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Pirate Bay Founder Sentenced To Jail

timothy posted about a year ago | from the didn't-you-see-how-michael-nyquist-lived? dept.

The Courts 168

An anonymous reader writes "Gottfrid Swartholm Warg — known also as Anakata — was on June 20th sentenced to two years imprisonment for data breaches and aggravated fraud by the District Court of Nacka in his native Sweden. It is unclear at this time wether the decision will be appealed to a higher court. Prison time in Sweden is generally served for two thirds of the time sentenced, if the person behaves well and the court finds no reason to abstain from the norm. Also, time spent in pre-trial confinement (swe: 'häkte') is deducted from the time sentenced. Warg was arrested in Cambodia in september of 2012, transferred to Sweden and ordered by court to remain in pre-trial confinement from September 14th, 2012."

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168 comments

Yer confused (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059477)

I'm Moses

God says...
rose_colored_glasses God to_infinity_and_beyond heads_I_win_tails_you_lose
do_you_get_a_cookie spunky I_quit You_can_count_on_that
ho_ho_ho recipe job

If you do the math... (5, Informative)

msauve (701917) | about a year ago | (#44059503)

2/3 of 2 years is 16 months. He's been held for 9 months already, so he has another 7 to go (until Jan 2014).

Re:If you do the math... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059629)

Hope so.

He shouldn't really be in prison at all. At first when I saw the story I was sad. But now that I see he'll be only there for a short time I hope he uses the time to take a break from all things internet and chills out.

Re:If you do the math... (2)

rioki (1328185) | about a year ago | (#44060585)

Sweden actually has quite good prison conditions. He may actually have internet access... maybe not much will change for him...

Re:If you do the math... (4, Funny)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | about a year ago | (#44060709)

They'll probably block Pirate Bay from his DOC-issued laptop. Can't have such a wide-open door for viruses and all.

Re:If you do the math... (1)

mendax (114116) | about a year ago | (#44060949)

I'd be surprised they will give them access to a computer. But the Swedish prison system is supposedly quite tolerable and remarkably humane compared to those in much of the rest of the world (especially the American federal and state gulags which are third-world in many aspects) so I could be wrong.

Re:If you do the math... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060721)

Amnesty International has accused Sweden of human rights violations for using its prisoners to assemble IKEA furniture.

Re:If you do the math... (1)

mendax (114116) | about a year ago | (#44060907)

If you know anything about life in prison you would know that just having a job is a "big deal®". It makes the time fly more quickly. There are worse things than assembling IKEA furniture. For example, prison systems are like Google in this one respect, they eat their own dog food. So they make and consume their own products such as food, clothes, and soap. Can you imagine spending years working in, for example, a chicken factory?

Re:If you do the math... (2, Interesting)

mwvdlee (775178) | about a year ago | (#44059763)

Assuming the US will allow Sweden to reduce the prison time, which I find quite unlikely.
Yes, I know US law doesn't apply in this case but, apparently, neither does Swedish law.

Re:If you do the math... (4, Informative)

Kiwikwi (2734467) | about a year ago | (#44060347)

2/3 of 2 years is 16 months. He's been held for 9 months already, so he has another 7 to go (until Jan 2014).

Yeah, and afterwards he's likely going to Denmark, to stand trial there for breaching servers belonging to the Danish police (hosted by the ever-incompetent CSC).

Remember, he's not serving time for his Pirate Bay involvement (yet?); he's serving time for breaching bank systems and using the access in an attempt to steal millions. Since he was extradited for this case, not the Pirate Bay case, it seems that the Swedish prosecutors actually consider this worse than file sharing. (Who would've thought?)

Re:If you do the math... (1)

durrr (1316311) | about a year ago | (#44061119)

I don't think they are allowed to serialize his supposed crimes in such a manner. All known crimes are supposed to be subject to one trial and one sentence, to prevent the legal system from indefinitely keeping someone locked up by partitioning the crimes and re-charing them when they're out indefinitely.

Then again, it wouldn't be the first time the law is bypassed to fight the great evil that digital piracy apparently is.

Re:If you do the math... (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about a year ago | (#44061205)

That is not bad. If I know I knew I would only get 7 months of jail time I would run a PB like website

Re:If you do the math... (1)

cangrejoinmortal (1315615) | about a year ago | (#44061317)

Besides, prison in the Nordic countries seems to be not half as bad as in the rest of the world. That doesn't mean he should go to jail tough. Piracy (copy right violation) should be a misdemeanor, not a crime.

And yet TPB lives (5, Funny)

skaag (206358) | about a year ago | (#44059513)

I find it amusing that while all this is going on, nobody is able to shut it down.
Which is great because that's where I like to search for my Linux ISO images.

Re:And yet TPB lives (2)

sirber (891722) | about a year ago | (#44059541)

You reinstall linux often?

Re:And yet TPB lives (2)

jeffclay (1077679) | about a year ago | (#44059569)

Did you hear that whooshing sound when you replied?

Re:And yet TPB lives (3, Funny)

sirber (891722) | about a year ago | (#44059689)

Did you hear that whooshing sound when you replied?

No sorry, I'm not on OSX.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060213)

No sorry, I'm not on OSX.

Why, don't you know where to download it?

Re:And yet TPB lives (2)

Requiem18th (742389) | about a year ago | (#44060869)

He has to download a reason for it first.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

AliasBackslash (2719011) | about a year ago | (#44059577)

I frequently install it on new and re-purposed computers and enjoy experimenting with different distros.

Re:And yet TPB lives (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059791)

Every time a new Doctor Who episode comes out.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

Peter Bortas (130) | about a year ago | (#44059843)

At least a couple of times per week. Thanks for asking.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#44060615)

Why? It's not like it's particularly unstable, and requires reinstalling every so often *cough*windows*cough*.... and if you're a sysadmin for a company and are installing it fresh on different computers all the time, wouldn't it be a more efficient to use the same distribution for each instead of searching for different ones on TPB all the time, and only download a new copy of the distro when that particular one is updated?

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

hackula (2596247) | about a year ago | (#44060233)

There are lot of computers out there that need saving.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

TheDarkMaster (1292526) | about a year ago | (#44060761)

Every time my favorite distro have a significant update (eg: version 5 to version 6). And by necessity, since trying to upgrade only the packages invariably results in a disaster area.

Re:And yet TPB lives (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059545)

This had nothing at all to do with TPB, so you shouldn't have worried about your Linux ISO images.

Re:And yet TPB lives (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059563)

This trial was about the "hacking" of a swedish bank.
So it's not related to TPB.

Re:And yet TPB lives (-1, Troll)

shentino (1139071) | about a year ago | (#44060085)

Not officially.

I wouldn't be surprised if they're really using the hacking as an excuse to go after him when it was actually TPB that pissed them off but wasn't popular enough to use as the official reason.

Re:And yet TPB lives (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060423)

So hacking a bank isn't a sufficient excuse to prosecute someone?

Unless you're stating that he's been framed, I'd say hacking a bank would probably get you arrested no matter who you are, TPB or not. In this case, I'd say that it was merely icing on the cake for those who care about TPB.

Re:And yet TPB lives (4, Insightful)

Buggz (1187173) | about a year ago | (#44059585)

The incident Warg was convicted for, data breach and releasing said data on the internet, is unrelated to The Pirate Bay. It's like saying Lindsay Lohan was convicted for acting, which I guess could be the case but you get my point.

Re:And yet TPB lives (4, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#44059793)

It's like saying Lindsay Lohan was convicted for acting

Which, all things considered, is not such a bad idea, which makes it a crappy analogy, though.

Re:And yet TPB lives (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059917)

Then there are others who think she shoudn't be jailed for Acting, because bad Acting shouldn't be a criminal offense, if anything it should really only be a civil one.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060087)

I totally agree, there should be immediate capital punishment, not jailtime.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060131)

Unless "Lindsay Lohan" is a new model of car, the analogy was crappy by default.

Re:And yet TPB lives (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059591)

Well, officially this has nothing to do with TPB.

(Unofficially there was some involvement from one of RIAAs goons in this case, even if there should be no reason for it.)

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | about a year ago | (#44059919)

Ironically, the last time I was looking for a particular Linux ISO, TPB didn't have it.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#44060669)

Why is that ironic? Linux is already freely distributed and often readily available as torrents directly on the distro vendor's web site, so there would not be any significant benefit to distributing such distros through TPB.

Re:And yet TPB lives (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060797)

http://linuxtracker.org/ [linuxtracker.org]

Re:And yet TPB lives (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060475)

Just download Linux ISO's from vendor sites and mirrors. They're much more reliable and up to date. Not like you need to download ISO's every day.

Re:And yet TPB lives (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year ago | (#44060693)

Some people do... sadly enough.

Although the demographic that does, in my observation, seems to be largely comprised of individuals who for whatever reason feel that by doing so they are somehow validating the existence of places like TPB.

Re:And yet TPB lives (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060571)

You know there are other places to get Linux ISO images, right? And many of them are even distributed by torrent.

But one is compelled to ask.... why would searching for Linux ISO images be something that you regularly do? Certainly I would think that you'd eventually settle on one distribution and just be downloading the updates to that, as they come out?

Fair trial? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059579)

Another person who majorly irked the moneyed ruling class. I am sure that these vaguely related crimes were not used as a bludgeon to achieve revenge.

Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (2)

nhat11 (1608159) | about a year ago | (#44059581)

They're nicer than most low end motels/hotels in the states, its ridiculous!

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (3, Funny)

Twiggeh (2948473) | about a year ago | (#44059645)

Yep, and we make sure to feed our inmates more properly than our schoolkids. Our country is kinda backwards on alot of things.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059897)

It's a populistic statement that only serves to rile up emotion. If you look at other factors around the issue, such as the mobility of schoolchildren vs. that of prisoners, you'd see why it's utter nonsense.

Not that the two are in a zero-sum game either. Reductions in one does not neccesitate increases in others. In fact, recently, reductions in one has gone to tax holidays for the richest people in the country, showing whoose meals the Swedes actually care about.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060075)

If you look at other factors around the issue, such as the mobility of schoolchildren vs. that of prisoners, you'd see why it's utter nonsense.

You reckon school kids pump more iron than the prisoners I'm seeing in various american dramas? Wow

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060049)

Yes, prisoners should get school-grade food, and schoolchildren should be fed by their parents.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

denis-The-menace (471988) | about a year ago | (#44060219)

Free labour is useless if it is weak.

If they allow schools to force students to do labour then they will feed them just as well as convicts. ;)

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (2, Insightful)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year ago | (#44061321)

Jail is useless if its not punitive.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

aliquis (678370) | about a year ago | (#44060247)

Yep, and we make sure to feed our inmates more properly than our schoolkids. Our country is kinda backwards on alot of things.

We also pay our politicans more than the people who haven't done anything!

And every public owned property or company is sold out so they can afford to lower the taxes for the people who earn the most while they also want to make it worse for people with no job so they go find one themself even though they themself got an awesome parachute with lots of income from not doing shit after they have left their political carrier because obviously it's freaking hard getting a job when people know you from the political scene.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44061303)

Twiggeh you sure haven't ever been to jail...

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059663)

It's about rehabilitation. Seems to be more effective than punishment (see USA PMITA prison system).

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

aliquis (678370) | about a year ago | (#44060109)

It's about rehabilitation. Seems to be more effective than punishment (see USA PMITA prison system).

It's actually not that efficient.

And I know outside of Oslo they have an island where you can "go to jail" and just live as normal with a house and stuff. They possibly had no guards or fences. If you behave there then fine. If you can act as a regular citizen they are happy. I guess if you escape or get caught again you may not go there a second time. Your choice.

Anyway I think the US putting lots of people on drugs in jail is just fucked up. I don't do drugs but that is anything is breaking them AWAY from society and into even more criminals.

Sounds like a good idea?

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (4, Informative)

Peter Bortas (130) | about a year ago | (#44060199)

"And I know outside of Oslo they have an island where you can "go to jail" and just live as normal with a house and stuff."

You are thinking of Bastøy, Norways possibly both cheapest prison and the one with the lowest reoffending rate: ~15%.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060435)

"And I know outside of Oslo they have an island where you can "go to jail" and just live as normal with a house and stuff."

You are thinking of Bastøy, Norways possibly both cheapest prison and the one with the lowest reoffending rate: ~15%.

Reason probably being that they don't put hopeless cases there.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (2)

vux984 (928602) | about a year ago | (#44061155)

Reason probably being that they don't put hopeless cases there.

And conversely that normal people don't in turn BECOME hopeless cases simply because they went to prison.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about a year ago | (#44060227)

Yea rehabilitation makes sense but there's people out there that need that type of accommodations that did no wrong to anyone. It's like committing a crime will reward you with those living conditions but losing a job and being poor punishes you.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

Zontar_Thing_From_Ve (949321) | about a year ago | (#44060597)

It's about rehabilitation. Seems to be more effective than punishment (see USA PMITA prison system).

Oh yea. An Anonymous Coward posts an opinion.

As an American, I'm going to give you some ideas on how things are here. First of all, yes, some people in prison in the US are there under dubious circumstances. When I was younger I was more of a "Lock up the druggies" kind of guy, but now I feel that imprisoning people for simply using drugs is counterproductive and harmful to them and society as a whole. So yes, we certainly do have people locked up for stuff they probably shouldn't be locked up for.

Second, I'm not even going to pretend that in general the US justice system does more than give paychecks to lawyers and judges. For sure there are times when it really does serve justice and do the right thing, but a lot of times the quality of what you get out of it is directly related to how much you can afford to pay into it in terms of your lawyers rather than how right or wrong the case against you is.

As someone who lives here, I want those of you who don't to know that we are a violent society and have always been one. We have a lot of bad people here, much more than you would ever imagine if you don't live here. One of the things we actually do well is we punish those who are really bad and maybe lock them up forever (or in rare circumstances execute them) so they don't hurt others again. This not Norway where the wimpy Norwegians are probably going to have to release mass murderer Anders Breivik TWICE more in his lifetime so he can get out and attempt to break his own record for violence. I can promise you that some people are just bad, everybody can't be rehabilitated, and countries that don't have the kind of unending violence we have here really just cannot judge us. Say what you will, but as an example serial killer Ted Bundy can never harm another human being whereas if he lived in some wimpy country like Brazil, Norway or Italy the justice system would feel sorry for him and release him so he was free to kill again at some point.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about a year ago | (#44061361)

The Humanitarian Theory of Punishment [angelfire.com]

According to the Humanitarian theory, to punish a man because he deserves it, and as much as he deserves, is mere revenge, and, therefore, barbarous and immoral. It is maintained that the only legitimate motives for punishing are the desire to deter others by example or to mend the criminal. When this theory is combined, as frequently happens, with the belief that all crime is more or less pathological, the idea of mending tails off into that of healing or curing and punishment becomes therapeutic. Thus it appears at first sight that we have passed from the harsh and self-righteous notion of giving the wicked their deserts to the charitable and enlightened one of tending the psychologically sick. What could be more amiable? One little point which is taken for granted in this theory needs, however, to be made explicit. The things done to the criminal, even if they are called cures, will be just as compulsory as they were in the old days when we called them punishments. If a tendency to steal can be cured by psychotherapy, the thief will no doubt be forced to undergo the treatment. Otherwise, society cannot continue.

My contention is that this doctrine, merciful though it appears, really means that each one of us, from the moment he breaks the law, is deprived of the rights of a human being.

The reason is this. The Humanitarian theory removes from Punishment the concept of Desert. But the concept of Desert is the only connecting link between punishment and justice. It is only as deserved or undeserved that a sentence can be just or unjust. I do not here contend that the question ‘Is it deserved?’ is the only one we can reasonably ask about a punishment. We may very properly ask whether it is likely to deter others and to reform the criminal. But neither of these two last questions is a question about justice. There is no sense in talking about a ‘just deterrent’ or a ‘just cure’. We demand of a deterrent not whether it is just but whether it will deter. We demand of a cure not whether it is just but whether it succeeds. Thus when we cease to consider what the criminal deserves and consider only what will cure him or deter others, we have tacitly removed him from the sphere of justice altogether; instead of a person, a subject of rights, we now have a mere object, a patient, a ‘case’.

Re:Look up Sweden's prison pictures on google.... (1)

Peter Bortas (130) | about a year ago | (#44059887)

I agree, the US need to get with the program already.

Data Breach (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059595)

He isn't going to jail for running TPB, but instead for doing something clearly illegal and just uncool in general. I don't see a problem with it.

The old lesson learned again: Don't go high profile and piss off the man if you have skeletons in your closet.

Official says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059747)

And of course, they don't lie, not even by technicality, do they. Like "We have no ability to look at everyone's emails (because we don't have enough time to look at them all, we DO, however, have the ability to look at anyone's)".

Re:Data Breach (1)

Beardo the Bearded (321478) | about a year ago | (#44059931)

And now we all have skeletons in our closet.

Re:Data Breach (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060041)

Pirate Bay should make all their torrent trackers point through Google or Bing searches instead of pointing to stuff directly.

Justice is for the little people (5, Insightful)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year ago | (#44059609)

In London during the riots, a man was sentenced to six months jail for stealing a bottle of water.

However, the bankers crash the economy, cost taxpayers £130 billion pounds, threw millions out of work due to their negligence and criminality -- and NOONE has gone to jail. In America, the problem is made worse because it's actually Obama Administration policy to not prosecute bankers for fraud.

Re:Justice is for the little people (1)

Phrogman (80473) | about a year ago | (#44059685)

Feudalism never really left our culture, it just changed its colours. There is the law for the rich and powerful, then there is the law for the peons :(

Re:Justice is for the little people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059849)

Noone went to jail? But he's the only one who was trying to stop it!

Re:Justice is for the little people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060167)

Give a man a gun and can can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and can can rob a country.

Re:Justice is for the little people (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060409)

I'll play you the worlds smallest violin, whiney brat.

NOONE has gone to jail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060537)

I never liked Herman's Hermits anyway.

Re:Justice is for the little people (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060545)

Here in Texas a man stole a $35 frozen rack of ribs from a grocery store and got 50 years.

Re:Justice is for the little people (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44061085)

The jury recommended Ward be sentenced as a habitual criminal. Ward has previous felony convictions for burglary, attempted robbery, aggravated assault, leaving the scene of an accident and possession of cocaine, and four misdemeanor convictions, including two thefts.

The man also told one of the workers of the store that he had a knife. He isn't some bum who was picked up for his first offence of stealing a paltry set of ribs. He was a career criminal who's likelihood of re-offending was very high. It's excessive to give 50 years, but I feel like you over sensationalized it to prove a point.

Re:Justice is for the little people (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060659)

Could you define "the bankers" more specifically? No, you can't can you? Nor do you really understand the cause of the global crash. The reason that no-one has gone to gaol is that, however much you want it to be, it's not really anyone's fault. Do you have 0% credit card? A mortgage you now can't really afford? You're as complicit as every other short sighted idiot involved.

Re:Justice is for the little people (-1, Flamebait)

benjfowler (239527) | about a year ago | (#44060809)

I do (I work in finance).

But I'm not going to match wits with a gutless faggot AC like you.

Re:Justice is for the little people (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44061003)

There is an element of fraud if they make something appear safer than it is AND by doing so profit from its sale.

There's a difference between investment bankers selling crap using names like "High-Grade Structured Credit Fund" when it isn't really high grade, and you getting a mortgage you can't really afford (assuming you didn't misrepresent your financial status to the bank).

If you did indeed deceive the bank then yes you are one of those at fault. If you didn't and the bank lent to you despite you being a high risk person, then it's the bank's responsibility - maybe they've actually got a fancy scheme to reduce risk rather than merely pretending to. And if the bankers lending to you did so for personal gain while not doing their jobs properly and thus putting the bank at risk then it's their fault too.

He can practise his Unix skills (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059611)

/usr/sbin/chroot /jail sleep 1892160000

Off topic... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059631)

I still find it hilarious that one of the things that is ALWAYS at the top of the most popular list is GTA san andreas.

Always makes me giggle to think of ALL those newer games out there.. Still losing in popularity to an 8 year old game.

Fucking editors! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059643)

It's

1) Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, not Swartholm
2) whether, not wether

Not every submission is perfect but it's your fucking job to fix them! DO YOUR WORK BITCHES!

Re:Fucking editors! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060101)

What makes you think that anyone here actually has a job? Be nice to people. Then they might be nice to you.

Re:Fucking editors! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060355)

It's not their job to fix anything. Their one and only job is to generate clickthroughs and ad impressions for their advertisers.

Crucial (2)

neckstop (1956940) | about a year ago | (#44059675)

This is a low blow from the establishment. Granted, Gottfrid comes off as a deranged, drug-addled terrorist occasionally, but he is at least partially responsible for the underpinnings of a true technological and cultural revolution. I am a security professional and as pissed as I get when some random asshole or DDOS (or me) brings down a datacenter of mine, I'm more upset with myself and my team for allowing that unsafe condition to exist in the first place. We have to be right all the time and they have to be right once. This is not a new concept. These companies and especially government organizations should be expected to assume the same level of due diligence, if not FAR more, than everyone else. They just had the sensitive data just sitting there to take. I'm not an anarchist and I believe completely in personal responsibility but there should be some comparative negligence that comes into play here. Yeah, sure, Gottfrid allegedly did it, but Logica and Nordea failed in protecting their customers' sensitive interests.

Re:Crucial (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059995)

I can assure you the breach is being looked at from all levels of the security apparatus in Sweden, civilian as well as military, and a number of regulation authorities.

In many ways this breach is a good thing since it broke publicly and thus became unavoidable to manage. It is systemic and nationwide (presumably ALL swedish citizens have been exposed through the SPAR-registry breach. The SPAR registry is an offshoot of the official adress registry for all persons in Sweden), spans multiple government agencies (Tax Authority, Police, Parliament amongst others) and private companies. IT involves third party IT (outsourcing).

The FUP-files hosted by wikileaks are VERY telling of the massive failure this breach is for this common model of data mangement in the public/private cooperation that Sweden as a nation state is dominated by, sometimes a contractual cooperation - sometimes an informal one.
The number of open doors into the breached systems, and the low level of security for this kind of information is totally astounding. It will surely become THE case referred to in security teaching in Sweden, and not only in IT sector.

Perhaps coincidentally, but perhaps not so coincidentally the (secret) head of the (extremely secret) Office of Special Collection (swe: Kontoret för Särskild Inhämtning, KSI) was found dead in a lake in Sweden in the summer of 2012. KSI ws previously known as IB (or Information Bureau) and has an interesting history which can be read about in brief here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IB_affair
Whilst being speculation of course, it would be .. interesting .. if there was a connection.
I for one find it quite interesting that Warg has not been put to the bench for espionage or some such.

As a side note, the bank in question, Nordea, is partially owned by the Swedish state and has historically been the number one bank for government transactions.
So whomever did the actual breaches is irrelevant, they hit a pretty big golden pot, that led to another golden pot, that led to another golden pot, many pots in the service of the State.
Two years in prison for THAT .... is not so much.

Re:Crucial (4, Interesting)

HappyHead (11389) | about a year ago | (#44060103)

Part of the problem here is that he does often come across as a drug addled terrorist, and judges almost universally tend to not only find against people who do that, but also tend to put the maximum sentence on them, in the hopes that during their time in prison, they'll come out of their drug-addling, and actually notice where they are. (Yes, sometimes that's hopeless optimism.) Gottfrid may be partially responsible for some wonderful technology being popularized, but he's also responsible for a lot of horrible things as well (google "Potentialprostitutes" and "extortion" for an example) - calling on Karma for this really doesn't weigh in his favor.

Yes, Logica and Nordea did fail to protect their customers from people doing bad things, but that doesn't mean the people doing the bad things shouldn't be punished for it. If anything, Logica and Nordea deserve a bit of punishment too - much like if a school bus driver decided to take the kids through a rough section of town (as a shortcut!) and some gang member shoots the bus up - yes, the bus driver should be in a lot of trouble for that, but that doesn't mean that the gang member who shot at the bus should be let off, even if nobody was hit.

boohoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059679)

Swedish prisons are not like u.s prisons. Their clean, cells are bigger than most ny manhattan 1 bedroom apartments, they have tv's in each cell. Basically, the guy is in a motel.

maximum penalty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059707)

oh, and some other notes:
2 years imprisonment is the maximum penalty stipulated by law for the crimes Warg's been convicted for.
Swedish sentencing terms are not cumulative (no 999 years ridiculousness) so he will only serve a maximum of two years in prison for crimes that he has been convicted for in this particular trial, if the conviction stands. /AC

the model is broken, but the machine still moves. (4, Insightful)

nimbius (983462) | about a year ago | (#44059731)

you cant destroy the pirate bay by simply arresting its founders, or any other torrent tracking system for that matter. its ludicrous.
the internet as a system and community enacts a sort of triage when this happens, and its geometrically faster than the litigation the **aa tends to favour.
One could argue rather convincingly that the advent of the magnet link was the downfall of the tradtional model of litigating peer-to-peer to death. Call me a cheerleader, but im sure Anakata understands that seven months of involuntary detention is no more an inconvenience than being roped into a particularly bad vodaphone contract.

Re:the model is broken, but the machine still move (1)

skaag (206358) | about a year ago | (#44059759)

That's the kind of comment I was hoping for.

Thank you.

Re:the model is broken, but the machine still move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060495)

Yea cause they're really after TBP here. The dude committed an obvious UNRELATED crime, one even the groupthink morons here shouldn't be able to defend. He's got a reasonable jail sentence (probably another 7 months given what he's already served). Get over it.

Re:the model is broken, but the machine still move (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | about a year ago | (#44059947)

seven months of involuntary detention is no more an inconvenience than being roped into a particularly bad vodaphone contract

Wow, the Telcos really are getting worse day by day.

Re:the model is broken, but the machine still move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060681)

Wow, prison is really getting worse day by day.

Fixed that for you

Re:the model is broken, but the machine still move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44059959)

This conviction is completely orthogonal to TPB.

Slight difference... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about a year ago | (#44060045)

With phone contracts you only get shafted metaphorically. In prison on the other hand...

I feel sorry for Anakata... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060011)

... because he is ugly as hell!1!!

Care packages? (1)

mfh (56) | about a year ago | (#44060175)

Anyone have the jail address so we can send him care packages?

I know he'd love to receive some reading material, hygiene products, junk food... etc. I think there are lots of posts on prisonlinks.com that talk about what you can and can't send a prisoner in the USA but I'm not sure about Sweden.

How to show support in the USA (0)

kurt555gs (309278) | about a year ago | (#44060313)

We all should show support for free speech and protest Anakata's imprisonment. Since the main reasons he is jailed are the **AA, and the "Mickey Mouse Forever" Act, I thought we could express our sentiment by pissing on Sonny Bono's grave:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=33.8197212,-116.4417191&spn=0.004205,0.005249 [google.com]

I would have also suggested the same for Jack Valenti, however he is buried in Arlington National Cemetery so that might result in jail.

This could be a great travel destination for those that value free speech.
     

Re:How to show support in the USA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060535)

This isn't about your frozen peaches, (Oh noes! My FREEZE PEACH!) and it's not anything to do with the **AA, Mickey Mouse, or Sonny Bono. It's about a particularly scuzzy douchebag getting arrested and sentenced for doing illegal things that had nothing to do with The Pirate Bay. If anything, the rest of the Pirate Bay crew should feel embarrassed at being associated with this guy.

It will probably (99%) go to higher court (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44060573)

Almost all sentences in municipal court (Tingsrätten) except really simple cases like traffic violations are always tried in higher a higher (Hovrätten). More or less automatically if one part doesn't agree with it (and if one part doesn't the other part also appeals).

His defense in this case is/was that there were open servers anyone of his "friends/acqauntinces/hacker community" could login to. (I think is was more or less a lab-server open for anybody who wanted access).

I personally think it's more probable than not that he actually isn't the one who did the intrusion in this case (but he probably knows who did...), but who cares about facts or probable cause in Swedish courts (see TPB case) ;)

(Anyway, maybe it's good for him spend some time in prision, away from drugs.)

Shouldn't go to jail, but come on (2)

TheSkepticalOptimist (898384) | about a year ago | (#44060729)

I mean every message and statement on TPB is about freedom and such, but then they basically distribute access to copyrighted content. Freedom is not selective. People have a right to distribute content, but people also have a right to protect their content, period.

While you may not like copyright, its a law, and breaking the law is breaking the law.

I don't believe, however, that exposing links to protected material is the same as distributing copyright material. Going after TPB is the easy route, going after the millions of peers that actually have the protected content is impossible. Providing plans how to build a bomb is not the same as someone taking those plans and building a bomb with intent to use it, for instance.

However the the messaging of the TPB is watered down and idealistic. They want to be a mechanism to allow independents in music, video or other arts to have a mechanism to get content to the masses, which I wholeheartedly support, yet the primary and often only reason why people use TPB is to steal protected content. Why? Because its there.

TPB will not change the minds of billion dollar companies to remove copyright and freely distribute content, nor should they. If I spend $100 million to make a movie, and take the risk to release it, I expect a return on that investment and have the "freedom" to have the content protected. Just because its easy to steal digital content doesn't make it valid. If it was easy to steal cars it doesn't make it a valid argument that I should be allowed to steal cars then.

If TPB was serious about being a mechanism for content distribution for the "independent" then they should have changed their site long ago and blocked links to copyrighted content. I mean you can't be a champion for the independent when you don't respect people that also want to protect their investments.

The fight against DRM and copyright is NOT THE SAME as providing a resource for independent content distribution, nobody is blocking independent content distribution, just look at YouTube and Vimeo and Tumblr and Instagram and a slew of other social content channels.

TPB should switch to a streaming cloud service allowing independents to provide access to their content. Become the independent Netflix and Pandora and App or Game Store if they really believe in protecting the independent creator, but continuing to offer links to protected content and fighting for the rights of the independent is a mixed message and will only continue to cause them grief.

Is it a White collar Resort Prison? (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about a year ago | (#44061239)

Or a Federal pound me in the ass prison?

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