×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

127 comments

Why would you do this (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064201)

I thought we were trying to figure out how to keep sound from coming through the wall, not help it!

New NSA-Approved Building Code (5, Funny)

justthinkit (954982) | about 10 months ago | (#44064289)

New NSA-Approved Building Code

Re:New NSA-Approved Building Code (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064831)

I believe this building technique has already been used on my apartment building...

Re:New NSA-Approved Building Code (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065485)

The Japanese have been building this way for thousands of years and are only now, inadvertently, making walls with insulative properties.

Maybe this is why Kim sang about being so ronery.

Re:Why would you do this (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about 10 months ago | (#44064315)

People building a nursery may want something like this, or use in prisons to reduce privacy without removing all of it (not that they can't just put a mic on one side and a speaker on the other, as is done today).

Re:Why would you do this (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 10 months ago | (#44065737)

Doubtful, you'd have to replace the entire wall when you no longer wanted to hear through it. What's more, it would work both ways, which means that not only would you hear your baby, but your baby would hear whatever nasty stuff you're doing next door.

A baby monitor OTOH, can be carried from room to room as need be, and can only be heard in one direction. The main disadvantage would be the batteries or the possibility of eaves dropping.

Re:Why would you do this (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065917)

How nasty could it be? That baby was all up in that not too long ago.

Re:Wall replacement (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 10 months ago | (#44066147)

In my experience, the sound attenuates as you plug the holes. I prefer 90 minute mud.
It is truly amazing how sound blasts through a single, tiny hole.

Re:Why would you do this (4, Funny)

WillgasM (1646719) | about 10 months ago | (#44064387)

If only there was an article enumerating possible applications of this technology.

Re:Why would you do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065863)

how bout at gas stations for the box the clerk is in so they can actually here us?

Re:Why would you do this (4, Informative)

JustinOpinion (1246824) | about 10 months ago | (#44064627)

Well, TFA [insidescience.org] suggests:

The research has potential uses in creating security barriers that permit voice communication to pass through, and in developing types of sound-based microscopes that could find application in research laboratories and medical practice.

The scientific paper [aps.org] further notes:

Such a high concentration of acoustic energy into a small hole of radius enables sensitive detection of acoustic signals with subwavelength resolution ... the present work not only opens the way to the efficient realization of [near-field acoustics] in fluid ultrasonics and underwater acoustics, but also to the analogous realization in solid-state ultrasonics.

More broadly, results obtained for one kind of wave behavior often have implications for other kinds. I.e.: results in controlling acoustic waves sometimes have implications in controlling/sensing light-fields, or radio waves, or even more esoteric things like electron beams or neutron beams (which are also regulated by wave equations).

Thank god the research is finally paying off (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064205)

Fantastic, now we have walls that sound like they aren't even there. What's next, ovens that are just as hot on the outside as they are on the inside?

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (2)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 10 months ago | (#44064577)

Hey man, not all research is immediately useful, but can lead to other things. One day, this research might lead to better speakers that take up a whole wall. Or better acoustics in concert halls. Maybe even walls that allow not just sound to pass through, but people and light and everything else as well. They might call that last one "there is no wall here." How crazy would that be?

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (2)

Behrooz Amoozad (2831361) | about 10 months ago | (#44065093)

...but people and light and everything else as well.

Maybe it's just me, but I don't think thats a wall anymore.

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 10 months ago | (#44065285)

One day, this research might lead to better speakers that take up a whole wall.

Or more practically, the ability to have a nice surround sound system at home without speakers and wires popping out of the wall. No more compromising the audio because your significant other wanted to put something where the speaker is.

Or the ability to have huge ass speakers in the walls without disrupting the aesthetics of the room. You can bet more than one person was subject to buying Bose purely because their significant other objected to anything but the cute little speakers.

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (1)

Kingkaid (2751527) | about 10 months ago | (#44064593)

Not ovens silly. It will mean when you hear noise from the apartment next door you can say "Those are well engineer walls".

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 10 months ago | (#44064699)

I was going to say that they should study the walls in some of the apartments I lived in when I was younger, they appeared to amplify sounds passing through them.

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (1)

Falkentyne (760418) | about 10 months ago | (#44064743)

What's next, ovens that are just as hot on the outside as they are on the inside?

We already have that, it's called Arizona.

Source: Just moved here :(

Re:Thank god the research is finally paying off (2)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | about 10 months ago | (#44065021)

I lived for two years in Clearwater, FL near the gulf.
Hotter than hell, but everyone used to say "but there's always a nice breeze!"

I'm not sure how you call what feels like an open blast furnace "a nice breeze."

And in other news... (3, Informative)

RdeCourtney (2034578) | about 10 months ago | (#44064231)

Researchers find that by putting a glass to a wall, helps sound travel through rigid surfaces as well.

Re:And in other news... (3, Funny)

lxs (131946) | about 10 months ago | (#44064363)

It's like that very old joke: Earlier today researchers announced the invention of a device that makes it possible to see through brick walls. They have named this contraption a "window."

Re:And in other news... (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 10 months ago | (#44064405)

So this one, they'll name "passive speaker"? It's nothing more than a microphone and passive speaker in one, one side of the plastic wrap providing each of the two functions.

Wat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064233)

As a resident crotchedy old-man neighbor, who would ever want this?!

Re:Wat? (2)

Nutria (679911) | about 10 months ago | (#44064443)

who would ever want this?!

Each and every spy and law enforcement agency larger than the county sheriff.

I know who'd buy such technology (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064251)

This technology is going to be widely used by builders of apartments and condominium complexes. They are constantly striving to build thinner and thinner walls. This is going to revolutionize the industry.

As an apartment dweller (5, Funny)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 10 months ago | (#44064257)

It would be nice to use plastic wrap to make walls impenetrable by sounds of penetration.

Re:As an apartment dweller (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064317)

If it makes a sound, you're not doing it right.

Re:As an apartment dweller (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064757)

If it doesn't make a sound, you're not doing it right.

FTFY.

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064861)

> you're not doing it right.

FTFY

Re:As an apartment dweller (5, Funny)

master5o1 (1068594) | about 10 months ago | (#44064957)

If she doesn't make a sound, you're not doing it right.

FTFY.

Re:As an apartment dweller (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065399)

If she doesn't make a sound, you're not doing her right.

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

Mrreh (2882685) | about 10 months ago | (#44064323)

That's funny, I was thinking the exact same thing, what with the family of 5 elephants and their dog that moved in last month. Do your neighbors to heavy construction late at night too? Mine are also quite fond of turning on every faucet in their apartment at the same time and then banging on the pipes. Surely science can do something for us?

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#44064371)

Mine are also quite fond of turning on every faucet in their apartment at the same time and then banging on the pipes.

No doubt they believe the guy shoveling coal into the boiler downstairs has fallen asleep.

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

I'm New Around Here (1154723) | about 10 months ago | (#44064399)

That's funny, I was thinking the exact same thing, what with the family of 5 elephants and their dog that moved in last month. Do your neighbors to heavy construction late at night too? Mine are also quite fond of turning on every faucet in their apartment at the same time and then banging on the pipes.

Surely science can do something for us?

I think the pharmaceutical sciences have done enough for you for a while.

Go to bed, and let us know if you are still seeing pink elephants in the morning.

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

plover (150551) | about 10 months ago | (#44067347)

You had a family of elephants? Luxury. We had a tribe of howler monkeys move in next door, where they apparently rewarded their children's behavior of "squealing when excited", "shrieking when talking", and "screaming when unhappy". The only good to come out of the housing crisis was when they were foreclosed upon and moved out.

Re:As an apartment dweller (5, Informative)

judoguy (534886) | about 10 months ago | (#44064393)

There is vinyl sheeting for just this purpose.

Mass Loaded Vinyl [acousticalsolutions.com] is a sheet of heavy vinyl that is loosely hung to absorb sound. Usually hung in the wall between the drywall layers for appearance sake, would still work just fine tacked on the outside of the wall separating you from your noisy neighbors.

Of course, sound will travel through the ceiling and floor as well.

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065151)

Wow, expensive, and for something that weighs a crapload (1 pound per square foot, and the smallest/cheapest roll covers 68 square feet). You wouldn't easily be able to "hang" this or "tack it on" to the outside of an existing wall. Dropping this stuff down into an existing wall is usually not possible given the amount of reconstruction that would be warranted (e.g. having to cut large slits in the floor or roof (many MDUs lack crawlspace) or possibly the wall itself). This stuff is, as you state initially, meant to be put between the walls during construction -- which no landlord will ever consider doing, given its cost. A sad but true reality is that landlords are universally cheap bastards, and often ignorant -- for example my landlord believes that fibre glass insulation is a sufficient noise dampener (yes I actually had this conversation).

Economically it'd be a lot more effective if human beings (okay, maybe just Americans) were actually aware of what living in an MDU (multi-dwelling unit) requires: people who walk light-footed, do not play music loud, do not own preposterous home entertainment systems pushing insane decibel ratings, and who are without children (age does not matter -- babies are just as loud as toddlers, just in a different fashion). Or rephrased more simply: are respectful and aware of the fact they are living around other people and therefore think of how their actions/noise may affect those around them before doing so. (This is how I have operated/lived all my life, and of the 30-some MDUs I've lived in, landlords and tenants alike have always told me "You're as quiet as a mouse, we never know if you're home!" -- good, that's how it should be!).

And before someone says it -- because every Slashdot article I've seen that mentions apartment dwelling has it -- "So move", despite being a legitimate point, is not pragmatic. Some of us live in areas with MDUs built in the mid-1940s (with little to no renovation having occurred, i.e. electrical is still using a single 10A circuit, barring kitchen/bathroom which gets its own 15A), and aside from dropping US$900,000 on a house (which doesn't guarantee noise dampening either!), it just doesn't make financial sense. So please be realistic. :-)

Re:As an apartment dweller (2)

hubie (108345) | about 10 months ago | (#44065263)

Why do you think the rest of the world is quiet? I've stayed in some pretty noisy places outside of the US.

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

macraig (621737) | about 10 months ago | (#44064427)

I second that wish!

(I'm not an apartment dweller, but... I "own" a 2-story townhouse with a 2-story shared wall.)

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 10 months ago | (#44064909)

How is that any different than an apartment? Because you own a door to the outside?

Re:As an apartment dweller (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065005)

The delineation is because:

1) They share a single wall with their neighbours (while most apartments, barring the end units, share 2 or more walls -- not including floors/ceiling if multi-levelled),
2) They have nobody living above them or below them,
3) Townhouses are usually larger (in square footage offered), particularly if it's a duplex unit -- these are usually the equivalent of two small houses put together sharing a single wall.

Re:As an apartment dweller (2)

macraig (621737) | about 10 months ago | (#44066483)

A single common two-story wall is MUCH worse than any two single-story walls. You've never lived in that situation, or you'd already know why. All the impacts, vibration and resonance from the entire linked second floor subfloor is funneled into that wall, which acts like a giant subwoofer in response.

Actually I got off easy because I'm on the end of a four-dwelling structure: were I living in one of the two central dwellings, I'd have TWO shared two-story walls instead of just one.

Re:As an apartment dweller (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064683)

Just serve them an ASBO instead. That'll silence them.

Let's see them patent the drum all over again (4, Insightful)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#44064341)

Ok, build a bunch of drum heads into a wall and notice they act just like, well, drum heads.
Brilliant. An acoustic diaphragm. [wikipedia.org]

Can't think of a single use for this other than eves dropping where no electronics were allowed.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (3, Interesting)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 10 months ago | (#44064439)

Ok, build a bunch of drum heads into a wall and notice they act just like, well, drum heads.
Brilliant. An acoustic diaphragm. [wikipedia.org]

Can't think of a single use for this other than eves dropping where no electronics were allowed.

NSA Jokes, apartment sex jokes, etc. aside this is apparently a potential way to increase the precision of ultrasound scanning for medical diagnosis. As medical imaging is being used extensively to diagnose early cancer (among many other things), advances like this could have really profound effects on healthcare.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (3, Interesting)

archshade (1276436) | about 10 months ago | (#44065337)

There's also a use in controlled/clean rooms. You can already get some something similar, there called Talk-Throughs [terrauniversal.com] (not affiliated, just top google hit).

I am not sure if this technology has a benefit over the existing solution, but it may. Maybe just because it looks cool. There is also a section at the bottom of TFA that gives over uses.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (3, Informative)

sir-gold (949031) | about 10 months ago | (#44064453)

The important part isn't the membrane, it's the fact that the hole was smaller than the wavelength of the sound, which,according to conventional theories about wave propagation, should not have allowed any sound though, membrane or no membrane

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (1)

mdielmann (514750) | about 10 months ago | (#44065105)

So the theory is incorrect (more likely incomplete). That's good news for science - something else to think about for a few years!

I'd be unsurprised to learn that the reasons are due to air being a fluid, the holes being spread out over a large surface (similar to the enhanced resolution of a telescope array), and the holes being large enough for air to flow through. Compression waves in the air pass through the holes, propagate on the other side, and are amplified by the membrane. I guess I could read the article, but that would break tradition.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44066419)

So the theory is incorrect (more likely incomplete).

Or random Slashdotter's memory of the theory is incomplete. Waves can travel through subwavelength holes just fine, although there may be attenuation and/or diffraction issues depending on the geometry and thickness.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44066019)

The important part isn't the membrane, it's the fact that the hole was smaller than the wavelength of the sound, which,according to conventional theories about wave propagation, should not have allowed any sound though, membrane or no membrane

This works because the sheet converts sound into pressure waves... like y'know... a drum. It absolutely is the conventional theory as to what happens when you have small holes in an acoustical partition (with or without a membrane). See also: the acoustic baffles for the air conditioning in any professionally designed recording space.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (1)

Hatta (162192) | about 10 months ago | (#44064489)

Can't think of a single use for this other than eves dropping where no electronics were allowed.

It would be nice to be able to turn the stereo on in the living room and hear it from the kitchen without cranking the volume up to eleven.

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064827)

You must be single. I'm constantly in the dog house for having the stereo on while others are trying to sleep or just read a book. I don't want to imagine the grief I'd get if all the house's interior walls were transparent to sound. (Except the bathroom walls; nobody wants those sounds traveling through walls.)

Re:Let's see them patent the drum all over again (2)

jbengt (874751) | about 10 months ago | (#44066107)

Can't think of a single use for this other than eves dropping where no electronics were allowed.

Actually, this might be useful for the design of sound attenuators. Letting the sound out of a space (say an HVAC duct) into another in order to absorb it with heavy weight mineral wool or the like could be a common application. TFA didn't go into any details, though, so I don't know if this could be any improvement over what is already done. (It sure sounds similar to how a lot of silencer walls are already constructed)

Just discovered? (2)

Doug Otto (2821601) | about 10 months ago | (#44064343)

I think the bathroom across from my office has this "technology" already.

Re:Just discovered? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065847)

according to TFA, this research finally explains why the loudest fart sound is made when the anus is only open a tiny bit.

goatse.cx was always silent, you will recall.

Wrong problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064349)

Find a solution for walls that allow sound to get through. I can hear my neighbours fart from the other side of the apartment.

The should talk to my condo's builders (0)

adisakp (705706) | about 10 months ago | (#44064413)

Because those guys have making walls (and floors and ceilings) transparent to sound completely mastered.

Is it one way or bidirectional? (4, Interesting)

niftymitch (1625721) | about 10 months ago | (#44064435)

Is this trick bidirectional?

If it is mono-directional it has application as sound proofing.

If it is bidirectional then the listener can be heard doing what listeners do as well as the "target".

If regions could be made "transparent" then 3D audio precision might be possible.

Interesting.... but I am not going to dig holes in my walls.

I would expect (1)

azav (469988) | about 10 months ago | (#44064459)

I would expect that these walls are rather one way with the transmission of sound, as in a one way mirror.

But, by alternating the side of the holes that are covered with plastic wrap, we could then make these walls truly two way with regards to sound transmission.

Why with the meatball? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 10 months ago | (#44064545)

Slashdot has research from Japan flagged for some reason? I haven't noticed any other countries represented in flag form, for instance, the south korean flag too.

A team of Japanese and South Korean researchers has devised a means of making solid walls virtually transparent to sound.

Re:Why with the meatball? (1)

dido (9125) | about 10 months ago | (#44067065)

It's strange that articles here only seem to have one of those icons with them nowadays. I could remember a time when there were three or sometimes even four icons relevant to a story when you opened it up (e.g. Google and Microsoft icons for stories involving both companies). Wonder why that stopped.

It's backwards compatible (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about 10 months ago | (#44064597)

cd /usr/java#
ls
jdk1.5.0_22 jdk1.6.0_25 jdk1.7.0 jdk1.7.0_01 jdk1.7.0_05

I dont' see the big problem. It's really as simple as downloading a tar and changing java path.

So if you pit a hole in a wall.... (1, Insightful)

scorp1us (235526) | about 10 months ago | (#44064641)

The sound goes through. Oh this is such a break through! No one ever thought of this! No one would ever think that a hole might alter the optical properties as well? Well it does! You can see through a wall with holes in it! It's amazing!

Re:So if you pit a hole in a wall.... (1)

Zynder (2773551) | about 10 months ago | (#44065613)

The way you say that, you sound British. If so, you've got the usage wrong for Americans. A pit is a pit, not a hole. A pit has a bottom, a hole doesn't even though we often say things like a hole in the ground. That's a colloquial thing though. This is a scientific article so in the scientific sense, a pit has a bottom and a hole goes all the way through. You put a pit in the wall like a golf ball has and stretch plastic over it. What they have reinvented is a wall covered in musical drums.

And the downsides not mentioned. (5, Interesting)

queazocotal (915608) | about 10 months ago | (#44064645)

The 'walls' were thin sheets of metal - yes - this is an interesting breakthrough, but will not help much for thick walls.
The effect is strongly frequency dependant, and relies on tuned membranes.
It will not work for signals such as voice.

Or at least - it will not work as well as it would for tuned signals.
It is unclear if you can get a useful effect with a large number (say 50) of tuned membranes covering the voice band.
You can perhaps also do interesting novel things with tuning, if this is possible.
You can have a 'transparent' wall - that mutes certain tones - for example if you want to notch out a train whistle that goes past every day.

Audio prisms are another application that springs to mind.

Re:And the downsides not mentioned. (1)

jbengt (874751) | about 10 months ago | (#44066137)

The effect is strongly frequency dependant, and relies on tuned membranes

I was wondering about that. TFA left that out. If so, then it would more useful as a sort of filter, more than a device to reduce reverberation or increase transmission in general.

Transparency to wireless would be useful (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064661)

Actually, I'd be much more interested in how to make solid walls transparent to the frequencies used in 802.11b/g/n/ac transmission, particularly the higher frequencies that are more easily stopped by walls.

For example, if I drove a very long nail through a wall, could it serve as an antenna that would help propagate wireless from one side to the other?

Re:Transparency to wireless would be useful (1)

qwijibo (101731) | about 10 months ago | (#44064817)

If the nail is made of copper, insulated, run through the wall and connected to the external antenna port on the wireless device?

Re:Transparency to wireless would be useful (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065543)

If the nail is made of copper, insulated, run through the wall and connected to the external antenna port on the wireless device?

Unfortunately, my placement is such that I can't do that. Both antennas are on the opposite sides of the room from the wall.

So back to my original question: Would driving a nail through the wall help in my case? (In other words: 5 meters of air between the first antenna and the nail, and then another 5 meters of air between the other end of the nail and the second antenna. Would the nail help? Or would it be useless?)

in additional news... (2)

NikeHerc (694644) | about 10 months ago | (#44064687)

Researchers have devised a means of making sound transmit easily through rigid surfaces, including walls. The process relies on creating large holes in a wall. Researchers have discovered the large holes do not require that either side need be covered with plastic wrap, thus making the process more environmentally friendly.

Remove the wall (1)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 10 months ago | (#44064875)

So to get sound to go through walls what you do is remove a bunch of pieces of the wall. This is essentially a window, but instead of having it all in one chunk you spread out the area. BRILLIANT!!!

Breaking News! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44064887)

Punching holes through walls allows the sound to travel through them more freely!

Dynamic positional audio? (1)

Intropy (2009018) | about 10 months ago | (#44064889)

If you can quickly cycle the pinholes open and closed then you could put a speaker on the other side and dynamically control where the sound apparently originates.

Even newer discovery (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065037)

The scientists then found that by increasing the size of the holes and removing the plastic, sound could then be heard much more clearly.

Forgive me if this is obvious (2)

EmagGeek (574360) | about 10 months ago | (#44065085)

But, wouldn't it just be easier to put speakers in the other room and get on with your life?

Well, I guess maybe if you were in the room next door, and wanted to hear what was going on without the occupants knowing, you could use this method.

I get it now. Perfect for NSA spying ops.

Focusing sound waves (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065159)

> "If you focus sound to a spot much smaller than the wavelength," ...

Sonic Screwdriver anyone?

Yu2o Fail, It (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065273)

(7000+1400+700)*4 but I'd rather h3ar vitality. Like an later seen in 'You see, even since we made the everything else

How about walls that are transparent to wifi? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44065293)

Walls that are transparent to wifi would be most helpful inside my house, but not the outside walls.

More info... (3, Interesting)

slew (2918) | about 10 months ago | (#44065743)

Some complementary work done at UT-austin [blogspot.com]

Instead of a membrane matching the impedence of a "meta-material" made by punching regularly spaces in a wall [hokudai.ac.jp] (kind of like a meta-material drum), the UT-austin work describe holes made with a "meta-material" approach. Basically a hole with some transverse tubes cut a regular intervals to create resonances that change the effective impedance parameters allowing pretty much lossless transmission through the hole (kind of like a meta-material horn).

Not solid... (1)

Roogna (9643) | about 10 months ago | (#44066355)

So if you take a solid surface... and make it not solid, then things of appropriate size can pass through the holes? ...
Is this obvious science week or something?

"It is indeed astonishing," said physicist Oliver (1)

JimtownKelly (634785) | about 10 months ago | (#44067353)

Like transducers haven't been used in the history of mankind. Like ever. Acoustics is what acoustics is, dumbass.

Prior Art (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44067479)

I would like to cite the apartment I lived in my 2nd year away as prior art. In all seriousness, it would be cool if there was a way to toggle it. Sometimes you want to hear the stereo in the next room without cranking the volume. Sometimes you want quiet.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...