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Records Labels Prepare Massive 'Pirate Site' Domain Blocking Blitz

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the fighting-a-corner-of-the-internet dept.

Music 110

An anonymous reader writes "In their ongoing battle against websites said to infringe music copyrights, record labels have initiated a fresh wave of actions aimed at forcing UK ISPs to carry out domain blocking. This third wave is set to be the biggest so far, affecting as many as 25 domains and including some of the world's largest torrent sites and file-hosting search engines. Furthermore, the BPI – the entity coordinating the action – will ask courts to block U.S.-based music streaming operation, Grooveshark."

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110 comments

SKWISGAAR SKWIGELF writing headline nows. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734513)

Somebody should tells Soulskills that the editor needs to be doing betters job.

Good luck with that (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about a year ago | (#43734515)

Domain blocking has been so successful already. No one will figure out how to use alternative DNS servers, or simply type in the IP address manually.

Re:Good luck with that (4, Informative)

Anubis350 (772791) | about a year ago | (#43734565)

Or the sites will just move domains/set up alternate domains, as has happened with thepiratebay, eztv, and demonoid just off the top of my head

Re:Good luck with that (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | about a year ago | (#43735191)

Or the sites will just move domains/set up alternate domains, as has happened with thepiratebay, eztv, and demonoid just off the top of my head

Why even bother? You can either install plugins off the Firefox site that'll do it for you, or just use Tor to access the site from one of the 150 other countries that aren't retarded. Once you have the magnet URI, the rest is distributed, and there's no amount of DNS tomfoolery that'll stop that.

Re:Good luck with that (3, Interesting)

CodeHxr (2471822) | about a year ago | (#43734609)

Domain blocking has been so successful already. No one will figure out how to use alternative DNS servers, or simply type in the IP address manually.

I already compile a list of IPs for sites I like to frequent - white hat, black hat, or otherwise.

Re:Good luck with that (5, Funny)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year ago | (#43734671)

As do I - I'd tell you where I keep that list (and a backup copy of it), but I don't feel like summoning APK.

first HOST (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735101)

A toast to the ghost who can boast the most HOSTS.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

ne0n (884282) | about a year ago | (#43736075)

I'm sure a lot of people would like a copy in case they're missing anything good. Linkage?

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43737173)

Thou shalt not useth the name of the LORD of HOSTS in vain!

Re:Good luck with that (5, Insightful)

Joce640k (829181) | about a year ago | (#43734643)

Domain blocking has been so successful already. No one will figure out how to use alternative DNS servers, or simply type in the IP address manually.

Doesn't matter, it's all about training governments to bend over whenever they say so. They'll be back again soon, with bigger demands.

PS: Thanks, RIAA, for letting me know about Grooveshark...

Re:Good luck with that (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#43736019)

I bet you the next step will be government mandated BGP route poisoning. The nice thing about it (from the point of view of the censors) is that it denies access to far more people than those within your jurisdiction/country/border. Potentially even remove access to the site from the whole world, and it can be done from any trusted BGP peer.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#43736109)

Oh, and unlike DNS, there is no way the end user can get around BGP route poisoning. It just can't happen. There's no mechanism for instructing the routers to provide an alternate route, they make those decisions entirely by themselves.

There are only a few things I can think of that *can* be done, but none of them are doable by the end user:

- Peering ISPs outside of the jurisdiction of the poisoned routers will all have to filter those route advertisements.
- The direct ISP of TBP will have to play with its local BGP table to subdivide it into smaller routes to make them more specific and thus preferred, which otherwise needlessly complicates the global BGP table, and doesn't completely solve the problem (some areas will still use the poisoned routes.)
- And finally, the blacklisted websites could move their services to be inside of the tor network. This is sort of the nuclear option though - tor is notoriously slow and your server compute requirements go through the roof, not to mention "domain names" inside of tor are hard to memorize.

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43737931)

A grooveshark poem
First there were 8
Then there were 20
Then they jumped to 213
And fell back to 76
And the rest, as they say will be living in history

Captcha: dynamics
Let's hope not

Re:Good luck with that (3, Interesting)

gmuslera (3436) | about a year ago | (#43734665)

That they are targetting grooveshark (and so warning players of the same league) gives a hint of what is their target, that the majority of people get free/pretty cheap alternatives to their offering, be legal or not.

If the people behind the idea of the flat earth had their kind of power back in their days to push their views on the masses we would be living in a pretty interesting (but weird) world by now.

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43738921)

Why are they targeting Grooveshark? I pay Grooveshark. Doesn't Grooveshark turn around and pay them?

Re:Good luck with that (3, Insightful)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about a year ago | (#43734721)

They don't need to make it impossible for EVERYONE, just the people who are dumb enough to buy the music they're selling. The "Taylor Swift" listening tweens who make up most of the market will get frustrated after one attempt and will go back to buying it on itunes. At least that's probably the powerpoint math that went behind this.

Full disclosure, I'm listening to Taylor Swift right now. That's right, I just called myself dumb and am admitting to listening to "Trouble" by Taylor Swift.

Re:Good luck with that (5, Funny)

Falkentyne (760418) | about a year ago | (#43734875)

Full disclosure, I'm listening to Taylor Swift right now. That's right, I just called myself dumb and am admitting to listening to "Trouble" by Taylor Swift.

Please mod parent down and parent's parents should be modded down too for allowing this to happen.

Re:Good luck with that (2)

Hypotensive (2836435) | about a year ago | (#43738733)

It's British ISPs - Taylor Swift listeners in Britain probably wouldn't fill a bus shelter.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about a year ago | (#43734723)

I've been using a Swedish VPN for a while now. There are a few to choose from. They are cheap and uncensored, and as an added bonus shield you from the prying eyes of Big Brother.

Re:Good luck with that (4, Funny)

martinX (672498) | about a year ago | (#43735149)

A Swedish VPN once bit my sister ...

    No realli! She was Karving her initials on the Swedish VPN
    with the sharpened end of an interspace tøøthbrush given
    her by Svenge - her brother-in-law - an Stockholm dentist and
    star of many Swedish møvies: "The Høt Hands of a Stockholm
    Dentist", "Fillings of Passion", "The Huge Mølars of Horst
    Nordfink".

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734767)

Domain blocking works for me ...
Kids cant go to Sony, Apple and a few others ;)

Re:Good luck with that (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year ago | (#43734843)

That won't work for name-based hosting, which pretty much every website uses these days. The old "1 IP, 1 machine" thing doesn't get used too often.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year ago | (#43735405)

That won't work for name-based hosting, which pretty much every cheap-ass hostedwebsite uses these days.

FTFY.

Most of your serious trackers and distie sites aren't going to be using virt domains - given the hellish amount of traffic involved, it'll either use multiple dedicated IPs handed off to caching servers, or one hell of a load-balancer.

Run your own DNS server (5, Insightful)

houghi (78078) | about a year ago | (#43734993)

Alternate DNS servers? I live in Belgium where they block (among others) TPB, so I just run my own.
OK, I am able to configure my own named server. What is needed for others is an idiot proof DNS server that people can run on their local machine (so no remote connections allowed).

And I talk about so easy, your grandma can install it and it runs by just double clicking. Something that is made for just local usage with as little configuration as possible. No need to be able to make any local domains. Just something so you do not need an external DNS server.

Perhaps that already exists and it is just not commonly known.

Re:Run your own DNS server (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about a year ago | (#43735491)

What is needed for others is an idiot proof DNS server that people can run on their local machine (so no remote connections allowed).

I can imagine a solution which doesn't need operating a server ... but mentioning it might attract apk. :-)

Re:Run your own DNS server (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#43736313)

Why would you need to run a server?

There's loads of servers which are quite easy to run. But why?

Re:Run your own DNS server (1)

fadethepolice (689344) | about a year ago | (#43736635)

Can't you just load the piratebay through TOR?

Re:Run your own DNS server (1)

Hypotensive (2836435) | about a year ago | (#43738739)

Yes, although arguably that is of the same order of magnitude of difficulty as running your own DNS server.

Re:Run your own DNS server (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43738145)

I live in Belgium too. I use the "proxybay" website offering a list of proxies. I wonder about this dns though. Is is more efficient then using a VPN/Proxy? I know very little about it.

Re:Run your own DNS server (1)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43738833)

I'm amazed the community hasn't just set up their own free DNS service yet like OpenDNS but overriding entries where necessary, such as redirecting ICE domain seizure based entries to mirrors of the sites or similar.

Sure this seems like a bit of a dirty hack and a use of public DNS that was never intended, but the internet was also never intended to be globally censored by national entities either quite frankly so it simply seems like a necessary fix to a problem of corruption of the network.

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735779)

Everyone here should submit a domain blocking request and make sure it targets the political blowhards you hate in the UK and any corprat entity you can think of.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43736243)

Domain blocking has been so successful already. No one will figure out how to use alternative DNS servers, or simply type in the IP address manually.

It's cute you think they're going to be doing this by futzing with DNS.
My ISP will reroute *all* traffic to the blocked domain's listed IP number(s) through their IWF filter and drop it there.

Re:Good luck with that (2)

Blue Stone (582566) | about a year ago | (#43736585)

The blocks in the UK don't use (just) DNS. You can type in the direct IP address of the Pirate Bay and get no connection.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

juliohm (665784) | about a year ago | (#43737123)

You know... I honestly wish they succeed and annoy the hell out of everyone by shutting down websites everywhere. To hell with being social! That way, whoever wants to pirate anything can just go 100% dark underground where they can't be found. Things will be a lot simpler.

Re:Good luck with that (1)

Hypotensive (2836435) | about a year ago | (#43738725)

cf. John Gilmore: "The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it."

Re:Good luck with that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43739371)

it* was IP blocked too (by it I mean PB)

hahaa (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734525)

The tighter they grasp, the more slips through their fingers

Re:hahaa (1)

Ziest (143204) | about a year ago | (#43735431)

Truth

Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734551)

Once again SUCKMERICAN Companies forcing there rules and ways upon everyone else, kinda like abortion rights, copyrights, nuclear power/weapons. And yet we wonder why the world hates SUCKMERICA and attacks us at every chance. When you force your will upon someone that doesn't want or need it then you create enemies and people that hate us.

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (3, Insightful)

MitchDev (2526834) | about a year ago | (#43734575)

While I hope the labels and all their executive die horrible deaths, copyright is rather international. So it's not just "American" companies with a stake in the game.

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735387)

I don't think they should die horrible deaths I think they should probably just stop being assholes. I used to pirate like a mother fucker I had TBs of movies, comics, and music on my drive. At one point I think I had 300gigs of comics. But I liked owning them so slowly all of that content was bought over time. I honestly don't think I would have got back into comics so hard if it hadn't been for piracy. My music collection would be half of what it is now too. I pretty much stopped watching movies besides going to the theater for that experiance.

Piracy has led me to be one of the biggest content purchases of people i know... who weren't themselves pirates at one time. It gets to a point when you get older that you realize you have the income that you just can't justify downloading it anymore and would prefer to have the vinyl or CD with the inserts laying around. I like holding and posting my comics on the wall in my study.

I get why they want to stop the hemorrhaging of pirated content and to be honest going after the websites to me makes much more sense than attacking content users. I just think there has to be a better way to get users to come download/stream legal content. So I can sympathize with these assholes in some respects but I don't think they understand why people think they are dicks. They go about this totally the wrong way. If this was all that the RIAA and their international equivalent oragnizations had done then I wouldn't be upset but it isn't. It's their total disregard for potential customers. They don't seem to care what we want. They don't seem to understand that maybe we would buy more if we weren't so mad at the industry. How upsetting it is that organization like this want to DRM everything to the point that used material is no longer legal.

It's sickening and disgusting but I don't think they should die.

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (2)

flayzernax (1060680) | about a year ago | (#43735663)

It's not only about the copyrighted information. It's also about public domain, and GNU like, or MIT like licenses. It's about the free flow of information. Copyright is just convenient for them to attack means of distributing information freely.

The best way I can prop up this argument is to point out VCRs. VCRs were hardly used on the scale that torrents are to commit mass copyright infringement.

Yet VCRs, 8 tracks, casettes where all targeted. Libaries were targeted. And with libraries, the works were being payed for and not distributed "freely" to anyone.

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734621)

Ya... I'd hate you too, considering the summary clearly states that this is in the UK and the states don't block any domains as far as I know (we take them down).

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734663)

Once again SUCKMERICAN Companies forcing there rules and ways upon everyone else, kinda like abortion rights, copyrights, nuclear power/weapons. And yet we wonder why the world hates SUCKMERICA and attacks us at every chance. When you force your will upon someone that doesn't want or need it then you create enemies and people that hate us.

Surprisingly, this isn't the RIAA or MPAA this time. Read the article to find out what the "B" in "BPI" stands for. :)

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734729)

Bullshit?

Re:Once again SUCKMERICA bullying the world (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734965)

BPI = UK mouthpiece for RIAA global agendas

What a coincidence! (5, Funny)

decipher_saint (72686) | about a year ago | (#43734579)

My wallet is going on a record label blocking blitz

Life sure is funny sometimes.

Re:What a coincidence! (3, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year ago | (#43734691)

Mine's been doing that for years.

As a bonus, it has the beneficial effect of leaving me more money for other, more worthy goodies.

They don't care. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734693)

There aren't enough of you for a boycott to make any difference.

Re:They don't care. (2)

Ioldanach (88584) | about a year ago | (#43734763)

There aren't enough of you for a boycott to make any difference.

Besides, they've already presumed that if you're not buying, it is because you're infringing.

Re:They don't care. (4, Interesting)

CelticWhisper (601755) | about a year ago | (#43734815)

The problem with that is that they can "presume" all they want, but they still have less money coming in. Granted, it doesn't address the aforementioned issue of needing a critical mass of participants for the boycott to be successful, but the mere act of assuming a given cause for a reduced revenue stream doesn't magically restore the revenue stream to previous levels.

Re:They don't care. (1)

Ioldanach (88584) | about a year ago | (#43735237)

Of course not, but they'll just put it on the powerpoint they present to lawmakers about how piracy is hitting their bottom line.

Re:They don't care. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734801)

For now.

But eventually they will do what they always do. They will think 'lets raise the price'. Suddenly people find they can live without it. For the first time in 30+ years of cable TV their viewership went down. That is for 3 years straight now.

They will find the gp and say hey what do you watch/read/listen to you have been doing this awhile. He will have a long list of stuff.

Went to the movies a few weeks ago on a lark (first time in nearly 5 years). 45 bucks for a bucket of popcorn 2 pops and 2 tickets and 30 mins of commercials before it started. That is not cheap. The theater was un-surprisingly nearly empty. People are really voting with their wallets. But only because the cost is high. Same with CD sales 10 years ago (oh look 18 bucks for 1 cd, cheaper now). Same with cable TV. These guys are over pricing themselves for the value they return.

Re:What a coincidence! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734715)

It's not like you were paying for music, anyway.

Re:What a coincidence! (1)

Pinkfud (781828) | about a year ago | (#43734955)

Absolutely. I buy nothing from these jerks.

Re:What a coincidence! (1)

Trogre (513942) | about a year ago | (#43738343)

Well put! In a capitalistic society, with a farcical two-party federal election every few years, the most effective way to vote is with ones wallet.

To everyone who has given these groups money - you let this happen.

What about "index of" searches? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734583)

That's where the easy downloading comes from.

Cory Doctorow much? (1)

morcego (260031) | about a year ago | (#43734589)

http://www.amazon.com/Pirate-Cinema-Cory-Doctorow/dp/0765329093 [amazon.com]

Interestingly enough, it also happens in UK...

Re:Cory Doctorow much? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734637)

Cory lives in the UK, he became a naturalized British citizen in 2011 iirc.

Time to consider an alternate/supliment DNS root. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734607)

Yeah, I know implementing an alternate DNS root isn't easy or it would have been done by now. Still, it's a week point that is vulnerable corrupt legal systems that are influenced by money.

Perhaps you could create a scheme that serves up websites based the browser request (Sort of like how you can have multiple domains point to one IP with HTTP 1.1) Some sort of service could then pass the request to a rootless, peer to peer distributed name service with no central authority. Yeah, that sounds messy, but perhaps claiming a name could revolve around some sort of bitcoin style "mining" service. That would help prevent mass registration and squatting (At least to an extent)

It's not a complete idea, but if thought out properly you might be able to create a sort of name root that would work without any modification to existing DNS clients.)(Though would probably require some clever DNS trickery/standard abuse)

You should call it Namecoin! (2)

Comboman (895500) | about a year ago | (#43734737)

Yeah, that sounds messy, but perhaps claiming a name could revolve around some sort of bitcoin style "mining" service. That would help prevent mass registration and squatting (At least to an extent)

That's such a good idea that I bet someone else already thought of it. [bitcoin.it]

Re:Time to consider an alternate/supliment DNS roo (4, Interesting)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year ago | (#43734809)

The worst problem with the central server approach is not squatting, that is a minor annoyance to some people's vanity. The worst problem with the central server is that it is a central server, and thus is vulnerable to whomever has juristiction over the physical location it resides in. However, a peer-to-peer solution (as they look right now) is much worse. There are two major problems with a P2P approach to DNS, that you don't have with the central server.

1) Privacy: when requesting a lookup, you're telling an arbitrary number of strangers which site you would like to visit next. With the server, you're only telling the server, but this is a trust issue and can be resolved. The P2P approach by it's nature cannot be trusted.
2) Poisoning: all you'd have to do to poison a swarm is join it, and start pushing bogus replies to requests. There is no barrier like with a central DNS server, which you'd have to hack into in order to poison.

An approach like you suggest is a central DNS server in disguise and not really a solution to any problem, since you get the worst of both worlds.

Re:Time to consider an alternate DNS root (1)

JesseMcDonald (536341) | about a year ago | (#43735029)

1) Privacy: when requesting a lookup, you're telling an arbitrary number of strangers which site you would like to visit next. With the server, you're only telling the server, but this is a trust issue and can be resolved. The P2P approach by it's nature cannot be trusted.

This can be solved easily, in exchange for some extra latency, by using onion routing, like Tor, Freenet, or I2P. Requests are encrypted end-to-end and routed through intermediate nodes. No single node (apart from the requester) is aware of both the origin and the content of the request at the same time.

2) Poisoning: all you'd have to do to poison a swarm is join it, and start pushing bogus replies to requests. There is no barrier like with a central DNS server, which you'd have to hack into in order to poison.

Namecoin solves this by associating each domain with a public key. You have to have the corresponding private key to create a reply anyone will accept, or to transfer the domain to someone else's key.

Namecoin doesn't include onion routing natively, but you can run the client over Tor or I2P to get the best of both worlds.

Re:Time to consider an alternate DNS root (1)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year ago | (#43735761)

1) Tor is not a peer-to-peer approach. It does not remove the central server, it only makes the routers individually unaware of the contents of a package. You still have to serve replies from a central server subject to a jurisdiction (the problem we were pretending we could solve). Tor works if you wish to obscure who wants what, but it is still an overlay to the client-server paradigm.

2) Assuming we buy the premise that BitCoins are a good idea and we'd want to use those for our domains in the future, there are a couple of issues with this approach aswell. For starters, it still does not get rid of the server, it just verifies that the reply is correct for a domain. There are a number of other solutions that will do this without getting the convoluted Bitcoin philosophy involved.

Re:Time to consider an alternate DNS root (1)

Kjella (173770) | about a year ago | (#43736285)

1) Tor is not a peer-to-peer approach. It does not remove the central server, it only makes the routers individually unaware of the contents of a package. You still have to serve replies from a central server subject to a jurisdiction (the problem we were pretending we could solve). Tor works if you wish to obscure who wants what, but it is still an overlay to the client-server paradigm.

Yes, but good luck finding out what that jurisdiction is, at least they don't seem to have much luck in locating and shutting down hidden services. If you only really need a DNS name that'll stay constant and that doesn't need to be "easy" then the onion system would be just fine, you own them by virtue of owning the private key and they all look like ebiueabv35rwas.onion. Unlike an IP you can move the key around and run your site from any box you want, which is the most essential part of DNS. You probably won't type it up but if you find it on some web page somewhere and bookmark it you'll have it.

Re:Time to consider an alternate DNS root (1)

JesseMcDonald (536341) | about a year ago | (#43736381)

1) Tor is not the only option for onion routing. I2P implements the same general idea and supports peer-to-peer protocols (including BitTorrent, Gnutella, and a P2P e-mail system known as I2P-Bote). Tor would work in a technical sense, but each user would have to manually configure up a hidden (.onion) service for other users to connect to, which may be a bit much to expect. With I2P this is the default configuration. Also, Namecoin already has working I2P integration.

2) The Namecoin approach is just one way to solve the poisoning problem. If you know of another way to assign meaningful names to specific users which doesn't involve some central authority choosing who gets which name, feel free to share it. So far as I know, Namecoin is the only truly peer-to-peer domain name system in active use. Note that Namecoin is not Bitcoin, despite being based on a similar low-level protocol, and there is certainly no "philosophy" involved beyond the desire for a free, open, secure, and peer-to-peer system for associating data with domain names.

Re:Time to consider an alternate DNS root (1)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year ago | (#43738821)

I2P certainly will not solve the problem, because onion routing was never an answer to the question asked. Onion routing helps protect privacy, and I2P does so by erecting a network within the network. In order to go "outside" you need an outproxy (and it is explicitly stated that you would need to put a great deal of trust in this proxy). Once you're at the outproxy, everything functions as normal - meaning the problem is still there, all you've done is add a layer of complexity for a part of the route from the client to the server.

The bitcoin philosophy I'm referring to is the one that has you expend CPU cycles to store "coins" in order to spend these "coins" on actions within the protocol. That is how Namecoin works, you save up coins and spend them on registering your domain, updating or transfering. Or did you not read past the hype when you googled it? But no, I don't know of a way to make P2P DNS work, that was the whole point. There really is none, and with that I'm fully aware that I'm discounting Namecoin as an option, because well, it's ridiculous.

3 pirate propaganda stories in 5 hours? We get it, (-1, Troll)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#43734615)

ANOTHER one, really? You guys post more piracy propaganda than the pirate party does. We get it - dice REALLY enjoys intellectual property theft. Also, you're rabid global warming freaks. We know. Now how about some news for nerds, stuff that matutrs.

Re:3 pirate propaganda stories in 5 hours? We get (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734697)

implying piracy isn't news for nerds

Re:3 pirate propaganda stories in 5 hours? We get (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734797)

I'd be happy with just summaries that English.

Another ridiculous situation (5, Insightful)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about a year ago | (#43734705)

This is yet another ridiculous situation, stupid enough that it makes me wonder why such situations exist.

If a website is illegal (for any definition of illegal, including terrorism, pornography, and IP violations), then it should be judged illegal by a court in country with reference to the specific law that the site violates. That country can then mandate that ISPs in that country block that specific website, the government can ask the government of the registrar or hosting company to take action, the government can identify people who access the site and charge them with a crime.

Illegal is illegal, but this thing about "anyone can take action if they think something is illegal" is ludicrous. Letting business advocacy groups, unelected government bureaucrats, and random government departments to suddenly state "we're the governing authority, this is illegal, we're pulling your plug" is complete bullshit. Government departments can certainly make such pronouncements, but should be required to act only with court approval. For instance, if the State Department wants Defense Distributed to take their plans offline, it should get a court order.

The courts exist to protect our rights. Taking action without judicial process is an end-run around those rights, and shouldn't be allowed.

Re:Another ridiculous situation (2)

m.ducharme (1082683) | about a year ago | (#43734793)

My reading of the summary is that they are going to the courts in the UK to get the courts to enforce their little list against the ISPs. My clue was the submitter's use of the word "action" which is legal jargon for a law suit.

Re:Another ridiculous situation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735045)

My clue was the submitter's use of the word "action" which is legal jargon for a law suit.

In my neighborhood action means something completely different. And it's not something you can download ;-)

Re:Another ridiculous situation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43738215)

And they're going to take a look at each individual site and making sure the organization's claims are true?

Re:Another ridiculous situation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43736355)

Did you read any part of anything at all? That's what they are doing, you fucking tool.

Re:Another ridiculous situation (1)

Hypotensive (2836435) | about a year ago | (#43738753)

The courts exist to protect our rights.

The courts exist to interpret and enact the law. If the law says that people are not allowed to breathe the free air around them or drink water from a stream, but must buy their air and water bottled from a factory, then the courts exist to put free-air breathers behind bars.

Its not the media comapnies that are the problem (4, Insightful)

future assassin (639396) | about a year ago | (#43734811)

its those who buy their shit. Stop buying it and in 5 years they`ll all fold.

Re:Its not the media comapnies that are the proble (1)

readingaccount (2909349) | about a year ago | (#43738613)

Won't happen. Can't happen. You'd have to somehow change the mindset of millions of people who like and buy the stuff they sell (giving them more money and influence in the process). The actions of these companies are not widely known except for tech sites, so again, nothing will happen. They've been behaving like dicks for YEARS, and are still hugely profitable.

Re:Its not the media compnies that are the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43738861)

and in 5 years they'll all have paid for a law to allow them to deduct 'compensation' directly from your salary.

FTFY

Re:Its not the media compnies that are the problem (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#43739273)

and in 5 years they'll all have paid for a law to allow them to deduct 'compensation' directly from your salary.

FTFY

..but they have already won that right.

in my country we have a public broadcasting company. that is now paid from money taxed from everyone directly. that broadcasting company plays music from RIAA(and local equivalent) members and pays them for broadcasting.

of course then there's the bullshit storage media fees etc, but I could avoid storage that is under those.

Good luck with that. (1)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | about a year ago | (#43734819)

So long as even a single search engine exists, these labels are just wasting everyone's time.

Youtube? (2)

Sporkinum (655143) | about a year ago | (#43734837)

I think they will have a hell of a time domain-blocking YouTube. It's trivial to grab all kinds of stuff there.

Re:Youtube? (2)

martinX (672498) | about a year ago | (#43735185)

That's what I was thinking. Full albums all over the place. 3 hour compilations. I was looking for Tull's 'Thick As A Brick' the other day, and there was the whole thing and it was a crystal clear rip of the original vinyl. Perfect.

Re:Youtube? (2)

Sporkinum (655143) | about a year ago | (#43735299)

Yeah.. I was looking for a digital version of some ancient vinyl I have. It's pretty obscure and never released on CD. I found half the tracks from album on youtube.

YouTube has licensing (1)

QuasiSteve (2042606) | about a year ago | (#43735793)

YouTube has licensing. The vast majority of songs, especially new ones, are released onto YouTube by the record labels themselves, free for everyone to enjoy unless you happen to live in a country with its own brand of insanity (GEMA in German, for example) or they have a branch in your country and they agreed that that branch would have to upload it instead. Keep in mind that record labels have flooded YouTube with DMCA requests before after negotiations broke down and they removed their videos;
http://news.slashdot.org/story/08/12/21/1710249/warner-music-pulls-videos-off-youtube [slashdot.org]

Perhaps a bit more timely, remember the story of a Windows Phone app, by Microsoft, which allowed users to download the videos, strips ads, and allows users to view videos on devices that the uploader has specified they shouldn't be viewable on?
http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/13/05/11/0041224/microsoft-youtube-app-strips-ads-adds-download [slashdot.org]

Well, Google wants that app yanked right the beep now.
http://www.theverge.com/2013/5/15/4334030/google-demands-microsoft-remove-youtube-windows-phone-app [theverge.com]

"Unfortunately, by blocking advertising and allowing downloads of videos, your application cuts off a valuable ongoing revenue source for creators, and causes harm to the thriving content ecosystem on YouTube,"

YouTube themselves aren't fond of people 'grabbing' things, and their legal department could probably do without the legitimate DMCA takedown requests in addition to the not-so-legitimate ones if for whatever reason the record labels didn't renew any agreements and went back to filing those instead. The current audio recognition stuff would probably be bumped up to just keep even more of the record labels' material from being uploaded in the first place, and there'd be little reason to having to block YouTube.

As it is, though, most people I know don't even 'grab' things from YouTube, let alone trying to find them on a 'pirate' website (even though it's not that hard) - they just look up the song on their phone and listen to it streaming from YouTube directly.. and that's just the ones who haven't gone with Spotify yet / buy the tracks on iTunes or Amazon or 7digital or, etc.

Re:YouTube has licensing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43738409)

I "grab" youtube videos all the time without watching the ads.

Adblock wins every time. And it saves everyone money, since I'm not downloading a bunch of data that I don't want and that we both have to pay for.

VLC, on the in-between days when Google hasn't broken it again. Worst case, use Stereo Mix and Audacity. They can't stop it without damaging themselves beyond repair.

This is a war of attrition. This is what it feels like on the winning side. Yeah, war is hell and you lose some battles. Some of your buddies become casualties. But you win at the end.

missing the point (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#43739281)

they're trying to ban grooveshark which operates directly like youtube technically.

thus, they should block youtube as well..

Offshore VPS (1)

cruachan (113813) | about a year ago | (#43734911)

Like you can't get a perfectly usable VPS in Russia, Hong Kong, The Netherlands or lots of other places for around €10 a month or less

roach problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43734933)

The way the record industry is trying to eliminate piracy, is a lot like trying to eliminate a roach problem by squishing each of them individually. They need to eliminate the food source... If they just find a way to turn off the internet, they can fulfill their lifelong goal of providing CD's again for consumers to enjoy...

Do people still pirate music? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735007)

I stopped pirating music years ago. I use rdio now... $10/month for (almost) all the music I want.

I figured pirating music would have more-or-less disappeared by now.

Re:Do people still pirate music? (1)

Xest (935314) | about a year ago | (#43738839)

Thanks for funding the RIAA and the BPI.

Enough! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735083)

To protect their copyrights, they think they have the right to infringe on Constitutional rights of free speech.

The corporations have partnered with government (Definition of Fascism). Those elected officials ignore their oath of office to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. Adding insult to injury, the courts provided those corporations the same rights that were intended for individuals, and provided those corporations immunity from civil and legal actions in many cases.

The people, having no other legal recourse, are likely to start responding with military force.

Re:Enough! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43739323)

You sir are the reason why the rest of the world finds the US to be a police state and one that thinks it controls the rest of the world. Pull your head out of your ass and look at the summary before assuming something is "unconstitutional" or are you one of those types who thinks that the US constitution applies to the rest of the world and tells Brits that they're lucky they aren't speaking with a British accent because we fought them off?

-- A North American

They've lost but their lawyers won't admit it (3, Insightful)

erroneus (253617) | about a year ago | (#43735087)

They can't stop the internet without hurting themselves and a lot of other legitimate business. And continuing to sue customers? Is it really working out for them? Perhaps all the settlements which never reach the news does make it all worthwhile.

What little [music downloading/sharing] there is going on now can't really be worth the effort in my opinion. There are lots and lots of paying customers out there. I seriously doubt the "bad guys" even come close to the numbers of legitimate customers. They should be paying marketers to improve the number of customers instead of lawyers to leech off of people who don't have money to spend.

Re:They've lost but their lawyers won't admit it (1)

asmkm22 (1902712) | about a year ago | (#43736139)

I'm pretty sure the whole lawsuit thing is just a matter of getting one or two precedents on the books, so they can threaten people with lawsuits saying "settle out of court for $10k or risk owing $200k like *these* people... I'm sure they have a payment plan option ready to go and everything because once they get one payment from someone, it's basically an admission of debt ownership.

Proving once again who the TRUE pirates are (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43735447)

All you movie and recording companies are obsolete and utterly worthless relics of a dead era. Just shut up, you thieving scum. You have nothing to say worth listening to. Nobody wants you. Nobody needs you. Just go away.

JUST SHUT UP AND DROP DEAD.

Thanks so very much (1)

mynamestolen (2566945) | about a year ago | (#43735857)

Thanks for wonderful list of torrent sites.

Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43736731)

This should be enough to get some decent anti-BPI-censorship sites up which can list the blocked sites, list all known proxies with user ratings, provide information on how to circumvent the blocks, and possibly accept donations (hopefully with a Bitcoin option).

Right now the BPI have blocked 4 or 5 sites (I think) and I find myself searching for mirrors for the blocked sites as I need them by hand.

Oh, and an easy way of linking to decent mirrors rather than blocked sites automatically (making Google searches for torrents more effective) would be great.

heh (1)

ikhider (2837593) | about a year ago | (#43736797)

Fighting file-sharing is kind of like "sand proofing" a house in a desert.

We mail huge hard drives around the world ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43738051)

Let's see you try to stop THAT, you parasitic Jews.

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