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XP's End Will Do More For PC Sales Than Win 8, Says HP Exec

timothy posted about a year ago | from the grass-was-always-greener dept.

Operating Systems 438

dcblogs writes "Hewlett-Packard executives say that the coming demise of Windows XP next year may do what Windows 8 could not, and that's boost PC sales significantly. 'We think this will bring a big opportunity for HP,' said Enrique Lore, senior vice president and general manager of HP's business PCs. Lore was asked, in a later interview, whether the demand for XP replacement systems could help sales more than Windows 8. His response was unequivocal: 'Yes, significantly more, especially on the commercial side,' he said. Lore said 40% to 50% of business users remain on XP systems."

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It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (4, Interesting)

CaptainOfSpray (1229754) | about a year ago | (#43975813)

..with XP look-alikes. Yeah, OK, I can dream, can't I?

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975925)

There is some credibility to that theory. After all, if you have to install an entirely new system anyway, it makes it easier to jump to a different OS family. especially if it has a similar UI. I hardly think the majority of businesses switching will do this, but I'm sure at least some of them will, and Linux numbers will reflect it. Hell, if you're so focusesd on saving money or maintaining stability that you've used XP for this long, something like Debian GNU/Linux might be perfect for you.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975961)

You're forgetting about that whole Windows software compatibility thing.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (5, Interesting)

fredprado (2569351) | about a year ago | (#43976147)

Considering MS Office versions have been increasingly different from each other, I don't think it is easier anymore, from a training perspective to keep using MS programs. I mean, if you will have to train all your employees to use Office 2010, 2012, Blue or whatever, why not train them to use Libreoffice and get done with it?

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976271)

Considering MS Office versions have been increasingly different from each other, I don't think it is easier anymore, from a training perspective to keep using MS programs. I mean, if you will have to train all your employees to use Office 2010, 2012, Blue or whatever, why not train them to use Libreoffice and get done with it?

For organization whose primary office suite application is the word processor there is absolutely no reason not to be switch to LaTeX and one of the many excellent GUI editing applications that support LaTeX. Heck you can edit LaTeX documents using a text editor including the venerable vi/vim.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (4, Insightful)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about a year ago | (#43976293)

Do you really think the average MS Word user is going to deal with markup to create documents in LaTeX?

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (1)

thsths (31372) | about a year ago | (#43976521)

Yes, except that it takes a PhD to create styles in LaTeX, whereas it is dead easy in MS Word (although of course people still fail, but that is a different issue). LaTeX is great for certain things, but for writing a quite note it is not suitable.

No, it just looks like it. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976611)

"it takes a PhD to create styles in LaTeX"

No, it just looks like it from the depths of stupidity you're standing at.

It's dead easy to create a style in windows, but bloody impossible to make that style actually work.

Whereas a style in LaTeX is written once and is usable by everyone because it isn't a word processor and therefore will separate style and content PROPERLY.

And for writing a quick note, you don't need styles AT ALL, idiot.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (4, Interesting)

hlavac (914630) | about a year ago | (#43976387)

I doubt these old unmaintained Windows XP business apps will work better on Windows 8 than on Linux :)

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (2)

g0bshiTe (596213) | about a year ago | (#43976399)

You're also forgetting that whole Windows looking and functioning similar to previous versions thing. If I want to use a tablet OS I'll use my phone otherwise I don't want my desktop turning into a smartphone that can't make calls.

Which is better than Win8 for Linux. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976571)

You're forgetting WINE.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (3, Informative)

slashmydots (2189826) | about a year ago | (#43976091)

zero of my company's software suites run on Linux so no it won't.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (3, Insightful)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43976161)

I'd rather guess it will work miracles in Apple sales.

Take my dad. He's ... well, let's say not too tech savvy. But then again, all he wants is some email, some web research for his hobbies, organize his pictures and writing documents. Open office took care of the latter and for the rest, there's an iBook.

It's easy, it's simple and it's something he can use without my aid (which is equally important to him as it is to me, he's a bit of a control freak).

So unless MS relents and lets people get some boxes with Win7, I kinda doubt that many will opt for Win8 and rather, if they have to learn a completely alien interface anyway, go for an Apple.

MS "relents" on the corporate side (5, Informative)

davidwr (791652) | about a year ago | (#43976215)

So unless MS relents and lets people get some boxes with Win7

"Pro" versions of Windows 8 come with downgrade rights. Many businesses have been "buying" Windows 8 Pro but installing Windows 7.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976273)

Why would I overpay hundreds of dollars for an alien interface when I can get one for free?

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43976413)

Because you might be a tech-illiterate and want to be CERTAIN that no matter what you do, it's virtually impossible to fuck up?

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (1)

dougisfunny (1200171) | about a year ago | (#43976515)

So a pet rock?

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976307)

I'd rather guess it will work miracles in Apple sales.

Take my dad. He's ... well, let's say not too tech savvy. But then again, all he wants is some email, some web research for his hobbies, organize his pictures and writing documents.

Ubuntu Linux is a cheaper alternative to Apple OS/X covering every use-case you've stated as relevant to your father. Then again maybe a Google ChromeBook would be the ideal solution for him if he prefers "the cloud".

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43976437)

I know, you know, but my dad and Linux just doesn't mix. Because for Linux you need to be a geek. Period.

You don't? Ok, you try to convince my dad, I spent enough time trying.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (1)

petermgreen (876956) | about a year ago | (#43976391)

Afaict at the moment you can still order new computers (and not just new old stock ones) with win7 licenses.

I suspect what MS will do when they end that is allow companies to sell machines pre-downgraded for a while. So you will be able to get machines with win7 but you won't find them in places like PC world, it will count as a win 8 sale, you will have to pay the extra for the pro edition and you may have to select from the "buisness" range rather than the consumer range.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976479)

Sounds like he'd be looking for ChromeBook. It's a lot easier to use than Apple OS.

Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (1)

Kingkaid (2751527) | about a year ago | (#43976363)

No, no you can't dream. Those are an extra upgrade.

XP? What's that? (-1, Troll)

UltraZelda64 (2309504) | about a year ago | (#43975817)

I've been using Linux since I left XP. It helped me to neatly avoid various Microsoft duds... Vista, 8, 8.1, and whatever crap the future holds...

Re:XP? What's that? (2)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975913)

XP is that thing a lot of productivity software and hardware drivers still work on.

There is Windows 7, but shh shh is Legend.

Tales tell of other Microsoft operating systems that basically restrict your computer to phone level functionality, but it's a bitch to hold a tower with one hand while using a 22" touch screen in the other.

Re:XP? What's that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976119)

but it's a bitch to hold a tower with one hand while using a 22" touch screen in the other.

Just think of it as MS encouraging you to lift, bro.

Re:XP? What's that? (3, Funny)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43976185)

Must be incredibly popular with chiropractors.

Living on the edge... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975819)

This claim is a pretty safe/sad bet, considering!

You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (5, Insightful)

Atomic Fro (150394) | about a year ago | (#43975873)

For the business users still running XP, I don't see them flocking to buy new Windows 8 hardware. They are still on XP because either the software they run won't run on anything else, or they are small businesses that don't have an IT budget. As long as the hardware and software works, they aren't going to go out and buy new systems.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (5, Informative)

Tharkkun (2605613) | about a year ago | (#43976005)

For the business users still running XP, I don't see them flocking to buy new Windows 8 hardware. They are still on XP because either the software they run won't run on anything else, or they are small businesses that don't have an IT budget. As long as the hardware and software works, they aren't going to go out and buy new systems.

Until the first big virus hits that exploits a security hole that won't be fixed. When you realize you machines that can't be patched and will continuously be infected you may think differently about corporate security.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (4, Insightful)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about a year ago | (#43976101)

just because microsoft wont support it does not mean the antivirus vendors won't i can see them making lots of money off of xp support.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976145)

That would only help for maybe a small portion of the vulnerabilities (i.e. anything that involves opening files, basically).

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (1)

thomasw_lrd (1203850) | about a year ago | (#43976105)

While I don't disagree with that statement, you'd think by now that all the security holes would be fixed on XP. I mean they've had what 11 years to get it right.

Maybe the can security through obscurity?

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (2)

smash (1351) | about a year ago | (#43976157)

Exactly. TCO of Windows XP is about to go through the roof when exploits are no longer patched. If you're running XP everywhere you are going to be wide open to a an enterprise scale disaster.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (4, Insightful)

linebackn (131821) | about a year ago | (#43976165)

Until the first big virus hits that exploits a security hole that won't be fixed. When you realize you machines that can't be patched and will continuously be infected you may think differently about corporate security.

At which time you discover that continuously re-cleaning the machines is STILL easier and less work and money than replacing the poorly written proprietary corporate dreck resembling a Rube Goldberg machine that only runs under Windows XP.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (3, Interesting)

Tharkkun (2605613) | about a year ago | (#43976357)

Until the first big virus hits that exploits a security hole that won't be fixed. When you realize you machines that can't be patched and will continuously be infected you may think differently about corporate security.

At which time you discover that continuously re-cleaning the machines is STILL easier and less work and money than replacing the poorly written proprietary corporate dreck resembling a Rube Goldberg machine that only runs under Windows XP.

Tell that to your sales staff making $150k a year that you need to re-image or clean their machine twice a month. Better yet, watch their machine go down on the last day of the quarter causing you to miss your quarter. Stock tanks. Now your cost just went through the roof because you want to take the route of additional downtime versus fixing the problem outright. I would hope most people in the corporate environment know we use Windows 7 as well. This article discusses the pushing of new machines but it doesn't explain how most companies downgrade to Windows 7 based on the licensing.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (1)

Krneki (1192201) | about a year ago | (#43976455)

If we haven't learned this by now, what makes you think it will change any-time soon?

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#43976543)

For the business users still running XP, I don't see them flocking to buy new Windows 8 hardware. They are still on XP because either the software they run won't run on anything else, or they are small businesses that don't have an IT budget. As long as the hardware and software works, they aren't going to go out and buy new systems.

Until the first big virus hits that exploits a security hole that won't be fixed. When you realize you machines that can't be patched and will continuously be infected you may think differently about corporate security.

Please explain that to the folks who purchase/load software on the machines in my office - I have no less than 3 business-critical programs I use daily, that are only compatible with XP.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976605)

Sounds like they're gearing up to figure it out the hard way!

Or they'll use the free XP virtual machine that comes with every "professional" edition of Windows since Vista; I guess they've got that option as well.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (1)

chuckinator (2409512) | about a year ago | (#43976409)

Corporate environments will be upgrading to Windows 7, not 8.

Re:You can pry XP from my cold, dead hands (3, Informative)

David_Hart (1184661) | about a year ago | (#43976567)

For the business users still running XP, I don't see them flocking to buy new Windows 8 hardware. They are still on XP because either the software they run won't run on anything else, or they are small businesses that don't have an IT budget. As long as the hardware and software works, they aren't going to go out and buy new systems.

Exactly. Even large companies cut their IT budget over the last few years. We were doing 3 year leases where we got a new computer every 3 years. They extended the current leases to save money so I am stuck on XP until the replacement program starts up again this summer. My X200 laptop only supports 3GB of RAM, so simply upgrading is not an option.

Well, I guess that's one way ... (4, Insightful)

jxander (2605655) | about a year ago | (#43975887)

"Pulling the rug out from under 40-50% of our clients should really shake things up and boost sales"

Re:Well, I guess that's one way ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976097)

Pulling the rug out from under 40-50% of our clients

I think 13-14 years is a good run for an OS. Would you use a circa 2001 ver of linux or macos? No, you would buy the latest...

Would I use old software? (2)

davidwr (791652) | about a year ago | (#43976379)

Would you use a circa 2001 ver of linux or macos?

I'm assuming you are talking about "PCs" as we normally thing of them, not special-purpose boxes, embedded systems, etc.

The answer is yes, if either

1) I had to, because my applications wouldn't run on the newer versions (think PPC-only binaries that I don't have the source for - okay, that's mid-2000s-era, but still).

or

2) it got the job done without any negative downsides and the cost to upgrade (license fees, new hardware, training, etc.) was too high. Think isolated (no Internet) systems OR the mythical (?) 2001 version of Linux or MacOS that was still vendor-supported and which had a supported security package available.

Heck, if Windows 2000 was still supported and it ran the software I needed to run (modern security software, modern web browsers with modern plug-ins, etc.) I would recommend it over XP to anyone with a sub-512MB computer.

Ditto Windows NT for computers in the 16-128MB range, provided I plugged all the security holes (disable LMHash, etc.) and my users were okay with a user interface that is as alien as Windows 8 is from Windows 2000/xp/7.

Re:Well, I guess that's one way ... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976489)

Would you use a circa 2001 ver of linux or macos?

I run debian stable you insensitive clod!

Re:Well, I guess that's one way ... (2)

Tharkkun (2605613) | about a year ago | (#43976141)

"Pulling the rug out from under 40-50% of our clients should really shake things up and boost sales"

Unfortunately there's no rug pulling going on. Microsoft announced this end of life 3+ years ago. That's the lifetime of a many business pc's so this should come as no surprise to anyone.

Re:Well, I guess that's one way ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976261)

A viable alternative to XP has been out for for nearly 4 years. It runs just fine on many of the same systems that were running XP towards the end of its life. It's time to move on.

XP will work long after it's "ended" (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975893)

I used Win2k for years after it was ended.

XP is holding me back from switching to Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975901)

Maybe Hewlett-Packard executives should chew on that for a while.

Linux is holding me back from switching to Linux (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976069)

Be honest. Linux is holding you back from using linux. Hewlett-Packard executive already knows this.

the fun part is other programs/websites (1)

RobertLTux (260313) | about a year ago | (#43975905)

http://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/to?iso=20140407T115959&p0=1244&msg=Windows+XP+End+Of+Life [timeanddate.com]

i wonder how many websites and programs are now NOT supporting XP??

in 300 days i bet a lot of them won't

XP machines can run Google Chrome` (1)

voss (52565) | about a year ago | (#43976203)

As long as Google Chrome supports XP ,it can use a modern secure browser....

Re:XP machines can run Google Chrome` (1)

Tharkkun (2605613) | about a year ago | (#43976381)

As long as Google Chrome supports XP ,it can use a modern secure browser....

What happens when a new conficker hits that requires a kernel patch? Or something like slammer (I know it's sql) where it broadcast relentlessly infecting anyone and everyone. It takes 1 machine to take down a whole company.

"An offer you can't refuse" (1, Troll)

Tablizer (95088) | about a year ago | (#43975941)

When your best source of revenue is from holding an e-gun to your customers' heads, you know you've jumped the corporate shark.

Like the saying goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43975943)

If it isn't broken, only a fool will buy a replacement.

Re:Like the saying goes... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976063)

If it isn't broken, only a fool will buy a replacement.

That's why Microsoft breaks it.

Wishful Thinking (5, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about a year ago | (#43975945)

Just because XP reaches its official "end of life" doesn't mean that people will throw out their computer and go buy a new one. For most people- and businesses too - as long as existing units still get the job done there is no compelling reason to buy a new computer. The fact that Win 8 is crap is also a factor.

Re:Wishful Thinking (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976123)

Many large institutions cannot legally continue using an out of support operating system.

Re:Wishful Thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976263)

Where did you study law?
You sound really smart!

Re:Wishful Thinking (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about a year ago | (#43976403)

You sound really smart!

You don't.

For example financial institutions cannot expose themselves to the risks related to running internet-facing operating systems for which there are no security fixes.

Re:Wishful Thinking (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about a year ago | (#43976429)

Replied to fast... "legal" in this case probably means contract law. ie they are constrained by existing contracts and other legal obligations to exercise resonable and well documented security practices.

I realize this is not the case in your basement/attic/living room/bedroom.

Re:Wishful Thinking (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976423)

Where did you study law?
You sound really smart!

Give it another five years and owning an "unlicensed" computer will become illegal.

Where do you practice law? You sound really ignorant as to how shit really works around here.

That's not an issue for large institutions (1)

davidwr (791652) | about a year ago | (#43976431)

Microsoft will sell support contracts for XP and older OSes to those willing and able to ante up.

However, your point is well taken for cash-strapped large enterprises (think governments, charities, companies with cash-flow problems, etc.) and for smaller companies who contract with other entities and who may have contractual obligations to upgrade away from XP by a certain date.

Security issues (2)

davidwr (791652) | about a year ago | (#43976175)

still get the job done without being an unacceptable security risk to their employees, their data, or the rest of their network there is no compelling reason to buy a new computer.

There, fixed that for you.

Piffle (1)

onyxruby (118189) | about a year ago | (#43976539)

What utter nonsense spoken by someone that obviously doesn't have any level of enterprise experience. The fact that support is ending is critical, and to be frank the only reason for the overwhelming majority of businesses to take on the significant cost burden of migrating systems. The fact of the matter is that XP is well known, deployed and just plain works. It has just plain worked for so many years that at this point many XP machines have been deployed for so many years that they are out of warranty. The net result is that you replace the hardware at the same time you migrate the computer to the new OS for cost reasons. When Microsoft ends support for an OS many vendors likewise end their support for their applications.

The fact that Win 8 is crap means jack as the enterprise will simply buy Windows 8 and use downgrade rights to deploy Windows 7. The crap your spewing will only hold sway for some small businesses and the proverbial Grandma Nellie that only uses her computer to look at pictures of her Grand-kids.

Re:Wishful Thinking (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976573)

Win 8 isn't crap at all. Yes, Win8 does some things less efficiently than Win7, but as a whole, it's much better. If you used Win8 for any length of time you would know this. +5 Insightful? For someone who judges products without using them? Please.......

#define Win7 XP (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976031)

Win7 is the new XP.

Re:#define Win7 XP (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about a year ago | (#43976171)

I'd be quite happy if that were the case, but it didn't run very well on my Fujitsu Stylistic ST-4121 (933 MHz Pentium III, 768 MB RAM --- ISTR issues installing on a 4GB SSD, and it wouldn't accept being installed on a CF in an IDE adapter) --- are there any available equivalent systems w/ a daylight-viewable, transflective display?

Re:#define Win7 XP (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976493)

It also doesn't install on my 66 MHz 486/DX with 4 MB of RAM.

Or my Game Boy Pocket.

Re:#define Win7 XP (1)

davidwr (791652) | about a year ago | (#43976585)

I don't know what "ISTR" means but Windows 7 does need more than 4GB to install. If the CF to IDE adapter is truly transparent to the hardware Windows 7 should install on it assuming space is available.

I don't know if the Windows 7 installer will even boot on a Pentium III (I'm sure it won't boot on an 80286, the newest stock Linux kernels won't even compile for use on an 80386).

Assuming it does boot on a Pentium III, the installer may check for hardware that will give an unacceptably low (in Microsoft's estimate) customer experience and refuse to install. That's a fact of life with many consumer-oriented commercial operating systems.

In general, operating systems that have hobbyists or special-purpose (embedded, itty-bitty-server, etc.) customers as a significant portion of their desired user base should publish "as is, unsupported" work-arounds to allow hobbyists and specialty-aftermarket-VARs to install the base OS plus as many bits as pieces as they want that will fit on powerful-enough-to-boot-the-kernel-but-too-wimpy-to-warrant-supporting hardware, provided that the customer realizes that "he's on his own" for support.

Wrong question (5, Insightful)

Jawnn (445279) | about a year ago | (#43976065)

The better question is how many people did not buy a new PC precisely because Windows 8?

Re:Wrong question (4, Interesting)

Opportunist (166417) | about a year ago | (#43976281)

This. A billion times this.

A lot of people don't really separate OS and hardware. They don't see the difference. To them, a computer comes with an OS and that's just something that is on the HD when they buy that thing. They don't even consider that they are essentially two very distinct things.

So when they consider "I need a new computer", they rarely really consider buying a new OS. The OS is simply something that is already on the box when they buy it. To them, this means that "new computer" invariably means "Windows 8". Because it has become near impossible to get complete hardware+OS bundles with anything but Win8.

And not wanting Win8 essentially means for them that they cannot buy a new computer now and have to wait until MS "fixes" this (with a new OS). Or they turn to different OSs. It might be interesting to check how Win8 affected Apple sales.

Missing something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976331)

...because of Windows 8. Without the preposition, your sentence is incomplete.

Re:Missing something? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976497)

Someone missed a meme.
Why? Because loser, that's why!

Shady types will fund catastrophic XP malware (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976099)

I bet you shady types (like CEOs) will fund the creation of catastrophic XP malware that messes with the motherboards of the target systems in order to cause permanent damage.

This won't turn out well (1)

MTEK (2826397) | about a year ago | (#43976111)

All those hanger-ons will feel pushed into Windows 8's fun new UI and that's a good thing?

I'm confused.. Are you guys trying to kill the PC market?

well... (2)

smash (1351) | about a year ago | (#43976121)

Given the XP holdouts clearly don't like Microsoft's current offerings, and Mac is growing faster in percentage terms, and Linux appears to be finally getting somewhere - i don't think these XP holdouts will be migrating to another Windows box any time soon.

Re:well... (3, Insightful)

H0p313ss (811249) | about a year ago | (#43976519)

Given the XP holdouts clearly don't like Microsoft's current offerings, and Mac is growing faster in percentage terms, and Linux appears to be finally getting somewhere - i don't think these XP holdouts will be migrating to another Windows box any time soon.

If the XP holdouts still prefer XP to Win7, they certainly are not going to gravitate to Mac or Linux. (Well some will, but the bulk are just too afraid of change to do anything that drastic.)

I migrated my parents off XP... (4, Interesting)

voss (52565) | about a year ago | (#43976125)

to Windows 7 this year.

Windows 8 was just too much of a learning curve for them even if it were the greatest thing since sliced bread.
Windows 7 is similar enough to XP that I can sit them down at it and not have to reteach them everything. I can even make it look
like XP If I really need to. I cant do that with 8 unless I buy add-ons.

  Also Windows 7 pro includes an XP virtual machine...so why bother with 8?

Windows 7 is barely 3 years old its not like its going anywhere anytime soon.

Re:I migrated my parents off XP... (1)

Karganeth (1017580) | about a year ago | (#43976607)

Windows 8 was just too much of a learning curve for them

You mean Windows 8 was too complicated for them. "Learning curve" is not the appropriate term.

Wishful thinking ... (2)

MacTO (1161105) | about a year ago | (#43976155)

Businesses continue to use XP for a variety of reasons, and in a variety of environments. In some cases, they will be willing to upgrade their systems. I will suggest that does not hold true in most cases.

These businesses have invested a lot into their existing systems: hardware, software, and training. They are aware of the strengths and weaknesses of what they have, which reduces the burden of supporting them. Their systems are also in production, fulfilling roles within their operations.

Depending upon the state of their existing systems: replacing XP would involve reinvesting in hardware, software, and training. They will be unable to make effective use of the strengths of their new systems, and will also fall prey to the weaknesses of them. It will take a considerable amount of time to document those changes. Changes also involve pulling systems out of production, meaning that they are unable to fulfill their roles in their operations. All of this represents a liability.

I'm predicting that a most of those businesses will continue to use XP. They will mostly depend upon their strengths internally in order to maintain them. They will also contract out to third parties when they need to. New policies may pop up when it comes down to maintaining systems that are no longer receiving security updates, but they will justify them by claiming that those policies should be in place either way.

I think that HP would do a lot better by servicing those businesses.

Re:Wishful thinking ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976491)

Businesses continue to use XP for a variety of reasons, and in a variety of environments. In some cases, they will be willing to upgrade their systems. I will suggest that does not hold true in most cases.

These businesses have invested a lot into their existing systems: hardware, software, and training...

Ah, I hate to be the asshole here waiving the "BULLSHIT! BULLSHIT!" flag high and mighty, but let's face it. If these businesses HAD invested a lot into their "existing systems" in the form of hardware and software, they sure as hell wouldn't still be running an OS that was superseded twice now, along with hardware that still supports it.

Xp - Linux easy path (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976231)

I have already helped several people to migrate from XP to Linux, because they din't feel like going to W7 or W8. None of them has had any serious problems and the few problems they had would have been far worse and harder to solve after going to W8.
I used Ubuntu with XFCE or KDE on top.
They all found it easier then Windows.

and if.. (2)

houbou (1097327) | about a year ago | (#43976235)

somebody asks me, I would say, go get a Win 7 PC, stay away from Win 8.

There is a god. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976251)

Looks like things aren't just straight up bleak anymore. Death to the single tasking OS Tablet abominations! Death to the cloud! (anyone remember that having to be connected to a mainframe is why we went to PCs?) May PCs rise again, may smartphones not be touted as a f****** replacement!

Re:There is a god. (2)

zeroryoko1974 (2634611) | about a year ago | (#43976549)

Cloud is just a fancy word for dumb terminal

Move to Win 8 doubtful (4, Interesting)

helixcode123 (514493) | about a year ago | (#43976267)

I don't know if this is any sort of indication about the popularity of Windows 8, but I got my daughter a new Acer laptop with Windows 8 for a graduation present. She asked my to put Ubuntu on instead. Interestingly, she prefers Mate to the default Unity desktop. Aside: boots in seconds because I put /boot and /usr on the SSD drive. Very nice.

It'll do more for ReactOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976283)

especially on this PC that'll be 12 years old by then.

xp usuage (2)

montemike72 (2948553) | about a year ago | (#43976315)

ok, so i am a neebie, and may not know as much as others in here, but...what your saying is, that when they discontinue offering support for XP, that everyone will rush out and buy new ? I highly doubt that, maybe the larger companies will, and governmental agencies, but the mom and pop type business, won't. I co-own one, and if it isn't broke, we aren't going to fix it period, even if it is broke, we prob won't fix it either, there is no perceived threat of anything different happening

I call BS (1)

anthony_greer (2623521) | about a year ago | (#43976345)

The only ones using XP are businesses, and they are buying hardware as usual on the scheduled cycle, they are just wiping the drive and imaging XP when they get them...as they transition to 7 they will just be wiped and reloaded after a data backup - I automate this for a living, been there and done it 2 times since Win 7 came out.

All those Windows 8 licenses (1)

zeroryoko1974 (2634611) | about a year ago | (#43976355)

All those Windows 8 licenses Microsoft says they are selling. how many are Windows 8 new machines being upgraded to Windows 7 by enterprise IT departments?

Windows 8 is beyond salvation (2)

kimvette (919543) | about a year ago | (#43976367)

There is no salvaging Windows 8. Even Classic Shell doesn't fix a lot of Windows 8 problems - it just makes Win8 tolerable for a home user.

I see this more as an opportunity for improvement of heuristic engines in anti-malware programs, and the selling of more security-related licenses.

Or, possibly, big corps finally embracing either Linux or Macs.

Re:Windows 8 is beyond salvation (2)

H0p313ss (811249) | about a year ago | (#43976475)

There is no salvaging Windows 8.

Nonsense; they just need to peel back the silly touch UI and restore the old desktop parts.

Yes, it's a trainwreck of a PR issue, but no, it's not un-recoverable. That's just silly FUD.

SP4 (1)

edanto (1990742) | about a year ago | (#43976371)

Maybe Microsoft could just give all those XP users what they seem to want and release SP4?! Maybe we could get another decade out of it.

Re:SP4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976517)

Who's paying for it? "All those XP users" paid for their XP license as much as thirteen years ago.

Re:SP4 (1)

intermodal (534361) | about a year ago | (#43976619)

SP4 and mainstreaming the 64-bit version would do wonders to preserve Microsoft's market share in the desktop world. I know a lot of people who have come to me asking for alternatives, knowing I'm an IT guy. Most of them ask about Mac, and many are seriously considering making that jump.

MACR 5 year depreciation (0)

NemoinSpace (1118137) | about a year ago | (#43976415)

If you are a business owner that is not taking advantage of free money, you're a dope. If you are the head of an IT department that locked your company into a WinXP only solution, you are a dope. The world will continue to spin without you.

XP's retirement won't shake PC slump (2)

QuietLagoon (813062) | about a year ago | (#43976471)

Windows XP's looming retirement won't shake PC business out of sales funk [computerworld.com]

.

The looming retirement of Windows XP won't stem the dramatic drop in PC sales this year, but it may help bolster Microsoft's revenue, analysts said today. Although experts expect some business laggards to buy new hardware as they try to replace the 12-year-old XP before it's retired in April 2014, the quantities won't be enough to move the PC shipment needle to the positive side of the meter. "Replacements for Windows XP won't be enough to offset the declines on the consumer side," said David Daoud, an analyst with IDC.

Regulatory issues (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#43976485)

I work at a bank in the US. We've been on XP, but as soon as its ongoing security updates end, we would be out of compliance, so we're doing an organization-wide OS upgrade. Otherwise, we (management and employees both, I would guess) would have been happy to stay. We're definitely not the only ones in the same situation.

How could it not? (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about a year ago | (#43976523)

It would be pretty hard to do worse than Win8.

Any many people have been stuck with XP for a long time, but still care about security vulnerabilities. Eventually, all of these people will have to update, and XPs end of life is a significant push towards that.

New systems? Maybe. New OS? Yes. (2)

intermodal (534361) | about a year ago | (#43976589)

I'm starting to suspect that Windows 8 has doomed the future of Microsoft's near-monopoly on the business desktop. This, combined with the sheer number of services provided via web browser, seems to be a serious threat to Microsoft's future. Where I work, almost all my users could get by with any desktop OS and the web interface they use all day every day would work no differently from what they are used to. Even on Linux, since the services we are using support Firefox independent of the underlying operating system.

With the exception of a handful of users who need Office for interop with vendors and services outside our office, the only thing that keeps me from seriously considering changing systems is the ever-present possibility that we may have to deal with vendors who require their own special software that only runs on Windows.

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