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Teens, Social Media, and Privacy

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the open-book dept.

Privacy 106

antdude writes "Pew Internet reports that: 'Teens are sharing more info about themselves on social media sites than they have in the past, but they are also taking a variety of technical and non-technical steps to manage the privacy of that information. Despite taking these privacy-protective actions, teen social media users do not express a high level of concern about third-parties (such as businesses or advertisers) accessing their data.'"

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Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800603)

Film at 11.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Funny)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800671)

Why is it a bad decision? The more advertisers know about me, the more likely I am to see ads for things I am actually interested in.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800687)

If you see ads, i guess you might feel that way. I don't see ads, therefore it does me absolutely no good for them to have personal information about me.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800697)

I guess you're against free services then. I for one am happy for social networks and any other website to have adverts down the side of their page or a banner at the top in exchange for services I use so frequently.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800719)

I am against being tracked. If the advertisements were just relevant to the content of the site I was on, and not based on what the advertising server thinks I am interested based on it tracking my browsing habits, I wouldn't mind them.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800741)

I am against being tracked.

So what? Just because you are against it does mean it is harmful. I am happy to be tracked, and am happy to reap the benefits of sites and ads that automatically tailor themselves to my wants. You may be happy in your paranoid little cocoon, but I don't see how you are better off in any way.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801041)

i am also against tracking. and according to my logic, things that im against, should be destroyed along with the human nodes, that reproduce them.
Also, the harm isnt really necessary, the possibility of harm is enough. One cannot misuse/sell to government thugs the data that one doesn't have... =)

tldr - kill all the advertisers. Preferrably ala Robespierre. that'll teach 'em.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (4, Insightful)

Joce640k (829181) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801081)

Are you Scott Adams?

You may want to form part of the matrix and let the overlords manage you, not everybody does.

Everybody screws up when they're a teenager, it's all part of the deal.

This is the first generation that will have all their screw-ups stored in a cross-referenced database for future reference. A database that "connected" people will be able to manipulate/edit for their own benefit.

Not being in the database will be even worse - employers are already demanding access to people's Facebook accounts.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Interesting)

thesandtiger (819476) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802209)

You're missing something though - the fact that everyone's indiscretions will be available will mean that indiscretions will matter less. In a world where everyone's got nude pics out there or whatever, nobody will give a fuck because giving a fuck is essentially risking mutually assured destruction, or, if they happen to be someone without easily discoverable dirt, they'll wind up being seen as a busybody asshole for bothering to try to shame someone.

Hell, the way tech is moving, we aren't that far from people being able to trivially find out anything they want, essentially instantly, about anyone they happen to run across with nothing more than a picture and a smartphone/watch/device.

For me, I learned a long time ago that rather than waste my energy fighting a losing (already lost?) battle, I would instead try to learn how to not give much of a fuck if people feel compelled to "violate my privacy" and how to mitigate the damage that could be done by a malicious person who chose to do so. 90% of this learning was becoming confident enough to just shrug and say "what's your point?" when nosy people try to shame me, and the other 10% was doing my best to ensure that the people who matter in my life aren't assholes.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (4, Insightful)

chihowa (366380) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802931)

You're missing something though - the fact that everyone's indiscretions will be available will mean that indiscretions will matter less.

That doesn't really follow, though. What will happen is that we'll have a larger class of people who will never be fit for high level jobs, politics, certain professions because of their actions as teenagers. Kids in the "right" class will be taught not to make these mistakes or their parents will pay to have them properly covered up.

Our society may talk the talk, but it isn't really tolerant of indiscretions, youthful or otherwise. In the same way, charging more and more people with felonies for minor victimless crimes doesn't make people look less harshly on felons; it just makes a larger class of unemployable felons.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43805847)

... What will happen is that we'll have a larger class of people who will never be fit for high level jobs, politics, ...

We already have a large class of people that are not fit for politics. They're called Congress.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#43803529)

You're missing something though - the fact that everyone's indiscretions will be available will mean that indiscretions will matter less. In a world where everyone's got nude pics out there or whatever, nobody will give a fuck because giving a fuck is essentially risking mutually assured destruction, or, if they happen to be someone without easily discoverable dirt, they'll wind up being seen as a busybody asshole for bothering to try to shame someone.

you might be right, but it won't come soon enough to help this generation.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (4, Insightful)

Razgorov Prikazka (1699498) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801225)

Define harmful please.
If a store owner sees me lurking around the high end laptops and comes to me to help me (and his income of course) I think that that is not 'harmful'.
If a server is tracking my every move around the web for years on end. Not so nice. Not harmful either, but annoying... yes, certainly.
If a company is tracking my every move around the web for years on end and sells this to who knows who, and has a 'privacy' policy of 24 pages in fontsize 5. Mmmmnot harmful in the sense that it will harm my health or quality of life, but back OFF!!
If a company is tracking my every move around the web for years on end and sells this to my future boss who wants to inquire my personal habits. This is harmful because it might deprive me of income (and with that food, medical treatments and so on). Yes harmful.

Privacy is not about harmful vs harmless. 25 Shades of harm I would say :-)
A lot of us here remember the time before internet and cell phones. When I wanted to know about herpes I would go to the library and look it up in a book on STD's. No one would ever know (to a certain degree of course). Now this search queries are logged and stored and available to the highest bidder. That is a completely different story!
The teens of today have no clue whatsoever how life would be without the web, social media, cellphones and the integration of all these. They therefore make different choices. Surprised? Not me. They have no 0. No baseline to what is intrusion and what is just fine.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801365)

If you're in the US, your library borrowing history is recorded by the gubmint. So don't check that book out.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43803477)

Not if you dont check them out. Or better yet play around and check out all random books. that is the fun one, a book on STDs, WMDs, and Biochemistry. and then rent the movie Get Smart: the Nude Bomb. What would they think you are trying to build. Troll the Gubermint.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43804349)

While technically true, this is why most libraries don't record their patrons' borrowing histories. No, really, it's an explicitly response to the Patriot Act. For example see the San Francisco Public Library's statement on the topic [sfpl.org] .

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801621)

Well.

"teen social media users do not express a high level of concern about third-parties (such as businesses or advertisers) accessing their data"

We worry about business, which is an irrelevancy, when compared to government tracking everything, which has been repeatedly shown, well, just look at history. The levels of misuse are not even close. Wherefore this rhetorically virulant boogeyman about companies, when government does magnitudes worse?

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2)

L. J. Beauregard (111334) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802057)

What business gathers, government can rifle through. It doesn't even require a warrant, unless the business refuses to cooperate. Which they ain't gonna do. It would put those sweet government contracts at risk.

If business doesn't gather it, government will have to do so for its own damn self. Which burdens their budget and can at least in theory be challenged in court.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about a year and a half ago | (#43803259)

Business affects me daily. It pays my salary. And it has no rules or transparency.

Teenagers, on the other hand, have trouble thinking about the future of 5 minutes, let alone when they want to apply for jobs and clearances.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43803687)

Today's kids may not even know the difference between government and big business

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43802977)

Just because you're happy that your ex-wife stalks you doesn't make it OK for the bitch to stalk me. How are you harmed by your ex staking you unless she pulls a knife or something? Why is it a felony for your ex to stalk you but perfectly all right for a soulless corporation to stalk you?

Tracking is stalking and stalking is wrong. Period. Tracking should be opt in and they don't even want you to be able to opt out.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43803415)

In my experience with targeted advertising (before I started blocking all adds) I was only getting advertisements for products that I already had or had recently purchased. Now why are they telling me that I need the exact same product that I just bought? What good is it to show me the same thing I have already, other then to possibly make me angry that it is now $0.05 cheaper? was it relevant to what I need now? and the more I see adds for the same 15 products across 100 different sites I tend to not want to even support that company even if I like them.

TL:DR; Adds were not there for thing I need/want but things I already have.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43802307)

I guess you're against free services then.

I don't know about you, but when I'm in the car and a commercial comes on the radio I change the channel. When a commercial comes on TV I pee and get another beer. The Illinois Times is a free weekly dead-tree newspaper I read every week and never look at the ads.

The trouble with advertisers is they're so damned obnoxious, especially on the web with the popups and popunders and flashy, distracting bullshit, often with sound. They slow page loads to a crawl with their excessive use of poorly written javascript. I have no problem with an ad banner, but unfortunately ad blockers don't discriminate between obnoxious ads that make me want to put the product on the "never buy" list (fucking morons lose me as a customer with this idiocy) and responsible advertisers.

Why should I have to watch ads on CNN or the History Channel when I'm paying for the content when I get ripped off paying a cable bill? I dropped cable for that reason, back in the '80s there was no advertising on cable channels and it only cost $10 per month. Now it's $50-$100 and there are even ads on the lower corner of some cable channels while the content I paid for is running.

I can't believe anyone is defending these sociopathic morons, so you must be in the ad industry. Get your industry to act responsibly and I'll stop hating you assholes.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800725)

I guess you're against free services then. I for one am happy for social networks or any website to have ads down the side of the page or a banner at the top in exchange for services I use so frequently.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2)

Ian A. Shill (2791091) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801161)

That's not entirely accurate. You seem to be one of two, 'cause your twin brother said the same thing up there (^^^). Or maybe you're so happy to have ads down the side of the page or a banner at the top in exchange for services you use so frequently, that you're repeating yourself.

Just saying.

I guess you're against free services then. I for one am happy for social networks or any website to have ads down the side of the page or a banner at the top in exchange for services I use so frequently.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801337)

Advertising is never good for any reason. Living a life where the maximum exposure you get is the odd billboard is much better.
If you want something look for it yourself. The people advertising crap are truly the definition of evil.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801631)

I am against free services. If you are not paying for it then you are the product being sold.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43803525)

NPR? PBS?

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (4, Funny)

_merlin (160982) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800749)

I'm working in Hong Kong, and youtube has been bombarding me with ads for finding a foreign husband, which is pretty funny considering I'm a straight married guy.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (5, Funny)

stephanruby (542433) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800803)

I'm working in Hong Kong, and youtube has been bombarding me with ads for finding a foreign husband, which is pretty funny considering I'm a straight married guy.

Are you sure your wife hasn't been using your computer?

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2, Interesting)

Joce640k (829181) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801035)

I'm working in Hong Kong, and youtube has been bombarding me with ads for finding a foreign husband, which is pretty funny considering I'm a straight married guy.

I live in Spain. You should see the amount of adverts/phone calls I get for English lessons. "Targeted", indeed.

They may be tracking people like never before but business intelligence is still an oxymoron.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801477)

Number of adverts. Number of phone calls. Get some English lessons.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800699)

No one cares for their personal information being shared..Until they suffer from financial consequences or fraudulent.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800791)

... The more advertisers know about me

That makes two assumptions.

The ads you want to see aren't the problem. First assumption: You won't be put on the mailing list for 'boner' pills, which is also the mailing list for gay amputees porn.

Anyone can buy your browsing/shopping history. Second assumption: Your unwanted 'adverts' won't threaten your life for being pro-abortion, pro-gay marriage, anti-republican, anti-military occupation.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2)

stealth_finger (1809752) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800913)

Second assumption: Your unwanted 'adverts' won't threaten your life for being pro-abortion, pro-gay marriage, anti-republican, anti-military occupation.

Well, that escalated quickly.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801801)

The correct quote is: "Boy, that escalated quickly".

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about a year and a half ago | (#43803335)

Second assumption: Your unwanted 'adverts' won't threaten your life for being (positions)

Well, that escalated quickly.

That's exactly the point. It *could* escalate quickly - particularly since it's being done by stupid computers with keywords, not thoughtful people reading a discussion. Imagine the "flash crash" of the stock market, or the publicity flare about a celebrity's comment, applying to YOUR employment. "We understand you're a (worst possible undesirable of whatever type), so you're fired."

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Informative)

marcello_dl (667940) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800823)

Your data is their ASSET.
Business exploit assets in whatever possible way.
Your assumption that they will be only be used for targeted ads is naive.
Your naivety has been noted.
As my paranoid convoluted thinking has.
Have a nice day.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2)

Alyeska (611286) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800929)

Your data is their ASSET. Business exploit assets in whatever possible way.

Not only business: Political campaigns use the same marketing tactics and sociological research business does.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800849)

Why is it a bad decision? The more advertisers know about me, the more likely I am to see ads for things I am actually interested in.

I do hope that none of your interests would be worth more to your insurer, potential employer, or other interested parties than they would be to doubleclick...

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801305)

You guys seem to think you're the most interesting person in the world and everybody else is just dying to get a scoop on your private life. News flash - you're not and they're not. Everybody has their faults and you shouldn't be ashamed for people to know who you are.

Case in point - what are fail videos? Stupid people doing stupid things on camera. But everybody is stupid at one point or another and it's normal to be drunk or tired or distracted every so often. So you're afraid that if everybody's wearing Google Glass your one mistake will become a meme or something and you'll be plastered on the Internet for all eternity. Guess what - with a hundred million streams featuring stupidity every minute only the most spectacular failures will ever be noticed (and will likely fade pretty quickly). Are you that guy? The one that's clearly dumber than a billion of his peers? If you are - tough luck. Otherwise why worry - if you're above average then information works in your favor and there's hard data showing you're BETTER than half of your peers.

Will an employer be able to find dirt about you? Sure. Will it be worse than what they'd have on everybody else? Probably not. Why are you so afraid? How is that so detrimental to your well-being?

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801475)

You guys seem to think you're the most interesting person in the world and everybody else is just dying to get a scoop on your private life.

Does the same apply to people who don't want cameras installed in every room of their house? After all, saying that you want a bit of privacy must mean that you think you're the most interesting person in the world!

Not everyone is concerned about just their own privacy, either.

Why are you so afraid? How is that so detrimental to your well-being?

Why would you be afraid of cameras being installed in your bathroom? What you do in there is completely normal and mundane, so why worry? People typically like to have privacy. A privacy invasion doesn't need to destroy someone in order for them to find it creepy.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801671)

I don't really mind people recording what they normally see. They can wear Google Glass or similar all they want and I won't care.

I won't even mind if people that come over to my place record it either. But none of those people would normally be in my bathroom together with me, especially if I'm engaged in anything "private" or "embarrassing".

So there's an elephant in the room that you refuse to admit to - there's a difference between recording what people normally see and putting cameras that follow you where you're normally alone and unseen.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802489)

So there's an elephant in the room that you refuse to admit to - there's a difference between recording what people normally see and putting cameras that follow you where you're normally alone and unseen.

There is no elephant int he room that I refuse to admit; I never said they were the same to begin with. The person I replied to said acted as if merely desiring privacy is an insane notion, and that he/she couldn't understand why anyone would do such a thing. In that regard, being spooked about cameras in private places is no different than being spooked about other privacy violations; either way, you simply desire privacy.

Some people seem to declare that certain types of privacy are 'worthless' without realizing that the same could be said about any type of privacy (even ones they value).

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

DutchUncle (826473) | about a year and a half ago | (#43803393)

You guys seem to think you're the most interesting person in the world and everybody else is just dying to get a scoop on your private life.

No. We think it's a problem because it doesn't take any effort. Paparrazi invest time and money waiting to take photos of celebrities' private lives because someone pays them for it. Business doesn't have to work as hard; it just has to skim through the constant stream of information passing through the financial and legal and communication channels as it passes by. And it's not interested in *me*; it's a totally random fishing expedition in which I might get caught up by accident in an *incorrect* connection to something. So the concern should be more along the lines of: We think that there shouldn't be random traps set everywhere for average people minding their own business.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

neonsignal (890658) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801551)

you shouldn't be ashamed for people to know who you are

... says Anonymous Coward

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801637)

Fair enough, I guess. Though please explain the logic behind registering to a site that allows you to post anonymously and then complaining about those creepy evil corporations that track you without your consent.

If I had a slashdot login I'd probably use it to post this, but creating one was never worth the effort.

Well, you got to consider his ancestors (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800873)

ShanghaiBills grandparents were last seen talking to that nice IBM census taker: "Our religion? Sure, all the better for the government to plan our future".

1939, Germany.

Godwin, kiss my sweaty hairy man ass.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Interesting)

Joce640k (829181) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801061)

Why is it a bad decision? The more advertisers know about me, the more likely I am to see ads for things I am actually interested in.

If you only use the internet for buying family groceries then that's probably a good thing, yes.

No, scratch that. I'm sure that even you don't want your medical-insurance company to know how many Cheetos you eat...

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43806547)

No, scratch that. I'm sure that evenyoudon't want your medical-insurance company to know how many Cheetos you eat...

And this is exactly the problem. Anyone who's had insurance for a number of years, and paid attention, knows that they take the baseline and raise it to the highest profit, giving you "discounts" if you not only qualify with rediculous exceptions, but also beg for them to recognize the fact. So if some beancounter decides that eating more than 2 bags of cheetos per month correlates to a 5% increase in heart attack risk, they go ahead and raise the rate of 2+ bag of cheetos eaters by 5%. That alone would of course be mathematically incorrect and unethical, but they don't stop there. The data they use isn't even necessarily linked to you, your friend could have used your grocery discount card one day, years ago, to put you over that threshold, and once you're over, you'd have to request to get it reevaluated. But it doesn't stop there either. They don't tell anyone this is the metric they use, its a proprietary they must protect from their competitors, and the govt helpsthem protect it. So you'd have to ask them to reevaluate something you don't even know they're using. It doesn't stop there either. They are more likely not using your grocery loyalty card... you see most people don't fill out the name / address part so the data isn't very useful, the ins company knows this...in order to getmore bang for their buck, they'll just use aggregated data. Probably by zipcode. So because you lived in the same zipcode as other shoppers who bought 2+ cheetos bags amonth, its assumed you did too. And once again, once you are in the higher priced tier, you are never removed, so because you lived in the same zipcode as ppl who ate 2+ bags of cheetos 10 yrs ago, you have a higher rate, and have no way of knowing thats why.
That's the problem.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801067)

The more advertisers know about me, the more likely I am to see ads for things I am actually interested in.

How often online are you actually looking to buy something without already knowing it exists?

If you're interested in a particular niche then you'll know what products are available thanks to your social circle. You don't need advertisers making vague claims of brilliance to 'inform' you.

Re: Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801087)

It is a bad decision because once the information is out there you lose control of it.

What you think is hip and cool now will go out of vogue. It always does. Some things become actively negative, rather than just embarrassing fashions of a bygone time.

How would you feel if you put your deepest secrets out there, "protected" by the privacy settings, for only your closest friends and then had those secrets exposed, resulting in ridicule or harm to you?

What if that childish prank you posted about became the focus of a serious criminal investigation? Case in point: http://www.geekosystem.com/driver-brags-about-hitting-cyclist/

Advertisers are scum. They will do anything to make a buck, including cause you harm by selling your details to anybody they think will pay. What do you think is good about your every move being tracked and stored forever?

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801203)

It isn't a bad decision, don't listen to them.
The more we know about you the better for everyone.
On behalf of lawyers, insurers, employers, spouses, law enforcement, marketers, creditors, and governments we appreciate your co-operation.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2)

MacTO (1161105) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801275)

It depends upon how you look at advertising. I would argue that advertising is meant to shape the tastes of consumers to reflect the interests of businesses. Given that this data is being collected to make advertising more effective, i.e. to make the shaping of our tastes more effective, I do see this as something to worry about.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802693)

Is that what you really think it's about? Let me tell you about a project I was involved in a while back...

There's a website where a customer could go to, to look up information about products. These products are basically services, so you need a contract and such to get them, so after you've perused the website you're going to either need to call, or a salesman is going to have to find out who you are and call you.

There's a vendor out there (Actually many of them) that sells a service where you install some of their software and give them various API access to your site. When someone visits the site, this software logs the session, logs EVERY bit of information about your visit and stores it. Now, keep in mind, they do not know who you are likely. You can create an account on the site and if you do they have your info, but likely they don't. There's a lot of psychological manipulation involved in getting you to log in and reveal who you are, but if you don't, that's ok to. They track your IP, your web browser, where your IP originates from, your OS, the time you spent on the site, everything you looked at, etc... from all of this they give you an ID. When you visit the next time, they know who you are... it's very accurate. I was so amazed by the process I tested it and tried to trick it. Even Tor didn't matter. It used that as a data point to identify me the next time I logged in.

So now you're visitor 12548... but they still don't know who you are. This is where the outside vendor or "partner" comes in. They have thousands of customers. All of which have thousands or tens of thousands of hits per day. So now you go to a different site, fall for their psychological manipulation to create an account... Boom, they have your email address, possibly more if you provided your name and number. But the fact of the matter is, if they have your email address they almost assuredly have the rest of your personal info with just a few simple queries. This is all automatic, it happens very fast, all of that companies customers get relayed the data. Then this data comes in as a "Sales lead" creates a ticket and gets shipped to a salesman who calls you. Not only does the salesman have your name, number and where you work, he knows just about every site you've visited in the past 30 days that's affiliated with the company that does the data mining, and the salesman knows everything about what you've been doing on his website.

Now he's ready to make a sales pitch and probably knows more about your habits that your wife does. Is that ok with you? Think of a financial institution that knows you've been looking for a loan to consolidate your debt... and they know all about your plans to go to Hawaii next month... or prediliction for furry porn? or anything else?

This isn't about serving up targeted adds. If it were, it wouldn't be a problem.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43806571)

Any chance you can be more specific?

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (2)

Stan92057 (737634) | about a year and a half ago | (#43803275)

Please explain why the print media had made billions of dollars all without the ability to track its readership? Same for magazines they are loaded with advertisements that interest its readers. Why must advertiser spy on us without permission? And they are advertising stuff that doesn't even remotely mirror the web sites content. As long as they try to spy on what i do say buy without my explicit permission i will block all attempts to do so.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43803369)

Yo internet user, I heard you like punching monkeys so I added a script so you can punch monkeys while you browse!

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43806623)

It is a bad decision if you share things that employers would frown upon. I have had hundreds of applicants I could not bring on board due to what we found on their social media accounts.

It's simple, really. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800703)

Pathetic narcissists desperate enough to seek-attention via "social media" can't expect to be treated with respect.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800739)

Film at 11.

Whelp. I'm out. See you on "To Catch a Predator."

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800843)

I'd argue that the behavior described can't (without doing serious violence to the details) be usefully dismissed as 'making bad decisions'.

Yes, unfortunately, Kids Today show no more signs of being Valiant Defenders of Privacy than did people yesterday. Outside of a principled-but-largely-ineffective minority, nobody ever has. Unshockingly enough, they've largely succumbed to the nigh-inevitable when it comes to advertisers and analytics creeps watching everything they do.

On the other hand, they do appear to be taking some degree of protective action against authority figures who are overt enough to be obviously worth evading(parents, principles, coaches, etc.) and dumb enough to be evadable(If you plan on using the internet in a remotely ordinary fashion without Google, Lexis-Nexis, your friendly local telco, and possibly a three-letter-agency or two, good luck with that. If you are trying to communicate with your friends without your parents catching on to what exactly you are drinking, that's still possible).

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801501)

On the other hand, they do appear to be taking some degree of protective action against authority figures who are overt enough to be obviously worth evading(parents, principles, coaches, etc.) and dumb enough to be evadable(If you plan on using the internet in a remotely ordinary fashion without Google, Lexis-Nexis, your friendly local telco, and possibly a three-letter-agency or two, good luck with that. If you are trying to communicate with your friends without your parents catching on to what exactly you are drinking, that's still possible).

That seems almost useless. The ones in the "principled-but-largely-ineffective minority" group that you mentioned a little while ago are mostly not imbeciles, at least.

Re:Newsflash: Teens make bad decisions (1)

Sez Zero (586611) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802077)

It is clear that no one read TFA. This isn't about teens revealing too much information on social networks, but how teens adapt to public communication channels by "cloak[ing] their messages either through inside jokes or other obscure references". It is darn clever, and something teens have been doing, well, since before I was a teenager.

Social Media (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800663)

You should be aware social media such as twitter and facebook forward your data to third-party companies. A reportage has been published on this : the real facebook [youtube.com]

Whew. (4, Insightful)

multiben (1916126) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800677)

I'm so glad that today's social media options didn't exist when I was at school. I shudder to think of the things I would have thought would be fun to post on the internet.

Re:Whew. (2, Funny)

Ghaoth (1196241) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800701)

But did you carve "Multiben loves Sue" into the old Oak tree that everyone still reads today?

Re:Whew. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800753)

... everyone still reads today ...

The Oak tree doesn't have his date of birth, or parent's address. Even better, no-one can pick up their phone and see the Oak tree (probably). Really great, is that no-one can search what is written on other Oak trees.

Re:Whew. (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800785)

Really great, is that no-one can search what is written on other Oak trees.

Makes mental note to buy www.shareyouroaktree.com domain . Could be a money spinner. Bwahahahah!

Re:Whew. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800819)

Even better, no-one can pick up their phone and see the Oak tree (probably).

Everyone with an iPhone and Facetime can.

Just sayin'...

Re:Whew. (1)

intermodal (534361) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802287)

Google Streetview begs to differ.

Re:Whew. (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802849)

I got my first webpage at 15. And there wasn't a lot of content around at the time.

Suffice to say, if I ever entertained notions of running for political office, they were long since dashed.

This is much of why I feel so free to share my feelings here. My attitude is already well-known and a matter of public record. (Although since the internet archive operates based on the current robots.txt, our once-significant site is not available to the public...)

Perspective... (4, Interesting)

Alyeska (611286) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800789)

Yesterday, I watched an old episode of "The Rockford Files" from 1977 -- a serious two-parter about a private consortium committing various crimes while setting up a secret computer system to track consumers. The episode ended with a black screen and a chilling message from NBC:

"Secret information centers, building dossiers on individuals, exist today. You have no legal right to know abut them, prevent them, or sue for damages. Our liberty may well be the price we pay for permitting this to continue unchecked -- Member, U.S. Privacy Protection Commission."

Re:Perspective... (2)

auric_dude (610172) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801059)

Support https://www.eff.org/ [eff.org]

Re:Perspective... (4, Interesting)

TapeCutter (624760) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801143)

I know the episode your talking about and remember the message. It's probably no coincidence that Nixon split his guts to David Frost in 1977. The FBI under J.E. Hoover had been spying on US citizens for decades, they routinely infiltrated and sabotaged non violent groups such as anti-war protesters, as an example of how absurd it became they had a huge dossier on John Lennon. I'm not an American but I was 17 at the time and watergate was a huge affair, it was clear that the kind of thing that happened at the Watergate hotel was routine, the scandal was followed by some significant legislation on what data government could collect, and under what circumstances domestic groups could be infiltrated. It doesn't seem to have worked, I would not be at all surprised if someone found a similar dossier on the "Dixie Chicks" buried somewhere in Homeland security's basement.

As an Aussie I would like to give Letterman a pat on the back for what he's been doing with his "stooge of the day" segment, regardless of your views on gun control, the point he keeps hammering home is that all the stooges voted in direct opposition to the expressed wishes of an overwhelming majority of their constituents. Every single stooge on Letterman's show is a specific example of an individual politician doing their bit to "steal your liberty". Sure politicians should lead rather than follow the opinion polls, but when they are so out of kilter with them (in some cases taking a position opposed by over 90% of voters), they have some 'splaining to do.

Re:Perspective... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801519)

I would not be at all surprised if someone found a similar dossier on the "Dixie Chicks" buried somewhere in Homeland security's basement

They keep it in the basement so they can sneak off during a coffee break and have a quick fap over the candid spy pics.

Re:Perspective... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43802171)

the point he keeps hammering home is that all the stooges voted in direct opposition to the expressed wishes of an overwhelming majority of their constituents

that's not true though..

Sure politicians should lead rather than follow the opinion polls, but when they are so out of kilter with them (in some cases taking a position opposed by over 90% of voters)

MUH 90% (is an outright lie)

http://gunowners.org/04052013congress.htm
http://gunowners.org/news05022013.htm

Re:Perspective... (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801361)

And the punishment for that little message was that government turned the media into another arm of tyranny, and now media is the mouthpiece of the statist movement.

Re:Perspective... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801657)

Statism is not a movement, it is the status-quo. Ironically, anti-statists are generally corporatists who would rather see private corporation rule the lands with complete disregard for public input.

Of the options available, I'll take statism any day because it at least affords me the guise of being involved in the system come election time. Our corporate overlords can go to hell.

Not really a surprise (3, Interesting)

OhANameWhatName (2688401) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800829)

teen social media users do not express a high level of concern about third-parties (such as businesses or advertisers) accessing their data

And two year olds haven't learnt to balance on their feet yet. At what point of intrusive monitoring of minors do we consider this illegal without parental consent?

Re:Not really a surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801467)

At what point of intrusive monitoring of minors do we consider this illegal without parental consent?

Only if they're under 13. Teens are all fair game. Unless you were saying you want to change the current laws to make it illegal.

Re:Not really a surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801785)

You probably aren't being litteral, however not being able to balance on two feet by the age of two is considered developmentally delayed. Most children can walk by about 12 months and if they can't walk by 18 months it would warrent investigation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages

Re:Not really a surprise (1)

mjr167 (2477430) | about a year and a half ago | (#43802001)

Stumbling about upright and balancing are two very different things. I have two small children (3 and 1) and they can walk, run, hop, and trip over their own feet. Hell, they can fall down while standing still. Never underestimate a small child's ability to simultaneously demonstrate a remarkable ability to climb and dance around unimpeded and then trip over a dust mite.

Rule one (2)

stealth_finger (1809752) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800887)

Never put anything online you wouldn't want you mum to. Goes doubly so for social networks.

Re:Rule one (2)

stealth_finger (1809752) | about a year and a half ago | (#43800955)

Never put anything online you wouldn't want you mum to. Goes doubly so for social networks.

...mum to see.

Re:Rule one (1)

CCarrot (1562079) | about a year and a half ago | (#43805897)

Never put anything online you wouldn't want you mum to. Goes doubly so for social networks.

...mum to see.

Well, to be fair, the original wording also applies. As in: "would I want my Mom posting pics of her doing bellybutton shooters with the local cheerleading squad? No? Hmm...better not post that one..."

Bigger trouble is: idiot 'friends' who oh-so-helpfully post their own pics of you doing stupid things, or even normal things that you don't necessarily want the entire world to see. I make sure that my friends know that I'm not okay with that, and so far it hasn't been a problem, cause I have good friends...not because I don't do stupid things that get caught on camera :)

Re:Rule one (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800967)

You know jack shit about my mom, she's probably kept you from drowning. America is in a Constitutional crisis, a Monetary crisis, a Market well Bubble, 74 undeclared motherfucking wars, the IRS is attacking tea party, the christians, the medical cannabis dispensaries, Mossad in the spy agencies while you and fucking ME pay to get spied on. I just got to ask, just where the fuck are your balls?

How about you actually fucking understand what the fuck your talking about before you post? Anything you put online your mom or mum sees isn't going to be approved by your mum or mom because the really good shit isn't approved. And that my friend is the REALITY of this electronic sea of death (LARRY SPRING (TM)) we all live in (beatles TM).


-- You can tell me by the way I write. I don't NEED a Internet (registered Kasper TM) ID.

Re:Rule one (1)

DoctorBonzo (2646833) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801587)

nice boldface.

America can do many things at the same time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43801703)

Yes, America is going through tough times right now, but that doesn't mean kids can't be advised about the long term consequences of using social media.

My Letter to Senators today (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43800903)

Hello Senators, (cc feinstein and boxer)

            You've been acting like bad children lately. My generation has
            MUCH WORSE CHILDREN, and we are PISSED

            As you both now well know, I been spending a whole hell of a lot of time
            watching your actions lately, my words are now spreading like a wildfire
            on certain things I have tried to bring to your attention to.

            Like obeying the oath of office, and protecting the constitution
            and regulating the monetary system, abolish the IRS and income
            tax, end these fucking undeclared wars.

            I've noticed you seem to just not care lately. Be it AIPAC, the
            UN agenda 21, CFR, EPA, undeclared war support. I am fucking
            sick of the oath breaking. You've broken the public trust on par
            with the IRS.

            Monsanto and all this shit is the tip of the ICEBERG.

            You fuckers are spraying us with Geo Engineering SAG/SRM ops.

            that's fucking TREASON.

            You probably thought I was asleep all these years. Actually I
            was pissed off all these years because frankly feinstein does
            not give a fuck about what I say and ALWAYS sends back a
            template fucking bullet talking point reply, also I would be
            lying if I said I wasn't somewhat worried of your full spectrum
            police state exploiting all electronics and networks at this
            point, with Obamacare trying to bind it to the fucking false
            science DSM-5 and take away peoples second amendment.

            My there's a lot of Israeli dual citizens holding OFFICE pushing
            this fucking shit.

            Now till my end of days, you get to pay the price of that
            apathy(I do too), I gave you your space and you screwed the
            people at every chance. Since you all have your spying and
            targeted kill lists now, it really doesn't matter what the fuck
            I say anymore.

            I don't respect you, I respect your OFFICE only, but you should
            not be in that office.

            Go ahead, spread my name to your fucking kill lists you oath
            breaking scum. I will be noticed if I disappear.

            So what the fuck is it going to be? Do the right thing? Get that
            mossad out of our spy agencies, the zionists out of our banking
            system or you all go live underground while the rest of us
            retarded muppets burn the fucking face of the earth off?

            I'll ask again, where is Stan Meyer's VW?
            Where is Tesla's stolen property?

            Oath breakers like you don't want to fix shit, You have it
            EXACTLY THE WAY YOU WANT.

            I am an honorably discharged veteran. I spit on your integrity.

            I dare you to pass these words on to the rest of the senate.
            DARE YOU.

            Your the one with the hangover and headache now. Not me.
            Sorry there's no more coke and heroin for you to do.

            I ought to CC pelosi with that clap trap bullshit false science
            global warming and fucking carbon tax on the back of the Moore
            OK weather-warfare. She works for the UN not the US, fucking
            bitch.

            You can tell your pals this, people are now starting to get it
            about geoengineering. You called us fucking KOOKS and
            Conspiracy theorists, but who is eating crow now? You said
            there wasn't any chemtrails, oh fucking hell, if we only said
            SAG/SRM WX OPS.

            Why is this relevant. Cause it's all tied together right back
            to motherfucking Monsanto/XE the fucking mercenaries.

            Ya all don't give a fuck about farmers.

            Try to have a nice day, I will too.
            I don't never wish you harm, (HEAR ME NSA, DHS, FBI) but I do
            wish you in a cell at Ft Leavenworth, KS. for breaking your
            fucking oaths.


-- I have been summoned to do the impossible, and I might just fail

Re:My Letter to Senators today (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43802353)

Your posts were funnier when they were APK trolls

Leonard Cohen's analogy... (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801015)

A12-year-old girl spreading her legs before [what was then] a television.

It happens for every generation... since Walt Disney. Walt Disney was the maestro in raping little girls and stealing little boys' imaginations.

Ah youth (4, Insightful)

Krneki (1192201) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801323)

Still innocent about how morally hypocrite the adult world is.

I envy them.

There is nothing wrong with sharing personal information if a person desire to do so, what is wrong is the exploitation of them. This is what we should be enraged about.

Re:Ah youth (1)

invid (163714) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801737)

There is nothing wrong with sharing personal information if a person desire to do so, what is wrong is the exploitation of them. This is what we should be enraged about.

There is something wrong about sharing personal information with people who will obviously exploit it, and when you share personal information on the internet you are sharing it with everyone, which includes the exploiters. I do agree that we should also be enraged about the exploiters as well, and squash them when legally possible, but in a free society you will find a minority of people who take freedom as a license to be scum.

Re:Ah youth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43802971)

what is wrong is the exploitation

Once data is out, it's out. The domain known as EVERYWHERE, the universe, is not a controlled domain.

Shelf your naivete and think twenty, fifty, hundreds years from now. Do you really think something as conceptual and fleeting as "rules" will be an eternal barrier that can force something as absurd as "Don't look at it! Not allowed!"?

You're welcome to try and hold everyone ever up to your "code of conduct" but meanwhile society will continue building walls and locks, since "this is MY side of the planet" doesn't work with words ("rules") alone.

Judgement (3, Insightful)

Waveguide04 (811184) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801579)

There is a reason my kids dont have FB, Twitter, etc accounts. Until they know what and where to disclose info, not a bright idea to open the flood gates both inbound and outbound. Just sayin.

Re:Judgement (1, Insightful)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about a year and a half ago | (#43801951)

There is a reason my kids dont have FB, Twitter, etc accounts... ...that you know about.

Well, More Jobs for the Rest (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43803569)

I suppose after their future potential employers dig up their interviewees' FB and nitTwitter posts and start rolling their eyes, that leaves better opportunities for those of us who refused to jump on the social media band wagons.

It's about more than just advertising.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#43804081)

Unless you've lived under a rock for the last few years, it's pretty obvious that the data aggregators that BUY this data are the real threat here. Sure, you may not mind that browsing for a new Chevy on one website results in Chevy ads targeting you on another site. But what about when all that data about your browsing habits is cross-referenced with personally identifiable information and then sold to data aggregators like Axciom?

They "say" they only sell non-personal marketing information to other advertisors. But the proven truth is that these companys know a LOT more about you than you think. And via analytics, they can accurately infer even more information about you - information you may not have disclosed on the web and that you don't want personally available.

Still think that's not a problem? What happens when your potential employers start paying for background checks from these aggregator databases before they hire you (already happening). What happens when your insurance companies start paying for aggregator information about you before they issue a life/health/automotive policy (already happening)? What happens when someone who wishes you ill pays an aggregator for your profile so they can use that information against you - think divorces, hostile takeovers, competing bid contracts, politics, blackmail, whatever.

It's not just about advertising. Any information you disclose on the web can and will be used against you in the future. And as analytics continues to advance, a lot of information you DON'T disclose on the web will become available as well. And that information is for sale to whomever has the cash - not just advertisers.

Still think it's benign?

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