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QANTAS Wants To Monitor Frequent Flyers' Home Internet

timothy posted about a year ago | from the watching-you-from-below-and-above dept.

United States 163

An anonymous reader writes "Australian Airline QANTAS wants to monitor recording frequent flyers' home internet searching and surfing. QANTAS will pass the data to US marketing partner FreeCause who are not subject to Australian privacy laws. Meanwhile the Australian Attorney-General's Department has been secretly drafting new data retention laws to log Australians' web surfing. The government claims it needs these to fight crime, yet is ignoring corruption by its own public service."

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163 comments

Drooling Insanity (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075351)

The madness must stop.

It won't (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075527)

The madness must stop.

Over the next several decades - or maybe as soon as a several years, supposed "free" countries will chip away at their citizen's rights little by little always using "safety" and "security" as the excuse. And there will be plenty of dipshits who buy into it and will keep voting those politicians into office. Until one day, we will all be governed by a pseudo representative government.

Armed revolt? Ahahahahahaha! See, this time, that has been dealt with. While all the NRA members and others go and quit their jobs to fight the government with their AR-15s with the M4 conversion kits that they paid through the noses for, the banks will foreclose on their homes, their cash will be gone, and what do you think they are going to do for supplies - like ammo?

Reload? And where the fuck are they going to get the lead? Or the kits to clean their guns? Or the powder?

And, and bunch of yahoos who spend a day or so at the shooting range pinking away at targets will be no match for a trained army - or ATF agents who are putting down a home grown terrorist cell (That's what they'll be called in the news and you bet your asses that the NSA has got the NRAs member list!)

What the current President of the NRA doesn't realize is that in the beginning of the US' Revolutionary War, the English were mopping up the colonists because they were a trained army. If it weren't for the French, we'd be like Canada or Australia.

Re: It won't (0)

The Sad Nazgul (2803507) | about a year ago | (#44075597)

The US would be a lot better off it were more like Canada.

Re: It won't (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | about a year ago | (#44075755)

Let the US send about 50,000,000 people to Canada......they can use the diversity up north.

Re: It won't (1)

tokencode (1952944) | about a year ago | (#44075849)

I'm not sure about that, Canada just passed a law that can send masked individuals away for 10 years if they are part of an "unlawful gathering".

Re: It won't (1)

ahabswhale (1189519) | about a year ago | (#44076181)

Really? Last I checked, they were in on this whole spying thing along with several other US allies.

Re:It won't (0)

skegg (666571) | about a year ago | (#44075777)

Such a shame you don't know more history. All tyrannical regimes can be brought down.

Might take 50 years. Might take 200.

Don't ever lose hope.

Re: It won't (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076501)

I turn 50 this year. I can give it 20 years and then I'm going inside for some lemonade, and the rest of you protesters can just get off of my lawn.

Re: It won't (3, Interesting)

fnj (64210) | about a year ago | (#44076889)

Good for you, sonny. I haven't seen 50 in almost two decades. I'm never going to be freer than I am now; hell, I'm never going to be AS free as I am now, and that's not saying much; but mercifully I won't have to live with this regimented oppressive shit too much longer. Bunch of pussies.

At least I have my yesterday. I got to live in the most glorious period of the most glorious place on the earth.

Re:It won't (1)

phrackthat (2602661) | about a year ago | (#44076015)

Until one day, we will all be governed by a pseudo representative government.

As near as I can tell we already are - the latest Gallup poll says that only 10% of Americans have confidence in Congress and 80% think that Congress is doing serious damage to our country. Our government is anything but representative of the will of the people.

Re:It won't (1)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | about a year ago | (#44076957)

Is this the same populace of which about 50% don't care if their government spying on them?

But yeah, why do the civilized thing and vote for good representation when you can just wait around until it comes to violence?

Re:It won't (2)

Aryden (1872756) | about a year ago | (#44077051)

Because it doesn't matter who you vote for in general. The people that run are chosen for you by a select few. And if someone slips in there that they don't want, they'll just drop millions on attack ads and the newcomer will just go away. Also, have you actually seen our media in the last decade?

Re:It won't (3, Insightful)

Concerned Onlooker (473481) | about a year ago | (#44077059)

Stop voting for Republicans or Democrats. For the rest of your life if you have to. When enough people abandon ship either a new party will come into power or--more likely--one of the major two will change their tune to gather up more votes.

If it doesn't matter who you vote for then why are the Republicans falling all over themselves trying to get the Latino vote back?

Re:It won't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076127)

Thank you for making it painfully obvious you know fuck-all about firearms or their owners.

Re:It won't (1)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#44076559)

PRO TIP: Just because you can voice a dissenting opinion and you have 500 channels of television to choose form and more fast food joints than you can imagine doesn't make a country free. Just because you're not being forced to work in labor camps and you don't have to fear for your life if you say you don't like the president doesn't make your country "free".

Unfortunately, short of those things happening, we keep acting like we're the freest place on earth and we have nothing to worry about.

Re:It won't (1)

kermidge (2221646) | about a year ago | (#44076959)

Funny, that. It's been said that in the valley of the blind the one-eyed man is king; my reading is that he's the first one killed.

I wouldn't count on the NRA (5, Insightful)

L. J. Beauregard (111334) | about a year ago | (#44076629)

When tyranny comes to America, the NRA members will not be fighting the government. They will be at the rallies, waving flags and chanting slogans between the Sousa marches.

Re:It won't (4, Insightful)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#44076671)

we'd be like Canada or Australia.

You missed the bit where this imported prick running QANTAS is sending the data to the US to get around the stricter privacy laws in Australia.

Re:It won't (0)

afgam28 (48611) | about a year ago | (#44076765)

Offtopic much? The article is about an opt-in browser toolbar, not unlike the Google or MSN Toolbar. By using it you can earn frequent flyer points. But you don't have to use it, even if you are a Qantas Frequent Flyer member.

FYI, when people are talking about a browser toolbar, and you launch into a paranoid rant about "rights", "armed revolt", terrorists, the NRA and NSA, it makes you sound like a nutjob. This makes it harder to get people to listen to you later if you want to talk about real issues like PRISM.

Re:It won't (1)

fnj (64210) | about a year ago | (#44076923)

Every hour of every day is a good time to stand against tyranny and oppression. Granted it's not directly related to the particular story under discussion.

Re:It won't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44077065)

> Offtopic much? The article is about an opt-in browser toolbar, not unlike the Google or MSN Toolbar. By using it you can earn frequent flyer points. But you don't have to use it, even if you are a Qantas Frequent Flyer member.

If the click-to-install says this I will agree with you:

"Hello. Please click YES to install this toolbar. We will send all your data to an off-shore company. We do this because they can do things with your searches that wouldn't be allowed under Australian Law. To get the 150 points you have to do 150 searches PER MONTH. Most people don't do 150 searches a month so will get far less than the 150 points we have promised. The points are so piss-weak that you will have to use this thing for 35 years before you get your free flight to London and you'll still have to pay us a $1000 fuel surcharge and be routed through Alaska. Yes, this really happens. It would be cheaper and easier not to use our FF scheme which is just clever marketing and just book the flight at the time on the Internet. If none of this bothers you click YES.'

> FYI, when people are talking about a browser toolbar, and you launch into a paranoid rant about "rights", "armed revolt", terrorists, the NRA and NSA, it makes you sound like a nutjob. This makes it harder to get people to listen to you later if you want to talk about real issues like PRISM.

Doesn't mean we're not allowed to complain companies doing what the government is also doing.

Re:Drooling Insanity (2)

ozmanjusri (601766) | about a year ago | (#44076659)

The madness must stop.

Have you considered not installing the toolbar?

That way the madness doesn't start. Or if you have already installed it, you could, just maybe, uninstall it?

Qantas wants frequent flyers to install a toolbar on their web browser that records their internet searches and web browsing activity for "marketing targeted and relevant products, services and offers".

In return for surrendering personal search data, which Qantas will tie to its customers' frequent flyer membership, it plans to award users up to 150 Qantas frequent flyer points a month.

http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/consumer-security/qantas-toolbar-to-monitor-your-web-activity-20130621-2omfa.html [theage.com.au]

Aussies don't have free speech (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076761)

Aussies do not have free speech ""Some of us may presume that because we live in a liberal democracy like Australia, certain personal freedoms are a given "like free speech" Additionally, we presume that many Australians would be familiar with the US Constitution and specifically the First Amendment which states; "Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press", and we’re going to also guess (again for efficacy) that some people may believe that we here in Australia also enjoy a similar type of Constitutional protection: But do we? Well it must be said that Australia’s free speech laws are interesting to say the least...""

""First, let's get the easy part out of the way: Australia does not have an explicit First Amendment equivalent enshrining the protection of freedom of speech in our Constitution." http://www.findlaw.com.au/articles/4529/do-we-have-the-right-to-freedom-of-speech-in-austr.aspx [findlaw.com.au]

Talk to Aussies and you find they hate their government and think politicians are lying cheating scumbags with their snouts in the trough, but if you criticize them you can be charged by sedition laws by John Howard: "Sedition: An intention to effect any of the following purposes: (a) to bring the Sovereign into hatred or contempt; (b) to urge disaffection against the following: (i) the Constitution; (ii) the Government of the Commonwealth; (iii) either House of the Parliament;" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_sedition_law [wikipedia.org]

Not like these kind of laws are passed but not used. Albert Langer told the public how to vote on election day for a local candidate without having to give their vote to Labour or Liberal candidate in the end. The government jailed him. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_speech_by_country#Australia [wikipedia.org]

Re:Aussies don't have free speech (2)

fnj (64210) | about a year ago | (#44076937)

Not that many places do have guaranteed freedom of speech, and those like the US who OSTENSIBLY do (ha!) find that it is getting to be more and more of a joke. What they do is invent the crime of "hate", corrupt the courts to accept that absurdity of a concept as a valid legal principle, and characterize speech they don't like as "hate speech". Nobody is in "favor" of hate, right?

Anal probes for everyone! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075387)

It's for your safety ofcourse!

Worst Summary Ever (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075393)

Thanks Timothy for posting the most horribly written, inaccurate and misleading summary ever. You should be ashamed for this clickbait trolling. Anybody who reads the fucking article will see your summary has little connection to the truth.

No wonder slashdot is such a toilet bowl now.

Re:Worst Summary Ever (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075499)

And yet you can't be bothered to provide a better summary. Thanks for contributing to the toilet bowl.

Re: Worst Summary Ever (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075515)

just read the article

Jesus

Re: Worst Summary Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075605)

DUDE!!!! Hi Jesus, I've waited a long time to talk to you. I have some questions if you don't mind.

Re: Worst Summary Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076167)

AC: You're the worst
AC: No, you're the worst
AC: No, you're the worst

ad nauseum

Re: Worst Summary Ever (1)

fnj (64210) | about a year ago | (#44076965)

It's a vexing headline, isn't it, because of what it tells us about ourselves. Turns out it's accurate in a literal sense. Qantas DOES "want" the information for simple economic reasons, and they may be using a somewhat underhanded method of coaxing people to give it to them, but they are not really stealing it. Of course when we read the headline we see a picture of guys wearing trenchcoats skulking around in dark alleys peering at our lives through our windows, poring through our trash, and planting bugs.

Re:Worst Summary Ever (4, Informative)

retchdog (1319261) | about a year ago | (#44075673)

it's an optional toolbar which is, like the fruity oaty bar, NOT MANDATORY even for frequent fliers. you get a piddling amount of scrip in exchange for being logged. how much?

``A customer who uses the toolbar and never flies with Qantas would take 35 years to earn the 64,000 points required to fly from Sydney to London's Heathrow Airport."

Re:Worst Summary Ever (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076071)

ok, but how long do they have to wait until they can get the hell out of Brisbane and down to Melbourne?

Re:Worst Summary Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076669)

fly from Sydney to London's Heathrow Airport

Why would anyone want to fly from Sydney to London?

Ripoff (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076807)

``A customer who uses the toolbar and never flies with Qantas would take 35 years to earn the 64,000 points required to fly from Sydney to London's Heathrow Airport."

And they *STILL* have to pay a COUGH COUGH $1000 fuel surcharge. Qantas is partnering with Emirates anyway. In 35 years QANTAS probably won't exist. http://www.smh.com.au/news/opinion/frequent-fly-in-qantas-ointment/2008/02/03/1201973735201.html [smh.com.au]

Re:Worst Summary Ever (2)

Trax3001BBS (2368736) | about a year ago | (#44076815)

Big difference from Summery.

Qantas customers have the choice of installing the search tracker and are awarded up to
150 Qantas frequent flier points a month for doing so.

Summery makes it sound like Ubuntu's policy of sending all search results to Amazon to raise cash;
with no choice by users, nor reward of any sort.
http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/ubuntu-bakes-amazon-search-results-into-os-to-raise-cash/ [arstechnica.com]

Re:Worst Summary Ever (1)

retchdog (1319261) | about a year ago | (#44076869)

heh. well played, sir.

RTFA (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076795)

Instead of whining like a bitch RTFA. Frequent flyers can of course elect NOT to install the toolbar, but do you think QANTAS will tell people "BTW You don't have to install this" or have a big banner saying "we are sending your data to the US where we can raep it without being subject to Australian privacy laws?" If you read the fine print further you read you have to do 150 searches per month to get the full benefits. How many people do 150 searches a month anyway? Maybe slashdotters but not Grandma or Uncle Phil. Most people won't know and will install it without thinking about privacy implications which QANTAS circumvented anyway. That's hidden too. RTFA. LifeHacker said the scheme was a ripoff.

Re:Worst Summary Ever (0)

Gothmolly (148874) | about a year ago | (#44075917)

+1
Timothy sucks

Re:Worst Summary Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076321)

HUH! You mean that /. actually has weird or (snicker) misleading news ?

Re:Worst Summary Ever (2)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about a year ago | (#44076421)

What was inaccurate about it? It sounds to me like Qantas desires to track everything the users of this toolbar does and send it to a third party. Just like every other toolbar.

In 1999 a company cold-called me to ask me to sign up for some program to watch all internet use on my newfangled cable internet in return for cash. The telemarketer seemed genuinely confused when I laughed in her face, she said she really could not understand why someone would would have a problem having everything they do online tracked.

Re:Worst Summary Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076625)

Sounds like those aussie corporations have got a taste for selling information like every other dipshit corporation in the world, they're just showing up to that luncheon a bit late. Most likely by the time they get that information on their gullable flyers, some spine tingling, gut wrenching, audacious company will have beat them to the punch and under-cut them by half. Isn't that the way this shit works?

Re:Worst Summary Ever (2)

adolf (21054) | about a year ago | (#44076423)

No wonder slashdot is such a toilet bowl now.

Every community needs a toilet bowl. It keeps things sanitary.

What's weird about /. these days is that the toilet seems to be just inside of the front door, inviting any and all to shit in it. And it doesn't flush; indeed, it hasn't worked for quite some time.

So welcome to Slashdot. Watch your step.

Re:Worst Summary Ever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076483)

Thanks Timothy for posting the most horribly written, inaccurate and misleading summary ever. You should be ashamed for this clickbait trolling. Anybody who reads the fucking article will see your summary has little connection to the truth.

No wonder slashdot is such a toilet bowl now.

You are exactly right.

"... wants to monitor recording frequent flyers' home internet searching and surfing..."

What the hell is that supposed to mean? Broken English much?!

Yet this happens time and time again on Slashdot. Simple, basic, easy to spot and fix English grammar and spelling. Its not rocket science!
There is no quality control by the Editors, there has not been any for some time now...This is rookie stuff.

For how long have we been bitching at Slashdot Editorial staff for not doing their job, and doing basic, simple grammar and spelling checks in article summaries?

OP here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44077021)

'horribly written, inaccurate, misleading'. Oh grow the fuck up. I said they want to. I didn't say you have to give it to them. Of course you can fucking opt-out. That's the whole point of posting the story. QANTAS is a company. Companies can't make you do anything you don't want to, but they can foist sneaky schemes on unsuspecting customers who don't realize they are being taken for a ride. Whole point of posting the the story on /. is to warn other customers SO THEY CAN OPT-OUT. In your hysteria you missed it. Suggest you stop taking your mom's hormone replacement tablets and calm the fuck down.

You know ... (0)

PPH (736903) | about a year ago | (#44075403)

... if the NSA offered a custom search/tool bar, some people would install it. I mean, besides the one with the Google brand name on it.

Re:You know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076213)

If the NSA offered a tool bar that provided security from browser based attacks (which is a big cause of infected PCs), I'd be more than willing to use it.

Lets be real. The NSA isn't raiding Americans willy-nilly. There are no NSA based Ruby Ridges.

Instead, my Web server (with SELinux extensions) is protected by NSA based work, I get my computers synced from NIST based servers, and security guidelines from NIST/FISMA sites.

So, all and all, my security is improved by the NSA. If they want to read my E-mail and have their eyes burned out of their head by viewing the horror of the log of websites I visit, oh well.

Re: You know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076551)

But this isn't the NSA - it's Pan-Am.

Just another... (3, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about a year ago | (#44075427)

Just another way the West has fallen into tyranny. But yet, there is comparatively little outrage. The violations of liberty that King George III imposed on the American colonists were minor compared to the crimes that modern presidents have committed. But yet although there will be a posting on websites like /. and will be discussed by liberty-minded bloggers there will be no revolution, there will be no outrage. Isn't it odd how times have changed, when a minor (by today's standard) tax increase sparked a revolution but today's routine violation of individual sovereignty, violation of basic civil liberties and violation of basic economic liberties have created.... a couple of blog posts.

Re:Just another... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075603)

Tyranny? Huh? When was the last time you or a family member were pulled from your home without a warrant or just cause and beaten by any arm of the government? The West if far from the killing fields. Stop being so excessive with your rhetoric if you want to be taken seriously.

Re:Just another... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075691)

When was the last time you or a family member were pulled from your home without a warrant or just cause and beaten by any arm of the government?

That's not a prerequisite for tyranny, you know.

Re:Just another... (3, Interesting)

Darkness404 (1287218) | about a year ago | (#44075727)

It hasn't gotten to that (yet) and it didn't get to that point in the colonies, although there were sure some "isolated incidents" just like here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kathryn_Johnston_shooting , http://jonathanturley.org/2011/01/20/utah-police-execute-no-knock-warrant-on-home-and-shot-and-kill-man-holding-golf-club/ [jonathanturley.org] )

Colonial life under George III wasn't the "killing fields" but yet Americans look at that as tyranny but in 2013 it is much worse than 1776 and yet the west hasn't done anything about it.

Re:Just another... (1)

skegg (666571) | about a year ago | (#44075845)

in 2013 it is much worse than 1776 and yet the west hasn't done anything about it

Yet. You forgot to append 'yet'.

There are rumblings in the West, which will soon turn into the roars of the Arab Spring.

Just observe the abundance of postings here on /., on Twitter, Facebook. Weak at the moment, but it's just the start. Ranters can coalesce into action groups which, if they attain critical mass, can force the hands of politicians.

In Australia, the Greens (who traditionally support online freedoms) have steadily gained seats over the past 10 years. I expect this to continue, albeit at the same snail's pace. A good number of policies of the current Australian government were borne out of the necessity of Labor to acquire and retain the support of the Greens.

Re:Just another... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about a year ago | (#44075955)

in 2013 it is much worse than 1776 and yet the west hasn't done anything about it

Yet. You forgot to append 'yet'.

There are rumblings in the West, which will soon turn into the roars of the Arab Spring.

Just observe the abundance of postings here on /., on Twitter, Facebook. Weak at the moment, but it's just the start. Ranters can coalesce into action groups which, if they attain critical mass, can force the hands of politicians.

In Australia, the Greens (who traditionally support online freedoms) have steadily gained seats over the past 10 years. I expect this to continue, albeit at the same snail's pace. A good number of policies of the current Australian government were borne out of the necessity of Labor to acquire and retain the support of the Greens.

The NSA tipped me off on this gaffe, you can thank them.

Re:Just another... (2)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | about a year ago | (#44076417)

they (we as a whole) havent done anything about it because everyone is sitting at home, eating bon-bons, watching soap operas, jersey shore, dancing with the stars (while texting and playing on their other devices) and keeping up with kardashians without a care in the world about whats going on around them. Everyone will wake up tomorrow, go to work, mow the lawn, go shopping and pay bills and think about what other useless TV shows they will be watching without a care for anything else.

dont believe everything you dont read (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076839)

ar matey in australia they can take you without a warrant and they don't have to tell family or let you speak to a lawyer. police even have shoot to kill rights when they pick you up. all legit & no shit. how often has it happened? no one knows because the law say newspapers and tv cant report it when it does. http://www.smh.com.au/comment/action-on-inept-antiterror-laws-must-get-priority-20130520-2jwuk.html [smh.com.au] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Terrorism_Act_2005 [wikipedia.org] http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4691190.html [abc.net.au]

Re:Just another... (1)

NotSanguine (1917456) | about a year ago | (#44076951)

Tyranny? Huh? When was the last time you or a family member were pulled from your home without a warrant or just cause and beaten by any arm of the government? The West if far from the killing fields. Stop being so excessive with your rhetoric if you want to be taken seriously.

Umm...It happens all the time. Although not to me personally. Most likely because I'm not poor and black [nyclu.org] or mistakenly accosted [google.com] by jackbooted thugs.

Re:Just another... (2)

theskipper (461997) | about a year ago | (#44075893)

Excellent point, King George was infamous for forced toolbar installations. When the users didn't get the tea they were promised in exchange for the installing it, well, the rest is history.

Austrailian slaves deserve what they've made (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075451)

You've destroyed gun rights
You've destroyed free speech
You've destroyed the right against self incrimination

etc etc

If a one of you had any balls they could turn your country into a charnel house but you buffoons with molder along like the britsh wimpire until an external conqueror enslaves you AGAIN.

Re:Austrailian slaves deserve what they've made (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year ago | (#44076067)

If a one of you had any balls they could turn your country into a charnel house...

If you think that phrase has positive connotations, you are mistaken.

The more you tighten your grip (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075461)

the more we'll slip through your fingers.

Yay.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075479)

Oh goodie.. another toolbar - I have so much spare screen real estate left to use up, what else could it possibly be used for

Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075523)

1) I'm normally pretty shy, but, umm, if I had a VM, it would be okay with me to install the Airline Privacy-Invading Spyware Toolbar in a VM
2) I would then do nothing on the VM other than search for My Little Pony two or three times a day, probably in the early evening hours.
3) So that it looks like a trend and not just a rarity in the long tail, encourage other members of the Herd to do likewise
4) Smile, smile, smile when some overworked jackapple in the airline's marketing department, confused by this spike in the data, paints a rainbow on a Dash-8 because the data mining algorithm says that'll make it 20% cooler.

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075591)

Pervert.

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075801)

This seems already to have been done. [x-plane.org]

Also, QantasToolbar has logged your IP address to make sure that you'll never sit next to a minor on a plane again [reddit.com] .

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075889)

No, your web surfing history has nothing to do with airline policy.

It's simple: if you are male, the airline will not seat you next a minor.

Despite this being widely reported in the Australian media [smh.com.au] Australia's Sex Discrimination Commissioner Liz Broderick [twitter.com] hasn't done ANYTHING.

Wonder why?

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076219)

It's not just Qantas: it's also Virgin Australia, Air New Zealand, and British Airways.

There's even a Wikipedia page about this.

One might add that the children of Indigenous Peoples are 7.5 times more likely to be molested than non-Indigenous children, generally by persons of Indigenous culture and ancestry. It is clear that persons of Indigenous heritage should be separated from minors on airplanes. Why haven't the airlines on their own initiative, or the Government in the name of our precious children's safety, taken a stand against allowing the Indigenous to sit next to our children, since they have taken that courageous stand against men?

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076557)

Because the "Sex Discrimination Commissioner" is a woman, and this situation was about a man being discriminated against.

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076853)

What the ... check out your Sex Discrimination Commissioner's Twitter picture favorites:

https://twitter.com/LizBroderick/status/263077789442392064/photo/1 [twitter.com]

https://twitter.com/LizBroderick/status/263096340358238209/photo/1 [twitter.com]

She really has it in for men ...

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about a year ago | (#44076431)

This seems already to have been done. [x-plane.org]

Also, QantasToolbar has logged your IP address to make sure that you'll never sit next to a minor on a plane again [reddit.com] .

Hopefully with enough more searching they will not seat you on the same plane as a minor.

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (1)

Zontar The Mindless (9002) | about a year ago | (#44076085)

Smile, smile, smile when some overworked jackapple in the airline's marketing department, confused by this spike in the data, paints a rainbow on a Dash-8 because the data mining algorithm says that'll make it 20% cooler.

Why not? Last time I flew from Coffs Harbour to Sydney, it was aboard a Qantas Dash-8 that had been painted bright pink.

Re:Things To Do With VMs While I'm Bored (1)

ZorinLynx (31751) | about a year ago | (#44076117)

I don't even consider myself a brony anymore but I still nearly fell over LOLing at this. :)

Rip them off. (3, Informative)

godel_56 (1287256) | about a year ago | (#44075545)

I like the "sign up, use it once, than uninstall" to get your "free" 200 points option. That is, if you're already on their bonus point system. :-)

Re:Rip them off. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075621)

That is, if uninstalling really does uninstall, and doesn't leave some hidden 'service' running in the background. Never trust any 'free' download that you can't personally verify the code, or what it installs or where. Online Security 101

Re:Rip them off. (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | about a year ago | (#44075827)

Install to a vm, partition, or unused machine?

Re:Rip them off. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075793)

According to the article you should be able to sign up, install the toolbar on a browser you never use (*cough* IE *cough*), or even better in a VM, and accrue 150 points per month.

Re:Rip them off. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076295)

How is that ripping them off? Do you really think giving you 200 extra points is costing them anything? You still need to buy something from them before you can cash in your "free" points and they'll still make a nice profit off you. Go ahead, "rip them off," they love naive consumers like you.

nobody ever won a war with their customers (1)

Presto Vivace (882157) | about a year ago | (#44075553)

but that does not stop corporation from trying to be the first.

What can I say but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075573)

Eat Flaming Death, you Nosy Motherfuckers.

WikiLeaks Party (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075577)

As if it was required, this is yet another reason why I will be voting for the WikiLeaks Party in September (for Senate).

Re:WikiLeaks Party (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076571)

+1

Is this slashdot.au? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075649)

The mreo imarnprot qseuotin is, ocne the ierennt is mtnoiored into ulessssnes, waht anviternlae do we hvae taht wlil alolw us to look siht up or tlak to echatheor whttuoit teh NAS lsnnetiig in on wath wee'r syanig or rdeanig ovre oru sulodrehs?

What new technique can we use that won't matter if we're using it, that will assure us we're not being spied upon, and that using won't be deemed illegal? If what they're doing doesn't violate any civil liberties or constitutional guarantees, who's to say they won't demand laws be passed putting a camera in every machine, pointing at the user constantly, and at the keyboard, etc., because otherwise, people will break the law, and they won't know. They've basically come out and said their right to know what we're doing overrides our right to insist they can't know what we're doing. In other words, we're coming dangerously close to the day that the US government stops pretending to give a shit what we think. Enjoy the illusion of liberty while you can, oh sleeping people, your wake-up call draws nigh, and a RUDE awakening it will be.

OK Why not (2)

PsyMan (2702529) | about a year ago | (#44075729)

In the true manner of /. of course I did not RTFA but I can add that if any company needs my home surfing habits then why not, shirley they are entitled to it. I also think that starbucks should have full access to my webcam, McDonalds need to see the inside of my shed and Microsoft (notice I did not use a $ there) really need to know how much toilet tissue I get through every week. Next thing you will be telling me is that the tin foil manufacturers are keeping tabs on just how much I have wrapped around my noggin. (think its time for bed) NN NSA

With great data comes great leverage (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075745)

Well if you have a lot of data on politicians, you know their dirty secrets, you also know their opponents dirty secrets. There's a deal to be made there, and the law doesn't stop NSA/CIA from using that leverage for political ends [not that a law would stop General Alexander].

We've lost out democracies. We went to sleep woke up the next day and democracy has gone.

Look at this:
http://boingboing.net/2013/06/20/nsa-boss-wants-companies-to-be.html

"NSA boss wants companies to be immunized from liability if they follow illegal orders from the NSA"
He wants US Corps to follow the military orders and ignore Congressional Laws, cutting out the Judicial and Legislative branches of government. Not only that *HE*, General Alexander is asking for that, not Obama. Obama is really out of the loop here, he still quotes what the law says the NSA should be doing, not what the General has ordered it to do.

You have this already with the telco's. They obey the military, not the law. The law says interception can't target Americans, the military says targetting *everyone* is not targetting Americans. The telcos would normally challenge this BS, but they have immunity in exchange for competitive intelligence, so they don't.

Re:With great data comes great leverage (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076217)

We went to sleep woke up the next day and democracy has gone.

Punctuation mysteriously disappeared too!

what the internet needs: (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about a year ago | (#44075771)

*preface: I know you can't send data using entanglement. That isn't what this does. Coments along that bent aren't welcome.

Recently, experiments have shown that distance isn't a factor for entangled photons, nor is linear time. [sciencemag.org] This means that a small device for entangling a few photons with a similar device at a remote host, can permit immdiate knowledge of man in the middle attempts, if the entangled samples are used as a cryptographic feature.

Basically, it's just another IC that you add to the NIC. When two hosts wish to enter a secure communication, they begin asynchronous entanglement attempts to create a correlated, random data set on which to encode the data portion of their messages to and from each other. It may take several attempts to arrive at a handshake. Once the correlated random sample is generated, the entanglement is propogated locally in the chip(s) with additional quantum bits, which is how the encode/decode pad changes and stays synchronized with each datagram. A man in the middle will hear only noise.

In light of the NSA bullshit, and other insanity lately, there is a real and present need for a technology like this.

It won't fix the "I'm with stupid!" Problem of installing the quantas toolbar, but it would go a long way on curtailing omnipresent goverment espionage.

Re:what the internet needs: (1)

retchdog (1319261) | about a year ago | (#44075891)

this is quite off-topic, really, but anyway: standard crypto is more than enough for (almost?) all applications, at least for now. what we really need is more people using what we have already. moving right along...

the problem with your scheme is the "propogated locally" part; note e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-cloning_theorem [wikipedia.org] . but it doesn't need to be that hard.

if there is quantum comms but no quantum computer (or other magical crypto-breaking device), you can of course just use classical public-key crypto over a quantum channel to reap the mitm detection benefit as a bonus. easy.

if, however, your adversaries have a real quantum computer (with a lot of qubits), you need either a new, harder classical one-way function (factoring and elliptic curve are both poly-time on a QC), or a quantum key distribution scheme. the former is quite likely impossible, but there are a few of the latter, e.g. http://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0105032v2.pdf [arxiv.org]

Re:what the internet needs: (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | about a year ago | (#44075997)

I apologize for the highly tangental nature of the OP. It just bothers me greatly that there is such an omnipresent data collection and sieving aparatus actively at work, and that the support for companies to jump into that pool comes directly from governments lusting for such big data.

(Quantas represents a feast of big data for the AU govt, and just a court order away. It's outsourced costs in action! As such, they have exactly ZERO real motivation to tell quantas to go hump a stump, like they should be doing.)

Making it impossible for that big data collection to even happen on a scale that would be useful (you can't easily break encryption whe the key changes with each and every datagram in a genuinely random manner. This means attacks like rainbow tables and the like, or other technical faults in the encryption method itself won't reveal enough information to decode useful amounts of information, and the computational burdens of trying to process big data under those conditions would be too large, even for the NSA. Quantum keypairs represent *real* random one time pads for each and every datagram.) Removes the incentive the government has to allow private companies to be data aggregators like this.

In order for public adoption to take off for something like that, the secure transaction mode must be silent, and also be the default mode of operation, in addition to being ubiquitous. As long as "all data free and clear!" Is the industry default, encrypted data will always remain an outlier.

Re:what the internet needs: (1)

retchdog (1319261) | about a year ago | (#44076437)

note that although q1 and q4 are entangled outside of time, this is done by centrally preparing two pairs: (q1,q2) and (q3,q4), and measuring (q2,q3). it's not magic: the qubits do need to be transmitted in the first place, just like regular data (except of course the channel is a lot harder to construct, and error correction is more complex).

growing a one-time pad in the way you describe also requires a "one-way quantum function" which is not an obvious thing (sorry, haven't looked at qc in a while, but it seems very unlikely). anyway, ANY implementation of a protocol is vulnerable to technical faults.

and if the spy is inside your computer (as it increasingly is), no amount of crypto will help you.

i'm afraid the problem isn't technical. it's social.

Re:what the internet needs: (1)

dbIII (701233) | about a year ago | (#44076715)

Qantas represents a feast of big data for the AU govt, and just a court order away

The stuff is being sent to the USA so it's just an intelligence sharing request to the NSA away.

But they don't use computers to analyze the data. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075773)

Qantas uses a team of idiot savants do the actual statistical analysis. The team has shifts working around the clock, only stopping when "The People's Court" is on television. They definitely do things differently in Australia.

Why did this make me think of Israeli after hearin (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#44075901)

Why did this make me think of Israeli after hearing this?

Re:Why did this make me think of Israeli after hea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44075965)

I haven't the foggiest idea.

And it's not for lack of trying, mind you. I did my level best to look at this through every possible angle for the minute and a half it held my attention, but came up empty. Sorry, but I'm just not getting it. I even made a half-hearted attempt at coming up with a wordplay joke using "hava nagila", but couldn't think of anything one could "have" that would rhyme with "nagila" and relate to the story in the slightest.

It's just not my night.

Re:Why did this make me think of Israeli after hea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076379)

The only reason I can think of is that you are totally obsessed with an Israeli- and not just any Israeli, I'm guessing. No, a person of your obviously discriminating taste (I can tell because you have the word 'Dragon' in your name, and, I'm guessing, more than one dragon poorly tattooed somewhere, maybe near your barbed wire tattoo- but I digress) would only obsess over one of the top Israelis- none other than Netanyahu himself! Oh, it seems everything makes you think of him these days, as you playfully doodle his name in your thick-lined notebook and wistfully dream of the things you and him could do together...

Anyway, that is why this made you think of an Israeli. I hope this cleared a few things up for you, and resolves that lingering, questioning, yearning feeling that has been nagging you lately.

Middle Man Dialing Dollars (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076387)

US marketing partner FreeCause is sending the data it mines to NSA for $$$$$$.

Whats the big deal? (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | about a year ago | (#44076493)

Set up a sight with "death to <insert person in power here>" and write a worm that makes that everyone's home page. Once they realize everyone in Canada wants them dead they'll move. On second thought, they might move to the US. We don't need any more of those guys.

More IPs to add to the block list (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076695)

Anyone know the destination IPs or host names for these parasites?

This is NOT NEW. (5, Insightful)

upuv (1201447) | about a year ago | (#44076885)

Qantas has had a form of spyware for years. Over 7 years ago I saw it's first version. It was a horrible crash prone mess. It was a flight search bar with other value add addons. And yes it reported to the mother ship.

A lot of airlines did the same. So did package delivery companies.

I work rather closely with large companies that are deploying or have deployed improved analytics tools to track your every click. Big brother exists. An issue is it's not just one big brother.

Face book for example. Almost every single app is mining your account for information. Very use any of the facebook apps if you must use facebook. Only ever give the minimal amount of information. Remember you are the product.

If you are dumb enough to ever install a "toolbar" then you get what you asked for. There is no such thing as a free value addon. They will all cost you dearly.

Re:This is NOT NEW. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44076929)

Mod parent interesting. Not new perhaps but they are getting cleverer at doing it and the public are getting used to giving up their privacy.

If you are dumb enough to ever install a "toolbar" then you get what you asked for. There is no such thing as a free value addon. They will all cost you dearly.

Problem is most people are very privacy unaware and don't realize there is a cost with all these 'free' internet services. They just go 'wow free points' and not realize they will be earning far less than 150 points per months promised, or that the points accumulate so slowly most customers will never see any reward at all, or that their searches are being mined. Not only do we have QANTAS - a fricking airline who wants to know everything you are searching for - this but Google mounting a device for hipsters that films you minding your own business. These corps do stuff that governments would never dare do and they rely on consumer ignorance to do it.

Obvious solution (2)

dalias (1978986) | about a year ago | (#44076905)

Browsers need to remove support for toolbars and other features that cater to malware extensions, like they should have done 10 years ago.
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