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Twitter's New Money-Making Plan: Lead Generation

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the have-we-got-a-deal-for-you dept.

Twitter 82

jfruh writes "Social networks like Twitter and Facebook have long hoped that the information they've gathered about you will help them create better targeted and more lucrative advertising, even though advertisers never see your personal data directly. But now Twitter is upping the ante, creating a new kind of card that encourages you to give your contact information directly to people who want to sell you things. For instance, Priceline has a new card with a 'sign up and save' button that saves you 10% on a hotel — and, though it isn't made explicit, adds your Twitter handle and contact information to a Priceline mailing list. There's nothing to stop Twitter from handing this info — including your phone number, if you've registered it with the service — to salesmen."

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19% support for jihadist slaughter (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810665)

http://www.pewforum.org/Muslim/the-worlds-muslims-religion-politics-society-exec.aspx

They try to minimize a hellish statistic by noting 81% say violence against civilians is never justified. But that means that 19% believe it is. And that is among US Muslims, the least radicalized in the world. That stat alone ought to chill your bones. The Pew report is hardly a right wing exercise in Islamophobia, if anything it is neutral orleans to the other side. They were unable to even conduct their research in the most virulent hotbeds of Islamist insanity like Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and other dens of jihad as the mere act of talking to a researcher could get even Muslims beheaded. If you apply the 19% support for jihadist slaughter among relatively moderate Muslims to the rest of the 1 billion plus around the world, you get several hundred million folks who are just fine with beheading infidels, honor killings and imposing religious totalitarianism on all of us.

I don't know about you, but that is something worth paying attention to, and doing so is not Islamophobia. It is common freakin' sense. If someone holding a meat cleaver says he and his friends are going to cut your head off, the smart move is to give him the bin Laden treatment. Shoot him in the eye and feed his carcass to the fishes.

Hehe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810685)

even though advertisers never see your personal data directly

Right... I'll keep on using adblock and ghostery.

Lead Generation (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810703)

You mean "not RoHS compliant"?

This is why (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810731)

This is why parties like facebook, google, twitter, and all the other oh-so-social sites want your contact info. Of course, you knew that.

But it's actually rather deceitful to say one thing and to actually do another. And there is a fundamental problem, where information given in good faith for one purpose gets (silently!) repurposed for another. Doesn't really matter that it's because they wants moar monies, it just isn't what you signed up for. Same with "updates" to privacy policies: Same thing, regardless of what lawyers say, or even if laws exist to explicitly allow such a thing: Such repurposing is always disingenious.

It happens all the time, of course. And you can't realistically legislate against it with privacy laws, that can do no more than say "now be nice with that valuable sensitive personally identifying information, y'hear?!?". So people keep on giving false information. It isn't so much retalliation but far more a protection mechanism against the inevitable exploits of marketeering. And then there's parties with a lot of power in the market trying to force you to give far too much and actually correct information, even try to get laws passed to force you even worse.

So I say there ought to be a law allowing the use of pseudonyms wherever you like. If the government is still there for the people, that is.

Re:This is why (2)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year ago | (#43810981)

Then the question is: why aren't there services like facebook's, google's and twitter's that are honest and let you be the customer, instead of commercial third parties?
I don't mind paying a reasonable fee, if the company treats me like I expect them to.

Re:This is why (3, Insightful)

mwvdlee (775178) | about a year ago | (#43811011)

An individual profile is probably worth (far) more to advertisers than an average person would be willing to pay.

Re:This is why (1)

edelholz (1098395) | about a year ago | (#43811367)

Looking at figures for Facebook and and Tumblr, it seems somewhere between $5 to $20 per user is a ballpark figure.

Re:This is why (1)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year ago | (#43811511)

I might pay $20/year for Twitter if that money bought me meaningful privacy protections. Unfortunately, I don't see that option becoming realistic. It's doubtful there are enough potential customers who value their privacy, and it would be a huge expense and a huge risk to re-configure the data centers to handle those customers.

Re:This is why (1)

gmyuriy (1441755) | about a year ago | (#43838237)

You are missing the point that you'll be the one in 10 who normally would be willing to pay "money" for "free" a service. So make it more like $200/year, and then Twitter will happily make it happen for you.

Re:This is why (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | about a year ago | (#43811643)

per day/week/month/year/forever?

Re:This is why (1)

edelholz (1098395) | about a year ago | (#43811671)

That's market cap for Facebook and purchase price for Tumblr, so that is "per user" (for the lifetime of the user/company).

Re:This is why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811085)

There is, it's called App.net. And it demonstrates the obvious adoption problem that nobody will pay to be social on service with so few users.

Re:This is why (1)

Threni (635302) | about a year ago | (#43811253)

There's app.net, but nobody (statistically, I mean) uses it. Twitter works because they got there first and loads of celebs, industry leaders etc use it. If you could convince them to switch then it might work, but you'd need people to go first and pay for the ability to post once into Twitter (for now), and again into the new system.

It's a bit like Windows - you don't have to be best, you just have to be first. Well, eventually this breaks down, but this current issue won't kill Twitter because if people didn't want their phone number shared they'd have put a fake one in in the first place.

Re:This is why (1)

Politburo (640618) | about a year ago | (#43811343)

Have to keep in mind that when Twitter started, smartphones were not as common. The whole 140 characters is because SMS was the primary access method (and still is for many). Hard to get a text without giving them your phone number.

Re:This is why (1)

nospam007 (722110) | about a year ago | (#43811493)

"It's a bit like Windows - you don't have to be best, you just have to be first."

Sure, but that's for stuff people _need_!

You can't run a computer without OS, but running a life without Facebook or Twitter is actually fantastic.

Re:This is why (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year ago | (#43811541)

you don't have to be best, you just have to be first

This apparently does not apply to telephone companies.
Why should it apply to Twitter etc.?

Re:This is why (1)

Threni (635302) | about a year ago | (#43828893)

If you switch your phone company, nobody else knows. You keep your number, you still call other people on their number.

If you dump Twitter you have to try and convince people to follow you on your new network, you need to add their new ids to your new account (assuming they switch), and you don't even get the chance to ask people you don't know to switch networks - not they would if you did.

Twitter may have been really cool in the early days - I don't know, I joined fairly recently. They seem to have done the same thing Netflix did - make APIs open and get people to write clients/services to increase the use of your network/services, then shut them off/fuck developers and users of third party clients off when you no longer need them.

Re:This is why (1)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | about a year ago | (#43818221)

I'm not sure what any legitimate company would do with your phone number anyways. Most people register with the do not call registry, and the only people who don't follow the do not call rules are breaking the law to begin with. I think twitter would be in for some nasty PR, possibly legal trouble, if they were caught doing business with such an organization.

Unless they're politicians of course - they put specific rules in to allow themselves to spam you in both email and phone calls. This is one reason why I no longer register to vote. (The other is that I feel there hasn't been any decent politician in a long time, so no point in voting.)

Re:This is why (2)

DragonWriter (970822) | about a year ago | (#43814189)

Then the question is: why aren't there services like facebook's, google's and twitter's that are honest and let you be the customer, instead of commercial third parties?

Probably, because no one who thinks that enough people are willing to pay enough money to make that a profitable business model has started a business in that space. If you think it would be viable, go ahead and start a firm working on that model and prove it.

Re:This is why (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about a year ago | (#43811019)

This is the price for being "Linked In"... most of these companies are rather unconventional business models. They generally do not charge users for their services, unless you consider that your privacy is the ticket price for the show.

There's more ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811119)

Here's the thing with the whole "10%" that is completely horseshit.

Compared to what?

In retail it's a common thing to do is to put something on "sale" and show a completely bogus original price.

Or for folks with a discount card, raise the initial price so then the "discount" they get is no better than if they bought in a different manner.

Even then - the travel industry has so many different pricing structures, add on fees, and other thing where they nickel and dime you - quote price is not the same as what you actually pay.

And then there's the small print on these cards. Read it very very carefully because there is always gotchas that cost you a lot of money.

Re:This is why (1)

swillden (191260) | about a year ago | (#43813855)

And you can't realistically legislate against it with privacy laws, that can do no more than say "now be nice with that valuable sensitive personally identifying information, y'hear?!?"

Sure you can. Just put some teeth behind privacy policy violation. If a company says it will do one thing and does something else, penalize it. Defining appropriate (and scalable) penalties would require some thought; you need to make sure that it will hurt no matter how big the company is, and you also need to ensure that companies don't get slammed for the actions of one malicious or negligent employee, but that they do get smacked if there's evidence of a pattern of encouraging or even tolerating such employees. But I think that could be defined with some time and some thought.

Further, it would be a good idea to direct legislatively that the policies covering a given piece of information are the policies that were in place at the time the data was collected. No retroactive policy changes, not without specific, positive permission from users.

I think that approach would strike the right balance, assuring that individuals have the right to trade their personal information for services if they so choose, but ensuring that companies can't arbitrarily change the deal.

DPA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810759)

Remember that once you share that data, it doesn’t belong to either you or Twitter; it belongs to the site you shared it with, and they can do pretty much whatever they want with it.

Does the US not have an equivalent of the UK's Data Protection Act or the EU's Data Protection Directive to prevent this sort of thing?

Re:DPA (4, Informative)

SirGarlon (845873) | about a year ago | (#43810837)

Absolutely not. Data privacy laws in the US and EU are quite different.

The closest thing we have to consumer privacy laws are HIPPA [wikipedia.org] , which makes medical records confidential, and various laws and court rulings that control wiretapping, surveillance,and random searches. There is a different legal theory at work in US privacy law: US laws aim to restrict of data collection and use by the government (I am sure to get flamed for that because there are gaping holes like email), and the EU Data Protection Directive, to the best of my limited knowledge, aims to restrict data collection and use by private entities.

What Twitter has just done is perfectly legal in the US. Also, the US respects no "right to be forgotten," (which is technically infeasible anyway in my opinion), so if you quit using Twitter they get to keep using your data forever.

Re:DPA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811469)

EU data protection is anyone collecting data has to keep it private, and the person in question can request that information for a small free. The US is opposite, you have no rights to what is collected about you and whoever collects it owns it and may sell it to whoever they want (other than HIPPA related, which is taken very seriously). Maybe American companies come unstuck when they continue their shit in Europe and fall foul of the laws of the land. Ford fucked up on something trivial, there was no data leak, but that particular project in Belgium was shut down for over a year.

Getting it backwards (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810785)

Alchemists throughout history have been trying to make gold from lead, not generating it.

Re:Getting it backwards (4, Funny)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year ago | (#43810865)

To be fair you need lead in order to start making gold from it. Baby steps!

Assbackward Comrade (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810965)

Eat hot lead,not babies, Commie rat! Good as gold.

Lead Generation? (2)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year ago | (#43810807)

There's an alchemy joke in there somewhere, and Dog knows the world needs more of those.

Re:Lead Generation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810861)

Well if they're transmuting this garbage into lead, then it can't be long before they get to gold.

Re:Lead Generation? (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | about a year ago | (#43811025)

Ba-da-boom!
He's on phlogiston tonight!

A Dick Move (1)

water-and-sewer (612923) | about a year ago | (#43810815)

Not that Twitter doesn't have the right to do this, but it's not cool. This is good for big money and bad for the consumer, and that's exactly why it got posted at the Dictator's Handbook forum: it's a Dick Move.

I use Twitter begrudgingly, but this really turns me off. Maybe I'm a grumpy old bastard but I remember an Internet that wasn't just some huge info-gathering and sales pitch scheme. This new internet sucks and I wish I could turn it off but I'm addicted to it :)

Re: A Dick Move (1)

Mabhatter (126906) | about a year ago | (#43810853)

I have several "tech industry sites" I signed up for because they are relevant to my work. It's not enough that they

Re: A Dick Move (1)

Mabhatter (126906) | about a year ago | (#43810885)

It's not enough that they are basically spam... that went from weekly, to daily, to several times a day....but at least they were relevant spam. Then they started having "white papers" (with spam) that are clearly adver-blogging...

What seems similar to this and Twitter is that they started cold-calling whenever you opened a "white paper".. And they'd reference tat you were interested in blah blah white paper... So you must want to buy stuff. I'm probably one more call away from "unsubscribe" and turning on the spam filter.

What's sad is that it's a niche platform I support, so if you don't sign up or these, there aren't any other blogs that do a good job, all the vendors are really small so they don't update their own stuff very often. It's frustrating to see it hijacked like thsis.

Re:A Dick Move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811163)

Businesspeople look at being flamed in Internet forums for their policies the way skiiers look at wipeouts. It's something they'd rather avoid, but on the other hand, if it never happens then they're probably being too cautious.

Re:A Dick Move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811265)

No, they don't have a right to do this. Unless you subscribe to the idea that not being forbidden to do something means you have a right to do it. This doesn't fly, and you can work out yourself why.

I'll grant it's a common figure of speech, but that itself is part of the problem. If everything that is not forbidden must necessarily be a right, then why bother with ethics or corporate responsibility or whatever?

Predictable years ago. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810823)

Welcome to the world of "OMG ITS FREE" social networks. Where have you been living? under a rock? Ah no wait... in a basement....

OMG My phone number is out there... (3, Funny)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about a year ago | (#43810835)

and I've tried to keep 555-1212 private for so long...

Re:OMG My phone number is out there... (1)

StripedCow (776465) | about a year ago | (#43810969)

My phone number is copyrighted. If they pull tricks like this, I'll send them a DMCA notice.

Re:OMG My phone number is out there... (1)

six025 (714064) | about a year ago | (#43811089)

and I've tried to keep 555-1212 private for so long...

Jenny 8675309 says this is not a new problem!

Re:OMG My phone number is out there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811995)

and I've tried to keep 555-1212 private for so long...

Just be glad your number isn't 867-5309.

Re:OMG My phone number is out there... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43814853)

Kids these days don't even recognize that number. I use it as a placeholder when webforms ask for a number and I had a customer service rep ask me to confirm my information recently. She didn't even hesitate when she read it back and asked me to confirm it. I couldn't help but burst out laughing!

That's great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810847)

I can get 10% off wherever just by giving them my fake account details, which they can spam all they like. What's not to like about this, here?

Re:That's great! (1)

qbast (1265706) | about a year ago | (#43811065)

Wouldn't that make you liable for fraud? Breaking TOS of free service is one thing, but if you are paid for your data and you provide fake then it is more serious.

Re:That's great! (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year ago | (#43811083)

On the contrary - you have no contractual relationship with the third party. A sale is just a sale. Twitter has provided information registered on your account, and you've made no guarantees with the third party about your information.

Re:That's great! (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | about a year ago | (#43814229)

On the contrary - you have no contractual relationship with the third party

Unless they can be construed as an intended third-party beneficiary under the contract between the primary parties.

This is exactly what Facebook and others are doing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810849)

n/t

When you get something for free on the web, *You* (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810923)

Almost universal with "social networks". You aren't their customer.

Lead generation is all fine and dandy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43810929)

...but you need a proper alchemist to turn your lead into gold.

Delete your history (4, Interesting)

Zebedeu (739988) | about a year ago | (#43810961)

I've often wondered about deleting all of my social networking messages older than [$time_frame], say 6 months.
Social networking like Twitter and Facebook is usually very time-critical: you post something relevant for the moment, but that doesn't really make sense to store for very long (unlike, say, a blog post).
After a few days your post will be so far down your contacts' streams that it will probably never be seen again by a human anyway.

So why leave it up for machines to harvest your data? Why keep posts you did when you were younger and which could possibly be embarrassing later? Why leave open the possibility that through some security failure or site policy change your data suddenly becomes public?

The problem is doing the deleting itself. Going over each post and deleting them manually is a bore.
Facebook, G+ and Twitter are obviously not going to help you automate it -- they'd rather keep your data.
What we need is plugin or site like http://www.deleteallmytweets.com/ [deleteallmytweets.com] but which has a cutoff point instead of simply deleting everything. I wonder how long such a site would survive, particularly if it became popular.

Then there's the question if you'd trust a third party with that amount of access to your profile.

Re:Delete your history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811099)

You should understand that none of this stuff is ever really "deleted", it will sit in their databases until the end of time.

Re:Delete your history (2)

Zebedeu (739988) | about a year ago | (#43811145)

Possibly - we all assume that, but we don't really know. Perhaps it gets deleted in time. Perhaps in certain jurisdictions they are forced to really delete it.

The point remains that even if the data is still available to the service itself, at least it becomes unavailable for everybody else
Something is better than nothing.

Re:Delete your history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811131)

I've often wondered about deleting all of my social networking messages older than [$time_frame], say 6 months.
Social networking like Twitter and Facebook is usually very time-critical: you post something relevant for the moment, but that doesn't really make sense to store for very long (unlike, say, a blog post).
After a few days your post will be so far down your contacts' streams that it will probably never be seen again by a human anyway.

So why leave it up for machines to harvest your data? Why keep posts you did when you were younger and which could possibly be embarrassing later? Why leave open the possibility that through some security failure or site policy change your data suddenly becomes public?

The problem is doing the deleting itself. Going over each post and deleting them manually is a bore.
Facebook, G+ and Twitter are obviously not going to help you automate it -- they'd rather keep your data.
What we need is plugin or site like http://www.deleteallmytweets.com/ [deleteallmytweets.com] but which has a cutoff point instead of simply deleting everything. I wonder how long such a site would survive, particularly if it became popular.

Then there's the question if you'd trust a third party with that amount of access to your profile.

Ah, then there's the question of the value of using social networking at all vs. the privacy you give up.

This is exactly why my usage is minimal, and why there is value in maintaining your own site/blog/server, regardless of that rather trivial cost.

Of course, the entitlement generation doesn't actually acknowledge any other price tag other than "free" for these kinds of services, and continues to be ignorant enough to realize there is no such thing.

Re:Delete your history (1)

Zebedeu (739988) | about a year ago | (#43811257)

Two different things. Once you're using social networking services, you've already gone through the "why" and the tradeoffs involved in questions of privacy, self-hosting, using other platforms, etc.
You're already using social networking for whatever reason, so why not try to mitigate your exposure at essentially zero cost (as I said, nobody's going to see your old posts anyway, and most of them are just useless fluff like "great weather today").

Like you, I also keep my interactions on FB and G+ minimal, but my proposal stands regardless of level of usage.
It's actually easier for me to go back in history and delete everything exactly because I've so few posts there, but for someone more prolific, it'd be a hassle.

Re:Delete your history (1)

edelholz (1098395) | about a year ago | (#43811391)

I like your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter. Or whatever.

A quick googling shows that both the Facebook and Twitter API support deleting. I'm tempted to build this.

Re:Delete your history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811441)

A simple screen scraping bot can be built with AutoIT and the imagesearch plugin.

Possibly even better, you could use IE's automation capabilities in conjunction with a relatively basic VBScript to log in and delete all posts prior to X date.

Re:Delete your history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811481)

Facebook doesn't delete anything, it's flagged internally to hide it. You can't see it again, but it's still there for internal (selling to others) and government access.

Re:Delete your history (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year ago | (#43819941)

Someone is always archiving data like archive.org. :P

Re:Delete your history (1)

Zebedeu (739988) | about a year ago | (#43821813)

Not if your profile isn't public

Re:Delete your history (1)

antdude (79039) | about a year ago | (#43822201)

If private, then companies and related ones will probably still have the data in their backups. Even if deleted, they probably still have them somewhere. :(

Re:Delete your history (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43839169)

Just because you delete it doesn't make it really "deleted" Facebook, Twitter, Google they don't really delete anything. You nor anyone else my not be able to "see" it again but they got a copy with your name on it. If you type it into their system they keep it and it belongs to them not you. Your words do not belong to you anyomore and you are tracked and traced by your words.

Fake Information (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811049)

I had one thing beaten into me before I even knew how to use the internet or a simple google search. Always assume everything you put on the internet will be there forever. That was close to 15years ago, still holds true today. I am thankful that I used nicknames, fake names, etc on registering on about everything and tried hard to make it as difficult to easily identify me on the internet.

A simple search for me will result in nothing, the closest you can get to me if you narrow down my name, school, etc is you will probably pull up one of the several other people who went to the same school as me with my same name for facebook, twitter, etc. In fact I am sure of it. In fact you will pull up multiple people with that kind of search, enough to confuse anyone who doesn't know or met me on who I am (if an future employer decided to do a quick google search for example). In fact the email I give in those situations will return nothing in a search and still sounds professional.

If you really needed a throwaway number to register for something as of recently I started using google voice. To put it short I don't trust majority of these companies with my information, so they don't get it. The only ones who do are the ones who actually need it, which are generally the sites I buy things from. Everyone else will get false information as I don't like being tracked, spammed, or my information sold.

Re:Fake Information (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | about a year ago | (#43811097)

Yes, but did you remember to register your google voice with a cash-only prepaid cell number, and did you purchase it while in disguise and did you alter your voice if you spoke with the cashier? Have you made sure to re-purchase keep-alive minutes in other states well away from your own? I presume you've never turned the cell phone on and, if so, certainly not in your own house.

Re:Fake Information (2)

Thing I am (761900) | about a year ago | (#43811271)

As suggested, I searched for Anonymous Coward and returned 4,130,000 results. You sure get around.

We must control our own data, separate services (1)

Nohea (142708) | about a year ago | (#43811053)

Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Flickr should be services which use personal data controlled by their own users. If we controlled our own tweets, posts, pictures, and connected them to our friends via interoperable services, then once service providers pull a fast one, we could pull up stakes and go to the next one.

Look into the prototypical Tent project https://tent.io/ for a vision of the future.

Re:We must control our own data, separate services (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43818119)

The ideal thing would be for everybody to own one's own servers (hosting providers won't do, it needs to be *your* server) and communicate using standard protocols (by general rule, if there's a service on internet, it's usually a failure on part of standarization). The problem is that it's unfeasible to expect everybody to maintain their own servers and keeping them on-line all the time.

Salesforce.com / Radian 6 partnership? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811103)

I wonder what implication this has on their partnership with Salesforce.com? Their Radian 6 login page [radian6.com] has "in partnership with Twitter".

Background:
Salesforce.com purchased Radian 6 and Buddy Media and have combined it into what they call the Marketing Cloud [salesforce...gcloud.com] .
Radian 6 listens [salesforce...gcloud.com]
Buddy Media publishes [salesforce...gcloud.com]
Social Media advertises [salesforce...gcloud.com]

TANSTAAFL (2)

jbmartin6 (1232050) | about a year ago | (#43811143)

That's a story as old as the hills

Re:TANSTAAFL (1)

Thrymm (662097) | about a year ago | (#43811213)

wtf is twatter anyway?

As if... (1)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about a year ago | (#43811245)

There weren't enough reasons to avoid social networking.

Nobody has mentioned their two factor authenticati (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811261)

Nobody has mentioned that their two factor authentication utilizes your phone number to "secure" your account. In the name of security you'll open yourself up to more invasive, more risky spam and increase the chances of you being the target if identity theft.

Real names (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811389)

Real names have power. Everyone (should) know that. So do real phone numbers, addresses etc. Avoid giving them out to those you don't trust (or at least those who don't require them).

Will they accept tangible assets? (1)

Hillgiant (916436) | about a year ago | (#43811527)

'Cause then I could turn gold into lead.

why the fuck (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43811571)

would you give twitter your phone number? because you're friends with twitter? because you want to have a business relationship with twitter? because you're an idiot?

There are tnwo types of tech comapnies (1)

WOOFYGOOFY (1334993) | about a year ago | (#43811609)

There are two types of tech companies. Those who make money by selling you a service or product you pay for directly - an IDE company, a programming company, a game company- and those who sell your personal data to companies =tech and otherwise -who are the first kind of company.

If you didn't pay for it, then you're being sold in some way as a lead . FB, Google, Huffpo, slashdot, all these companies run on some combination of eyeballs (advertising) and personal information selling.

advertisingsucks (1)

Korruptionen (2647747) | about a year ago | (#43811869)

A great man once said, "By the way, if anyone here is in advertising or marketing... kill yourself." His name was Bill Hicks.

Re:advertisingsucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43814125)

A great man once said, "By the way, if anyone here is in advertising or marketing... kill yourself." His name was Bill Hicks.

Yet he was happy enough to use advertising to bring people to his shows.

Why Lead? (2)

rossdee (243626) | about a year ago | (#43811971)

I suppose you can use it in batteries, for UPS and cars etc. (I just bought a battery for the mower, it was nearly half the price of what I paid for the mower in the first place.)

But it would be better if you could generate Lithium

I don't fear The FB (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year ago | (#43812133)

One of the reasons I don't fear The Omnipotent Facebook is due to their inability to serve up a single ad that is of interest to me. I've been on FB for three years, I post content and links a few times a day, both from a PC and mobile. I live in a city of two million, 'check in' here and there and have a network if probably 100 friends. Yet FB is completely incapable of serving up a single ad that I might click. Ever.

same policy for both corporations and crazy chicks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43812179)

never give your real name or address

always lie, use email obfuscation services like sneakemail (or mailinator for people you don't want to talk to again), use pre-paid credit cards whenever you need to make a payment

the world we live in is such that we have to actively protect ourselves from advertisers and marketers, they will never leave us alone if we ask nicely

i am not a commodity to be "monetized" if someone wants to make money off of me they can give me a cut of the cash, not whatever "intangible" service they offer

Inevitable (1)

steelfood (895457) | about a year ago | (#43815301)

They've already mastered the ability to generate energetic CO2 in large quanitites. It seems they're starting to move up in the world.

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