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Larry Page's Vocal Cords Are Partially Paralyzed

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the strong-silent-type dept.

Google 189

theodp writes "Last summer, unspecified voice problems caused Google CEO Larry Page to miss Google's Annual Shareholder Meeting, the I/O conference, and a quarterly earnings call. Now, Page has come forward and revealed that he suffers from partial paralysis of each of his vocal chords, an 'extremely rare' condition. Not unlike what Sergey Brin and his wife are doing with Parkinson's research, Page and his wife will be funding and overseeing 'a significant research program' led by Dr. Steven Zeitels of Harvard Medical School."

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189 comments

Get well (0)

unityofsaints (1213900) | about a year ago | (#43729693)

Get well soon Larry! Although I don't know how realistic that wish is with this condition :(

Re: Get well (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730011)

Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm! You have a particularly rancid rectum! My cock began drooling as soon as I thought of jamming it into the deepest reaches of your disgusting, feces-infested rectum and giving your insides a cock-smooch. I can't wait any longer! I have to shove my putrid cock into your asshole right now! What say you?

Re: Get well (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730897)

Next up:

Anonymous Coward has Haemorrhoids; Vows to Pay for Suppository!

Re: Get well (1)

TWX (665546) | about a year ago | (#43731515)

Maybe all that he has to do is to get a kiss from the pretty girl...

After all, it worked for Chris Stevens on Northern Exposure.

Shame it wasn't Eric (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729695)

That would be a good week for PR.

Only when (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729701)

all the rich people get all the world diseases, will the funding start..

Re:Only when (0)

swamp_ig (466489) | about a year ago | (#43729885)

If only the rich would get malaria. That's killed more people in history than any other cause, and there's very little research.

Re:Only when (4, Interesting)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year ago | (#43729985)

Bill Gates is looking into it and said if there was a cure he would buy it for everyone. So as much as people hate windows ... ... ... is the amount of cure he has to make up for.. :)

Re:Only when (5, Informative)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year ago | (#43730173)

Specifically the Gates foundation is working on eradicating polio at the moment, he just put $50 million in the pot and the taliban have finally given health workers paperwork to let them pursue their goal. He said on NPR the other day that his next stop after polio would be Malaria. You can say what you want about his Microsoft days, but given what he's doing now he's a great guy in my book.

Re:Only when (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730299)

You really need to see Bill Gates do his presentation on Malaria [youtube.com] .

Re:Only when (1)

Inda (580031) | about a year ago | (#43730495)

Don't confuse your liking Gates and liking his money.

His money does great things.

Re:Only when (3, Insightful)

Sun (104778) | about a year ago | (#43730723)

I loath a lot of what he's done, but I don't think divorcing "Bill Gate's money" from "Bill Gates" has any merit. I think this is response is just you trying to handle your cognitive dissonance [wikipedia.org] .

The man was a ruthless copycat and a predator who set the computer world back at least a decade. For that he deserves (and, to a certain degree, receives) scorn.

He is also a man who decided that his wealth should go to help make the world a better place for people whose trouble do not, usually, receive funds. For that the man deserves (and, to a certain degree, receives) praise.

Learn to live with these two facts, contradicting though they may seem.

Shachar

Re:Only when (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | about a year ago | (#43730793)

So, if I steal a dollar, and give it away, I should go to jail.

But if I steal billions, and then proceed to give that away, I should be held in awe?

The only reason he started doing this was because his wife convinced him that he needed to leave a legacy behind. That once he started doing it, he embraced it is not a problem, but his "doing good" is still laced with problems. For example, the Gates Foundation is now trying to monopolize donations. They want to channel all donations through them, and take a small % of the donations. And manage the donors. For some reason, all the major foundations hate that idea, especially the part where they give up the donors to the Gates Foundation. Gee, I wonder where that behavior came from.

You have a truly fucked up perspective.

Re:Only when (4, Insightful)

Sun (104778) | about a year ago | (#43730949)

I think it is important (though, I would be the first to agree, not common) to read comments in the context in which they are given.

If you steal a billion dollars, and then proceed to do good things with them, then you should be applauded for the good you did, while going to jail for the billion you stole.

Shahcar

Re:Only when (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year ago | (#43731091)

They want to channel all donations through them, and take a small % of the donations. And manage the donors. For some reason, all the major foundations hate that idea, especially the part where they give up the donors to the Gates Foundation. Gee, I wonder where that behavior came from.

Monopolizing philanthropy next?

Re:Only when (1)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about a year ago | (#43731641)

I am not convinced that Microsoft "set the world back at least a decade."

If anything, Microsoft's dominance in the personal computer market actually was a good thing in the beginning. Microsoft achieved its dominate position by delivering what people wanted during a time when the multitude of IBM PC clone manufacturers were pushing their machines out the door and needed an OS to install on them. The market flooded with cheap clones and the technical support for most of these machines were non-existant. Microsoft saw a market and took the lead by marketing directly to the users as well as the OEMs. At first these machines were marketed as "MS-DOS compatible" later the marketing became "Windows compatible". Consumers considered having Windows installed as a good thing. I think most consumers today still feel that way.

It was Microsoft's methods of maintaining that dominance that had detrimental effects to upstarts and smaller companies I saw the writing on the wall when Microsoft started using its operating system dominance to dominate the office software application market. While I detest the tactics that they used, one product in particular was actually good - Microsoft Excel. It was their bundling of Excel into 'Office Suites' and sabotaging the Windows API in order to give third-pary applications a disadvantage that was pretty "evil". Of course there is more to computing than word processing and spreadsheets and Microsoft's dominance in this area forced independent developers to work on other applications.

Microsoft's ability to unify all the device drivers into a Windows API combined with their work in delivering affordable compilers and development suites made it possible for a lot of independent software vendors to exist. This offsets any damage they may have theoretically caused in the office or OS space.

Re:Only when (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43731499)

Harm vs good Bill Gates wins. He will do more for the world than all the whiners on Slashdot combined.

Re:Only when (2)

jd2112 (1535857) | about a year ago | (#43731631)

Don't confuse your liking Gates and liking his money. His money does great things.

You mean his money escaped from his bank account and started a charitable foundation all in its own? His money must be a lot better than mine. My money frequently escapes never to be seen again.

Re:Only when (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#43730643)

Does this come with any of those rumored patent agreements?

I would hate to see people who avoided polio because of Mr. Gates generosity die of something else that could have been treated but patent agreements prevented them from getting affordable treatment. Buying patents on some drugs and making them free to produce would likely save a great many lives. It would also prevent the situation where a charity kills off jobs the locals need by killing the market for that good.

Re:Only when (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year ago | (#43731479)

The rumored patent agreements do sting; but if you pour money into something I'm sure you'd want a receipt. I would be in his business mind set to do that.

If he gets a cure for those things (he's got the money to get it done). Then I'm happy that he fucked off a load of geeks for 30+ years with some software. Remember with 99.9% of mosquito malaria gone we get 0.01% for aids zombies. /lerning wivf siyence is fun

Re:Only when (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#43731557)

Then it is no longer charity and all the tax repercussions that go with that change. If there is quid pro quo then it is not charity.

Re:Only when (1)

ciderbrew (1860166) | about a year ago | (#43731647)

From wikipedia:
"To maintain its status as a charitable foundation, it must donate at least 5% of its assets each year.[17] Thus the donations from the foundation each year would amount to over US$1.5 billion at a minimum."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_%26_Melinda_Gates_Foundation [wikipedia.org]

[17] http://www.savewealth.com/planning/estate/foundations/ [savewealth.com]

Re:Only when (1)

jhoegl (638955) | about a year ago | (#43730809)

correction, 1.5 billion. He estimates 4 or 6 billion to eradicate it.

Re:Only when (1)

citizenr (871508) | about a year ago | (#43731465)

He does this because malaria was killing his cheap OIL RIG labor in Africa.

Re:Only when (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43731011)

Will he buy everyone a cure for Windows?

Re:Only when (2)

mds820 (944427) | about a year ago | (#43730013)

If only the rich would get malaria. That's killed more people in history than any other cause, and there's very little research.

Malaria is a top priority of the The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in both funding R&D and practical prevention.

http://www.gatesfoundation.org/What-We-Do/Global-Health/Malaria#OurStrategy [gatesfoundation.org]

Re:Only when (1)

Cutterman (789191) | about a year ago | (#43730785)

Very little research??? My Pa (a physician epidemiologist) spent his whole life researching malaria and I can assure you that there is PLENTY of malaria research. The Cutter

Re:Only when (5, Insightful)

werewolf1031 (869837) | about a year ago | (#43730159)

all the rich people get all the world diseases, will the funding start..

Not everything that improves health and quality of life for many, needs to be done for purely altruistic motivation. Better to have research funded for selfish reasons - which then benefits others as well - than to not have the research done at all.

Re:Only when (0)

jhoegl (638955) | about a year ago | (#43730833)

It is a detriment to society that a 3d gun was printed before a 3d medical scalpel.

Re:Only when (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43731087)

the tolerances for machining scalpels are incredibly smaller than the tolerances in making gun parts. That a gun could be made before a scalpel when refining the technology is a matter of limitation not a matter of moral choice.

Re:Only when (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year ago | (#43730255)

I suspect to see more CEOs will be developing this condition . . . right around the time to report earnings and analyst conference calls.

Re:Only when (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year ago | (#43730713)

How much did you care about this disease, 12 hours ago?

Re:Only when (1)

dcooper_db9 (1044858) | about a year ago | (#43731005)

In many cases the money to develop pharmaceutical treatments is readily available but people cannot afford them. I have a disease, Polyarteritis Nodosa, that paralyzed my vocal chord, my left arm and my right shoulder. I've since recovered my vocal chord and use of my left arm. I also have Crohn's disease. I'm tired most of the time and limited in my ability to work. My disease is entirely controllable with a range of biologic drugs (Remicade, Humira, etc). Unfortunately, even though I now have heath insurance I cannot afford the drugs. I've spent about $200K of my own money just to survive, now I don't have the money to live.

Lip reading software would be good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729709)

And probably not too far off with current technology.

And what do we learn from this ? (5, Interesting)

Foske (144771) | about a year ago | (#43729729)

No matter the number of digits in your bank account, in the end you're still human... A very complex and wonderful piece of engineering, way above the complexity that we understand. Kudos for funding research, and all the best for this man...

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (-1, Flamebait)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year ago | (#43729757)

you're still human... A very complex and wonderful piece of engineering...

Ummm... (maybe a particular case of Poe's law...) anthropomorphising [wikipedia.org] or "intelligent creation"-ist?

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

tgd (2822) | about a year ago | (#43730347)

you're still human... A very complex and wonderful piece of engineering...

Ummm... (maybe a particular case of Poe's law...) anthropomorphising [wikipedia.org] or "intelligent creation"-ist?

As far as I can tell at most software companies, random experimentation and tweaking does pass for engineering...

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729775)

...A very complex and wonderful piece of engineering, way above the complexity that we understand...

You're talking about perl here, right?

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729853)

Replying to myself: That would be 'Page', not 'Wall'. D'oh!

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

katsh (2760437) | about a year ago | (#43729991)

i believe he said "wonderful". clearly he's talking about bash

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | about a year ago | (#43729979)

And what do we learn from this ?

No matter the number of digits in your bank account, in the end you're still human...

You mean to tell us you never expected this until today's epiphany?

And all the best wishes to Larry from me too.

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

fazig (2909523) | about a year ago | (#43730051)

No matter the number of digits in your bank account, in the end you're still human... A very complex and wonderful piece of evolution, way above the complexity that we understand. Kudos for funding research, and all the best for this man...

With that I can agree. The term 'engineering' implies some kind of intent.

Even if there isn't any deeper intrinsic meaning in our existence it doesn't make make the effects evolution caused less fascinating.

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

GauteL (29207) | about a year ago | (#43730265)

"A very complex and wonderful piece of engineering"

On the contrary. We suffer from severe race conditions in the brain, we have obsolete and potentially dangerous "features" (i.e. the appendix). Replacement parts are hard to come by and we are very, very difficult to service. A simple service procedure can lead to catastrophic system failure. We're also got extremely poor interoperability with each other, leading to very large knowledge loss in transmission between systems and often disastrous and destructive intra-system interaction.

We perform impressive tasks in the same way that a PC running Microsoft Windows and Autodesk Inventor can perform impressive tasks. But like those two systems we are not so much engineered as stuck together with gaffa tape from millions of smaller components developed over a large number of years. Perhaps the best way to describe us is that we arose organically without any real engineering oversight.

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (-1)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about a year ago | (#43730303)

Kind of sad that he's been given the power to direct the efforts of a large number of respected medical professionals to address something that is extremely rare and neither crippling nor life threatening. What sort of work are they being taken away from to deal with his insignificant little problem, I wonder.

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (1)

michaelmalak (91262) | about a year ago | (#43730345)

No matter the number of digits in your bank account, in the end you're still human.

No matter how many digits King Louis XIV had in his bank account, he was still limited by the speed of horses for transportation and communication.

"Immortality" will probably happen within this century or millennium.

But then, we're ultimately limited [case.edu] by available matter/energy in the universe.

Re:And what do we learn from this ? (3, Informative)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year ago | (#43730933)

in the end you're still human... A very complex and wonderful piece of engineering, way above the complexity that we understand.

Look up human. It means something that is exhibits some of the characteristics of a human, any stricter definition excludes folks with disabilities, which are actually human. That lowers the bars for machine intelligence to become human... I digress.

Humans are pretty complex, but it's not above the ability for us to understand the complexity. A single human can specialize on familiarity with a small part of the human structure, there are enough such humans to divide humans into small enough pieces that their complexity can be fully knowable. We do know something of humans, we learn more every day, and what we have discovered doesn't point to them being engineered.

If you were an engineer, would you supply blood to an eye's retina's cones from the back side, to allow the detection cones to be unobstructed, and avoid needing to route the blood through a hole in the visual field? It would seem a cephalopod is more likely to be engineered than a human, their retinas aren't flippin' upside down, so they don't have blindspots in their retinas like humans do!

If you were an engineer, would you use larger longer vertebrae in one's vertical spine structure or a bunch of smaller ones? The advantage of the smaller bones is that they can swivel more, yet humans can turn only around 90 degrees due to the muscle and tendon configuration; The effect is just a series of small weak links in the spine's chain -- why are those lumbar vertebrae so damn small that they don't hold up over the intended lifetime of use and thus cause back problems? It would seem a giraffe is more likely to have been engineered than a human.

The list of horribly inept design flaws in a human is staggering. Nerves, under the feet?! Hair that gets so oily you must wash it regularly? Embryonic yolk sacks that waste energy developing then disappear, unused? No. There is no evidence for an intelligent designer; I just can't believe that ANYONE would be this daft, especially when they supposedly created BETTER designs in other species first -- I mean, unless.... Unless Humans were meant to be the butt of some cruel genetic joke?!

It would seem that if humans were engineered, it was a job undertaken by a malicious spite filled asshole, or an utterly unintelligent designer. This design looks like it was done haphazardly, perhaps by pure random chance, just slapping together features and picking the first model that doesn't break and meets the basic needs.

Humans are not finely crafted organic machines, they're a hodge podge of tacked together features shipped to mother nature with apologies and promises of a patch for the bugs in the next version! It's foolish to think humans are a piece of engineering wonder. Oh, humans are complex, one marvels at the scale of things -- but the wonder is not at the beauty in engineering elegance, it's that they even function at all given the design flaws!

Shouldn't have made that deal... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729751)

He gets billions, and Ursula gets his voice.
Oh well, lots of people would take that deal!

Re:Shouldn't have made that deal... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729785)

If only he'd kissed the girl when he had the chance.

Re: Shouldn't have made that deal... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729803)

Larry Page was a former merman. It all makes sense now.

So? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729767)

News for fanboys, stuff that doesn't matter?

I'm tellin ya... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729771)

We go out and get those top 10 richest people on the planet... You know the ones that own 60% of the world and all the stuff in it...

Infect them with aids.. Give them all cancer. Heck a whole bunch of diseases.. Toss in the flu and common cold.

We'll have cures for all of it by the end of the year.

It's time we start exploiting a valuable resource. Rich people.

We're not currently using them for anything but placeholders...

Re:I'm tellin ya... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729909)

No we won't. You obviously have no concept of the amount of money and time it takes to develop "cures" for most diseases. The personal wealth of these people is close to the order of magnitude of money that can be spent researching one of these diseases over the course of a single year and that doesn't even factor in the number of years (man hours and simply waiting for enough accurate data to be collected) it takes in the end to find a "cure," if there is one. [I wrote it as "cure" because I think the word is frequently used to infer a quick-acting, life term treatment when in many cases that is not and may never be possible]

Re:I'm tellin ya... (1)

Ryanrule (1657199) | about a year ago | (#43730655)

Perhaps, but who cares? We are interested in the result here. One dies? Infect the next in line.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (4, Insightful)

Ash Vince (602485) | about a year ago | (#43730699)

No we won't. You obviously have no concept of the amount of money and time it takes to develop "cures" for most diseases. The personal wealth of these people is close to the order of magnitude of money that can be spent researching one of these diseases over the course of a single year and that doesn't even factor in the number of years (man hours and simply waiting for enough accurate data to be collected) it takes in the end to find a "cure," if there is one. [I wrote it as "cure" because I think the word is frequently used to infer a quick-acting, life term treatment when in many cases that is not and may never be possible]

Most medical research nowadays is done by drug companies. They are not interested in "cures" they are interested in finding a drug to manage a particular condition, that way they get to make tons of money from all the repeat prescriptions of their creation. If they came up with a cure for that condition they only get the money from a single prescription.

If they created a single pill that would cure and vaccinate you against all the worlds diseases they would all go bankrupt within a decade, even if they could sell the pill for $1 million.

So who knows what is possible when the corporations who fund (and hence choose the direction of) most medical research are not interested in looking? Instead they come up with crap like Viagra as that is where the money is.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (1)

Splab (574204) | about a year ago | (#43729989)

Erm, Steve Jobs died of cancer; a cancer that might very well have been treatable, had he not been absolutely mental and gone for "natural" cure.

Not only do you need funding, you also need someone who believes in science (like Bill Gates, whom by the way does a heck of a lot for research).

Re:I'm tellin ya... (4, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | about a year ago | (#43730089)

"a cancer that might very well have been treatable, had he not been absolutely mental and gone for "natural" cure."

Yeah, its ironic isn't it that the man who ran such a high tech company reliant on cutting edge science would head off down the hippy bullshit road to cure himself of cancer instead of taking advantage of 50 years of medical research. It just shows that having a high IQ doesn't necessarily prevent someone from being a complete imbecile.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730213)

Not sure where you get the high IQ approbation. My impression is that he was mostly just a lucky douchebag.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (1)

sg_oneill (159032) | about a year ago | (#43730297)

Jobs was kind of always into the hippy shit. 60s lsd head and all that. He did realise eventually that it was time to hand it over to the pros. Unfortunately by that stage it was too late.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (3, Informative)

sg_oneill (159032) | about a year ago | (#43730319)

He had pancreatic cancer. Its generally one of those cancers where your fucked no matter how you try and attack it. He certainly didnt help his case with the daft hippy crap, but its unlikely a full science approach would have saved him.

Pancreatic cancer is a death sentence generally.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730547)

And its one of a couple types of Cancers one can contract - thus on the 'conspiracy theory' sites is claimed to be an assassination method.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (4, Informative)

pseudofrog (570061) | about a year ago | (#43730907)

Steve Jobs had a rare form of pancreatic cancer that can actually be cured in some cases, according to this interview [usatoday.com] and other sources. His doctors recommended a radical surgery to prevent it from spreading, but he delayed surgery for nine months because of his belief in non-scientific alternatives. It is unclear if this delay made a difference, but it's possible that he could have been full-blown cured had he opted for surgery right away.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730337)

I think you need to be a bit more like Bill Gates and do some of your own research. Pancreatic cancer isn't very "treatable" at all. The 5 year survival rate is 6%. Foregoing regular treatment and trying something different makes perfect sense in this case. If you found out you had pancreatic cancer and were given the choice between trying the standard treatment that has a 6% survival rate and trying something else which would you choose?

Re:I'm tellin ya... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730501)

If you found out you had pancreatic cancer and were given the choice between trying the standard treatment that has a 6% survival rate and trying something else which would you choose?

The one with the higher percent survival rate. If no percent survival rate can be found, one should assume it to be zero. You're telling me you'd do something different?

Re:I'm tellin ya... (1)

the_B0fh (208483) | about a year ago | (#43730829)

What's the survival rate for this thing called life anyway?

Re:I'm tellin ya... (3, Insightful)

h4rr4r (612664) | about a year ago | (#43730693)

The one with the 6% survival rate, vs the 0% one the alternative offers.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (4, Interesting)

tgd (2822) | about a year ago | (#43730409)

Erm, Steve Jobs died of cancer; a cancer that might very well have been treatable, had he not been absolutely mental and gone for "natural" cure.

Not only do you need funding, you also need someone who believes in science (like Bill Gates, whom by the way does a heck of a lot for research).

One problem with very successful people -- they equate success in one field with success and expertise in all fields. Its a common problem, even among things like Nobel winners. They assume success (or luck) in their field makes them somehow an expert in anything they take an interest in.

IMO, that's always been one of Gates' strong points -- he knew what he knew and knew what he didn't know, and always surrounded himself with people who could compliment his expertise. Jobs always seemed the exact opposite.

Re:I'm tellin ya... (1)

Ash Vince (602485) | about a year ago | (#43730817)

Erm, Steve Jobs died of cancer; a cancer that might very well have been treatable, had he not been absolutely mental and gone for "natural" cure.

Not only do you need funding, you also need someone who believes in science (like Bill Gates, whom by the way does a heck of a lot for research).

It is worth remembering that the only treatments for Pancreatic Cancer are: Surgery, Radiation Therapy or Chemotherapy. Ok, he probably should have gone down the surgery route sooner than he did (he waited nine months) but the other two options both suck.

Many people choose to die of cancer rather that go through the shit of Chemo or Radiation Therapy as they both utterly ruin your quality of life for the time you have left for a very low probability of success anyway. By choosing to avoid these two treatments you can actually make the most of the time you have left and remain relatively active.

Slightly Unethical Plan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729787)

If more influential billionaires and/or their relatives come down with obscure diseases, then think of how much money and awareness will go to those causes.

I suffer a similar and more serious condition (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729793)

I have PPP (partially paralyzed penis), my penis only works some of the time.

Re:I suffer a similar and more serious condition (1)

cjjjer (530715) | about a year ago | (#43730525)

Isn't that typical of all Anonymous Coward's?

Prostate cancer (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729815)

Brin, who began donating to Parkinson’s research in 2005, accelerated that giving after he learned in 2008 he has a flawed gene that presents him with a 50 percent chance of getting the disease by age 70.

But, regardless of genetic background, there's a higher probability of developing prostate cancer by the age of 70. From Wikipedia:

Autopsy studies of Chinese, German, Israeli, Jamaican, Swedish, and Ugandan men who died of other causes have found prostate cancer in thirty percent of men in their 50s, and in eighty percent of men in their 70s.

Also,

People with prostate cancer generally encounter significant disparities in awareness, funding, media coverage, and research—and therefore, inferior treatment and poorer outcomes—compared to other cancers of equal prevalence. In 2001, The Guardian noted that Britain had 3,000 nurses specializing in breast cancer, compared to only one for prostate cancer. It also discovered that the waiting time between referral and diagnosis was two weeks for breast cancer but three months for prostate cancer. [it goes on...]

Given these disparities, and since prostate cancer is far more prevalent than any of these genetic diseases, IMHO prostate cancer research would be a far better target for any donations.

The difference is obvious. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729883)

Hey i'm going to specialize in tittys!

Hey i'm going to specialize in assholes!

One of those you don't wanna hang around... or fund.

Why worry be happy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730161)

You can always find things to worry about, things that might kill you. I can guarantee you SOMETHING WILL kill you, and worrying about what that something will be isn't productive!

Enjoy the life you have while you have it.

Re:Prostate cancer (5, Interesting)

Kiwikwi (2734467) | about a year ago | (#43730267)

Prostate cancer is very common among older men, but it's more often an annoyance than a killer, since people usually die of other causes before the cancer can kill them.

To quote the doctor treating one of my relatives, it's a cancer you die with, not of.

The relative 5-year survival rate is nearly 100%. The relative 10-year survival rate is 98%. The 15-year relative survival rate is 93%.

(US numbers) [cancer.org]

That's why prostate cancer has low priority, compared to e.g. breast cancer, which has a relative 1-year survival rate of 96%, and 85% for 5 years (UK numbers [cancerresearchuk.org] ).

Re:Prostate cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730875)

People also don't usually die from paralyzed vocal chords.

Would you really rather extend your life than improve its quality?

Some advice. (5, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year ago | (#43729835)

Don't yell as much at your employees, throw a chair once in a while.

Re:Some advice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730611)

I know this is a joke, but I don't think Larry Page has ever yelled at a person in his life. It's just not in his character.

Re:Some advice. (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | about a year ago | (#43731341)

Don't yell as much at your employees, throw a chair once in a while.

I thought people were not listening.

Oh no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729931)

...there goes all of Googles Star-Trek-Computer-style voice-activated interface research projects.

omg get well larry (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43729937)

i thinkin about u

Nothing wrong with it, but... (1)

oldhack (1037484) | about a year ago | (#43729951)

Some rich people get sick with a rare condition, they fund research addressing it. Sure, others may benefit from it as well, but it's not exactly selfless philanthropy, is it.

BTW, wired is nothing but bullshit hype. It always has been, and fuck me if I can figure out how they managed to still be in business.

Re:Nothing wrong with it, but... (2)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about a year ago | (#43729975)

So what? No one is asking you to kiss his backside because of his good deeds. If his cash helps find a cure for his disease, good for him, and we'll benefit as well. Better than spending it on another butt-ugly yacht.

Re:Nothing wrong with it, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730301)

Reminds me of when I got solicitations from the Christopher Reeve to "help find a cure so that spinal cord injury victims will be able to walk again in my lifetime." I didn't donate. Maybe he would've been better off teaming up with a celeb with a different disability so they could pitch each other's causes.

Re:Nothing wrong with it, but... (1)

AvitarX (172628) | about a year ago | (#43730349)

Wired is in business because they figured out that basically free print ($.50 an issue) laden with adds translates really well to actually free and laden with adds on the internet.

Re:Nothing wrong with it, but... (1)

Sarten-X (1102295) | about a year ago | (#43731143)

Humans aren't evolved for philanthropy. Our brains care most about our own situation. When we hear "Millions of people suffer from this condition", we shrug and move on. It's just vocal cords, or it's just a stroke, or it's just depression. Once a particular condition affects us personally, we become fully aware of just how bad it really is. That's when we realize how much we take our voices for granted, or how difficult our life is without even a small part of our cognition, or how crushing sadness can affect our daily lives. That's when our brain now only allows us to donate time or money, but compels us to do something in the hope of getting relief. This is why so many nonprofits have awareness campaigns. The average person is utterly unaware of how bad life can be, because our brains aren't built for empathy.

Yup... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730029)

I had partial vocal cord paralysis for almost a year...it was miserable. It hurt to talk. I went to specialists, got scoped multiple times, and they said if it didn't clear up after a month or so, it was likely permanent. They put me on all kids of drugs, and then prepared speech therapy for me. I read up about it, but it's just crazy to understand first-hand how how of a gift it is to have the ability to speak. To simply communicate. I had to write down everything I wanted to say to people - and half my job was to speak and teach.

That year was _not_ fun.

There is a good ending: near the end of that year, I went to a dev camp for a week, but, I was diagnosed with a sinus infection right before I left. They gave me the regular jar of antibiotics. I got a chance to rest that week, and take my meds.

Then I came home...the next day I went to the grocery store and gave them my order. The deli lady said "Oh...you've got your voice back...when did that happen?". I went home and said "Honey, I'm home". My wife was cried tears of joy, jumped up and gave me one of the biggest hugs of my life. I could talk again.

It sounds like his case is more severe in nature, but here's hoping...you never know.

-jm

Re:Yup... (1)

blackest_k (761565) | about a year ago | (#43730223)

Do you know which antibiotic, you never know it might have a specific application to this problem.

Re:Yup... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730545)

I honestly don't remember, but it sounded generic...probably just amoxicillin.

Re:Yup... (2)

dcooper_db9 (1044858) | about a year ago | (#43730799)

Your story is remarkable in similarity to my own. One of my vocal chords was paralyzed as a result of Polyarteritis Nodosa, an autoimmune disease that affects the vascular system. A few months after the paralysis I got bronchitis. My vocal chord recovered two days after I started taking antibiotics. I'd have to dig through my records to see if they bumped up my prednisone before or after the recovery. Maybe the medicine caused the recovery, or maybe the bronchitis somehow triggered my body to repair the cells. I don't know but I'm grateful to have my voice back. At the time my left arm was fully paralyzed and my right arm was at risk (and it hurt to use it). I pretty much couldn't type, write or speak. I'm not sure that Mr. Page's condition is worse than yours or mine. Most people suffer full paralysis of one chord or the other. He evidently has partial paralysis of both. Perhaps his was caused by an injury.

Speak No Evil? (3, Funny)

Bob_Who (926234) | about a year ago | (#43730093)

Just couldn't resist....

Re:Speak No Evil? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730117)

It would be ironic if Brinn went blind and Schmidt went deaf.

Re:Speak No Evil? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730315)

And Gates got constipation?

same problem? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730135)

Is this the same thing that scott adams and RFK jr. suffer from or is it different?

New product opportunity. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730439)

Can we expect to hear about Google Mouth Beta soon?

Google Glass (1)

Schreckgestalt (692027) | about a year ago | (#43730631)

I bet this will dramatically speed up the process of implementing thought-commands for Google Glass.

Re:Google Glass (1)

Cyko_01 (1092499) | about a year ago | (#43731423)

Maybe not thought commands, but new types of input for the device for sure

If only it'd been Steve Ballmer... (1)

Cyfun (667564) | about a year ago | (#43730637)

If only it'd been Steve Ballmer...

Potassium, Potassium, Potassium (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43730871)

He needs to increase his potassium intake.
Should have started months ago, but it's not too late.
Good luck Larry!

Oblig. Mad TV (1)

EGenius007 (1125395) | about a year ago | (#43731347)

How has this not come up yet? http://youtu.be/va71a7pLvy8 [youtu.be]

"Perhaps your greatest achievement, sir, was your cure for cancer?"
"How did I cure cancer?"
"Well, you took 9 of the heads of the world's largest corporations and gave them all cancer. Within 7 months we had 4 different cures."

God obviously wanted him to shut up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43731507)

Christians: 1 Atheists: 0

u mad athiestfags?
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