Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Pitcher-Turned-Law Student On Cheating In Baseball

timothy posted about a year ago | from the sports-builds-character dept.

Games 276

An anonymous reader writes "As a 27-year old minor league pitcher who had never made it to "The Show" (ballplayers' slang for the big leagues), Garrett Broshius was advised by a coach to develop an 'out pitch' by cheating (doctoring or scuffing the baseball while standing on the mound). It was an ethical crossroads faced by many players past and present, and Broshius ultimately decided to give up the game. While a student at the St. Louis University School of Law, he wrote a paper that attempted to apply the tenets of legal theorists to the rampant cheating in baseball and other sports (click the 'download' button, no registration required). While Broshius' paper isn't brilliant or novel, it tours the techniques and issues surrounding cheating in baseball better than most. Broshius concludes with recommendations for how baseball should handle two classes of cheating: 'traditional' cheating of the type he was advised to do by the coach, which has achieved acceptance in some quarters as part of the game; and 'new era' cheating involving performance-enhancing drugs such as steroids, which has become prominent in the last 25 years. Oh, and Brosius remarks that in almost every baseball game he watches these days, he notices something suspicious — usually from the pitcher."

cancel ×

276 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

who needs to cheat (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43861941)

it's a girls game anyways

Re:who needs to cheat (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862049)

There's no crying in Baseball!!!

Re:who needs to cheat (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862707)

If you took a line drive to the nads, I bet you'd cry.

Re:who needs to cheat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862165)

Nah but its only popular because it's the place public drunkeness is allowed in American culture. After all it's not like you go to watch a non-stop exciting game.

Money (4, Insightful)

stoolpigeon (454276) | about a year ago | (#43861949)

I don't care what sport it is - when contracts worth millions of dollars are on the line, there will always be talented people willing to do whatever they have to in order to stay competitive and even excel.

Re:Money (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862147)

Like international finance. My favourite sport.

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862479)

I'm a volunteer judge at competitive gang bangs. There aren't too many rules but some people are still try to break them.

Re:Money (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about a year ago | (#43862569)

You're right. There is tons of cheating in many other professions. It's just that in most other professions, they don't have "rule books" so it's a lot less obvious when someone is breaking the rules. Also, because the "game" is played behind closed doors, without a ton of spectators, it's must less likely that they will get caught.

Re:Money (1)

krept (697623) | about a year ago | (#43862695)

Simple. Hire corporate umpires!

Re:Money (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | about a year ago | (#43862925)

Hell, bring it to a more normal every day level.

Most people will do what it takes to get what they want in life...period.

Lying to women to get laid...check

Speeding to get a delivery made quicker and have low turnaround time....check

Checking your answer on a test with your neighbors'....check

When competition is up for ANYTHING....people that are really driven to succeed, will often do what it takes to win. Sure, I'd say most people prefer to do everything honest and aboveboard (I'm an optimist), but I also think most people that are consistently successful and manage to stay on top of their game in any en devour, have gone outside the 'rules' in order to win (I'm realistic).

Re:Money (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862267)

Well, they are taking a risk. If they are caught cheating they might end up with nothing.
It is referees and the tournament organizations job to make sure that the risk of getting caught and the punishment for it outweighs the benefit of cheating.

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862305)

Only if there are opportunities to cheat. Opportunities can be reduced or eliminated, in theory.

Being a top level chess grandmaster is a lucrative lifestyle. Do you see much cheating in top level international chess competition?

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862389)

It has been only recently that cheating via computer would have helped, and even now the computing power necessary to gain an edge at that level isn't something available to many people.

Probably if you subjected chess players to the same level of testing as pro cyclists many of them would be found in violation of caffiene, at a minimum.

Re:Money (5, Interesting)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#43862425)

The Russians were known to bring a dozen backup grandmasters to sit in a backroom and examine unlikely move combinations in depth. Kind of like a Beowulf cluster of grandmasters.

Re:Money (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862335)

As a former professional cyclist, I can attest to that as a certain fact.

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43863085)

You forgot to sign in with your Lance novelty account there buddy.

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862441)

And I really don't care if they cheat or not. What I care about is not being forced to support them, cheating or no cheating. Many cities use tax dollars to prop up these franchises when (obviously) voluntary support isn't enough. The obvious conclusion -- when voluntary support isn't enough -- is that not enough people actually want the product or service in question. If those people don't value the product or service, then why are they forced to support it?

Re:Money (-1, Offtopic)

moeinvt (851793) | about a year ago | (#43862721)

"... if those people don't value the product or service, then why are they forced to support it?"

It's called "government". They authorize themselves to steal your wealth and then use it to provide goods and services whether you want them or not.
I don't want to pay for public schools, but I'm forced to support them anyway.

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862507)

Perhaps so, but it removes a bit of the gloss when you find that out, and that leads to reduced enthusiasm and what-not for the average Joe. What may be good for the player, may not be good for the sport.

Re:Money (1)

Minwee (522556) | about a year ago | (#43862561)

If they're using Excel to play baseball, then they're doing something wrong.

Then again, I wouldn't be surprised to see someone abusing Access in that way.

Re:Money (1)

dsvick (987919) | about a year ago | (#43862603)

... there will always be talented people willing to do whatever they have to in order to stay competitive and even excel.

If they have to go to those lengths, they're not that talented

Re:Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43863009)

I don't care what sport it is - when contracts worth millions of dollars are on the line, there will always be talented people willing to do whatever they have to in order to stay competitive and even excel.

Then I don't care who you are involved in that. Greed will always be the true winner, and sickens fans even more thinking that people are being paid millions of dollars to cheat.

But that is only half of it. When they are caught and not fired (I didn't say punished, I said FIRED), it just goes to show you just how deep that corruption goes (to include writing obscene contracts that refuse to write cheating clauses within).

Few other professions in this world reward with such riches, and yet we continue to award them, all for entertainment. Perhaps we should call it what it is, because it's hardly sportsmanlike.

baseball needs more replay (2)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#43861953)

baseball needs more replay

Re:baseball needs more replay (3)

bobthesungeek76036 (2697689) | about a year ago | (#43862121)

Amen. And electronic scoring of pitches!

Re:baseball needs more replay (1, Troll)

intermodal (534361) | about a year ago | (#43862229)

Yes, because baseball could totally use things to make the games longer and slower. Think of the extra advertising revenues and concessions sales!

Re:baseball needs more replay (4, Funny)

korgitser (1809018) | about a year ago | (#43862597)

baseball needs more cowbell

FTFY

But thats OK! (2)

jellomizer (103300) | about a year ago | (#43861961)

Just as long it is about sports, we don't care about right and wrong or morals. But if a Scholastic student who wasn't good at sports did it. They will be locked up in jail for the rest of their life.

Re:But thats OK! (4, Insightful)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year ago | (#43862019)

Just as long it is about sports, we don't care about right and wrong or morals.

IMO our society has a ridiculous fixation on sports.

Re:But thats OK! (1)

Laxori666 (748529) | about a year ago | (#43862053)

What? Nooo [smbc-comics.com] ..

Re:But thats OK! (2)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about a year ago | (#43862357)

Another somewhat relevant SMBC comic [smbc-comics.com] .

Re:But thats OK! (2)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year ago | (#43862421)

LoL. More than somewhat relevant!

Re:But thats OK! (3, Informative)

internerdj (1319281) | about a year ago | (#43862447)

A baseball scholarship put my wife's oldest brother through an engineering degree. It is also putting my wife's youngest brother through school although he doesn't really know what he wants to do other than baseball. My kids are playing but I'm not sure I want them to be successful with it beyond college. Too much pressure to do amoral or destructive things to get an edge, but I guess that is the case with most high profile success areas.

Re:But thats OK! (-1, Troll)

NoImNotNineVolt (832851) | about a year ago | (#43862655)

A baseball scholarship put my wife's oldest brother through an engineering degree.

Meanwhile, a kid with a genuine passion for engineering, who wouldn't have been distracted from his studies by throwing, catching, and hitting a small ball, was denied a spot. I hope your wife's oldest brother is okay with that.

Also, why do sports and higher education have anything to do with each other? This makes about as much sense to me as corporate chess teams or military charities.

Re:But thats OK! (4, Insightful)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year ago | (#43862857)

If you're not interested in stuff other than engineering, you're going to be a terrible, terrible, terrible engineer.

What you call "distraction from your studies" is what makes you good at your job.

Re:But thats OK! (1)

NoImNotNineVolt (832851) | about a year ago | (#43863069)

We're all entitled to our own opinions, but I have yet to see any actual evidence of this claim.
Were Einstein, Feynman, or Hawking in college on athletic scholarships?

Re:But thats OK! (1, Interesting)

VirginMary (123020) | about a year ago | (#43862873)

Also, why do sports and higher education have anything to do with each other?

They don't, at least not in my country. I got my Master's and Ph.D. in the US and was and still am baffled by this. What really bugged me though is that I had to support people's sports hobby with a financial contribution. I thought it would have been better for other students to pay for my scifi-book-reading hobby instead. The bogus argument was that the sports teams were making my university money. If that would have actually been true, why did I have to financially support it then? Also, I never attended a single game in my 5 years at my university. I would have preferred watching paint dry. My degrees are in physics, btw. and I am from Germany. I also think it is disgusting that people get scholarships based on their athletic abilities. Are we still ape men?

Re:But thats OK! (1)

niado (1650369) | about a year ago | (#43863093)

Short answer to all of these questions -

People like sports...

Re:But thats OK! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43863025)

Military charities like Toys for Tots, for example?

Re:But thats OK! (1, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | about a year ago | (#43862871)

IMO our society has a ridiculous fixation on sports.

The good news is, once you figure out that sports == crap, and ignore it? It frees up a metric ton of time and money for the stuff that's actually fun to do.

OTOH, I think it's not the fact that we have made-up conflicts as entertainment, but the fact that the conflicts themselves *are* the entertainment. Dress it up all you like, but people love to see conflict (and more importantly, love to see the realization of victory from that conflict, even if by proxy). That's what drives movies, books, TV shows (not just the "reality" flavor, either), and, well, you-name-it.

Gotta give props to the Romans, though... even though their ideas of public entertainment were bloody and brutal (and often deadly), they didn't try and dress it up much.

Re:But thats OK! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862915)

That's some insightful stuff right there.

I, on the other hand, have a ridiculous fixation on boobs.

Re:But thats OK! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43863083)

Just as long it is about sports, we don't care about right and wrong or morals.

IMO our society has a ridiculous fixation on sports.

...which is overshadowed by a ridiculous fixation on paying people to cheat in those sports, and refusing to punish them when they are caught.

And no, fines that equal the amount the player has in their wallet or purse does not constitute punishment. That's called a "joke".

Re:But thats OK! (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about a year ago | (#43863265)

My wife would probably argue I have a ridiculous fixation with tinkering with my phone. Usually I end up temporarily breaking it due to flashing the latest version of cyanogenmod.

Many people have hobbies, be they sports, software, computers, or other electronics. Our hobbies just tend to be a little rarer than sports fans.

Not brilliant or novel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43861981)

Lying on television isn't brilliant or novel at all. Since the is a common medium for viewing the game. Ultimately isn't it the goal to make it as entertaining as possible so people keep throwing millions of dollars at it. Wrestling is faked already, why should other sports be any different?

I can't count on one hand (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43861985)

I can't count on one hand how many people I offended back in the day when I kept exclaiming that McGuire was on steroids. It would make a McGuire fan go completely rabid. I was in high school, and one guy almost punched me over it.

Of course, I was right. Common sense and all that.

Re:I can't count on one hand (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about a year ago | (#43862027)

You and me both. It was pretty obvious, if you didn't hail from St Louis. Sosa too...

Re:I can't count on one hand (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#43862139)

You...you don't wanna watch old Arnold Swartzenegger movies.

Re:I can't count on one hand (2)

locopuyo (1433631) | about a year ago | (#43862935)

It sounds like his fans had roid rage.

Shocked, shocked! (1)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year ago | (#43861999)

Cheating in sports? Who'd of thought it!

Re:Shocked, shocked! (2)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#43862339)

Here's the actual cheat:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spitball [wikipedia.org]

Pretty disgusting stuff.

Re:Shocked, shocked! (1)

larry bagina (561269) | about a year ago | (#43862693)

You think that's disgusting? There are other body fluids that are also used, if you get my drift. Back in high school, our pitcher hit a batter with a cum ball. (The batter mad some comments about his girlfriend).

Re:Shocked, shocked! (1)

torsmo (1301691) | about a year ago | (#43862967)

Happens in cricket, as well, and is termed as ball tampering. It's illegal and is done to affect the aerodynamics of the ball. Bowlers (the equivalent of pitchers) work on one hemisphere of the ball and keep it smooth and shiny by applying saliva, sweat etc. and rubbing it vigorously against fabric. Using any means other than body fluids and natural wear and tear on the ball to affect its swing is illegal and carries harsh penalties.

To quote Homer Simpson. . . (4, Funny)

smooth wombat (796938) | about a year ago | (#43862075)

after he gave up drinking for a time to please Marge:

I never realized how boring this game is.

Re:To quote Homer Simpson. . . (2)

stoolpigeon (454276) | about a year ago | (#43862565)

Annnd... there's a beach ball on the field.......

one of my favorite scenes.

Isn't that the point? (2, Funny)

simonbp (412489) | about a year ago | (#43862081)

Isn't that kinda the point of baseball? It's only cheating if they catch you? Is a scuffed ball any different from stealing a base?

Re:Isn't that the point? (2)

dreamchaser (49529) | about a year ago | (#43862141)

Isn't that kinda the point of baseball? It's only cheating if they catch you? Is a scuffed ball any different from stealing a base?

Stealing a base is a legally allowed move in the game, so yes it is very different.

Re:Isn't that the point? (4, Insightful)

Abstrackt (609015) | about a year ago | (#43862697)

Stealing a base is more like taking your time when your opponent forgots to stop their clock in a game of speed chess. It's not cheating so much as taking advantage of inattentiveness.

Re:Isn't that the point? (2)

niado (1650369) | about a year ago | (#43863169)

Another interesting example is fouling in basketball. You are legally not allowed to foul in the game, but fouling happens constantly and the players are only punished for a small fraction of the fouls that occur. Fouling is openly used in various strategies, and players often have trouble mitigating the advantages gained by fouling because free throws are difficult, and referees are not omniscient.

Hey BBWAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862099)

Take that and chew on it for a while!

Kool-Aid Man went to law school? (0)

korbulon (2792438) | about a year ago | (#43862107)

"Would counsel please approach the bench?" "Oh yeahhh!"

Re:Kool-Aid Man went to law school? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862203)

You owe me more coffee and pants.

MLB has much bigger problems (5, Insightful)

schwit1 (797399) | about a year ago | (#43862183)

Slow play and umps that can't find the strike zone with a telescope

Coaches should get red flag just like football so replay could be used. Replays should be done at MLB HQ like the NHL does it.

MLB should institute an automated strike zone and a pitch clock when no one is on base.

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

Formorian (1111751) | about a year ago | (#43862281)

If I had points I'd mod you up. Make the game faster. Use electronic scoring for pitches, so all things are equal. Not 1 ref has this strike zone, this ref has that one, etc.

Baseball is quickly becoming the last sport in America and the oldest (in the fans that watch). I can't watch it. They start the World Series like after 9PM EST, games are 3.5-4hrs long. Yeah I have to be up for work, so yeah not staying up for that. SO I haven't watched world series in many years.

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (3, Insightful)

CoderBob (858156) | about a year ago | (#43862503)

The World Series starts after 9PM because much earlier than that and you leave out the west coast TV market. 9PM EST = 6 PM Pacific.

Perhaps I am an oddity, but I find basketball much more annoying to watch than baseball, and football really isn't any better. In terms of continuous action, I would put forth that the NHL is actually the most "gameplay" for the length of a game.

I'm not saying Football and baseball are "equal" in downtime, but if you start adding up the time between a play being declared dead and the actual start of the next play (not men lining up, but when the ball is snapped), I think that the amount of time that is spent not "playing" the game becomes more comparable. Yeah, there's a clock counting down, but what is the actual run-time of a typical football game at this point? 3.5, 4 hours?

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

Formorian (1111751) | about a year ago | (#43862595)

football usually right around 3. I usually start a game at 1 and it's over by 4, sometimes 4:15.

I get your point about west coast, but 5pm is late enough and you're not leaving out cause game would still be getting over at 5pm start 9pm. I don't care about watching first few innings. Plus the majority of Baseball fans are northeast/East Coast compared to other area's, you're cutting out you're biggest supporters. Also, the metric shows you're loosing young people. And I know my sports interest stem from what I watched growing up. I know with my kids we don't even watch baseball together. Anyways, I heard a stat, not sure it's true but baseball games even 15 years ago used to be 3.25hrs long, now they are like 3.65. I'm too lazy to actually find out if that's true right now tho.

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (0)

gnick (1211984) | about a year ago | (#43862605)

...I would put forth that the NHL is actually the most "gameplay" for the length of a game.

Not an MMA fan then?

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

chuckinator (2409512) | about a year ago | (#43863225)

MMA would be far more interesting if they flooded the arena and had mock naval battles.

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

niado (1650369) | about a year ago | (#43863285)

MMA is not a "game". It's sortof a sport, and is certainly an "athletic competition". Difficult to compare with the mainstream sports (unless you include boxing in that group).

I would liken it more to skydiving - the goal is pretty much to avoid dying while looking awesome.

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

coinreturn (617535) | about a year ago | (#43862713)

The World Series starts after 9PM because much earlier than that and you leave out the west coast TV market. 9PM EST = 6 PM Pacific.

Perhaps I am an oddity, but I find basketball much more annoying to watch than baseball, and football really isn't any better. In terms of continuous action, I would put forth that the NHL is actually the most "gameplay" for the length of a game.

I'm not saying Football and baseball are "equal" in downtime, but if you start adding up the time between a play being declared dead and the actual start of the next play (not men lining up, but when the ball is snapped), I think that the amount of time that is spent not "playing" the game becomes more comparable. Yeah, there's a clock counting down, but what is the actual run-time of a typical football game at this point? 3.5, 4 hours?

Though I gave up watching any sports years ago, football actually has things going on before the ball is snapped: man in motion actually does change play. But Aussie rules football kicks ass on all other sports.

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43862815)

true, but in hockey and soccer it seems like all they do is pass the puck/ball around for 2 hours with one or two points scored in a game

Re:MLB has much bigger problems (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43862437)

they do replays for some plays, but i've read the equipment they use is 90's era TV's

no money for new equipment

Walk Away (4, Insightful)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | about a year ago | (#43862189)

There's only one solution to a completely corrupt system. Walk away from it. Broshius made the correct decision by leaving the game behind him.

You cannot change a corrupted institution from within. I'll repeat that. You cannot change a corrupted institution from within. There are too many people inside who have spent their lives justifying and profiting from their misdeeds, who are not about to turn over a new leaf or air their dirty laundry because you've made an appeal to their conscience. They killed theirs long ago.

The best thing to do is leave the rotten ship to sink all by itself. Every honest person who stands by a rotten game, or bankrupted bank, or broken political party is just propping up an at best amoral system, and usually an immoral and even illegal one. There is no obligation to stay loyal or remain in solidarity with a disloyal and dishonest organisation.

Broshius has done more for baseball as a law student that he ever could have as a player or a fan.

Re:Walk Away (1)

Spudley (171066) | about a year ago | (#43863067)

There's only one solution to a completely corrupt system. Walk away from it. Broshius made the correct decision by leaving the game behind him.

You cannot change a corrupted institution from within. I'll repeat that. You cannot change a corrupted institution from within. There are too many people inside who have spent their lives justifying and profiting from their misdeeds, who are not about to turn over a new leaf or air their dirty laundry because you've made an appeal to their conscience. They killed theirs long ago.

The best thing to do is leave the rotten ship to sink all by itself. Every honest person who stands by a rotten game, or bankrupted bank, or broken political party is just propping up an at best amoral system, and usually an immoral and even illegal one. There is no obligation to stay loyal or remain in solidarity with a disloyal and dishonest organisation.

Broshius has done more for baseball as a law student that he ever could have as a player or a fan.

I've quoted the above comment in full because it deserves repeating.

Well said. I came here to post pretty much the same thing, but I won't bother, since you said it so well.

Re:Walk Away (1)

Agent0013 (828350) | about a year ago | (#43863117)

I think this applies to police also.

What kind of hardware do I need to play this? (5, Funny)

Guano_Jim (157555) | about a year ago | (#43862209)

I've been trying to download this "baseball" game all morning and all every website I visit just shows me a bunch of sweaty dudes in pajamas.

They're using wooden controllers (!) and even worse, they're outside. Is this a beta? wtf

Re:What kind of hardware do I need to play this? (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about a year ago | (#43862375)

Don't worry. If you are posting to slashdot without anyone having introduced it to you at this point then you are so far behind the learning curve it isn't worth picking up a copy.

Re:What kind of hardware do I need to play this? (2)

matrim99 (123693) | about a year ago | (#43862953)

No worries, you can always buy the DLC (steroids) that everyone is complaining about as being Pay to Win.

OUTSIDE?? (3, Funny)

washort (6555) | about a year ago | (#43862823)

Aren't there bears outside?

everybody does it (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43862213)

batters kick dirt onto the batters box to make it harder to call a strike
catchers call the pitch and jump in or outward just before its thrown. or move their glove after its caught to increase the amount of strikes
pitchers are always rubbing their sweaty heads right before throwing the ball

in the end it doesn't really help. a good pitcher is good for 100 some pitches. but these tough guys are always telling the manager they are OK in the 6th inning right before they give up a bunch of runs. or a few pitchers will get injured and the rest of the staff has to take up the slack with less rest. a starting pitcher needs close to a week of rest after a game. a few injured players will tire out your pitching staff and result in more runs given up

fatigue and acting tough has a much greater effect on the game than foreign substances

Wait..LOL WUT? (3, Funny)

ArhcAngel (247594) | about a year ago | (#43862219)

So the guy has an ethical dilemma with an out pitch but not with becoming an attorney? I have yet to meet an attorney that didn't employ at least a few ethically questionable tactics.

Re:Wait..LOL WUT? (2)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | about a year ago | (#43862347)

It's called saving face. The coach didn't have much faith in his skill and encouraged scuffing the ball to improve his performance. In the end, he did right thing. Instead of resorting to cheating to improve his chances of making it to the major leagues, he realized his limitations and chose a new career path instead. He decided to become a lawyer. Lawyers know how to put a positive spin on anything, and he demonstrates how he is a natural.

Re:Wait..LOL WUT? (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year ago | (#43862483)

I have actually met some ethical lawyers. They aren't Johnny Cochrane, they also aren't Atticus Finch, but many of them do very ordinary things like draw up contracts that accurately describe the agreements their bosses came to. There are also guys like Lawrence Lessig and Ray Beckermann (NewYorkCountryLawyer) who try to put their skills to use for what they see as the greater good.

Re:Wait..LOL WUT? (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | about a year ago | (#43862779)

I never said I hadn't met a lawyer who used their power for good. Even the good ones employ devious tactics at some point. Kind of a nature of the beast thing. I also don't doubt there are lawyers who do not use said tactics but their numbers are statistically insignificant.

Re:Wait..LOL WUT? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43863157)

I never said I hadn't met a lawyer who used their power for good. Even the good ones employ devious tactics at some point. Kind of a nature of the beast thing. I also don't doubt there are lawyers who do not use said tactics but their numbers are statistically insignificant.

There is a considerable difference between "devious" and "illegal", and last time I checked, asking a pitcher to modify the very object used in the game was not allowed by any stretch of the imagination.

control of the ball trumps foreign substances (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43862307)

having the ball fly crazy won't make the batter try to hit it. a good pitcher like Justin verlander has control of the ball. he can aim a pitch onto the outside of the strike zone to trick the batter. a good pitcher will know the batter's habits and style of swing and adjust his pitches for that.

a good batter will avoid swinging at a bad pitch

sounds like this guy did a study on a few pitchers who had no chance to make it to the majors and tried to cheat their way in which would not have worked anyway since the worst major league hitters are as good as the best Triple-A hitters

Re:control of the ball trumps foreign substances (2)

dkleinsc (563838) | about a year ago | (#43862435)

a good pitcher will know the batter's habits and style of swing and adjust his pitches for that. a good batter will avoid swinging at a bad pitch

Yogi Berra said it better: "Good pitching beats good hitting, and vice versa."

Re:control of the ball trumps foreign substances (1)

geekoid (135745) | about a year ago | (#43862813)

Lets not forget, most batters have decided to swing before the ball is released.
For most swings, their is no conscious decision to swing once the pitcher finished the wind up. Not enough time. less then .5 seconds.

Anything you can do to the ball that hides the pitchers intent hurt the batters odds of a hit.

What is Baseball? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862309)

Is this Baseball game something that is on Windows 8 or something new on 8.1?

Says the guy who didn't make it to the show (1, Insightful)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#43862373)

So a minor leaguer who didn't cut the mustard decides that everyone in the Majors is cheating? Color me surprised.

Re:Says the guy who didn't make it to the show (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862587)

Cheating isn't his excuse, it's his observation from the time he played (his coaches told him how to cheat), and from watching the game at the top level. At no point does he say the cheats prevented him from becoming a pro. Type reading next time, or do you always want to come across as a complete tosser?

If you don't believe him, read the fucking report and dispute it.

Re:Says the guy who didn't make it to the show (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#43862667)

check out his stats on fangraphs.com
he wasn't good enough to make it to the big leagues. he started in AA where he did OK. in Triple-A his numbers dropped and that was it.

chances are a lot of guys cheat, but which ones? are the best ones who make it to the pro's cheat? most likely not since your average MLB hitter won't swing at most pitches that fly erratically. sure he'll get a few who do, but most average hitters will blow him out of the game

They need to adopt the NACSAR rule (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | about a year ago | (#43862669)

If you ain't cheaten, you ain't winnin.

How to fix the drug enhancement issue (1)

geekoid (135745) | about a year ago | (#43862741)

Everyone gets tested after a game, any single person come sup positive, then game is considered a loss. Happens twice, they give up 25% of merchandising for a year.

Make it an incentive for the owners to fix it, and the owners will fix it.

Re:How to fix the drug enhancement issue (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about a year ago | (#43863235)

Everyone gets tested after a game, any single person come sup positive, then game is considered a loss. Happens twice, they give up 25% of merchandising for a year.

Make it an incentive for the owners to fix it, and the owners will fix it.

End result: Every single team purposely throws a "cheater" into the drug testing mix, resulting in losses for every single team. Happens twice, and the entire franchise is dinged 25% on merchandising, causing the merchandisers to be punished, creating a 30% markup to account for losses. Fans are the ones ultimately punished.

C'mon man, you gotta do better than that. I promise you that is what would happen when billions are at stake. They would band together quicker than oil companies fixing gas prices just to break that system in half and go back to the "good ol' days".

If you can throw. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43862795)

If you can throw the ball 100 mph in the strike zone, you throw the ball 100 mph in the strike zone.

If you can't you whine about it and write sour grapes crap that ends up on Slashdot.

I know people who think all pro-sports are fixed (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#43862797)

... and would chalk up players who are "caught" cheating as all part of how the games are rigged, done solely to keep fans interested in the game by trying to reinforce the notion to the fans that it's not fixed.

Axiom to live by in sports and life. (1)

doubledown00 (2767069) | about a year ago | (#43862811)

"If you're not cheating, you're not trying."

Third type of cheating (2)

puddingebola (2036796) | about a year ago | (#43862905)

I think he left out a third category of cheating: cheating that transcends the sport and becomes an object of admiration among fans. The textbook example would be Gaylord Perry. One of the more interesting sports interviews I've heard involved Perry describing his elaborate routines to keep the opposition guessing where he had hidden a gob of vaseline. Apparently there were people on the opposing team whose job it was to watch him during the game and try to catch him cheating. The vaseline, of course, moved from his pant leg, to his cap, to the back of his neck, which he rubbed to loosen up... etc. I agree with a previous post that the economic rewards are too large to stop it, but I admire the author of this article of refusing to take part. It is possible, I think, however, for people to become so accustomed to cheating that they accept some forms of it as part of the game. Gaylord perry demonstrating a spitter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXLc8hKoaBw [youtube.com]

Background explanations for Europeans & others (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about a year ago | (#43862923)

"The Show" = Big Leagues = Major League Baseball, the highest professional baseball league.

Note that there is no question at all that MLB is the best professional baseball league. This is not like soccer/football where fans night argue that the EPL or Bundesliga or La Liga or some other league is the best. MLB to every other baseball league is like the EPL to MLS or worse.

The fact that Broshuis (his name is misspelled on the original post) was asked to cheat is a good indicator that on talent alone he wasn't good enough for MLB. I found his minor league record and at the highest level of minor league baseball, AAA, (consider this to be something like playing soccer/football in Football League Championship in England) he barely played and was bad. He played quite a bit in AA, which is the league below AAA, and had mixed results. I've seen worse for sure, but nothing in his stats was so great, even at his best, that it looked like he was going to be a future pitcher in MLB. He barely got a chance in AAA (3 games) which to me strongly suggests that his organization gave up on him being a serious candidate for MLB and gave him a very quick test to see if he might be better than they thought, and he wasn't.

Re:Background explanations for Europeans & oth (1)

Spudley (171066) | about a year ago | (#43863197)

The fact that Broshuis (his name is misspelled on the original post) was asked to cheat is a good indicator that on talent alone he wasn't good enough for MLB.

Hmmm, well that assumes that everyone else is playing honestly.

If his assertion of rampant cheating is accurate then no, it doesn't indicate anything.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>