×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

HP Discontinue OpenVMS

samzenpus posted about 10 months ago | from the end-of-the-line dept.

HP 238

simpz writes "The register is reporting that 'the ancient but trustworthy server operating system' OpenVMS has been discontinued. From the article: 'HP never really promoted its acquisition and OpenVMS suffered from a lack of development compared to HP-UX, itself suffering from competition from Linux. It was only a matter of time, but it's a sad end. Many of its old-time fans, your correspondent included, cherished a hope HP would move it to x86-64 – but since development moved to India in 2009, OpenVMS has been living on borrowed time. Now, it's run out.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

238 comments

When will it be open-sourced? (4, Insightful)

Erbo (384) | about 10 months ago | (#43967035)

There might be a few insights in that old code worth preserving...

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (4, Insightful)

mrr (506) | about 10 months ago | (#43967115)

HP already put those into a new product: http://h17007.www1.hp.com/us/en/enterprise/servers/management/insight-control/index.aspx

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967195)

oops I farted.

Re: When will it be open-sourced? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967271)

Yeah, R.I.P. to he best OS ever... This makes me sad...

Re: When will it be open-sourced? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967741)

Why can't HP open-source the OS now?

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (2)

msauve (701917) | about 10 months ago | (#43967275)

"There might be a few insights in that old code worth preserving..."

Just look to Windows. Just as IBM(rot -1) = HAL, VMS(rot 1) = WNT. VMS and Windows NT were both developed by Dave Cutler (who hated UNIX).

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 10 months ago | (#43967399)

Hmmm ... HAL ultimately killed all people who relied on it. What does it tell us about WNT? ;-)

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967603)

It/he didn't kill David Bowman. He could potentially have returned the Discovery to Earth orbit. He and Frank Poole had already discussed continuing with a disconnected HAL-9000

Re: When will it be open-sourced? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968355)

With what oxygen would he have survived on? HAL released it all. He had the suit and after that, nothing.

I used to rely on ReiserFS (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968201)

It only killed my wife. Despite this, it still was better than Windows NT.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (5, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967423)

Just look to Windows. Just as IBM(rot -1) = HAL, VMS(rot 1) = WNT. VMS and Windows NT were both developed by Dave Cutler (who hated UNIX).

The original Windows NT (3.51?) was a pretty good OS. After the first release though it became Microsoftized. I don't know what Cutler's involvement with that was. However, the real beauty of VMS wasn't so much it's architecture (though that had a lot of good points) but the incredible quality of DEC's implementation. Bugs were for the competition.

"Cutler hated Unix" probably sounds like Neanderthal blasphemy to most Slahsdotters, but there were plenty of reasons to hate Unix in the 80's. The big split (AT&T vs. BSD style), numerous other incompatibilities (later overcome to a large extent by GNU utilities), horribly inefficient, bad security even for (largely) pre-Internet days, and practically non-existent documentation. Take it from an old fart who was there - any Unix of the last 15-20 years is definitely not your father's Unix.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967797)

Exactly. Back then the phrase "Unix security" was a joke not a positive attribute.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (3, Interesting)

el borak (263323) | about 10 months ago | (#43967977)

However, the real beauty of VMS wasn't so much it's architecture (though that had a lot of good points) but the incredible quality of DEC's implementation. Bugs were for the competition.

While I used VMS extensively and liked it in many ways, this is just silly.

When VMS 4.0 was released (the first version to include DCL command line editing), we had some unexplained crashes in our cluster. We eventually tracked it down to a bug in the command line editor (yes, it ran at least partially in kernel space). We had a local "competition" to see who could find the shortest number of keystrokes that would crash the system. The winner: 4. Yes, you could crash VMS 4.0 by getting an unprivileged command prompt and typing 4 characters (didn't even need to hit RETURN).

The bug was fixed in 4.1.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (1)

DamnStupidElf (649844) | about 10 months ago | (#43968185)

Windows XP's csrss.exe had a similar feature, triggerable from cmd.exe. If the cursor was on the top row of the terminal and then a tab (0x09) and enough backspace (0x08) characters were emitted the cursor would fail a bounds check and bluescreen the system.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (3, Interesting)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43968233)

IIRC 4.0 was a turkey. We waited until 4.1 because word had quickly gotten out about 4.0. Undoubtedly I exaggerate due to my nostalgic haze, but while DEC occasionally screwed up (e.g. 4.0) it was overall a very reliable OS. Certainly way better than any *nix variety of the day that I had the displeasure to work with.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968263)

Microsoftized isn't a real word - I think you mean it was Microsoftened.

Re:When will it be open-sourced? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967287)

I wonder too. Perhaps some of "Open"VMS can be ported into FreeVMS.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FreeVMS

Mistake India (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967045)

Of fsck. India ?

Re:Mistake India (0)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967439)

Of fsck. India ?

The real beauty of VMS was the incredible quality of its DEC implementation, so if they shipped it to India I'm glad it was euthanized.

no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967051)

noooooo

Re:no (4, Funny)

isopropanol (1936936) | about 10 months ago | (#43967091)

Indeed, what will their customer use now?

Re:no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967247)

They "upgrade" to AIX or Plan9.

Re:no (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 10 months ago | (#43967257)

probably some flavor of linux (redhat , oracle, suse, ubuntu...) possibly Solaris, AIX, Free/Open/Net BSD, HPUX, worst case Windows Server 2012.

Re:no (1)

Tore S B (711705) | about 10 months ago | (#43967493)

VMS had quite a few customers, but much like z/OS, they tend to be in use with systems that you don't notice until they fail - which means, you very rarely notice them. Banks, stock exchanges, power utilities, that sort of thing.

Re:no (2)

isopropanol (1936936) | about 10 months ago | (#43967777)

Had being the important tense. I work as a computer sub contractor. I have been in a LOT of branches of banks, power utilities, big box stores, restaurants, telephone exchanges, defence sites, that sort of thing. The only place I have seen a VMS machine this decade is a certain video store chain who's parent company went bankrupt (and stopped supporting/upgrading their IT) last decade.

SO IT IS CALLED CLOSEDvms ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967057)

Should be !!

Damn. I guess we'll just have to settle for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967071)

Windows 8

Re:Damn. I guess we'll just have to settle for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967099)

Or, not quite so bad, unix.

Re:Damn. I guess we'll just have to settle for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967205)

UNIX is pretty far from VMS. WNT is CLOSER.

Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like TRADEMARK INFRINGMENT.

Never hacked? (3, Interesting)

riverat1 (1048260) | about 10 months ago | (#43967083)

Last time I heard VMS had never been hacked. Is that still the case?

It was the best OS I ever worked with. It'd be nice if they open sourced it.

Re:Never hacked? (2)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 10 months ago | (#43967161)

When I worked on it the main reason was that it didn't support most of the normal ways to remotely log in to systems. You couldn't telnet to it by default for example. Early versions were hopelessly insecure. For example it was easy to tell when logging in whether the username you entered was in SYSUAF.DAT by waiting for the login process to read the file to the end.

Re:Never hacked? (4, Informative)

Shirgall (110235) | about 10 months ago | (#43967239)

VMS was hacked, but it is certainly rare. https://www.cert.org/advisories/CA-1989-04.html

Re:Never hacked? (1)

ArchieBunker (132337) | about 10 months ago | (#43967349)

The early days had its share of issues (back when it was just VMS). But once those were sorted out it was pretty secure.

Re:Never hacked? (1)

EvilSS (557649) | about 10 months ago | (#43967779)

The early days it didn't need to be hacked, so many companies left the default SYSTEM and/or FIELD account passwords in place you didn't need to waste time trying to hack in.

Re:Never hacked? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967571)

I don't understand where that myth comes from. VMS was no more secure than UNIX, and arguably less so (because its security and configuration was a lot more complex). Probably the only reason it was hacked less was because it was deployed less.

Re:Never hacked? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967655)

VMS was no more secure than UNIX, and arguably less so (because its security and configuration was a lot more complex).

Which Unix variety are you talking about and which year(s)? It makes a big difference.

Re:Never hacked? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967949)

Last time I heard VMS had never been hacked. Is that still the case?

It was the best OS I ever worked with. It'd be nice if they open sourced it.

You forgot to install the anti-virus

Re:Never hacked? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968123)

Depends on what you mean by hacked. We had a program that looked exactly like the login program, which would harvest user passwords before logging them on to the real system. We'd just leave it running on random terminals around campus and then walk away.

We got caught by the University, of course, but this was a time when they applauded ingenuity, though making it clear it wasn't the done thing and would have serious ramifications if done in the real world (or if we ever did it again at the Uni).

Technically, that's not hacking the OS but it is one of the possible attack vectors that the bad guys can use.

Open source it... (2)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 10 months ago | (#43967111)

HP needs to release it under an open source license since they're discontinuing it.

Is it just me or has it become tradition for HP to kill things lately? It really makes me wonder what they plan on actually selling...

Re:Open source it... (2)

sjames (1099) | about 10 months ago | (#43967401)

Their stock, just as soon as the id10ts on wall street get done applauding them for eliminating all of their expenses.

Re:Open source it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967449)

You might want to look up the word "needs." It does not mean "a good deed."

India where projects come to die (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967127)

Its always the same when a huge software project moves out of the EU or US to india its bound to die. India has some great engineers but 90% of those graduating have just memorized stuff and passed an exam which has a pass rate as long as you have 33/100. Obviously this creates a lot of worthless engineers.

From personal experience: One our customers the ESA (European Space Agency) had some servers and storage arrays running on SUN hardware. We just managed the hardware and operating systems. The software/middleware was all responsibility of the customer who had outsourced this part of the job to Tech-Mahindra (and india based outsourcing giant). These guys would mail us asking us how to change their password and how to "copy" a file from the server while having ssh access (and this happend every few days). If you have such guys working on such important systems I don't even want to know whats happening on development level. Its true that in every team you have a few top-scorers but not knowing how to change your password on a unix system and "managing" that system day to day tells me there is something seriously wrong.

Re:India where projects come to die (4, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about 10 months ago | (#43967251)

Yeah, it really seems like when it comes to India, their engineers are fine with low-level stuff but when it comes to doing something beyond what they learned in school, they've got no clue. They also don't seem to understand how it all "fits together" and how to actually innovate and make usable features for normal users.

Indians are fine for grunt work, and there are some truly bright engineers there, but too many companies see that they can get 5 engineers for the price of one and think they'll get 5x the productivity... instead they find out they get 1/2 the productivity.

Re: India where projects come to die (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967253)

The only thing happening in India is raping innocent women.

Re: India where projects come to die (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967413)

Yes, because rape doesn't happen anywhere else in the world...

Re: India where projects come to die (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967933)

Want to join my India bus rape tour? We're hitting all the major cities! Slots are filling up fast!

enough with this racist bullshit (-1, Flamebait)

decora (1710862) | about 10 months ago | (#43968221)

when the US was first becoming industrialized by copying the english, im sure we had our own share of problems. watt, joule, ampere - which of these was american? none.

india has a mathematical tradition going back thousands of years. they pioneered the fucking decimal point for chrissakes. i woul dtake a bunch of indian dudes who are ambitious and poor over 20 cum-guzzling american NSA contractors, whose main job is to sit around figuring out which lobbyists will win the next round of contract negotiations so they can decide what kind of buzzword laden horse shit to spoon around all over their whorish, lie-filled resumes.

Re:enough with this racist bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968417)

when the US was first becoming industrialized by copying the english, im sure we had our own share of problems. watt, joule, ampere - which of these was american? none.

Neither James Watt or André-Marie Ampère were English...

How enthusiastic is our support for UNIX? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967133)

One of the questions that comes up all the time is: How
enthusiastic is our support for UNIX?

Unix was written on our machines and for our machines many
years ago. Today, much of UNIX being done is done on our machines.
Ten percent of our VAXs are going for UNIX use. UNIX is a simple
language, easy to understand, easy to get started with. It's great for
students, great for somewhat casual users, and it's great for
interchanging programs between different machines. And so, because of
its popularity in these markets, we support it. We have good UNIX on
VAX and good UNIX on PDP-11s.

It is our belief, however, that serious professional users will
run out of things they can do with UNIX. They'll want a real system and
will end up doing VMS when they get to be serious about programming.
With UNIX, if you're looking for something, you can easily and
quickly check that small manual and find out that it's not there. With
VMS, no matter what you look for -- it's literally a five-foot shelf of
documentation -- if you look long enough it's there. That's the
difference -- the beauty of UNIX is it's simple; and the beauty of VMS
is that it's all there.

Re:How enthusiastic is our support for UNIX? (1)

Tore S B (711705) | about 10 months ago | (#43967519)

The point was genuinely a good one at that time. There were a lot of facilities in VMS that made some really elegant transaction processing, for instance, available with even a relatively few lines of code. Besides - keep in mind, Unix was seriously fragmented at the time. BSD/SysV and a ton of varieties of those. All immature and inefficient. Unix in the days of VAX and PDP-11 is nothing like Unix in the last two decades.

Re:How enthusiastic is our support for UNIX? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967613)

Forget it old timer, you and I can discuss it after the shuffle board game if I can fix my walker. Kids today think that *nix is The One True Way. They don't remember when men were men and real computers ran VMS. None of this "can't get any" geek crap either. Beautiful women would throw themselves at VMS programmers and admins until you finally had to say enough, enough!

Re:How enthusiastic is our support for UNIX? (2)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 10 months ago | (#43967773)

Beautiful women would throw themselves at VMS programmers and admins until you finally had to say enough, enough!

Never happened to us RSX11M guys.

Re:How enthusiastic is our support for UNIX? (1)

Tore S B (711705) | about 10 months ago | (#43967829)

For the record, I'm 25. Got into VMS about a decade ago, when I found a VAXstation 3100 in a dumpster. But I'm not entirely representative in general. :)

Re:How enthusiastic is our support for UNIX? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43968291)

Over 21 is old - get used to it. I'm 29 I think (my memory isn't what it used to be - is Reagan still president?). Still I admit that I'll probably be by the shuffle board court before you - but not by much!

Not surprised OpenVMS lasted this long (5, Funny)

T5 (308759) | about 10 months ago | (#43967185)

I'm not surprised that it took HP so long to figure out

SYS$SYSTEM:SHUTDOWN.COM

on the whole O/S.

After all, it has a dollar sign in it and they're not particularly astute with cash lately.

More of the same... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967219)

More sad news caused by our top and business leaders such as Fiorina, Ellison and other hapless piece of crap that were born on 3rd base hit a triple. All they know how to do is buy up good things from other mismanaged companies and run them into the ground. the biggest threat to US national security and tech preeminence is the ivy league MBA.

Re:More of the same... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 10 months ago | (#43967301)

Think of it as an opportunity. With this many morons spending that amount of money, if you can't divert some into your pocket, there is something wrong with your approach. Perhaps you are holding onto childish ideas like ethics and pride.

I sense a really insignificant disturbance... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967269)

I sense a really insignificant disturbance in the force as if a few voices suddenly cried out in terror and then went back to stroking their beards.

I think that is last call.... (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 10 months ago | (#43967381)

Get your requests in for the hobbyist licenses and for any emulators you want to run. Grab the patches and licenses while they are available.

A pity HP was so indifferent to VMS. Its user base was as loyal as any I've seen, often foreswearing all suitors. The VMS documentation is enviable to anyone accustomed to Unix. I could appreciate much of its magnificence even if I didn't have the heart to love it.

Now comes the decent into the long dark.

Re:I think that is last call.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968149)

It doesn't matter how loyal your user base is when it consists of seven guys and a dog called Roger.

RIP VMS (5, Interesting)

Tore S B (711705) | about 10 months ago | (#43967389)

There were few operating systems that handled loose-clustered networking as elegantly as VMS. Want to centralize user credentials? Easy, just place SYSUAF.DAT on a shared volume. And since the files could have structure, you could lock individual user records for editing rather than the whole file.

Another great feature was the concept of "quorum". Quorum, as in the organizational term of the number of people present at a meeting necessary for it to be an official meeting of an organization, was the number of reachable hosts necessary to conduct business. Say you had a redundant banking site - and the link between them would go down. If they are a redundant configuration, they would continue to process transactions - with their database quickly diverging. Using quorum nodes, you could set up three hosts on three sites - two major server setups and a simple workstation somewhere central - and voila, no single point of failure.

Besides, there is a magnificent book, "OpenVMS Internals and Data Structures", which so elegantly and wonderfully describes operating system design.

I really, really hope that OpenVMS could be open-sourced and this codebase might serve as the base for a community-written x86 port.

Re:RIP VMS (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967547)

I really, really hope that OpenVMS could be open-sourced and this codebase might serve as the base for a community-written x86 port.

Forget it. Even if HP did open source it there wouldn't be enough people willing to support it, just a few old diehards. Kids today think that in the beginning God created *nix and all else is man's blasphemy.

Re:RIP VMS (1)

Longjmp (632577) | about 10 months ago | (#43967561)

[...] And since the files could have structure, [...]

As much as I loved VMS for its design and its features (hello $ENQ, $DEQ) I truly hated its filesystem .
Opening a few hundred files in a row on UNIX would go with a snap, on VMS you could go on a long vacation and return before the task had finished.
And that because of its structured filesystem.

Re:RIP VMS (3, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967625)

There are less illiterates than people who can't read.

No, there are fewer illiterates than people who can't read.

Re:RIP VMS (1)

Longjmp (632577) | about 10 months ago | (#43967693)

Congrats! You are the (I think) fourth person in about 15 years to notice that.
You just won a washing machine, but I'm afraid you'll have to come and pick it up yourself ;)

Re:RIP VMS (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43967685)

And that because of its structured filesystem.

Only files that you chose to make structured were structured. Most files were flat (the only choice in Unix of course). Why did you need to open hundreds of structured files?

Re:RIP VMS (1)

Longjmp (632577) | about 10 months ago | (#43967747)

If I remember correctly, plain text files were structured by default, i.e. stored in a Pascal-like string system.
There were more, I don't remember anymore, been a while after all.
All I remember is, I ended up caching file channels for frequently used (flat) files using raw $QIO for open/read/write operations.

Re:RIP VMS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 10 months ago | (#43967811)

I remember in 1986 this scientist I worked with had a data reduction procedure he did by hand with a pocket calculator. Took about a week. So I wrote him a fortran program to do the lot on a VAX 11/730 (the slowest computer in the world). It still took three hours to run.

Re:RIP VMS (1)

Tore S B (711705) | about 10 months ago | (#43968105)

The 11/730 was mostly made for small software developer houses who couldn't afford either an 11/750 or an 11/780, but needed access to VMS and the fairly comprehensive, 32-bit architecture of the VAX. It really was a terribly slow machine, but a neat hack.

Re:RIP VMS (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 10 months ago | (#43968163)

I recall on that 730 it was so easy to work out where in SYSUAF.DAT my account was located by the delay between Username: and Password: when logging in.

Vale - my first operating system (1)

capt_mulch (642870) | about 10 months ago | (#43967589)

I first used VMS in Computing 122, programming in Fortran 77, at uni in 1984. Vale VMS...

Re:Vale - my first operating system (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 10 months ago | (#43967837)

Slacker. It was 1984. Granting it was being generous to call what was on the microcomputers of the day an 'operating system'.

Re:Vale - my first operating system (1)

fl!ptop (902193) | about 10 months ago | (#43968047)

I first used VMS in Computing 122, programming in Fortran 77, at uni in 1984

I was thinking the same thing as you. College programming classes in the 80's (at UMBC [umbc.edu]) consisted of taking your assignment and writing out your logic by hand, signing up for terminal time, then coding it in Fortran.

HP: where tech goes to die (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967669)

HP has become the place where many tech eventually gets put to sleep forever. I wonder which one will be next?

Re:HP: where tech goes to die (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 10 months ago | (#43967841)

HP has become the place where many tech eventually gets put to sleep forever. I wonder which one will be next?

hpux probably, as they only support itanium and itanium sales arn't that great. they should of ported their OS's to x86_64 but have stuck with itanium as they are half owner of the architecture despite the fact no one wants it oh and it pisses oracle of is another reason they stick with it. Put i predict they will soon end up just another x86 sever and prinet maker like their old ceo wanted due to lack of momnetum.

Re:HP: where tech goes to die (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967987)

They didn't port to x86_64 it because they already spent a huge amount porting it to Itanium. There weren't enough sales to fund HP porting it again.

VMS was awful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43967787)

VMS was an awful operating system. Sure, it was better than RMS, RSX, etc but that isn't saying much.

Good riddance. VMS's demise is proof that the market actually does work very well.

This Is What Happens (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 10 months ago | (#43967791)

This is what happens when you hire Carly Fiorina.
Just don't do it.
Take 5 seconds to look at her track record.
She will neuter your company's ability to adapt and innovate and respond to the market by repeating the age-old mantra of "just screw the customer more".
She will poison your company from within so they continue to flail and flop about years after she's left.
She's absolutely not worth the "diversity" PR bonus point.

VMS was doomed when HP bought it (4, Interesting)

tyme (6621) | about 10 months ago | (#43968001)

When the amount of development your OS gets suffers "compared to HP-UX" you are in astonishingly deep trouble. I have had three run-ins with HP-UX, first in 1998, next in 2004, and finally in 2010 (when my current job retired all it's existing HP servers and moved to Solaris). When I encountered HP-UX the first time, in 1998, it seemed to be at least 10 years behind the times. Very little had changed in 2004, which meant that it was falling farther and farther behind each year. In 2010 it seemed little better than it had been in 2004, and I guess that management agreed, since we finally cut the cord and moved on to something that was, at least by comparison, more up to date.

I also used OpenVMS in the early 2000s, and it was capable, but idiosyncratic (record structured files were a PITA, and the file versioning was no replacement for proper version control. I really liked logical names, however, and the global symbol table was useful). It had a head start on lots of other OS's with respect to clustering features (cluster wide file system, message queues, and distributed lock management was all built-in), but much of the userland was GNU stuff ported over on the POSIX layer. DEC seemed to have given up on the whole "innovation" thing and was just milking existing big contracts.

Re:VMS was doomed when HP bought it (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 10 months ago | (#43968061)

HP/UX wasn't really developed as had all manner of acquired and licensed third-party bolt-ons (often 'lite' version too) thrown on, Perl 6's flounderings have nothing on the slow motion train wreck that is HP/UX urban sprawl of directionless feature bloat

An epitaph for software (2)

hessian (467078) | about 10 months ago | (#43968069)

development moved to India in 2009

That's how they always kill it: they outsource to the perceived cheaper labor, which lets them claim that the product got discriminated against by the market, when the market is reacting to the fact that the project got farmed out, thus is unlikely to have frequent updates, thus is a dead-end project because users won't get the support they need or a competitive product. RIP

Chrisfrd (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#43968125)

YAAAY!!!! OpenVMS was horrid! Glad it's gone.

Our UNIX invironment, however, still goes strong to this day..

VMS and the US Military? (1)

haruchai (17472) | about 10 months ago | (#43968131)

About 5 years ago, an HP instructor told us that the US Military wanted VMS to never be sunset.
I wonder what changed.

Re:VMS and the US Military? (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#43968181)

Probably nothing changed. The US military may not have been a big enough VMS customer to justify HP maintaining it. Shame HP didn't open source it, or even turn it over to some small company that could maintain it for less money (and sell to the military, etc.).

Re:VMS and the US Military? (1)

iggymanz (596061) | about 10 months ago | (#43968295)

five years ago to five years from now is a decade of support from HP from then. military replaces systems too...

A sad moment in the history of computing (2)

wick3t (787074) | about 10 months ago | (#43968215)

I consider myself to be very fortunate to have had the opportunity to experience such a wonderful operating system. I'm probably very young compared to most VMS system managers, my first experience of VMS was about 7 years ago. My first impressions were that it seemed quite antiquated (mostly due to the lack of a modern shell) but as I began to learn more, it became a breath of fresh air compared to anything I had ever used. I began to discover features, flexibility and power that make other modern operating systems seem primitive. I can only hope that it will now be open sourced as it would a great shame to loose such a unique operating system that offers so much that others don't.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...