Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

New Zealand ISP Offers "Global Mode" So Users Can Circumvent Geo-Restrictions

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the one-price-for-all dept.

The Internet 126

An anonymous reader writes "Many content sites restrict access from different markets or have variable pricing for downloads in different markets. New Zealand-based ISP Slingshot is now offering a 'global mode' that lets customers hide their location. This means they can access overseas online services that would normally be restricted to specific markets."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Hum interesting (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130453)

Seems like (N/U)SA needs to go there and free the shit out of them from that regime whatever they have. Do they also have oil?

Re:Hum interesting (2)

Zemran (3101) | about a year ago | (#44130551)

They have sheep and scenery, ooh, and the Lord of the Rings was filmed there. Nothing to liberate.

Re:Hum interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130611)

then they obviously are hiding WMD's

Re:Hum interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131661)

Weaponized sheep STDs are nearing the red line.

Re:Hum interesting (2)

shikaisi (1816846) | about a year ago | (#44133183)

then they obviously are hiding WMD's

Yes, they have pressure cookers in New Zealand. That proves it.

Re:Hum interesting (4, Funny)

Arancaytar (966377) | about a year ago | (#44130863)

Well then let's invade and catch this Osama Bin Sauron guy.

Re:Hum interesting (3, Funny)

mwvdlee (775178) | about a year ago | (#44131013)

It's not like Iraq, where you can just invade one country to catch a guy in different country which doesn't even share a border.
Osama Bin Sauron is actually in NZ, so they should probably invade Indonesia or Papua New Guinea, whichever has most fuel.

Re:Hum interesting (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131307)

It's not like Iraq, where you can just invade one country to catch a guy in different country which doesn't even share a border.

One does not simply invade New Zealand.

Re:Hum interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131683)

don't know why but http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdVHZwI8pcA

Re:Hum interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131669)

Well then let's invade and catch this Osama Bin Sauron guy.

You mean Kim Dotcom, and you've already done that.

Re: Hum interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131431)

NZ used to be known for sheep, but in the past decade or so they've switched to cattle.

Re: Hum interesting (1)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44130929)

Even the English don't want that useless country anymore

Re: Hum interesting (1)

ls671 (1122017) | about a year ago | (#44131031)

I'd write "even the Brits" or "even England".

Re:Hum interesting (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about a year ago | (#44131195)

I just can't believe that this company doesn't realize that this is a clear violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. You would have thought that the Kim Dotcom case would have made it clear to these people that New Zealand is under U.S. jurisdiction.

Re:Hum interesting (1)

Errol backfiring (1280012) | about a year ago | (#44131333)

Are people from the (N/U)SA called (N/U)SAns?

Re:Hum interesting (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about a year ago | (#44132299)

Do they also have oil?

Not that much, but THEY HAVE WATER! Move on this, quick!

Re:Hum interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44132405)

I agree. Its probably a trap, you use choose the ISP, next thing you know a full SWAT team is raiding your home and confiscating your computers.

More importantly (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130459)

this comment is not available in your country

Re:More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130575)

It is, it is, it is! ;)

Re:More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130619)

This comment is not available on mobile devices

Re:More importantly (1)

readingaccount (2909349) | about a year ago | (#44131247)

This comment is not available on your operating system.

Re:More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131029)

Dit commentaar is niet beschikbaar buiten Nederland.

Re:More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131963)

That's because of the mold contamination.

And that's the way it should be done (5, Insightful)

Parsiuk (2002994) | about a year ago | (#44130461)

There are no borders in the Internet. End of story.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (5, Funny)

Zemran (3101) | about a year ago | (#44130559)

... and the USA is the land of the free.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about a year ago | (#44130839)

Yes USA is the land of the free... but that doesn't apply to other countries lol

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | about a year ago | (#44130969)

Yes USA is the land of the free... but that doesn't apply to other countries lol

I checked this, but it turned out not to be true. The USA uses and makes plenty of non-free software still.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

nhat11 (1608159) | about a year ago | (#44131603)

I was just playing off Zemran comments.

Re: And that's the way it should be done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131405)

USA, the land of the free, and the home of the Whopper.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

readingaccount (2909349) | about a year ago | (#44131267)

and the USA is the land of the free.

Is it hilarious or sad that this comment is (currently) rated 5: Funny?

Re:And that's the way it should be done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131447)

Both, unfortunately.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131451)

Honestly, I'm suprised the the max score hasn't been kicked up to six just for this comment.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (2)

JustOK (667959) | about a year ago | (#44130651)

Then why do they have internet border routers?

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about a year ago | (#44132333)

Then why do they have internet border routers?

Ha ha. A funny.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130717)

http://borders.com would like to disagree.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

Titus Groan (2834723) | about a year ago | (#44130905)

explain BGP to me then.

Re: And that's the way it should be done (1)

dugancent (2616577) | about a year ago | (#44130917)

If a plug can be pulled to disconnect you, it has a border.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (4, Interesting)

six025 (714064) | about a year ago | (#44130953)

There are no borders in the Internet. End of story.

There are no borders, anywhere - END OF STORY. ... except those invented by "man" for the purposes of control, so why would the internet be any different? Because it's cyber? ;-)

Anyway, I agree with the premise that there should be no borders on the 'net so just playing the devils advocate here. And I also truly believe that borders between countries now cause more problems than they solve, but that's just an ideal not the reality, unfortunately.

Peace,
Andy.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131337)

because I patented "border on a computer" you insensitive clod!

Re:And that's the way it should be done (2)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year ago | (#44131859)

There are no borders, anywhere - END OF STORY

Except for oceans, great lakes, raging rivers, mountain ranges, ice sheets, impassible jungles & deserts and rivers of lava....

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131921)

... and for these we invented boats, kaltrops, airplanes, machetes, chaisaws, etc etc.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131941)

There shouldn't be borders. Or at least no documentation required to cross them.

Re:And that's the way it should be done (1)

Luke has no name (1423139) | about a year ago | (#44131987)

Why is "man" in quotes?

I'd be interested in hearing more about how you and your like-minded friends think the world would work without borders defining the legal codes to which a person is expected to adhere at any time.

If anything, I've pondered that internet routing should be changed to strongly prefer staying within a particular country's borders if the source and destination are in the same jurisdiction. Of course, if one wants to route through the world, tor/proxys are easy as pie, but the bulk of normal, direct traffic could be routed this way.

An example (1)

taniwha (70410) | about a year ago | (#44131519)

yes truly - for example I can't get the Daily Show here (in NZ) on cable or satellite ... but it's region blocked so I can't play it on their web site either - apparently the US thinks some things are just too funny, or maybe too close to the bone, for us to see

Re:An example (1)

JakartaDean (834076) | about a year ago | (#44131711)

That's interesting, I don't get the Daily Show over cable here in Indonesia either, but the online feed from comedy.com works just fine. I watched several episodes earlier today.

Re:An example (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44132605)

Look up the Mediahint browser addon. Lets you watch Hulu & Netfix as well

Re:An example (1)

ElementOfDestruction (2024308) | about a year ago | (#44133223)

You really think some US Government employee embargoed episodes of The Daily Show to New Zealand? I understand the great karma for America Hate but let's call a spade a spade, it's either not worth selling ads to you or your government restricts free speech.

hardly a new idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130489)

Another ISP in NZ was doing it first before pulling the plug recently this year.

Finally a good ISP service. (5, Insightful)

eddy (18759) | about a year ago | (#44130497)

Sound great. Wish my ISP had the same. All this 'free market' is bullshit when it's perverted with artificial region restrictions. Here's the REALITY of it straight out of my inbox:

This is an important announcement for our MYREGIONHERE users regarding pricing on the Green Man Gaming website. We are always reviewing our policies here and have decided to make a change that will help us deliver the value you expect from GMG. All MYREGIONHERE users will notice that prices on the Green Man Gaming website are now shown as GBP (£) instead of USD ($). Of course, this is a change and change doesn't suit everyone, but we hope that this will enable us to stay competitive and continue to serve your market diligently. Thanks for your continued support The GMG Team

Some times even if you can actually buy the product, you can't use it because there are further region checks down the line (e.g steam refusing out-of-region keys).

Re:Finally a good ISP service. (5, Interesting)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year ago | (#44130661)

My wife loves Sims. She bought Sims3 in the US before we moved out of the country. She later downloaded an expansion. The expansions are country coded. She had to return it, then buy it from a US server, lying about her address. It didn't do a location check on her IP, so she could download it, but she had to lie to access a computer service to buy it, so a felon she is, if anyone ever cared to prosecute that particular crime.

It's amazing how hard they made it to buy things. At least region coded players are gone (Even if the media is still player-coded), because there is no more PAL/NTSC with HDTV. I've never seen a TV, US or otherwise that couldn't play any HDMI source, even if not "proper" to the region. For all the ills of HDMI, I no longer have to look for PAL/NTSC when buying components to go with my mix of media. Though an Xbox will only play media of its region, even if my PAL Xbox works fine on my NTSC HDTV over HDMI, I must still buy PAL games. So any US-only release is out, and my Wii is US, so I have to buy mail-order from the US, ship it to a US address (none of the major media peddlers will sell out of the country), and have it re-shipped to get to me.

Games like World of Warcraft let you buy from anywhere and play like you are anywhere. Someone in the US can buy a Europe region game and play Europe servers.

Re:Finally a good ISP service. (0)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year ago | (#44131229)

My wife loves Sims. She bought Sims3 in the US before we moved out of the country. She later downloaded an expansion. The expansions are country coded. She had to return it, then buy it from a US server, lying about her address. It didn't do a location check on her IP, so she could download it, but she had to lie to access a computer service to buy it, so a felon she is, if anyone ever cared to prosecute that particular crime.

It's amazing how hard they made it to buy things.

No, that's only surprising. What's amazing is all the people who would rather become criminals than buy a game from someone who doesn't make them into one.

Re:Finally a good ISP service. (1)

Common Joe (2807741) | about a year ago | (#44133231)

At least region coded players are gone (Even if the media is still player-coded), because there is no more PAL/NTSC with HDTV.

I get what you're saying, but it's still a pain for me to watch TV. After living and collecting DVDs in America for over a decade, my wife and I moved to Germany. Needless to say, we didn't throw out our DVD collection. We asked about buying region-free players, but no one could guarantee us any kind of warranty for a reasonable price. I would cheaper to throw away a broken DVD player and get a new one. Obviously, my answer was "Screw that".

We now plug in an HDMI cable into one of laptops and play it on a TV. Not too bad. I still need to get a remote to work, though. I have a remote that worked with a program that worked for a few years in Windows XP, but we picked up new laptops when we got here and it won't work in Windows 8 and I don't feel like hunting down drivers that may or may not exists for a downgraded laptop. Anyway, it's still a pain in the neck because even though we use VLC, it either can take a long time to load up a DVD (sometimes over a minute) or it won't play at all. (Avengers is the guilty culprit.) I've had to resort to getting external DVD players and running Region 2 on the internal player and Region 1 on the external. (Avengers won't play the other way around.)

I hate DRM. I hate region encoding. I just want to watch TV when I want without ripping something, without downloading something, and without it costing an arm and leg. It would be nice if I didn't have to connect and disconnect my computer all the time too.

Re:Finally a good ISP service. (2)

TheDarkMaster (1292526) | about a year ago | (#44130907)

"Free market" is for big corps. For you and me, is feudalism 2.0

What is global mode? (5, Interesting)

A beautiful mind (821714) | about a year ago | (#44130539)

Is it some proxy? Is it a weirdly labeled block of IPv4 addresses? Is it some DNS level trickery?

Re:What is global mode? (5, Funny)

geekmux (1040042) | about a year ago | (#44130751)

Is it some proxy? Is it a weirdly labeled block of IPv4 addresses? Is it some DNS level trickery?

Yes, it is a proxy. It's got a rather odd name, you might have heard of it before.

They call it "PRISM".

Re:What is global mode? (1, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | about a year ago | (#44130807)

Err , proxys hide the location YOU'RE coming from , they don't hide their OWN location you flipping idiot.. The parent made a valid point - what is special about the IP addresses they're going to use that makes them "global"? And I suspect soon enough other sites will soon recognise them and flag them as NZ regardless.

Re:What is global mode? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130833)

The -1,Woosh moderation is so much needed on this site.

Re:What is global mode? (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about a year ago | (#44130869)

The -1,Woosh moderation is so much needed on this site.

Yes, apparently, since my post was made in complete jest.

Re:What is global mode? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131525)

Diagnostic => Sarcasm detector broken. Need part replacement.....

Kim Dotcom? (1, Interesting)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44130553)

Until they straighten out their misfeasance in the Kim Dotcom saga I have no business in NZ. AFAIK they are still an arm of the US DOJ.

Re:Kim Dotcom? (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about a year ago | (#44130803)

AFAIK they are still an arm of the US DOJ.

. . . and the US DOJ seems to be an arm of Hollywood . . .

Re:Kim Dotcom? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#44131545)

. . . and the US DOJ seems to be an arm of Hollywood . . .

With the rest being an arm of Wall Street.

Re:Kim Dotcom? (1)

Hypotensive (2836435) | about a year ago | (#44131471)

I'll see your misfeasance and raise you a deliberate disentendu on the part of all those who equate an entire nation with a tiny minority in power.

PIRACY! (2)

Alsee (515537) | about a year ago | (#44130565)

They are obviously promoting PIRACY, because paying the copyright-holder's requested price (possibly zero) to converse in one region while you're in a different region is blatantly THEFT.
Theft theft theft theft stealing theft theft theft burglary theft theft theft larceny theft theft rape theft.

-

Re:PIRACY! (3, Interesting)

fa2k (881632) | about a year ago | (#44130639)

I don't know if you're being sarcastic, but you're on to something. If we're talking streaming of entertainment, the people using this service are not actually breaking copyright in the US or NZ. They are not making a copy. They are however very likely breaking the terms of use of the service (though the streaming site could be relying 100 % on IP-blocking, and not have it written in their terms of use). As we know from whatshisname who downloaded papers from MIT, terms of use violations can be a felony in the US. Half-measures like this global mode seem stupid to me. The content owner insist on a legalistic, to the letter interpretation of copyright. If you're going to infringe on their copyiright (or ToS, etc) anyway, why not do it for free and download a torrent? Anyway, the streaming services should just correct their IP->country mapping, unless the NZ ISP uses some kind of shared VPNish IP space.

Re:PIRACY! (5, Insightful)

Caitlin Fitzsimmons (2966349) | about a year ago | (#44130793)

Except that national law on consumer rights trumps terms of use conditions. It's not just streaming. Another example might be buying songs from iTunes. Apple charges Australian customers more per song than US customers (and probably NZ customers too but I don't know the situation there). Apple has been asked to explain itself to an Australian Senate committee and the matter is not yet resolved. In the mean time, I don't think I'm breaking any law or moral code by maintaining a US iTunes account so that I don't have to pay higher prices. It's really no different to parallel imports of physical goods. I don't think I'm doing anything wrong by getting my friend in San Francisco to buy Clinique foundation and post it to me either. It costs twice as much in Australia for the exact same product. It is Clinique (and Apple) who are in the wrong here as far as I'm concerned.

Re:PIRACY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44132161)

As someone who has dealt with sending shit to Australia in a wholesale capacity it seems to be that it's Australia who are in the wrong. The importers try and get exclusivity agreements and charge outrageous markup to distributors within the country. Those distributors then markup and you're left with double the price on a product.

Re:PIRACY! (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about a year ago | (#44130985)

It is not just paid stuff. A lot of free streaming video is behind a country blocker.
And the ability to buy stuff\get sales\get lower prices.

Re:PIRACY! (1)

sjames (1099) | about a year ago | (#44131083)

At the same time, it could be that we simply need to ban some kinds of restrictions entirely and then people don't have to work around them. Perhaps the content provider isn't entitled to terms of use added on top of copyright.

If employers are free to offshore whatever they can (and often hide the fact), perhaps consumers are likewise entitled to cross borders at will (and hide the fact).

Re:PIRACY! (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about a year ago | (#44132533)

Theft theft theft theft stealing theft theft theft burglary theft theft theft larceny theft theft rape theft.

You forgot your META tags ;)

So how long until.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130567)

So how long until the sites that do this just change it to "If you aren't from country xyz or if you have your geo blocked you can't view this page?

Translations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130605)

It would be most useful to avoid worse-than-Google translations being forced down my throat.

But I hate that it seems like a plan to make NAT look good.

Region encoding is illegal in NZ (5, Informative)

Danious (202113) | about a year ago | (#44130613)

In NZ the Commerce Commission has long held that region encoding is illegal under NZ law. What that effectively means is that when you buy a DVD player in NZ it is already chipped by the manufacturer to play any region, and you can buy DVD's from any region and play them completely legally. Basically it's a necessary move by a country so small that we have to ride the coat-tails of other countries for content distribution.

Re:Region encoding is illegal in NZ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130707)

Actually region coding is highly illegal in most of the world, I believe even in the US. It is an artificial restraint on trade and price fixing, in fact it is criminal. Sadly no one is ever prosecuted for this.

Quite a few european countries do allow ignoring region coding and chipping players. Some countries requires all players to be chipped before selling them to consumers.

Re:Region encoding is illegal in NZ (2)

Caitlin Fitzsimmons (2966349) | about a year ago | (#44130749)

The former head of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Allan Fels, said that DVD region zoning was illegal in Australian law too. Unfortunately he was too busy dealing with Telstra's monopoly power in the telco industry to do anything about it.

Re:Region encoding is illegal in NZ (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about a year ago | (#44131183)

The former head of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, Allan Fels, said that DVD region zoning was illegal in Australian law too. Unfortunately he was too busy dealing with Telstra's monopoly power in the telco industry to do anything about it.

Really? I haven't seen a region locked DVD player since they first came out. Even my new Samsung Blu-ray player happily plays region 1 and 2 discs. The only region locking I've seen is on computer DVD drives and that I don't think have ever stopped any bored young geek.

Re:Region encoding is illegal in NZ (2)

symbolset (646467) | about a year ago | (#44130765)

NZ has held that whatever the US FBI wants, they get, regardless of NZ law. I'm not OK with that and I don't even live there.

Re:Region encoding is illegal in NZ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131647)

DVD player in NZ it is already chipped by the manufacturer to play any region

DVD players? Yes.

But almost all Blu-ray players sold in New Zealand are locked for Blu-ray regions and AFAIK all BD players not from Sony are sold locked for DVD regions too.

New Zealand was placed in the South American DVD zone so you can imagine how that worked out. The lack of DVD region locking in players was less to do with noble intentions than the fact that you couldn't use a locked DVD player to play alot of stuff.

They're able to get away with locking Blu-rays because there are only 2 zones (outside China where nobody uses BD anyway) and two thirds of discs are unlocked. However, many Blu-ray releases (such as those from Criterion) are region locked to the Americas without any proper Europe zone release meaning nobody in NZ can play them and a great deal of lost sales from Amazon.com.

It's the same kinds of story with all kinds of region locking for New Zealand.

Oh Hollywood! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130635)

http://hotair.com/archives/2013/06/27/hollywood-hey-this-obamacare-thing-is-going-to-be-pretty-costly-and-complicated-for-us/

        Three letters have been giving the payroll-services industry fits for several months now: ACA. That’s the semi-acronym for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, and it’s up to the payroll industry — which cuts checks to production workers and offers related financial services to TV and film studios — to help educate its clients on the rules before a good portion of the law kicks in Jan. 1.

        “It’s a morass of regulations and requirements, and everyone’s trying to figure out what their exposure is,” says Eric Belcher, president and CEO of Cast & Crew Entertainment Services. Adds Mark Goldstein, CEO of Entertainment Partners, which has held 16 seminars to help studios understand ACA: “It’s going to be a very big deal.”

        Determining the exact nature of the new laws has been difficult, given that many ACA terms have yet to be worked out. Hollywood productions, for instance, might find it irksome simply trying to categorize employees as full- or part-time, seasonal or variable, and it’s important that they get the classifications right lest they face hefty fines. “ACA is thousands of pages, and it wasn’t written with this industry in mind,” says Belcher.

In fairness, who could have possibly guessed that a top-down solution from Washington and thousands of pages of regulations would cause problems for businesses with unorthodox work schedules, scads of part-time, contract, union and non-union employees from different fields, and the need for flexibility?

So, what’s Hollywood doing about this problem? Gamely making sure they help the president live up to every unfounded promise he made, right? No, they’re acting rationally and pondering such strategies as, “running to foreign countries, given that ACA doesn’t apply to U.S. citizens working abroad.”

Trying to figure out if they can wrap productions within 90 days before the Obamacare coverage requirement kicks in:

        Some also say the number of production days in the U.S. are likely to be cut due to ACA because there’s a 90-day waiting period before productions must either pay a penalty or offer health insurance to full-time workers. That rule provides big incentives for a production to wrap in less than three months.

And, wondering if they can minimize their overhead by employing as few full-time workers as possible:

        Payroll firm Entertainment Partners has authored a 39-page report that includes 81 frequently asked questions. FAQ No. 7, for example, contains the seven steps to determine whether or not a production employs 50 full-time workers, which would trigger an “employer mandate” for health coverage. In a nutshell, if you’ve got about 40 employees who work 130 hours a month and an additional 20 who work 65 hours monthly, you’re probably subject to the mandate.

I have a feeling this is headed the direction of the New York gun-control legislation, which found a surprising, hilariously hypocritical critic after its passage— in Hollywood:

        ALBANY — The sweeping gun control measure signed by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and hailed by Democratic leaders has a surprising critic: Hollywood.

        Officials in the movie and television industry say the new laws could prevent them from using the lifelike assault weapons and high-capacity magazines that they have employed in shows like “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” and films like “The Dark Knight Rises.”

        Twenty-seven film and television projects, including programs like “Blue Bloods” and “Person of Interest,” are now in production in New York State using assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, according to the Motion Picture Association of America. Industry workers say that they need to use real weapons for verisimilitude, that it would be impractical to try to manufacture fake weapons that could fire blanks, and that the entertainment industry should not be penalized accidentally by a law intended as a response to mass shootings.

Well, we certainly wouldn’t want any law-abiding citizens with no intent to kill anyone “penalized accidentally by a law intended as a response to mass shootings.” So, in New York, you have the ludicrous display of the industry responsible for more gun porn than the entire NRA, whose big players happily smear the rest of the country’s law-abiding gun owners as murderers, asking for an exception to the rule many of them lobbied for so they can continue to make gun porn.

I expect to see the same on Obamacare. A bunch of good-looking, rich people to whom backing Obamacare gives a thrill of moral superiority will tell the rest of us we should embrace the law because it’s good, you see. Then, all their production companies will find exceptions to the law because they don’t want to be “accidentally penalized by a law intended” to help the little people. And, then Alec Baldwin will take millions to shill for Capital One, and the beat goes on.

good for them! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130761)

absolutely nothing wrong about that. big deal. no different than if someone set up a cheap vps to proxy their own traffic... just an easier way to access a similar setup. neither the isp, nor their customers, should NOT come under any sort of fire or scrutiny for this service.

won't help with audible (2)

0111 1110 (518466) | about a year ago | (#44130783)

It's really frustrating when I can't legally purchase an audio book because of my physical location. I think audible.com and audible.co.uk use credit card numbers and credit card billing addresses in addition to IP addresses so the fascist publishers won't be fooled by this sort of thing unfortunately.

Re:won't help with audible (1)

Kvan (30429) | about a year ago | (#44130861)

In many cases though, the automated credit card processing doesn't actually check the address. I'm not sure if its my bank that doesn't offer the service to payment processors or what, but I can generally provide arbitrary billing addresses and have them accepted with no ill effects.

Re:won't help with audible (5, Insightful)

Merls the Sneaky (1031058) | about a year ago | (#44130965)

If they won't sell it to you, pirate it. That's obviously what they want you to do.

Re:won't help with audible (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about a year ago | (#44132583)

If they won't sell it to you, pirate it. That's obviously what they want you to do.

You know, this is the comment that has made the most logical and monetary sense that I have read today. People (read: people/their corporate holding companies/resellers) basically put themselves in a position where piracy is the only way something is feasible.

Not counting people who are just leeches and don't want to but anything, ever, this is an excellent representation of the self-fulfilling prophecy hard at work.

New Zealand. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130883)

Leading the world again.

Good for International Travel (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44130913)

I'm currently on international travel and can't get Netflix in the hotel I'm at, even though I've been a valid paying US customer for over 7 years. "Netflix is not available in your location". Found a VPN proxy solution which works for a nominal fee per month. Glad to see an ISP offering a new feature directly to their customers, rather than pocketing it.

When will they be opening services in Texas? (1)

intermodal (534361) | about a year ago | (#44131485)

I'm in.

Problem: Geo-coded Ads (2)

coinreturn (617535) | about a year ago | (#44131509)

But how am I to get the correct geo-coded ads? I'll be disappointed when the ad says "Meet single ladies in $fakeregion," if $fakeregion isn't where I'm sitting.

Re:Problem: Geo-coded Ads (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about a year ago | (#44132615)

But how am I to get the correct geo-coded ads? I'll be disappointed when the ad says "Meet single ladies in $fakeregion," if $fakeregion isn't where I'm sitting.

Worry not, my friend!

IE 10.2 will have location information included as part of every request as a required element. If it's missing, you'll get an HTTP 400. ;)

Re:Problem: Geo-coded Ads (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44133123)

Have to: https://xkcd.com/713/

LOL ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about a year ago | (#44131529)

So, you're going to help them commit a 'crime' by circumventing the TOS of a site which says you're not allowed to access it?

I fully expect a trade delegation to make their displeasure known ... you can't have Kiwis buying songs only intended for Americans or not paying the jacked up prices they expect to receive.

They may have to push for regime change. ;-)

Canadian Netflix sucks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44131667)

There are a LOT of people in Canada that use proxies to connect to Netflix as if using a US account. This is simply because the Canadian version of Netflix sucks! Another one that gets me is that you can not use iHeart Radio in Canada either (without using a proxi). This is even though that I can pick up a lot of the stations from where I live especially at night time.

That's great (1)

HalAtWork (926717) | about a year ago | (#44131907)

That's how the internet is supposed to work. It's the INTERnet, not the localnet.

BBC iPlayer for the large UK ex-pat pop of NZ (2)

seoras (147590) | about a year ago | (#44132113)

I've lived in NZ and hope to return to living there at some point. I'm from the UK.
One thing I missed while living there was the BBC iPlayer service (or maybe not ;) ).
If I had an ISP in NZ who could give me a UK IP Address I'd be laughing all the way to my TV/Laptop.
I'm sure there's other reasons why you might want to cover up your from NZ (Mr Dotcom!) but this is the best one I can think of.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?