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Activist Admits To Bugging US Senate Minority Leader

timothy posted about a year ago | from the figured-it-was-cool-with-mitch dept.

Democrats 247

cold fjord writes "Curtis Morrison, co-founder of the Progress Kentucky PAC, which had previous issued an apology over a racially charged tweet about Senator McConnell's wife (former Secretary of Labor, Elaine Chao), has admitted to bugging Senator McConnell. Morrison admitted he was behind the recording and said a grand jury is investigating the situation. "[Assistant] U.S. attorney, Bryan Calhoun, telephoned my attorney yesterday, asking to meet with him next Friday as charges against me are being presented to a grand jury," Morrison wrote on Salon. Morrison writes that after releasing the recording, his personal life took a negative turn. 'I've never doubted that making the recording was ethical.' He also says that he doesn't believe his actions were illegal, but admits he could be prosecuted for them."' Morrison has said that one of his inspirations was Julian Assange. Given the current direction of government activity, he may simply have been trying to build a suitable resume for future federal employment."

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247 comments

It is truly sad... (2, Insightful)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43890111)

It is truly sad to see the direction things have been heading in the United States.

Re:It is truly sad... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890143)

Yes when assholes commit felonies against an opposing party it should end with the president resigning. That won't happen in this case since his imperial highness has some distance from the perpetrator.

At least Nixon resigned.

Re:It is truly sad... (5, Insightful)

amiga3D (567632) | about a year ago | (#43890231)

Back when President Nixon was in office this country still had journalists and in that day expected their elected leaders to be held to a higher standard. If Nixon was president today he wouldn't have to resign.

Re:It is truly sad... (5, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#43890331)

Back when President Nixon was in office this country still had journalists and in that day expected their elected leaders to be held to a higher standard.

Get a grip. Back in those days politicians got away with far more than they do today. In fact, it was Watergate that caused a major shift in journalism. It was no longer acceptable to "look the other way" when people like Richard Daley stole elections or had the cops beat up their opponents. Many journalists knew about JFK's affairs, and there was little coverage of LBJ's wholesale cheating in the 1960 election, as well as his earlier campaigns for the senate. The current IRS flap is a joke compared to the way the IRS (and the FBI) were used politically prior to Watergate. There was never a "golden age" of ethical politicians.

Re:It is truly sad... (1, Troll)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about a year ago | (#43890755)

That doesn't make the current situation any better. Politicians have always been liars and cheats, the difference today is the power of the federal government in our every day lives. The executive branch is routinely and publicly ordering the assassination of US citizens. Granted I'm sure it happened in secret in the past, the fact that it happens openly and routinely now should scare the shit out of all of us.

Re:It is truly sad... (2, Insightful)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about a year ago | (#43890903)

Back in those days politicians got away with far more than they do today.

I got four dead guys in Benghazi who'd probably argue with you, if they could.

Re:It is truly sad... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43891039)

3000+ American soldiers killed in Iraq would argue if they could. And yet Bush and Cheney walk free.

Re:It is truly sad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43891113)

Hundreds of millions of dead smokers would tell all of those groups to fuck off.

Re:It is truly sad... (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43891145)

fastest way to find a republican hack -- mention of benghazi.

i totally agree. the administration should take full responsibility for benghazi and more importantly learn a lesson from it. at the very least those "four dead guys" would not have died for absolutely no reason. at least their deaths would be a wakeup call for some who had grown complacent.

but i agree with the sibling poster. what about bush and cheney? (note because bush and cheney did what they did doesn't excuse what obama did did.) and compared to bush, cheney, or obama, lbj kept us in vietnam in which many more lives were lost. so it's not that it's worse now necessarily across the board.

btw, adults speak in nuances. children and those who haven't grown up yet speak in absolutes and can't detect irony.

Re:It is truly sad... (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43891155)

I love how the anti-regulation "government can't do nothing right" folks are so up in arms over the deaths of 4 people thanks to lack of regulation but don't give a shit about the combined millions of deaths each year caused by alcohol, tobacco, and firearms.

The battle cry of the conservative, "REGULATE PEOPLE NOT PRODUCT!"

Re:It is truly sad... (0, Flamebait)

buybuydandavis (644487) | about a year ago | (#43890675)

I don't know that the media has changed that much. The media, along with the universities, is an arm of our progressive theocracy. They will hold people on the right accountable, but not the left. Rage against Nixon. Rage against Pinochet. But praise and fawning over Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot. The left has no standard of justice beyond power - that which furthers their power is good.

Obama uses the full force of government to stifle opposition. The media aids, abets, and enables his crimes. This guy is your typical progressive, completely self righteous in their criminality, because their standard of right and wrong is what serves the power of the left.

Re:It is truly sad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890729)

But praise and fawning over Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot.

What

Re:It is truly sad... (0, Redundant)

maugle (1369813) | about a year ago | (#43890765)

I don't know that the media has changed that much. The media, along with the universities, is an arm of our progressive theocracy. They will hold people on the right accountable, but not the left. Rage against Nixon. Rage against Pinochet. But praise and fawning over Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot. The left has no standard of justice beyond power - that which furthers their power is good.

Greetings, being from a bizarre parallel universe! Before you interact with anyone else, I must be quick to point out that nobody in the media or universities of this dimension praises Stalin, Mao, or Pol Pot. In fact, asserting something so ridiculous will get you nothing but strange looks, scorn, or sarcastic responses!

Re:It is truly sad... (3, Insightful)

Daniel Dvorkin (106857) | about a year ago | (#43890897)

But praise and fawning over Stalin, Mao, and Pol Pot.

Wow. You genuinely believe that, don't you? Which probably explains this priceless line:

Obama uses the full force of government to stifle opposition.

Hint: under Stalin, Mao, or Pol Pot, you wouldn't be saying that, with or without the thin gloss of anonymity that comes from posting under a screen name. If web forums had existed in their day, very bad things would have happened to anyone posting such a comment. You clearly have no idea what "the full force of government to stifle opposition" actually looks like, and for all our sakes, I sincerely hope you never find out.

Re:It is truly sad... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890401)

Stop watching TV and read a book. Nixon didn't resign because some random conservative operative did something bad forcing Dicky to bravely fall on the sword of honor, he resigned because he'd HIRED the person to do something bad, and then got caught. Drawing some idiotic, unsubstantiated parallel to the current administration just makes you look ignorant, and deceived.

Re:It is truly sad... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890743)

Talk about irony, they guy who is claiming he knows history got it wrong - Nixon resigned because he knew he would be impeached and thown out of office. The reason why he would have been impeached is because he hired the person to do an illegal thing and then covered it up. Lets just hope The Obama administration doesn't or hasn't fallen into these same traps.

Re:It is truly sad... (0)

JockTroll (996521) | about a year ago | (#43890769)

Lets just hope The Obama administration doesn't or hasn't fallen into these same traps.

And even if it has? Everybody knows Lord Bonobo is above the laws because... Racism! Hope! Change! And... Yoorop?

Re:It is truly sad... (5, Insightful)

TrollstonButterbeans (2914995) | about a year ago | (#43890227)

"'I've never doubted that making the recording was ethical.'"

The cornerstone of ethics is that is the idea they don't bend to suit your whims. If we all act "low class" and just do whatever we justify to ourselves, the world will be headed into the gutter (even faster than now).

Re: It is truly sad... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890449)

The worst ethics are the ones that do not bend to circumstance but lack a capacity to act in response to details.

This is shocking (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890113)

And this is just the tip of the iceberg [foxnews.com]. There's lots more [washingtontimes.com] where that story came from [nationalreview.com].

Re:This is shocking (1, Troll)

bmo (77928) | about a year ago | (#43890131)

Referencing both Fox *and* the Moonie paper?

Get out.

--
BMO

Re:This is shocking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890217)

Yes because Fox News has nothing true on it. MSNBC is the place to be for an unbiased experience.

Get a CAT scan. Something is damaged inside your head.

Re:This is shocking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890317)

Anyone that takes Fox News or MSNBC seriously is in need of a CAT scan.

Re:This is shocking (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890799)

I bought a CueCat Scanner at a thrift shop for $1, I can lend it to anyone who needs it.

Re:This is shocking (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890381)

Just because one does not hold Fox News in high regard does not mean you view their politically opposed rivals as better.

The fact we have to choose between left* and right leaning "news" shows how broken journalism has become (probably always was).

The facts, or the "news" does not have any political agenda. The duty of journalists is to report what is actually going on, not endorsing the varying political agendas surrounding the facts.

As a European, the left/right divide in the US news outlets is very much relative and always leaning heavily to the right. Both sides are corporate apologists, the key difference being only one side (openly) holds the poor in contempt. The other difference being, R or D in the White House is the decider in which side parrots the Government line this week. But one side is always uncritically reporting the Presidents/Federal actions.

Re:This is shocking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890861)

This isn't exclusive to the US. Europe has it's own cesspits of newspapers. Like "DailyMail" for example. "The Times" is quite right leaning, "The Guardian" is more lefty. Or "Die Welt" and the "FAZ" in Germany. Pretty conservative. Germany's "TAZ" and "Junge Welt" are as lefty as it can be.

Actually I don't know ANY newspaper that is truly neutral.

Re:This is shocking (-1, Troll)

bmo (77928) | about a year ago | (#43890557)

>Yes because Fox News has nothing true on it

1. Fox went to court in Florida to defend the "right" to lie as news. They are the only news network to do so in the history of reporting. This is significant.

2. Shepard Smith (the only redeeming quality of Fox) is not enough to balance the derp.

Deal with it.

>assuming I watch MSNBC

Hardly ever. I watch BBC mostly and local news.

--
BMO

Re:This is shocking (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890779)

1. Fox went to court in Florida to defend the "right" to lie as news. They are the only news network to do so in the history of reporting. This is significant.

Wrong! First, it was NOT FoxNews. It was a Fox affiliate. You know, the TV station that shows "Family Guy" and "The Simpsons"? Next, they never went to court to fight for the "right to lie as news". That was something that a blogger wrote on his blog in his "analysis" of the verdict.

This case was about a story on BGH (Bovine Growth Hormone) in milk. Jane Akre and Steve Wilson were "journalists" who wrote a story about the dangers of BGH. The Fox Broadcasting Company station, WTVT in Tampa, Florida, was willing to air the story, but was also going to give Monsanto a chance to respond. This pissed Akre and Wilson off. They thought they would be allowed to report their story without any chance at giving the company that they were skewering a chance to respond. Akre and Wilson pulled their story and sued, arguing that Monsanto would just lie, and therefor should not be allowed to respond.

Nowhere, did FoxNews, or even the Fox affiliate WTVT EVER claim that they had a right to lie.

2. Shepard Smith (the only redeeming quality of Fox) is not enough to balance the derp.

Next, on number 2, Shepherd Smith is not the only liberal on FoxNews. Bob Beckel, Mariah Liason, Juan Williams, Sally Kohn, Alan Colmes, Kristen Powers, Susan Estrich, Pat Caddell, Greta Van Sustren and many others are on FoxNews to represent the liberal perspective.

Deal with it.

I recommend that you take your own advice.

Unfortunately, this is illegal. (5, Insightful)

tysonedwards (969693) | about a year ago | (#43890129)

First, there is an expectation of privacy inside one's office, and secondly Kentucky is a one party notify state when it comes to recording, so one party to the discussions taking place in the office needed to know that they were being recorded. Public records searches don't apply here.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890199)

No, public officials do not have an expectation of privacy at any time they are performing their official duties.

Re: Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890293)

Are you suggesting that even public officials are not allowed to take a lunch break and have a personal phone call or have a friend stop by for a few between appointments?

Re: Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#43890621)

I think elected officials should have live feed AV cameras attached to their bodies 24/7. Yes, even when pooping or having marital (or other) relations.

It's the only way to stop the backroom deals and power exchanges, which is why these people seek office in the first place.

No, I am serious. 100% coverage. This extends for 2 years before an election and 1 year after.

Re: Unfortunately, this is illegal. (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about a year ago | (#43891185)

Are you suggesting that even public officials are not allowed to take a lunch break and have a personal phone call or have a friend stop by for a few between appointments?

Are you suggesting that they have friends?

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (4, Informative)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43890325)

Your post is a red herring [wikipedia.org]. He wasn't engaged in official duties as a US Senator at the time. He was in his campaign headquarters discussing his reelection campaign with his campaign staff.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890345)

Totalitarian yet schizophrenic shit like this is what bugs me so much about the US. First you want total personal privacy (a good thing), yet you readily scream for the surveillance of others.

Because Americans, and this has been shown in studies, have forgotten what personal trust relationships and being nice to each other for the greater good means. They have become the prime example of a dog-eat-dog society where nobody trusts nobody anymore.

That's not nice. "Even" public officials are still humans. And you can't just magically separate private personality and professional job, nor should you ever attempt to, as it is utterly absurd ignorant nonsense.

Whatever somebody does in his work, is a reflection on his *whole* self. So whatever he does, inherently contains personal things. Anything else is a neurological impossibility.

Hence while a public official, just like any other employee, has to report to his boss... (in this case, the citizens of his country) ...he STILL has a right to to be under 24/7 constant 1984-style surveillance with a horse cock probe up his ass.

Maybe if you would manage to even ONCE not put your own worst enemies in power above you, or ACTUALLY rise up and kick some ass if they try to force you to accept somebody you don't like, (first and foremost the asses of all those secretive TLAs that inject agents provocateurs, socially engineered disinformation and false flag conflict creators into every uprising [see: Occupy movement, Wikileaks, any but the two big "parties"])... maybe then you wouldn't have to put your "elected" officials under Stalin-like surveillance.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (1, Insightful)

Cali Thalen (627449) | about a year ago | (#43890823)

Totalitarian yet schizophrenic shit like this is what bugs me so much about the US. First you want total personal privacy (a good thing), yet you readily scream for the surveillance of others.

Seems to me like he wants people he likes (himself, liberals, etc.) to have total privacy to do whatever they want, but he wants people he doesn't like (republicans/conservatives) to be constantly recorded and harassed.

And BTW, that isn't remotely an American ideology.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890265)

First, they were talking loud enough to be heard in the hallway through a closed door. The recording was made _in the hallway_ on a friggin' camera phone.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890349)

So you admit that he performed the illegal recording? Excellent! That is a good start. It is strange that you think that the means to record the conversations would matter. Would doing it on a cassette recorder make it worse or better in your mind? Hint: It would still be illegal, regardless of the technology. The point of law is that a recording of a private conversation was made, not the technology used to make it. The "but it was just on a camera phone that also can digitally record voice" exception hasn't made it into law yet, and probably never will.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890427)

Why is it illegal? Kentucky is a one party notifier state, so they didn't need to be notified.

It's just like wifi. If you're in range of hearing/connecting, then it's fair game to listen in. Just because they had the door closed and were still shouting loud enough to be heard through it doesn't change anything.

Re: Unfortunately, this is illegal. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890465)

Because zero parties were notified

Re: Unfortunately, this is illegal. (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | about a year ago | (#43890585)

You mean that the accused was an ANDROID? or even worst, ALIEN?

Re: Unfortunately, this is illegal. (1)

khallow (566160) | about a year ago | (#43890773)

The accused was not a member to the conversation that they recorded. Neither party was notified of the recording.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (2)

fermion (181285) | about a year ago | (#43890291)

This is the kind of expectation of privacy that naive kids have. They think if they post a terrorist plot on facebook, and their facebook is private, that they have an expectation of privacy. They don't. Your friends can see you facebook, it isn't private.

Here is something to ponder. If you have sex, in front of an open window, in your home, is there an expectation of privacy? Are we going to arrest someone for filming the act? If you are talking so loud in a closed door meeting that everyone can here you, is there an expectation of privacy? I don't know. I have closed door meetings all the time, and we speak in tones that don't let others know what we are talking about. But I think legally it would be the equivalent to recording a private conversation in private club.

Additionally, I do not see fraud. He did not edit the tape to make it sound like something criminal activity was going on in the office. He merely recorded and released what actually happened. The consensus is it did not harm to the senator.

My main concern is that we have a senator that is not competent enough to keep conversations private and requires the taxpayer to clean up his garbage.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (2, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#43890337)

An elected official, in his appointed office should have absolutely ZERO expectation of privacy while in it. That office belongs to the PEOPLE, not him.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (3, Insightful)

Bartles (1198017) | about a year ago | (#43890383)

Really? So are you also calling for the release of the minutes of all meetings in the Oval Office, the IRS, the State Department, and the DOJ?

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (4, Insightful)

ATestR (1060586) | about a year ago | (#43890687)

Really? So are you also calling for the release of the minutes of all meetings in the Oval Office, the IRS, the State Department, and the DOJ?

Yes.

Re:Unfortunately, this is illegal. (5, Interesting)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43890397)

An elected official working in his private campaign headquarters discussing this reelection campaign with his campaign staff does have an expectation of privacy while in it. That was the case here. Your post has nothing to do with this situation. I also doubt that your point even holds true in general as even public officials discuss confidential matters not for public release.

His campaign office doesn't belong to the PEOPLE (2)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#43890521)

While in his semester office, you mean? Assuming that were true, it elephant matter nectar this was a campaign meeting, at a private office, not his senate office. Personally, I think leaders should be able to have frank, honest discussions with advisors. I know that JFK's private consultations with his attorney general (and brother) helped avoid World War 3. For the consultations to be forthright, that means those discussions aren't public.

Damn you autocorrect (1)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#43890547)

That post got mangled.

While in his senate office, you mean? Assuming that were true, it wouldn't matter because this was a campaign meeting, at a private office, not his senate office. Personally, I think leaders should be able to have frank, honest discussions with advisors. I know that JFK's private consultations with his attorney general (and brother) helped avoid World War 3. For the consultations to be forthright, that means they aren't public, and therefore carefully worded for political purposes.

Yeah, Ethically sound (1)

waddgodd (34934) | about a year ago | (#43890173)

Let's see, this puts him in the same ethical category as E Howard Hunt, Charles Colson, G Gordon Liddy, Virgilio Gonzalez, Bernard Barker, James McCord, Eugenio Martinez, and Frank Sturgis. What could possibly go wrong with that?

Re:Yeah, Ethically sound (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890281)

Except that he wasn't "bugging" the office, the was standing outside and recording what he was overhearing.

Re:Yeah, Ethically sound (1)

waddgodd (34934) | about a year ago | (#43890475)

And the room that McCord, Sturgis, et al were found in was the public reception area and not the actual offices where planning went on in (it's not as easy to tape locks open of personal offices, the person locking tends to check those doors for actual locking function more often, as they have personally valuable stuff in them), so that logic could have been applied there as well.

News For Nerds (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890205)

This story belongs to politico or any number of political blogs. Why in the fuck is this story on a site that is ostensibly news for nerds???
There is no nerd angle here whatsoever.

Re:News For Nerds (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about a year ago | (#43890253)

I don't know. Maybe it's because they bugged his office, that would be a tech thing I suppose. Yeah....it's a stretch I know.

Re:News For Nerds (1)

flayzernax (1060680) | about a year ago | (#43890513)

An audio video recording device being operated is hardly as technical as leaving a microphone in the ceiling light.

I agree this is purely political and not even journalism.

Re:News For Nerds (3, Interesting)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#43890343)

Slashdot has become politicized well beyond any normal nerditis. Perhaps they're fishing to see how egregious a behavior will get defended, or attacked, depending on which "side" the offender is on?

Fox News (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890539)

Slashdot has become the frustrated-nerd outlet for Fox News.

Re:News For Nerds (0)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43890959)

This story belongs to politico or any number of political blogs. Why in the fuck is this story on a site that is ostensibly news for nerds???
There is no nerd angle here whatsoever.

Any more than these?

Declassified LBJ Tapes Accuse Richard Nixon of Treason [slashdot.org]
FBI Wiretapped Hemingway [slashdot.org]
Girls Bugged Teachers' Staff Room [slashdot.org]
High-Tech Squirrels Trained to Conduct Espionage [slashdot.org]
DOJ Fights To Bury Court Ruling On Government Surveillance [slashdot.org]

There are plenty more, just search on surveillance [slashdot.org] or wiretap [slashdot.org].

Over the years, Slashdot has covered stories from the silly to the sublime. The tag was: New for nerds, stuff that matters.

The fact that a major political figure has been secretly recorded in a manner made possible with modern technology with the intention of trying to influence the election by an organization that previously embarrassed itself on Twitter is clearly something that matters, as attested to by the coverage on various news sites on the web - that you want them to go to. I think this story might be a bit more significant than kids recording their teachers in the lounge, don't you? You must think it is significant as well, since there are plenty of other stories on Slashdot that you could comment on, but you are commenting on this one instead of ignoring it. Why might that be?

Re:News For Nerds (1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about a year ago | (#43891127)

Because the admins of Slashdot are too fucking lazy to actually read submissions, check the links, and run a spell/grammar check. Instead we get random shit like this or blatant advertisements for the "most extreme usb drive ever".

It could be worse. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890207)

I thought it said "Activist Admits To Buggering US Senate Minority Leader".

What a lie of a story and headline (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890225)

Bugging ?

The voices were coming from the other side of a nearby door, which had a window. I pulled out my Flip camera and started to record.
I don’t need to tell you what a weapon the pocket video camera has become."

Re:What a lie of a story and headline (1)

amiga3D (567632) | about a year ago | (#43890363)

I always thought that was defined as eavesdropping. Maybe because he recorded it. Still and all he never entered the office. I'm not sure if what he did was illegal or not. I guess the lawyers will have fun with it.

Re:What a lie of a story and headline (1)

DaveV1.0 (203135) | about a year ago | (#43891181)

Depending on location, it is illegal to record a conversation between two parties without those parties' knowledge. In some states, both parties are required to know, in other only one is required. That is why many video surveillance systems don't have sound capabilities. These are the laws many video peepers and upskirt video shooters were prosecuted under because there was nothing on the books about shooting video.

This man has rights! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890303)

And he has a right to expose the corruption that exists in our government!

1) Benghazi
2) IRS targeting American citizens (AKA the enemies of the State)
3) Stealing phone records from the AP (because it's important to know who is leaking information, am I right? who gives a shit about freedom of speech/the press)
4) Attorney General Eric Holden
5) Fast and Furious (because those Mexican cartels really needed all those weapons)
6) HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius solicited donations from companies HHS might regulate
7) The General Services Administration in 2010 held an $823,000 training conference in Las Vegas, featuring a clown and a mind readers. Resulted in the resignation of the GSA administrator
8) Republicans charged the Obama administration funded and promoted its poster boy for green energy despite warning signs the company was headed for bankruptcy. The administration also allegedly pressed Solyndra to delay layoff announcements until after the 2010 midterm elections
9) The Justice Department was accused of using a racial double standard in failing to pursue a voter intimidation case against Black Panthers who appeared to be menacing voters at a polling place in 2008 in Philadelphia
10) Obama may have violated the Constitution and both the letter and the spirit of the War Powers Resolution by attacking Libya without Congressional approval
11) Vice President Biden’s office has repeatedly interfered with coverage, including forcing a reporter to wait in a closet, making a reporter delete photos, and editing pool reports
12) President Obama was born in Kenya and doesn't have an authentic United States birth certificate

Re:This man has rights! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890433)

You had me up until #11.

No way Biden knows you can delete photos.

You are deluge in all (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890483)

Every thing that you have submitten here is a fabrication of a simple mind, possibly one that has schizophrenia. Or in lame man's terms, you are utterly insane.

By mentioning Obama's alleged lack of a birth certificate, you have proven that every thing else said by you from the gecko is false and a lie. Nothing said by a stalk raven mad individual such as you can be taken seriously, and that proves that all the other accusations are false.

You should be wearing a straitjacket, sir, and not be on the internet posting garbage. You are just mad because Obama won the election. Give it up, you sadsack. Rebel rousers like you deserve to be ridiculed and mocked for their utter stupidity. Quit drinking the cool aid, good sir. There is still hope for you.

Vote for Obama in 2016. They say a President can't be elected 3 times. I challenge you all to to change the rules so He can be President for 3 times in a row. Maybe even 4 times in a row.

Re:This man has rights! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890935)

1) Benghazi

There where dozens of attacks on american embassies with multiple deaths during the tenure of republican presidents.
Where was the outrage there?

PLUS : It was the "G"OP that cut funding to defend the embassies. This is the result.

2) IRS targeting American citizens (AKA the enemies of the State)

The IRS is independent. Has nothing to do with the president.

4) Attorney General Eric Holden

What's up with him?

7) The General Services Administration in 2010 held an $823,000 training conference in Las Vegas, featuring a clown and a mind readers. Resulted in the resignation of the GSA administrator

Not the fault of the president. The one responsible resigned. End of.

9) The Justice Department was accused of using a racial double standard in failing to pursue a voter intimidation case against Black Panthers who appeared to be menacing voters at a polling place in 2008 in Philadelphia

No such thing ever happened.

10) Obama may have violated the Constitution and both the letter and the spirit of the War Powers Resolution by attacking Libya without Congressional approval

Like Bush attacked Iraq illegally???
Or Afghanistan?

11) Vice President Biden’s office has repeatedly interfered with coverage, including forcing a reporter to wait in a closet, making a reporter delete photos, and editing pool reports
12) President Obama was born in Kenya and doesn't have an authentic United States birth certificate

Idiot.

Re:This man has rights! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43891027)

"The IRS is independent. Has nothing to do with the president."

So true. Mod parent up.

As a European, I'm confused... (2, Informative)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#43890305)

Recently, the group turned its attention to McConnell’s wife, former Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao, with a focus on her race. ... In a Feb. 14 Twitter message, Progress says: "This woman has the ear of (Sen. McConnell)—she's his wife. May explain why your job moved to China!"

So "China" is a race now? Are there many 19th century reporters in Louisville?

Re:As a European, I'm confused... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890409)

Asian is the race you retard. She's not even Chinese.

Re: As a European, I'm confused... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890525)

"Islam" and "homosexuality" are a race now, so why not China?

Racism charges are tossed around so flippantly now they are starting to mean nothing.

Re:As a European, I'm confused... (3, Informative)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#43891085)

Senator McConnell's wife is Chinese American. She was born in the Republic of China, commonly referred to as Taiwan, and came to the United States when she was eight years old. I guess you didn't read far enough into the story to pick up that Progressive Kentucky were drawing attention to the fact that she is Asian, specifically Chinese, and the implication that as US Secretary of Labor she had sent American jobs to China because she is Chinese by birth. Some might regard that as racist. I'm a little surprised you didn't catch on to that. Aren't Europeans generally held to be more sophisticated in such matters?

it's relevant that this was a campaign office (1)

Goldsmith (561202) | about a year ago | (#43890357)

I think there's an argument that a truly open government would allow us to see what's going on in the public offices of the elected officials (I think that would also further decrease our ability to compromise, but that's a digression...).

However, this was in a campaign office. That's not a public function, it's necessarily a private group which is (supposed to be) separate from the staff and work of the public office. Recording campaign discussions is just dirty politics, not looking out for the public good.

What a moron... (3, Insightful)

sirwired (27582) | about a year ago | (#43890367)

What he did was neither ethical, legal, or even a remotely good idea. Even if your opponent is a prick. I cannot imagine in what universe he is inhabiting that he thinks that this was not going to get him in serious trouble (as well it should.) And under what journalistic ethical code is bugging somebody's office allowed?

I'm no fan of Julian Assange (not because I think that wikileaks is illegal or immoral, rather because the way he handles it, and himself, is really poor...) but this isn't even remotely similar. The only inspiration he could have possibly drawn from Julian is a gigantic ego.

Re:What a moron... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890451)

Maybe you should read the details of what he did before accusing him of things. Hint, he didn't actually bug anything. He heard a conversation through a closed door.

It's no different than walking by your neighbors, hearing them having an argument and recording it.

Or turning on your laptop, seeing your neighbor's wifi signal and using it.

Whoops! (1)

sirwired (27582) | about a year ago | (#43890489)

I apologize; you are correct. I should have read all the linked articles. It's a grey area that the law will have to sort out. (I suspect it hinges on if he would have been considered trespassing at the time, and if the participants in the recorded meeting had a reasonable expectation of privacy.)

Re:What a moron... (1)

amorsen (7485) | about a year ago | (#43891041)

It's no different than walking by your neighbors, hearing them having an argument and recording it.

Hearing it is fine. Recording it is a grey area. Sharing the recording or talking about what you heard is wrong.

Now there are obviously exceptions to that, if you hear someone describing their murder plans, then you can certainly share that. In this case the public good (if any) that came from the release does not seem to outweigh the damage done.

Re: What a moron... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890491)

If you can find any electronic bugs in McConnell's offices that aren't from the CIA, please tell us.

Re:What a moron... (1)

Tailhook (98486) | about a year ago | (#43890805)

I cannot imagine in what universe he is inhabiting

It is long past time to have shed that naivety.

Hate filled libtards like Morrison regard the very existence of Republicans as criminal. The guy released his stupid little recording thinking he had blown the lid on his enemies. The fact that almost nobody cared because all he actually had was boilerplate campaign activity was a complete surprise to him. Doubtless he is convinced that the reason for the general indifference is that we're all brainwashed corporate consumerdroids. Or something.

The distance between reality and these people is profound and that fact should no longer be a surprise to any rational adult.

Re:What a moron... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890985)

What he did was neither ethical, legal, or even a remotely good idea. Even if your opponent is a prick. I cannot imagine in what universe he is inhabiting that he thinks that this was not going to get him in serious trouble (as well it should.) And under what journalistic ethical code is bugging somebody's office allowed?

If this moron had recorded something serious. Something of the level of bribery or some kind of felony. Recording a private meeting illegally is justified. However, that's not the case here. Not even close.

Conspiracy theory: (0)

flayzernax (1060680) | about a year ago | (#43890403)

Note that this is completely unfounded. And a theory ;p I don't need a million arguments why I could be wrong, I already know them.

But it is possible that this guy is a plant to defame people like Julian Assange. Or other geeks who may try similar tactics in desperation down the road.

I do not condone this guys actions. He has damaged the reputation of everyone who speaks against the current political regime in everyones eyes.

But please sane people of the world do not associate one mans behavior with another mans agenda far away despite what the press says. Julian and this guy are not even apples and oranges.

What's the difference? (1)

xyourfacekillerx (939258) | about a year ago | (#43890509)

I don't want ANYONE to think it's EVER ethically or legally justifiable to bug my personal residence, or the personal residence of anyone else.

How do people like this activist justify it for themselves, but disallow it for everyone else? You don't want to be spied on, but you can do some spying yourself?

Re:What's the difference? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890597)

RTFA

Re:What's the difference? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#43890699)

RTFA

you can "bug" a residence outside the residence.. it's still illegally listening to what's being said. double so if you make a recording of it..

hell, the guys could just claim that they OWN THE COPYRIGHT on it. then they could sue the guy for 100 million bucks(see, if a newspaper was willing to pay let's say 100 bucks for it then of course every illegal copy of it that the defendant enabled in this case is his fault, right? because that's how it works with mp3's ).

False flag (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890673)

Progress Kentucky is a GOP plant to discredit Democrats and strengthen McConnell.

I know a man who was threatened for murder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890739)

I know a guy who married a scam artist. She threatened him for murder and confessed to a murder across state lines on the phone with him. When he brought this information in to the police, they arrested him! They told him it is illegal to record a phone conversation and refused to listen to it. When he was out of the house once, she had some guys rob him and left the state.

It can happen here (and almost has) (1)

David Govett (2825317) | about a year ago | (#43890831)

After WWII, Americans scoffed at the notion that something like Hitler's Germany or Stalin's Soviet Union could happen here in America. Scoff no more, America. It could happen here. Morrison and millions like him are the reasons why.

Re:It can happen here (and almost has) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43890901)

Oh yeah, this is just like those two you mentioned.

And I remember right after WWII ended whenever someone brought that up possibility, I used to scoff. Big scoff!

*smirks*

Re:It can happen here (and almost has) (1)

thrich81 (1357561) | about a year ago | (#43891099)

Let's examine the event -- a private citizen associated with a group which opposes the party in power (remember, this is Progress KENTUCKY) secretly records a powerful government official and then releases the recordings for public review. So far, this sounds like the exact OPPOSITE of Nazi Germany or the Soviet Union. What unpleasant things will next happen to Morrison will determine how close the analogy turns out to be.

Re:It can happen here (and almost has) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43891139)

After WWII, Americans scoffed at the notion that something like Hitler's Germany or Stalin's Soviet Union could happen here in America..

Did we? I thought a man by the name of McCarthy kept the entire nation beliving that Stalin's Soviet Union was happening even as he stacked kindling around the pyre.

Bugged? (1, Interesting)

Todd Knarr (15451) | about a year ago | (#43891063)

So, let me get this straight. He didn't surreptitiously gain access to any area any random member of the public wouldn't have access to. He didn't plant any recording device to record in his absence. He stood outside a door and with a cel phone recorded what any passerby would have heard had they stopped to listen. Is that correct?

That doesn't even sound particularly unethical to me. A bit sleazy, but then if McConnell's careless enough to have that kind of discussion where anyone in the hallway can overhear the problem doesn't lie with the people in the hallway listening.

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