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US and Russia Set Up Cyber Cold War Hotline

samzenpus posted about 10 months ago | from the don't-say-that-you're-the-more-sorry-than-I-am-because-I-am-capable-of-being-just-as-sorry-as-you-ar dept.

United States 72

judgecorp writes "In a move reminiscent of the 1960s Cold War days, Presidents Obama and Putin have set up a hotline between their respective cyber-security authorities, to defuse any possible crises and prevent them from escalating into an online equivalent of the Cuban Missile Crisis. 'We recognise that threats to or in the use of ICTs include political-military and criminal threats, as well as threats of a terrorist nature, and are some of the most serious national and international security challenges we face in the 21st Century,' a joint statement from the presidents read."

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72 comments

In Soviet Russia (1)

Roachie (2180772) | about 10 months ago | (#44057499)

... hotline call YOU!

Re:In NSA America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057543)

Agent 99 jokes to 98 about your penis pump order.

Re: Duqu In NSA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058189)

Shhhhh! dont talk about the leak from Dimona!
There was an interesting vid on eavesdropping called "Big Ears", on RT, but it was not pro/anti american.
It was the first time a smaller country has been shown to have tech on par with usa/China. a bunch of fancy huge satellite dishes, and then a black one pointing at Rome!?!

I've seen Dollhouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057501)

Don't pick up the phone!

Re:I've seen Dollhouse (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057569)

Don't worry the NSA will be there to hold your hand. Or at least private memo the funny bits around the office.

It won't solve anything (1)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | about 10 months ago | (#44057513)

The 1992 capitalist counterrevolution in the USSR was a disaster for the working peoole there and all over the world. For the communism of Lenin and Trotsky! For a soviet America! That is the only way to prevent another world war.

Re:It won't solve anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057589)

yes in the land of free speech, you can say anything. Just dont expect to stay out of prison if you talk about communism.

Re:It won't solve anything (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057665)

Sure is distractionist bootlicker damage-control in here. The short answer is, " The people(outside of fat, lazy, stupid, America) will riot."

So, how's that greedy, corporatist American foreign policy working out in Afghanistan, or Brasil? Not very.

You can't, after all, Mossad the Assad :)

-- Ethanol-fueled

Re:It won't solve anything (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057759)

I say we gas the niggers and the kikes.

-- Ethanol-fueled

Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 10 months ago | (#44057527)

The problem is China/West. China has been cracking the west for over a decade (though I blame W for forcing the gov to be on Windows). Things are heating up now, esp. with Snowden's BS.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057557)

America soon to be the only country in all history to go to nuclear war over IP theft.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | about 10 months ago | (#44058097)

America soon to be the only country in all history to go to nuclear war over IP theft.

US: We didn't launch the nukes at you Russia! Chinese hackers did it while we were distracted by a huge PRISM!

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058713)

I am currently spamming about Prism Enlargement Pills, NSA checkmate.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44059381)

Its funny because during the industrial revolution the US was pretty content to steal IP from anyone to assist their advancements.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (5, Insightful)

beckett (27524) | about 10 months ago | (#44057937)

you claim China has been 'cracking the west', and yet you conveniently ignore stuxnet and flame [ieee.org]. you're more pissed off at a whistleblower's "BS" than plain evidence the US government has been engaging in rampant data mining and surveillance on a global scale.

China is the new 'enemy' that the US has been waiting for since the end of the Cold War. No doubt this escalating rivalry will drive the development and purchase of a new generation of military equipment, and justify the US government exerting unilateral control over ever more aspects of online activity and identity. Rest easy: we'll all continue to enjoy unending war in our lifetimes.

Piping-in (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058203)

Duqu? It seems they have penetrated the terrestrial-power-grid, and corrupted mosts scada-controllers.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about 10 months ago | (#44060953)

I see this attitude ALL THE TIME and it never fails to baffle me. Because someone thinks that China is the new boogeyman, that means that China must not be hacking at all. It's all about the all-powerful US government boogeyman instead! (newsflash, Obama is the good guy, the media is on his side these days)

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

beckett (27524) | about 10 months ago | (#44063061)

I see this attitude ALL THE TIME and it never fails to baffle me. Because someone thinks that China is the new boogeyman, that means that China must not be hacking at all. It's all about the all-powerful US government boogeyman instead!

Note you're the only person that said that "China must not be hacking at all": neither me nor GP said this. congratulations on your hasty strawman creation.

(newsflash, Obama is the good guy, the media is on his side these days)

If you continue to think in binary "good guy, bad guy" terms, we'll never get past this caveman "us vs them". The first things you should check at the door is any notion of American exceptionalism, and your blind faith in "the media".

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058875)

If Snowden's stuff is BS, then why are there Senators out there trying to have him executed for high treason? If it was all false, then he would be just another crackpot conspiracy theorist and nobody would have bothered to pay attention to him. Of course, that is not what went down...

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44060129)

why are there Senators out there trying to have him executed for high treason?

Just playing Devil's Advocate, but why does that mean that what Snowden said was true? Is it only treason when someone tells the truth, or can it be treason if the person is lying, but their lies are intended to cause mass devastation?

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#44061139)

why are there Senators out there trying to have him executed for high treason?

Just playing Devil's Advocate, but why does that mean that what Snowden said was true? Is it only treason when someone tells the truth, or can it be treason if the person is lying, but their lies are intended to cause mass devastation?

well... if his lies were levying war on the united states(I don't think he gave them Aid and Comfort which means lodging them).

actually it's only treason nowadays if you can't pin any other crime on it. that's the modern treason. mainly because they changed what treason meant and how it is to be tried, funny thing is that it's one of the only specific crimes in USA that had such definitions.. even if levying war can mean many things. you would need an open court according to the original definition as well. technically I don't think what snowden did was levying war, true or not. though it would not have been a big deal if it was not true.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (1)

GPLHost-Thomas (1330431) | about 10 months ago | (#44059729)

I'm getting a little bit tired of this anti-Chinese constant racism when we have to deal with online stuff. Most of the SPAM is sent from USA, though there's always someone to claim it's coming mainly from China (which is completely false these days, China only ranks nine on the top 10 spammers). Here, we're seeing the same thing. USA is the country with the biggest government sponsored hacks, and by far. Also, it's well known to all Chinese that the government is spying on its people. The government doesn't even claim not to do it. In USA, even when the gov. is caught with the hand in the basket, they still claim the basket doesn't exist. It's been really disgusting to see major companies doing a deception campaign claiming that the NSA doesn't have "direct access to our servers" when the PRISM program isn't about that (it's about tapping on the major peering of the Internet and listening what goes through the wire).

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44059817)

Well said. I've frequently posted similar responses as this "one sided" nonsense is ridiculous. In this posting for example there are the following:

China has been cracking the west for over a decade
- And you want me to think the US hasn't? The US has been spying on everyone for a very long time.

America soon to be the only country in all history to go to nuclear war over IP theft.
- Only the Chinese steal IP?

The US is pretty quick to forget its own past:
Piracy and Fraud Propelled the U.S. Industrial Revolution
http://mobile.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-01/piracy-and-fraud-propelled-the-u-s-industrial-revolution.html

How many posts have there been on Slashdot about "the great Chinese firewall" and how evil it is? Then the whole Snowden thing comes out and one has to wonder which is worse, Censorship or spying?

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44059857)

You don"t know WHAT you are talking about. China is constantly hacking every single business I've ever consulted. They aren't just hacking your email server to send spam.

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44059903)

Why does the bulk of the spam i receive seem to come from US servers telling me how i can buy cheap Canadian drugs?

Re:Russia/USA is NOT the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44059979)

Did you read the link i posted where it talks about "Hamilton’s Manifesto". He knew exporting the technology was against the law but encouraged the importation anyhow. "Tourists" went to Europe with the sole purpose of stealing IP, this seems to be espionage.

Its OK for Hamilton to encourage others to willingly break the law and smuggle foreign technology so the US can compete in the textile space, but hacking isnt cool?

Do as I say and not as i do at its finest.

Is it Vetted? (5, Interesting)

mitcheli (894743) | about 10 months ago | (#44057561)

If memory serves, a group of small Russian children presented one of our embassies a gift of a beautiful wooden state seal to hang on the wall. Unbeknown to anyone in the embassy at the time, it contained a small passive bug built within and that allowed the Russians to listen in to priviledged embassy conversations. The seal is now hanging up a the NSA museum in Columbia, Maryland. So the question is, who made the phones for this hotline?

Re:Is it Vetted? (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057643)

The Seal Bug [spybusters.com] was just one bug. Later, the Soviets kindly built us an embassy with bugs built into the very concrete of the walls [airforcemag.com].

Re:Is it Vetted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44060951)

Hmm.. do you know why the US developed the SR-71?

Enough with the "soviets spied on us" while ignoring the US was actively spying on them stories.

The Soviets were caught spying many times, as was the US.

Re:Is it Vetted? (1)

z0idberg (888892) | about 10 months ago | (#44057649)

Do you really think the USA side would need specific hardware installed from the Russian side to setup a hotline (or vice versa).....Or do you think they would use their own hardware and it is just the actual line that is common?

Re:Is it Vetted? (3, Informative)

tlambert (566799) | about 10 months ago | (#44057997)

Do you really think the USA side would need specific hardware installed from the Russian side to setup a hotline (or vice versa).....Or do you think they would use their own hardware and it is just the actual line that is common?

In fact, yes, they do, because the US doesn't trust that the Russian encryption isn't crackable, and vice versa. So as of 2010, there's been a joint encryption agreement in place for the White House/Kremlin hotline, and the same technology is being deployed in this case as well. Specifically the GRU and SVR in Russia, and their opposite numbers in the US. The agreed upon solution was to use cryptosystems from both countries on the communications.

"More recently, the United States and Russia agreed on new joint encryption arrangements for the forty-year-old hotline between the Kremlin and the White House. Moreover, American and Russian banks already cooperate in secure digital communications for international transfers of staggeringly large sums of money."

See this 2010 report for details, specifically, the executive summary beginning on page 7:
http://www.ewi.info/system/files/USRussiaCyber_WEB.pdf [ewi.info]

Re:Is it Vetted? (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 10 months ago | (#44057763)

Bugs are so old tech now. For 20 years they've been bouncing lasers off windows and decoding the audio vibrations.

Re:Is it Vetted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058771)

For 20 years they've been bouncing lasers off windows and decoding the audio vibrations.

20? Try 40 years on that one, and that's why we have speakers aimed at the windows playing elevator music 24x7.

Re:Is it Vetted? (1)

sociocapitalist (2471722) | about 10 months ago | (#44057943)

If memory serves, a group of small Russian children presented one of our embassies a gift of a beautiful wooden state seal to hang on the wall. Unbeknown to anyone in the embassy at the time, it contained a small passive bug built within and that allowed the Russians to listen in to priviledged embassy conversations. The seal is now hanging up a the NSA museum in Columbia, Maryland. So the question is, who made the phones for this hotline?

China of course...

Re:Is it Vetted? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44060525)

China

Cold war again.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057603)

I think Russia is responsible for network attacks recently. Here the damage caused to a French network hub : Cyber attack [youtube.com]

The Enemy Of My Enemy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057633)

Russia should nuke D.C. and SAC AF Sites and down all U.S.A. satellites as statement of acceptance of the 'Cyber hot-line.'

Russia IS my ally.

Of course it's a friendly call (1)

srjh (1316705) | about 10 months ago | (#44057637)

Hello? ... Ah ... I can't hear too well. Do you suppose you could turn the music down just a little? ... Oh-ho, that's much better. ... yeah ... huh ... yes ... Fine, I can hear you now, Vladimir. ... Clear and plain and coming through fine....I'm coming through fine, too, eh? ... Good, then ... well, then, as you say, we're both coming through fine. ... Good. ... Well, it's good that you're fine and ... and I'm fine. ... I agree with you, it's great to be fine. ... a-ha-ha-ha-ha ... Now then, Vladimir, you know how we've always talked about the possibility of something going wrong with the Bomb. ...The *Bomb*, Vladimir.... The *hydrogen* bomb! ... Well now, what happened is ... ah ... one of our base commanders, he had a sort of ... well, he went a little funny in the head ... you know ... just a little ... funny. And, ah ... he went and did a silly thing. ... Well, I'll tell you what he did. He ordered his planes ... to attack your country... Ah... Well, let me finish, Vladimir. ... Let me finish, Vladimir. ... Well listen, how do you think I feel about it?! ...Can you *imagine* how I feel about it, Vladimir? ... Why do you think I'm calling you? Just to say hello? ... *Of course* I like to speak to you! ... *Of course* I like to say hello! ... Not now, but anytime, Vladimir. I'm just calling up to tell you something terrible has happened... It's a *friendly* call. Of course it's a friendly call. ... Listen, if it wasn't friendly ... you probably wouldn't have even got it. ... They will *not* reach their targets for at least another hour. ... I am ... I am positive, Vladimir. ... Listen, I've been all over this with your ambassador. It is not a trick. ... Well, I'll tell you. We'd like to give your air staff a complete run-down on the targets, the flight plans, and the defensive systems of the planes. ... Yes! I mean i-i-i-if we're unable to recall the planes, then ... I'd say that, ah ... well, ah ... we're just gonna have to help you destroy them, Vladimir. ... I know they're our boys. ... All right, well listen now. Who should we call? ...*Who* should we call, Vladimir? The ... wha-whe, the People... you, sorry, you faded away there.... The People's Central Air Defense Headquarters. ... Where is that, Vladimir? ... In Omsk. ... Right. ... Yes. ...Oh, you'll call them first, will you? ... Uh-hu ... Listen, do you happen to have the phone number on you, Vladimir? ... Whe-ah, what? I see, just ask for Omsk information. ...Ah-ah-eh-uhm-hm ... I'm sorry, too, Vladimir. ...I'm very sorry. ... *All right*, you're sorrier than I am, but I am as sorry as well. ... I am as sorry as you are, Vladimir! Don't say that you're more sorry than I am, because I'm capable of being just as sorry as you are. ... So we're both sorry, all right?! ... All right.

Cyberway arms race (5, Interesting)

faustoc4 (2766155) | about 10 months ago | (#44057651)

This only confirms an article by Bruce Schneir that I just read, he surmises if the U.S has started a secret cyberwar arms race putting all internet infrastructure at perils. http://edition.cnn.com/2013/06/18/opinion/schneier-cyberwar-policy/index.html [cnn.com] "... advance U.S. national objectives around the world with little or no warning to the adversary or target and with potential effects ranging from subtle to severely damaging" fuckers

Cyber war games (1, Insightful)

gmuslera (3436) | about 10 months ago | (#44057677)

The only way to win is that no one plays it. But as there is a player (i.e. the elephant/donkey on the room that is US), everyone lose. And i don't mean government or citizens of some particular nation, i mean mankind as a whole.

Re:Cyber war games (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058925)

But as there is a player (i.e. the elephant/donkey on the room that is US), everyone lose.

So you're dumb enough to ignore something like this [nytimes.com] and put all of the blame on the US. Let me guess, you're not from the US, yet you'll use the Internet which WE invented (and don't get me started on Berners-Lee; he simply wrote an implementation of the ideas and research of Bush, Engelbart, and Nelson).

Yes, it's always the Yankees fault. Quit using the net if you don't like it and move back to your cave.

Nice timing. (5, Interesting)

chrullrich (111050) | about 10 months ago | (#44057681)

It certainly is no accident that today is the 50th anniversary of the agreement to set up the original Hot Line.

Re:Nice timing. (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057875)

Yeah, coming on the heels of Obama's JFK-redux speech in Berlin, one of the defining Cold War moments. There's a conscious effort on to portray Obama as a Cold War leader. Certainly an abrupt departure from earlier characterizations like the US-Russian "reset" (an annoying metaphor—as if the world were a video game that you could reset at will whenever you didn't like your position).

So the question is, who is the new Cold Opponent? Who is the Evil Empire? And does all this justify PRISM or something else?

Re:Nice timing. (2)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 10 months ago | (#44058485)

There's a conscious effort on to portray Obama as a Cold War leader.

Obama has always portrayed himself as MLK's "dream" and JFK's ghost all rolled into one. Not dissimilar to how Jesus portrayed himself as the "lamb" that was prophesied in the old testament. He certainly has the eloquence of the civil rights leaders but it will be a couple of generations before anyone can tell if he has had as much significance.

The recent UN compromise between Putin & Obama to work towards a caretaker government in Syria looks promising from a humanitarian and civil rights POV, but it's to the great shame of both nations that it's taken them 2yrs of bloodshed to get that far.

using twitter hotline? (4, Funny)

goffster (1104287) | about 10 months ago | (#44057769)

@putin, WTF is up with goddamn @assad?
@obama, you have no proof #WMD.
@putin, no proof, WTF were those #sarin loaded missles?
@obama, perhaps #israel fired them and put blame on #syria.
@putin, you are a pussy.

Re:using twitter hotline? (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | about 10 months ago | (#44057903)

@obama, what are you wearing? @putin, the commander in chief goes commando, no briefs

Re:using twitter hotline? (2)

TapeCutter (624760) | about 10 months ago | (#44058505)

In the dark ages, Putin (ex: KGB 'commando') would have sailed to the US on a Viking boat, personally kicked the crap out of Bush/Obama, and told Americans they would all have to get used to being paid in vodka.

Re:using twitter hotline? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058859)

Russians doesn't sail Viking boats, they ride bears.

Re:using twitter hotline? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#44061039)

In the dark ages, Putin (ex: KGB 'commando') would have sailed to the US on a Viking boat, personally kicked the crap out of Bush/Obama, and told Americans they would all have to get used to being paid in vodka.

Oh.. a funny story relating to that. Vikings were used in pacification of Russia into Russia.

Online equivalent of the Cuban Missile Crisis? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057787)

an online equivalent of the Cuban Missile Crisis

How does that work exactly? Will I have to duck and cover under my desk when I use a web browser? Should I be build a Faraday cage in the back yard and stock it with enough batteries to power my laptop for several weeks?

We Will Spy On Americans Through Electrical Applia (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057799)

CIA Head: We Will Spy On Americans Through Electrical Appliances

Global information surveillance grid being constructed; willing Americans embrace gadgets used to spy on them

Steve Watson | Prisonplanet.com | March 16, 2012

http://www.prisonplanet.com/cia-head-we-will-spy-on-americans-through-electrical-appliances.html [prisonplanet.com]

"CIA director David Petraeus has said that the rise of new "smart" gadgets means that Americans are effectively bugging their own homes, saving US spy agencies a job when it identifies any "persons of interest".

Speaking at a summit for In-Q-Tel, the CIA's technology investment operation, Petraeus made the comments when discussing new technologies which aim to add processors and web connections to previously 'dumb' home appliances such as fridges, ovens and lighting systems.

Wired reports the details via its Danger Room Blog[1]:

"'Transformational' is an overused word, but I do believe it properly applies to these technologies," Petraeus enthused, "particularly to their effect on clandestine tradecraft."

"Items of interest will be located, identified, monitored, and remotely controlled through technologies such as radio-frequency identification, sensor networks, tiny embedded servers, and energy harvesters - all connected to the next-generation internet using abundant, low-cost, and high-power computing," Petraeus said.

"the latter now going to cloud computing, in many areas greater and greater supercomputing, and, ultimately, heading to quantum computing." the CIA head added.

Petraeus also stated that such devices within the home "change our notions of secrecy".

Petraeus' comments come in the same week that one of the biggest microchip companies in the world, ARM, unveiled new processors that are designed to give practically every household appliance an internet connection[2], in order that they can be remote controlled and operate in tandem with applications.

ARM describes the concept as an "internet of things".

Where will all the information from such devices be sent and analyzed? It can be no coincidence that the NSA is currently building a monolithic heavily fortified $2 billion facility[3] deep in the Utah desert and surrounded by mountains. The facility is set to go fully live in September 2013.

"The Utah data center is the centerpiece of the Global Information Grid, a military project that will handle yottabytes of data, an amount so huge that there is no other data unit after it." reports Gizmodo.

"This center-with every listening post, spy satellite and NSA datacenter connected to it, will make the NSA the most powerful spy agency in the world."

Wired reports[4] that the incoming data is being mined by plugging into telecommunications companies' switches, essentially the same method the NSA infamously uses for warrantless wiretapping of domestic communications[5], as exposed six years ago.

Former intelligence analyst turned best selling author James Bamford, has penned a lengthy piece[6] on the NSA facility and warns "It is, in some measure, the realization of the 'total information awareness' program created during the first term of the Bush administration-an effort that was killed by Congress in 2003 after it caused an outcry over its potential for invading Americans' privacy."

--

Steve Watson is the London based writer and editor for Alex Jones' Infowars.net[7], and Prisonplanet.com[8]. He has a Masters Degree in International Relations from the School of Politics at The University of Nottingham in England.

(C) 2012 PrisonPlanet.com is a Free Speech Systems, LLC company. All rights reserved.

[1] http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/03/petraeus-tv-remote/ [wired.com]
[2] http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17345934 [bbc.co.uk]
[3] http://gizmodo.com/5893869/this-is-the-most-powerful-spy-center-in-the-world [gizmodo.com]
[4] http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/all/1 [wired.com]
[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSA_warrantless_surveillance_controversy [wikipedia.org]
[6] http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/03/ff_nsadatacenter/ [wired.com]
[7] http://infowars.net/ [infowars.net]
[8] http://prisonplanet.com/ [prisonplanet.com]

What the hell? (2)

flargleblarg (685368) | about 10 months ago | (#44057881)

FTFA:

In a move eerily reminiscent of the Cold War, the US and Russia have set up a hotline to avoid an accidental or catastrophic cyber war, after two years of discussing how best to collaborate on online threats.

The two companies want to “reduce the possibility that a misunderstood cyber incident could create instability or a crisis in our bilateral relationship”, according to a fact sheet from the White House.

Both Russia and the US are hotbeds of cyber criminal activity, and both are thought to be throwing much funding into military efforts in cyber too.

Emphasis mine.

WTF?

Take a guess, what benefits both sides? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44057919)

This hotline reminds me of my first explorations into sex when I was 8 or 9, "Show me yours and I'll show you mine".

In this analogous case, the US and Russia are probably showing each other their user data which the NSA captures with PRISM and the Russian equivalent on the other side. I guess the hotline is so that Obama and Putin can giggle at their respective subservient sheeple.

Of course the reality isn't *exactly* like this. But I bet it's similar in spirit.

Shouldn't it be between the US and China? (2)

Arancaytar (966377) | about 10 months ago | (#44057975)

Because it's not like the US and Russia are the ones consistently at each others' throats over alleged cyber attacks.

Re:Shouldn't it be between the US and China? (1)

Alex Belits (437) | about 10 months ago | (#44058751)

No, US blames China for every exploit, and China likes to posture. In reality it's mostly organized crime, and there is plenty of that in Russia.

Unrelated to that -- who cares, at least it keeps US from bringing up invasion of Syria or other truly idiotic crap.

Re:Shouldn't it be between the US and China? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44110369)

Alex Belits: Idiot, Asshole, Troll, Russian-Immigrant, Faggot, Liar, Extremists, and all-around Motherfucker, moderated at -1 by default. Justice feels good.

Cyber war against the Internet is very real (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058139)

The Internet (as a whole) could be attacked by those who are being disclosed. This is something that they really dislike, being in the open, and that everybody knows about what they did, are doing and what are they planning. So, it is of not surprise to me that governments are coming together to protect this vital resource. The magic of the Internet is that everybody can have a voice, a permanent one, and acts as a continuum connecting us to a different (and more factual) reality. It is our duty to protect the Internet, it belongs to us, the people.

Sleep Tight (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058149)

Are they going to read each other bedtime stories now?

phone phreaks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44058995)

How do we keep phone phreaks from hacking the cyber hotline?

Not what it'll actually be used for (1)

oobayly (1056050) | about 10 months ago | (#44059179)

I can see it mainly being used to request information on citizens than aren't allowed to be spied on by their own government. I'm sure Downing Street will be getting involved in this too.

Talk of hotlines reminds me of Yes, Prime Minister (1)

caseih (160668) | about 10 months ago | (#44060881)

Every time I read about setting up hotlines between governments on various things, I think of this classic episode from Yes, Prime Minister, "The Grand Design."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=diuQiXt5qE4#t=45s [youtube.com]

Prime Minister: So in an emergency I can get straight through to the Soviet president?

General: Theoretically, yes.

PM: Theoretically?

General: It's what we tell journalists. Ha Ha Ha. In fact we did once get through to the Kremlin, but only to a switchboard operator.

PM: Couldn't the operator put you through?

General: We never found out. Didn't seem to speak much English.

PM: How often is it tested?

Sir Humphreys: Well they try not to test it too often. It tends to create unnecessary panic at the other end and panic is always a good thing to avoid where nuclear weapons are concerned, don't you think?

I've seen the actual "hotline" (1)

sirwired (27582) | about 10 months ago | (#44061579)

On a tour of the Joint Intelligence facilities in the Pentagon many (15) years ago, we got to walk past the room with the actual hotline (it's not in the White House, or even some buried secret Pentagon sub-basement.) It's a closet with a door with a bored-looking officer in there, along with a teletype. It has a phone, but it was connected to the DoD phone system, not Russia.

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