

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726851)

the news story was on youtube this morning at 9 am, so it is a little late

Re:Maybe the FSB has silenced this site (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728539)

Or maybe people don't care much. I don't; it's (failed) boredom fodder. It's less interesting and newsworthy than Ghana catching a Canadian spy.

From Russia (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726759)

I call this mission improbable

yeah. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726775)

concern in Washington over what it sees as President Vladimir Putin's crackdown on human rights."

Coming from the US with its imprisoning of more people (by absolute numbers and percentage of population) than any other country in the world. Indefinite detention, torture, summary execution. Yeah. The US has credibility when it comes to human rights.

Re:yeah. (2)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#43726969)

Yes, GITMO etc removes the moral high ground, but that doesn't change things like a difficult journalist getting assassinated as a present for Putin's birthday last year.

GITMO (1)

tlambert (566799) | about a year ago | (#43727515)

Yes, GITMO etc removes the moral high ground, but that doesn't change things like a difficult journalist getting assassinated as a present for Putin's birthday last year.

Actually GITMO is precisely to maintain the moral high ground by providing extraterritoriality. The extraterritoriality is what makes it safe from enforcement of US law, and makes the president and his underlings safe from accusations of violating US law by condoning events on its premises.

This is exactly why it has not been shut down, despite the campaign promises of several presidents, including Obama. Once sworn in, they get a thorough briefing on everything, which includes a little sit-down about GITMO with the White House General Council, after which it stays open to aboid personal criminal liability for the staff in the executive branch, up to and including the president.

Re:GITMO (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728213)

precisely to maintain the moral high ground by providing extraterritoriality

That's precisely the opposite of maintaining the moral high ground.

Re:yeah. (-1, Flamebait)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43727135)

You seem confused, so I'll help you sort it out.

the US with its imprisoning of more people (by absolute numbers and percentage of population) than any other country

They are imprisoned for what are recognizable as ordinary criminal offenses, such as drug offenses. People in the United States are not imprisoned for things like singing songs that insult the president, such as this [globalpost.com] .

Indefinite detention

You are referring to Prisoners of War. Completely legitimate and a recognized standard. You can keep POWs in detention until the end of the conflict. Unfortunate that they made a bad choice of fighting for Al Qaida.

torture

The US waterboarded a total of three people [go.com] , the most recent of which was 10 years ago. The US has waterboarded at least thousands, or tens of thousands, of military pilots and special forces personnel both before and since in the same way. It is certainly a form of coercion. But torture has a legal definition, and waterboarding under those circumstances didn't meet that at the time. Or would you claim that the US actually tortured its service members?

summary execution

Killing people on the battlefield or in the theater of war isn't summary execution, but simply killing, and in no way illegitimate. The people killed were in the same status as these people [youtube.com] shot dead by the US Government without trial or warrant.

Yeah. The US has credibility when it comes to human rights.

Yes, it does.

Re:yeah. (3, Insightful)

cusco (717999) | about a year ago | (#43727543)

If they were actually considered POWs they would have to be accorded certain treatments, like visits from the Red Cross, decent treatment, freedom from torture, notification of their detention to family, and the like. Instead the Shrub Madministration invented a new and completely internationally unrecognized category of "illegal combatant" and pretended as though the Geneva Conventions don't apply to them. Even worse, the current administration continues with the farce, even though they acknowledged that it was actually illegal.

How blinded are you? What do you think the purpose of the Black Sites is, lovely vacation sites? You're too late, the previous administration would have paid you for posting nonsense like this, I think this one just relies on volunteers.

Re:yeah. (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43727743)

The POWs in Guantanamo do get Red Cross visits [cbsnews.com] . As to the rest of their status - in order to receive the full protection of the Geneva Convention as a combatant you have to obey the Law of War. Al Qaida doesn't do that, quite the reverse. Their basic strategy of directly targeting civilian noncombatants constitutes a war crime. They are quite rightly recognized as unlawful combatants. And do note, it isn't that this categorization is unknown internationally, but rather that various advocates refuse to acknowledge that it exists.

The black sites? Last time I looked they were for detention and interrogation.

Now, there are a couple of factors that make these discussions more interesting. First, is the fact that Al Qaida teaches its members to lie about their treatment and not cooperate.

Al Qaeda Manual Drives Detainee Behavior at Guantanamo Bay [defense.gov]

. . . Police in Manchester, England, discovered the manual, which has come to be known as the "Manchester document," in 2000 while searching computer files found in the home of a known al Qaeda member. The contents were introduced as evidence into the 2001 trial of terrorists who bombed the U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya in 1998. . .

The closing chapter teaches al Qaeda operatives how to operate in a prison or detention center. It directs detainees to "insist on proving that torture was inflicted" and to "complain of mistreatment while in prison."

Chapter 17 instructs them to "be careful not to give the enemy any vital information" during interrogations.

Another section of the manual directs commanders to teach their operatives what to say if they're captured, and to explain it "more than once to ensure that they have assimilated it." To reinforce the message, it tells commanders to have operatives "explain it back to the commander."

One consequence of this lying, and international pressure on their behalf, is that committed terrorists have been released who then return to Jihad again, killing who knows how many.

Recidivism rises among released Guantanamo detainees [reuters.com]

(Reuters) - The proportion of militants released from detention at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay who subsequently were believed to have returned to the battlefield rose slightly over the last year, according to official figures released on Monday.

In a summary report, the office of the Director of National Intelligence said that 27.9 percent of the 599 former detainees released from Guantanamo were either confirmed or suspected of later engaging in militant activity

Second, as does sometimes happen in war, service members will occasionally exceed their instructions, lose control, or develop a mental illness, and then engage in behavior that constitutes a war crime. Some people want to pretend that those actions are deliberate policy rather than the illegal actions of an individual or particular group. One prime example is the incident at Abu Ghraib. It resulted in a number of American soldiers going to jail, including the infamous Lynndie England [guardian.co.uk] . An isolated incident by a small number of soldiers that took an extraordinary number of pictures in a very short time, and gave a black eye to the US military and the United States. The actual events were magnified by the work of the media - the New York Times put stories and/or pictures on the front page 47 times.

Pay? Nobody pays me to post. But I do like to see the discussion occasionally enter the realm of facts even if it aggravates some people.

After all, facts that contradict some political view are "flamebait."

Re:yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728259)

I do like to see the discussion occasionally enter the realm of facts even if it aggravates some people.

Fact: If we tried the prisoners for first degree murder and executed those found guilty, the recidivism rate would be zero.

Instead we pay how much to keep them sitting around forever, then when someone whines we get a bullshit court that does a bullshit pony show on bullshit charges, sentences them to a bullshit sentence, then releases them so we can act all surprised and sorry when they kill someone again.

This behavior crosses all the lines. This is pure grade A malfeasant preschool temper-tantrum "I'll show you! You'll regret it waaaaaaaaah!" behavior, perpretrated by Bush, Obama and You. I doubt that the secret service would look kindly on anyone giving Bush or Obama the spanking they need though.

Re:yeah. (1)

Sabriel (134364) | about a year ago | (#43728781)

Although sometimes the torture is indeed deliberate policy. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/may/13/guantanamo-bay-hunger-strike-forced-feeding [guardian.co.uk]

On a related note, can you post any facts on whether the CIA had or has a policy of followup drone strikes on rescuers/funerals and/or of treating multiple civilian casualties as acceptable if it means another dead terrorist? E.g. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/19/world/asia/19pstan.html?_r=1&ref=world [nytimes.com]

I'm more than beginning to have the disturbing sense that the US government/military has stared too long into the abyss. Yeah, we know the bad guys are evil. Flying airliners packed with civilians into buildings is pretty damn obviously evil. But it's becoming less obvious how good those claiming to be the good guys still are.

Re:yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728357)

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/05/13/2212253/us-government-monitoring-associated-press-phone-records [slashdot.org]
It's hard to claim human rights high grounds when you pull stunts like this.

As much as the government will admit to the above, some claim that's merely the tip of the iceberg:
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/13/05/05/2329240/former-fbi-agent-all-digital-communications-stored-by-us-govt [slashdot.org]

Getting alot of mileage, but pot calling the kettle black is as appropriate as ever.

Re:yeah. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43728511)

That is why there are checks and balances.

Obama waits for probe before condemning IRS; Congress pounces [washingtontimes.com]

Having a good overall human rights record doesn't necessarily mean that nothing bad ever happens, but the system should respond to it in an appropriate way.

The AP scandal is pretty fresh, but I have little doubt it will provide the administration some very uncomfortable moments in the months ahead.

Re:yeah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728575)

Wow! you been drinkin' the cool-aide!

Take about 5 minutes to research any of your claims, and you will realize you are wrong on all counts.

prisoners in the US are both due to racism and politics. The percentage of whites committing crimes vs. persons of color committing crimes vs. the percentage of whites/persons of color convicted of crimes and serving time has an outrageous disparity. Especially death row. We have factories in prisons staffed by descendants of slaves working as slaves..

Private for profit prisons also need to fill their beds. Read up a little bit, and you will find a few judges who sent thousands of children to private prison in exchange for 6 figure bribes.

For a little history lesson, read up on cointelpro. You will find that many prisoners in the US, today are political prisoners.

Torture. Having been a child in Guatemala, I can assure you the US has been involved in torture for decades, and has been complicit in the torture, disappearance and murders of (at least) tens of thousands. The US, has been involved in torture in nearly every Central American state, and in E. Europe, as well as the Middle East, and Far East. Now, probably in Africa too. The US even has a torture / coupe training camp in Fort Benning GA. Ronald Reagan has another name outside the US, "Reagan the Butcher". He was complicit in genocide even.

"3 persons" I _know_ more people than that who were tortured and murdered by, and in service of, the US. I tried to keep it civil, but have to say, to this, Fuck you, you fucking lying sack of shit.

If you "define the battlefield" as anywhere and combatants as any post-pubescent person, then you can murder at will, right? We really need Nuremberg trials for Americans complicit in these crimes. Per well established International law, _and_ domestic law, every person in both the Bush and Obama administrations, and most of the American foot soldiers committing the crimes on the ground would be locked up or executed. (Clinton, Bush Sr., Reagan administrations, etc. too)

And, no, the US is a pariah state. It has zero credibility on human rights. What the US has are military bases all over the world. It is a short-term strategy. Eventually, (soon if the military keeps up its leeching of all our tax dollars), the US will collapse under the weight of maintaining its huge military machine.

Are you still confused?

timing? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43726793)

I don't doubt for a second that this was an American agent. But I would think in every situation there is a reason everything happens when it did. Why did the Russians nab him now. Why not keep him under surveillance let him reveal traitors to the FSB as they get recruited? They obviously were not all that serious or they wouldn't have promptly turned him back over to the US. So what is up?

Re:timing? (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year ago | (#43726875)

I don't doubt for a second that this was an American agent. But I would think in every situation there is a reason everything happens when it did. Why did the Russians nab him now. Why not keep him under surveillance let him reveal traitors to the FSB as they get recruited? They obviously were not all that serious or they wouldn't have promptly turned him back over to the US. So what is up?

When the article says "The incident comes amid a new chill in Russian-U.S. relations sparked by the Syrian crisis and concern in Washington over what it sees as President Vladimir Putin's crackdown on human rights.", it should probably say that it comes because of the chill.

See also, 'game' [wikipedia.org] .

This story sounds ridiculous (2)

mike449 (238450) | about a year ago | (#43726837)

A compass, a paper map of Moscow and a flashlight? Is this all CIA has in its arsenal? O yeah, a semi-literate "recruitment letter".
Another detail that make it sound even more ridiculous: an FSB guy lecturing Fogle on Russian primetime news about how spying is bad. Looks like some really bad spy movie.
I think this story was created by FSB for consumption within Russia. It is possible they knew more about his activities, but they are not telling the interesting stuff and for some reason decided to disclose this "evidence" that makes people laugh.

This is news for nerds? (1)

mishehu (712452) | about a year ago | (#43726945)

Not trying to start a flame-war here, but I've been seeing a fair amount of strictly politics related postings here lately. Could anybody please explain to me how this is on topic for Slashdot?

Re:This is news for nerds? (1)

fightinfilipino (1449273) | about a year ago | (#43727159)

there are definitely espionage and foreign relations nerds. this would also qualify under "stuff that matters", since incidents that affect the peaceful relations of two world powers would count as such.

Re:This is news for nerds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727315)

there are definitely espionage and foreign relations nerds.

foreign relations nerds?

?????????????

Fuck you, go back to whereever you came from.

Foreign Relations Nerds.

Fuck, why don't we have Football Nerds. Or Malt Liquor Nerds.

Christ almighty, Foreign Relations Nerds. Jesus almighty christ.

Re:This is news for nerds? (1)

cusco (717999) | about a year ago | (#43727551)

Just watch how much traffic a story about early brewing or distillation techniques gets, and you'll realize that there are malt liquor and liquor nerds.

Re:This is news for nerds? (1)

neo8750 (566137) | about a year ago | (#43727185)

nerds are into politics sometimes?

Re:This is news for nerds? (2)

gman003 (1693318) | about a year ago | (#43727253)

Story is about a spy, James Bond is a spy, Bond uses crazy gadgets, nerds love crazy gadgets.

QED.

Re:This is news for nerds? (2)

tlambert (566799) | about a year ago | (#43727559)

Not trying to start a flame-war here, but I've been seeing a fair amount of strictly politics related postings here lately. Could anybody please explain to me how this is on topic for Slashdot?

I'm guessing the flashlight he had was a Google Firesword?

Re:This is news for nerds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727713)

You know how China has paid astroturfers? [wikipedia.org]

Re:This is news for nerds? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about a year ago | (#43727929)

As mentioned in this slashdot discussion page he had a RFID shielded bag.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-05-14/russia-captures-us-embassy-worker-act-cia-recruitment [zerohedge.com]
Wireless is safe for "anyone" in the USA but we see the CIA understanding the need for a shielded bag.
We now know the NSA and CIA loves/trusts Google.
The need to buy a clean computer like device with cash to email from.
The CIA feels they can lure/own a Russian with $100k.
The going rate from the CIA is now $1 million.
New fratboy fancy dress party idea is super easy - cheapest wig, a cap and shirt. Hand out your own spy letters at the party with amazing offers.
Just watch for the Keep Geeks Busy types.

Somewhat old fashioned mobile phone (4, Funny)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#43726949)

Excuse me Sir. Your shoe is ringing.

Re:Somewhat old fashioned mobile phone (2)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year ago | (#43727589)

Excuse me Sir. Your shoe is ringing.

Which one?

Counter Counter Counter Intelligence (5, Funny)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43727021)

"We suspect this man is spy."
"Take his money, Tell him only lies, see where lies turn up."

"Maybe they know, we know, he is spy?"
"Possible. He has been searched?"
"He is carry a compass, torch, map of Moscow, mobile phone..."

"Yes, is spy. They expect we know. Use our lies to deceive. Make false leak to trick us... Kill him -- Wait, he has wig, yes?"
"Has not only a wig, but two."

"Two wigs? Ah! Is sign of double agent! Carry one wig, is a risk. Two is job application."
"You want I should not kill him then?"
"Of course not. Pay him standard fee; Send back to embassy. Tell this story to news, so CIA know he can not spy here. He can go home, work for us."
"Moscow Winter is the Father Land's greatest ally. Thin blooded American will do anything to escape it."

"One thing. Why we must speak filthy English, not Russian?"
"Everyone knows. Is basic spy training to trick double agen--- Wait, you are American SPY!"
::BLAM::
"No. I'm a Brit you poor, dead git."

Torch (0)

JustOK (667959) | about a year ago | (#43727049)

Isn't "a torch" and "a somewhat old fashioned mobile phone" the same thing?

Re:Torch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727287)

Isn't "a torch" and "a somewhat old fashioned mobile phone" the same thing?

No, he had a laptop from the same era. The FSB was confused by it booting on fire.

Re:Torch (1)

VocationalZero (1306233) | about a year ago | (#43728867)

Don't joke about that, that's how lp0 died.

Re:Torch (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727967)

Torch is British for flashlight.

Vienna Convention? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727251)

I'm surprised that nobody has brought up an obvious point:

Article 29 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations prohibits the arrest or detention of a diplomat.

The US Department of State even issues guidance [state.gov] to law enforcement on how to deal with issues in the USA. Even if the case of driving while intoxicated, the officer may remove the keys or prevent the diplomat from driving, but may not handcuff the diplomat or prevent him/her from leaving.

Sheesh (1)

fullback (968784) | about a year ago | (#43727261)

Every U.S. embassy has CIA staff.

Reset (1)

amightywind (691887) | about a year ago | (#43727263)

How's that Reset button workin' for ya Mr. President? I'm really glad you gave away missile defense. It has been quite a week for the Mau Mau.

Re:Reset (1)

tsotha (720379) | about a year ago | (#43728113)

Reset? It was "overcharge".

Torch! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727277)

Torch eh? Good thing he didn't light it on fire ahead of time - would have set his briefcase on fire!

In ex-Soviet Russia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43727351)

Spies kick YOU out!

Putin's crackdown on human rights (4, Insightful)

SysKoll (48967) | about a year ago | (#43727657)

Yeah, as the OP said, there is a lot of concern about Putin's crackdown on human rights. Why, the rumor is that he is using the tax administration to harass opponents [wsj.com] and that his chief Justice has grabbed phone records from news agencies [slashdot.org] that don't tow the line.

Fortunately, such things would never happen in the US.

distraction/diversion? (1)

nicoleb_x (1571029) | about a year ago | (#43727659)

You think that maybe this guy is a distraction/diversion? I sure do, and I suspect the Russians do too.

doesnt add up (4, Interesting)

fazey (2806709) | about a year ago | (#43728157)

This doesnt make sense. CIA operatives are better than this. First since when does the CIA write a note that can be used as evidence. Next, search for the translation of the letter... they wanted him to sign up for gmail. FFS gmail? Really? Then they would contact him via that email address in a week. This seems like Russian propaganda and not a CIA operative being caught. Operatives always have a way out, and they would repeatedly try the same guy. If they wanted him bad enough, he would have been kidnapped. Nothing about this makes sense.

Re:doesnt add up (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729031)

When you think about it, it actually makes perfect sense. What is easier to deny, A highly skilled operative that has high tech equipment and encryption or someone that acts like Maxwell Smart and uses common and cheap tech. Personally if I was setting up an operation where there was some likelihood of getting caught then the second option would be my choice as realistically most of the time you don't actually need anything more than what that guy supposedly had.

Cool (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728163)

Glad to see someone is keeping an eye on those people. Send more spies. We'll want some deeply embedded assets when they revert to a tyrannical hell-hole. Again.

McLovin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728439)

Should not have used his Hawaii driver's license

Equipment (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43728445)

show his alleged espionage equipment including wigs, a compass, torch and even a mundane atlas of Moscow as well as a somewhat old fashioned mobile phone

I think I finally understand the CIAs remarkable success record at killing Fidel Castro.

Sounds like inspector Clouseau (1)

Wild_dog! (98536) | about a year ago | (#43728757)

Are you sure this guy isn't from the Surete?
The description sounds like something from Get Smart or something else.....not a serious CIA operative.

Re:Sounds like inspector Clouseau (1)

Wild_dog! (98536) | about a year ago | (#43728761)

Oh right... incompetence was his disguise.

Operetta singer (1)

Max_W (812974) | about a year ago | (#43728895)

He looked more like operetta singer in this blond wig.
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