Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ask Slashdot: How Will You Update Your Technical Skills Inventory This Summer?

Soulskill posted about a year ago | from the underwater-basketweaving-using-node.js dept.

Programming 208

Proudrooster writes "As technologists, developers, and programmers it is essential to keep moving forward as technology advances so that we do not find ourselves pigeonholed, irrelevant, or worse, unemployed. If you had to choose a new technology skill to add to your personal inventory this summer, what would it be and why? Also, where would you look for the best online training (iTunesU, Lynda.com)? The technologies that immediately jump out as useful to me are HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX. How about you?"

cancel ×

208 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

AJAX is too bulky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137805)

BSON is the way to go.

Re:AJAX is too bulky (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44138101)

BSON is the way to go.

I've always wanted to write my own programming language, if for no reason other than to give it a vulgar name... maybe COXUX or something like that... probably a good thing I chose a different path, eh?

Re:AJAX is too bulky (2)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year ago | (#44138495)

Gonna be hard to beat this one [wikipedia.org] ...

Re:AJAX is too bulky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138553)

I dunno, how do you fancy writing in SHITCUNT?

Re:AJAX is too bulky (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138719)

Most programming languages have been called that at some point.

Marketing babble galore (5, Insightful)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about a year ago | (#44137811)

This Ask Slashdot sponsored by: Dice.com.

Re:Marketing babble galore (1)

14erCleaner (745600) | about a year ago | (#44137995)

Isn't it AC#AX now that Java is in its death throes?




{cue the outraged Javascript fans to tell me Java != Javascript...too bad...}

Re:Marketing babble galore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138279)

...no.

Re:Marketing babble galore (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44138355)

This Ask Slashdot sponsored by: Dice.com.

Because stale, obsolete, rusty skills are the way to a solid future. Probably handling solid waste, that is.

Re:Marketing babble galore (1)

murdocj (543661) | about a year ago | (#44138657)

Because constantly switching platforms, environments, and languages because "that's what the cool kids use" is a great way to need those hot new skills when your project sinks under a mass of half written, non-working code in 5 different frameworks.

Re:Marketing babble galore (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about a year ago | (#44138727)

So, the only two change models you see are static and profligate? I'm thinking there might be something in-between. Besides which, project management can be a useful discipline.

.

Re:Marketing babble galore (2)

murdocj (543661) | about a year ago | (#44138805)

I'm a fan of the middle ground myself. But because I've been working in Ruby on Rails I see way too much "omg you gotta switch to this cool new tech which is a little more obscure and slightly less functional and certainly less reliable than what it replaces, but wow, it's new!!!!"

So I've gotten a bit jaded.

Re:Marketing babble galore (1)

sconeu (64226) | about a year ago | (#44138591)

Actually, Lynda.com.

And apparently the "Disable Advertising" checkbox doesn't work, because this binspam story still shows up on the front page.

frist psot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137813)

frist psot

Summer of COBOL (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137825)

Why are skills in ALL CAPS?

So managers can ignore them better.

AJAX? (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about a year ago | (#44137831)

It's a JSON world baby. I'm learning flash myself, it's the COBOL of the future, niche knowledge for the win.

no formal training (2)

X10 (186866) | about a year ago | (#44137837)

I don't do formal trainings, not any more. I'm happy with my focus on Android, but if I'd want to switch to other technologies, I'd download the tools and read the docs on the web. Same as I did for Android.

Re:no formal training (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44138117)

I don't do formal trainings, not any more. I'm happy with my focus on Android, but if I'd want to switch to other technologies, I'd download the tools and read the docs on the web. Same as I did for Android.

Any good (and preferably free as in "don't cost money") docs you can recommend? I've been wanting to do some stuff with Android, but coding has never been my forte.

Re:no formal training (1)

X10 (186866) | about a year ago | (#44138167)

Any good (and preferably free as in "don't cost money") docs you can recommend? I've been wanting to do some stuff with Android, but coding has never been my forte.

If you have to ask this question, you should stick to formal training.

Re:no formal training (3, Insightful)

White Flame (1074973) | about a year ago | (#44138271)

People learn new platforms via reference materials, which brings existing programmers into their realm. This is especially true with Android, since it builds off of Java and to a lesser extent from the user & app-programmer perspective, Linux.

Learning to program, however, is a separate skill. I'd suggest learning Java, then applying what you've learned to Android. If you're good at learning on your own, then go straight into Android programming examples from Google's materials and learn both at the same time, sussing out any weird language understandings with Java references.

spam? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137855)

This story submission feels like spam for lynda.com.

HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (4, Informative)

Ignacio (1465) | about a year ago | (#44137861)

Those are not skills for this summer, those are skills for several summers ago.

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (1)

GreyLurk (35139) | about a year ago | (#44137889)

*shrug* my current plan is actually to spend some quality time figuring out how to use Ruby this summer. Though to be fair, I'm skipping Rails and going straight to Sinatra.

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138345)

Ruby and Sinatra are a great combo.

I'm using them myself, to wrap / webify Unix commands, wrap / webify Windows PowerShell commands, handle template-/data- driven websites, and to host JSON web services.

On the browser side, I've recently started using Google's AngularJS with Twitter's Bootstrap, and using its super-easy JSON stuff to talk back and forth to Sinatra.

It's so easy to build stuff and to interact this way, via AJAX / JSON / REST calls.

As for databases, I've recently started using the OrientDB multi-mode database. It's a NoSQL database that does SQL / JSON REST / Tinkerpop / Document / Graph / Key-Value / Schema- (full|mixed|less) data.

OrientDB's JSON REST mode works very nicely with Sinatra and AngularJS.

Re: HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138371)

I wouldn't call that skipping rails

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (2)

rthille (8526) | about a year ago | (#44138439)

Ruby **shudder**

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (1)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | about a year ago | (#44138011)

>> Those are not skills for this summer, those are skills for several summers ago.

Heh. Wish I had mod points today. Can anyone else speculate on why these would be "skills for summer" anyway?

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (2)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | about a year ago | (#44138033)

Because lynda.com just happens to sell online course videos for those specific topics at $25/month?

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (2)

arth1 (260657) | about a year ago | (#44138285)

Yeah, technical skills for the summer is more like how to dig a good pit barbecue, or how to remove a swimsuit with no hands.

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (2)

sexconker (1179573) | about a year ago | (#44138281)

Those are not skills for this summer, those are skills for several summers ago.

And they are skills for some monkey slave. The trick with programming is that a competent programmer with access to the internet should be able to pick up a language they've never even heard of as they go.

Need to do X in language Y? Google.com. How to do X in Y. Read. Learn. Do.
Code monkeys may be able to read and do by copying, but they generally won't learn unless they spend an ungodly amount of time and effort on rote bullshit (i.e., formal certifications).
It's the application and business logic, external considerations, and the people that dictate them that are hard. If you have access to the internet, the language is the least of your worries as a programmer.

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (1)

mariox19 (632969) | about a year ago | (#44138677)

Where I work, the he-man programmers there, once upon a time, took the program they wrote in C, and reinvented it in Visual Basic, unthinkingly porting every C idiom and programming convention they knew and even reinventing the built-in event loop for the GUI. They then took their Visual Basic product, years later, and redid it in .NET, writing classes 10,000 lines long and preferring their home brewed, fragile and buggy libraries, to Microsoft's framework. Sorry, but to my mind, the "monkeys" are the ones who given a nail gun would hold it like a rock and pound in nails by hand. I don't buy your "Just-Google-the-syntax-like-any-real-programmer" ethic. I'll take the books and tutorials by industry leaders any day.

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (4, Interesting)

mysidia (191772) | about a year ago | (#44138367)

Those are not skills for this summer, those are skills for several summers ago.

Agreed...

Learn yourself some HTML6, haXe, Zimbu, Opa, F#, Rails 4.0 (released a few days ago), CoffeeScript, Google Dart, Ceylon, , Django 1.5, MS Excel, 'R', Dao,Hadoop, MongoDB, C# 4.0, Python 3,

Not. More seriously: go buy some books on cooking, and learn that, or find some other hobby that fancies you -- maybe remotely leveraging skills from your technical job, maybe not. Learn some new hobbies -- have fun; concentrate on gratitude. Happy people are more successful. Don't worry about competing with other people for "knowledge of the latest fad".

Try to figure out which worldly subject is important, but that you know the least about -- read a book or two on it. To have depth of knowledge; reading a book isn't good enough, you need lots of experience to learn -- if you don't do a lot of programming in the language, you won't learn it very well.

On the other hand, you can expand breadth of knowledge into other subjects such as History or Art, by reading, and doing a little ---- the weaker you are in a subject, the easier it is to learn a meaningful amount

The fewer subjects you are that weak in.... well, the more global intelligence you will have :)

Re:HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44138503)

That is very insightful. I concur. Heck, I'd even say that if you want to try something new in bed with your significant other, even that's worthwhile. Good sex life often translates to less grumpiness and more productive office life ;)

Vodka mostly (5, Funny)

decipher_saint (72686) | about a year ago | (#44137863)

to kill off the slow brain cells that are holding me back from synergizing my knowledge of vertically integrated mobile platforms in local cloud-based content management system datafication.

Re:Vodka mostly (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44138123)

to kill off the slow brain cells that are holding me back from synergizing my knowledge of vertically integrated mobile platforms in local cloud-based content management system datafication.

Lemme guess... middle management.

Re:Vodka mostly (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138435)

no way man. with buzzword skilz like that, he has to be upper management.

What? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137879)

Everyone should know at least HTML5 or stay off the web.

The underlying Javascript isn't quite as critical to know.

Using XCode and learning OBJC is useful if you want to develop iOS apps

Other than that, not irrelevant.

Re:What? (3)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44138155)

Other than that, not irrelevant.

Lol, damn but do I love it when some high-and-mighty know-it-all makes such a novice mistake...

Re:What? (1)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year ago | (#44138547)

Everyone should know at least HTML5 or stay off the web.

That the one with the blink tag?

Node.JS (2)

xyzio (1470567) | about a year ago | (#44137881)

I'll be learning the latest and greatest hotness - Node.JS. Watch me create jaw dropping, brilliant code on both sides of the request transaction. Meow. Latest and greatest? Yes, of course! http://developers.slashdot.org/story/13/06/27/1733243/nodejs-and-mongodb-turning-javascript-into-a-full-stack-language [slashdot.org]

Java (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137911)

So I can mod Minecraft.

C# (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44138507)

So I can mod Kerbal Space Program :)

Huh? (-1)

Desler (1608317) | about a year ago | (#44137915)

The technologies that immediately jump out as useful to me are HTML5, XCODE, and AJAX.

So the skill to learn this summer are: a 5 year old draft of HTML, a 12 year old IDE and 14 year old web technologies? If you are a web dev and don't know either HTML5 or AJAX at this point you already ARE irrelevant. Learning Xcode at this point puts you about 5 years behind for iOS development (which I assume is your point since learning an IDE in and of itself is not particularly useful).

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138127)

So the skill to learn this summer are: a 5 year old draft of HTML, a 12 year old IDE and 14 year old web technologies?

Don't be silly. Scrap the HTML, but the others might be worth a look; they'll almost have got to a workable state by now..

Re:Huh? (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44138515)

So obviously people who are only now starting iOS development are irrelevant, according to you. The fuck?!

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138577)

So, under your logic, if you don't know something and someone else already does, you are irrelevant? Right. So anyone learning anything new sounds pretty pointless then, huh?

The "age" of a standard, language, or IDE has nothing to do with its usefulness, that's idiotic. How does learning something that has been out for a while put you "behind"? Is it some sort of head-to-head race by all million or so iOS developers to create one app?

And obviously by Xcode he meant iOS app development, your pedantry doesn't help the discussion either.

re: Huh? (2)

Proudrooster (580120) | about a year ago | (#44138709)

Yes, that is about the size of it. I am still a command line, C, HTML/CSS, JSON, Javascript, PERL, PHP, SQL, backend database, Linux type of developer. I see apps taking over the web on tablets both native and in HTML5. I realize there is still a huge base for this stuff, but I wanted to fast forward 10 years. It was a sincere question not an advertisement for Dice.com or Lynda.com as others have suggested.

Can I haz updated skill set? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137917)

While I bitch and moan about how I can't find a job?

i need to learn BASIC (0)

demoncleaner925 (2718229) | about a year ago | (#44137925)

tieping sckills!

juglling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137929)

two balls

Re:juglling (1, Funny)

techno-vampire (666512) | about a year ago | (#44138019)

Are you sure your boyfriend will trust you that much?

Re:juglling (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138085)

wasn't planning on telling him, but 4 would be nice

starcraft, fools! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137931)

I'm gonna play some broodwar, to work on my micro.

Def Leppard and OS/2 Warp (0)

martiniturbide (1203660) | about a year ago | (#44137953)

I'm going to try to compile at least one WorkplaceShell Class.

Depends on your field, of course . . . (1)

Kimomaru (2579489) | about a year ago | (#44137977)

I'll be using the summer expanding my knowledge with Debian, an Os that won me over on its own as well as with with some awesome variants in the micro-computing scene. Will hopefully spend some time building a Cubieboard cluster and will also be trying out Asterisk.

Type Theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44137987)

Writing certified programs in Coq. Once I finally finish wrapping my head around all of the Curry-Howard correspondence between proofs and programs either I can tell the people who urge you to use a "safe" language to go stuff it because no safe language in the world will work, or I can stop writing tests and write proofs instead and not have to worry about hackers finding crazy corner cases in my code.

Re:Type Theory (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44138533)

That's not yet very practical, although certainly worth learning just to expand your horizons. You need a proven-safe compiler as well, and those are few and far between. You'll find that the name of Xavier Leroy pops up a whole lot :)

PI (1)

zeldor (180716) | about a year ago | (#44138001)

for me its the summer of PI. raspberry and arduino projects and general amusement.

Re:PI (1)

Proudrooster (580120) | about a year ago | (#44138717)

I did Arduino last summer. Controlling my lawn sprinklers :) Fun little platform.

Summer? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138017)

As an adult the time of year doesn't make any difference in the amount of free time I have to "update my technical skills inventory."

Re:Summer? (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | about a year ago | (#44138151)

When you progress to parent it will.

Re:Summer? (2)

sexconker (1179573) | about a year ago | (#44138303)

When you progress to parent it will.

That's not progression. Hell, even regression would be preferential to that. I guess it would be subgression.

Re:Summer? (1)

PNutts (199112) | about a year ago | (#44138713)

As an adult the time of year doesn't make any difference in the amount of free time I have to "update my technical skills inventory."

You beat me to it. I'm employed full time so my schedule doesn't change based on the calendar, so I'm puzzled by the question unless it's targeted towards the "school's out" crowd. If that's the case then it doesn't really matter. 60-ish days of something new isn't going to matter much come fall when classes start. I'd recommend summer courses to get out of school sooner to get started on a soul-crushing career. Bonus points if those courses are a technology you aren't familiar with to stick your toe in the water.

Mohammad raped little boys (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138035)

FUCK ISLAM!

Quite a few things (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138045)

Reversing virtualized packers, network protocols fuzzing, learning to reliably exploit dangling pointers through heap spraying and other methods. Development with VHDL on FPGA boards. Grasping the inner workings of elliptic curve cryptography and maybe lattices too.

Also emptying/documenting/deleting data from any datacenter belonging to the NSA that i might come across in the meantime.

None of these fads (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138055)

I don't care about web technologies and fads which will last 2 years.

I will continue to expand my skills in C, C++, cross-development infrastructure, build tools, SOC firmware support, device drivers, build infrastructure management, Linux, compilers, and similar stuff.

With these skills, I will still have a good job in 20 years, because most newbies are terrified of the middleware guts, because it's the hardest part, and everything is built on top of it, so it can't go away.

Once all the AJAX experts are out of work in 15 years, I'll still be making a living writing C.

Camel, Neo4J, ActiveMQ, and more Spring (1)

mars soup eel (879362) | about a year ago | (#44138061)

I find that I make more effective use of the knowledge I already have when I add to it.

Learning python (1)

serialband (447336) | about a year ago | (#44138067)

I'm teaching my kids some basic python while I learn it.

Luthier/Gunsmith training (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44138079)

What? Not all technical skill are computer related, yo.

Re:Luthier/Gunsmith training (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138461)

Are there a lot of luthier/gunsmiths?

What does a handcrafted 6-sting .30-06 scoped hunting lute with electric pickups, 30x scope, and a built in tuner go for?

Where do you go for training? Exactly how dangerous is it to walk aroind there?

Can traditional horsehide bridge glues cope with the recoil of high-caliber rounds and automatic modes of fire, or do you have to use modern epoxies?

Has anyone ever been fatally wounded as a result of their rhythm rifle moving his capo for the next song?

How is the traditional world of the luthier/gunsmith changing with the advent of electronic sound effects, exotic ammunition, and ever-stricter guitar control laws around the world?

Do you feel that the recent upswing in persons using MRI machines to image and replicate the strumming weapons of past masters is a cheap violation of their secret techniques, or a great step forward which makes great instruments attainable for budding marksmen?

What is the ideal caliber for a ukelele? What is your view of the new semiautomatic models?

So many questions!

Re:Luthier/Gunsmith training (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138763)

So, been watching too many Robert Rodriguez [imdb.com] movies, have we?

P.S. His Puerco Pibil recipe is to die for!

Planning for the future of America (1)

hessian (467078) | about a year ago | (#44138129)

I'm reading The Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, learning to farm, shoot and watch the northern paths for Vandals.

Seriously, this place is on its last legs.

Re:Planning for the future of America (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138471)

Yep, nothing scares a Texan more then a flock of Yankees headed South with U-Haul trailers.

First update for your technical skills... (1)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | about a year ago | (#44138141)

XCODE, unless it's meaning changed since I last checked, is not an acronym. It's just Xcode.

As far as Xcode as a skill? Xcode is just another code editor. It has a few fancy features, but nothing that's that dramatically different. Submitter probably means learning either iOS or Mac development (and probably learning Obj-C.) All of these things could be valuable skills.

But let's be specific. Learning Dreamweaver and learning HTML5 aren't the same thing either.

Learning Linux! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138147)

I'll learn more about Linux this summer.

Re:Learning Linux! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138263)

I love interviewing folks like you.....

Assembly Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138223)

Im learning assembly language. It will never become obsolete unlike some high level languages.

Re:Assembly Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138253)

Which flavour? ARM?

Re:Assembly Language (4, Funny)

slew (2918) | about a year ago | (#44138283)

Im learning assembly language. It will never become obsolete unlike some high level languages.

Nah, go for the metal, I'm learning binary this summer...

0, 1, ok now time for some fun in the sun... ;^)

create an application; building blocks=mere parts (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138239)

My honest answer is to unask the question. Learning specific buzzwords should never be a goal. If I can just accomplish some kind of worthwhile amateur project this summer, I will be a hell of a happy camper. And then just learn whatever techs come up in the course of the project.

If I were considering hiring me, I'd be a lot more impressed by "Wrote the cool new thing people use to pirate movies on the internet and $N million people are using it now" than I'd be impressed by "up to speed on $BUZZWORD version $V." And then when I asked me how my new movie pirating tool works, if I then happened to drop a bunch of buzzwords, that'd impress me even more.

Successful applications, dude: that's real tech. HTML5 and AJAX are "sub-techs" ; pieces of minor tech that "real tech" is made out of. You don't ask an architect if he's ever heard of bricks, and you sure as hell don't ask him during a job interview, what color bricks are his favorite.

Unfortunately, I fear by the end of the summer, my resume's extra line will be "Summer 2013: came home tired every day, drank lots of beer and didn't get anything done. One year closer to my grave."

The same I do every summer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138247)

Working, as I'm an adult that lives in the United States. If I waited until the summer to do anything then I would be wasting the fall and the winter, when people take off and work slows down.

read some good books (1)

zugedneb (601299) | about a year ago | (#44138277)

example:
Abstract Computing Machines, Werner Kluge - organizing computations from lambda calculus perspective
Complex Variables (Dover Books on Mathematics), Francis J. Flanigan - good book on complex analysis
Graphs, Networks & Algorithms, Dieter Jungnickel - as the title says, applied math

This summer I'll learn how to dream in code (4, Funny)

Spy Handler (822350) | about a year ago | (#44138293)

that way I can get all my work done while I sleep

Re:This summer I'll learn how to dream in code (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138671)

For that you'll have to learn to deliver pizzas in your sleep, neckbeard.

Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138311)

I will be re-reading MSCE course materials. Sometimes I forget where to click.

Entire Win32 Skills Inventory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138329)

Now up to 70 percent off!

OpenGL 4, Shaders and c++11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138337)

What is old is new again.

I'm relearning OpenGL and shaders with c++11 and having a blast.
Never mind I can use it in HTML5 with JavaScript now :)

Re:OpenGL 4, Shaders and c++11 (1)

GreyLurk (35139) | about a year ago | (#44138403)

I was trying to draw on my OpenGL 1.x knowledge a few months ago when building an Android app... Damn, OpenGL has changed a lot since 1999 :)

Node and CoffeeScript (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138437)

I got a head start on the summer, so I've been writing CoffeeScript that runs on Node.js since May.

I avoid online training in lieu of curling up on the couch with a good paper book.
For Node.js, I chose Smashing Node.js [amazon.com]
For CoffeeScript, I chose The Little Book on CoffeeScript [amazon.com]
I recommend both of these excellent books to anyone interested in CoffeeScript and/or Node.js

Since finishing the books, I've been writing code, uploading it to GitHub, and having a great time with both the new language and the new platform.

ham license (2)

NikeHerc (694644) | about a year ago | (#44138465)

Gonna get my ham license this summer. I may try to take the technician and general tests the same day. I'm not sure this particular technology skill will help keep me employed, but it will surely help keep my sanity.

3D printers (1)

ascii3f (193795) | about a year ago | (#44138475)

I am going to learn how to produce 3D printer files from design ideas (probably jewelry products).

Redundant Inventory is Redundant (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44138485)

For the useless editor: the word "inventory" in the title is entirely redundant.

This summer I'm going to study buzzword compliance (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138501)

By studying trends of buzzwords in Slashdot articles I'll know how to sound relevant to managers, and maybe even learn how to invent my own buzzwords.

Mercenary outlook (4, Interesting)

Okian Warrior (537106) | about a year ago | (#44138587)

This seems a rather mercenary outlook to me. You are asking for suggestions on how to spend your spare time with the goal of keeping yourself employed, without regard to whether you would enjoy the subject or process.

I'm all for goal-driven careers, but studies show that the most successful people are the ones who like what they do. It largely doesn't matter whether the skill is the most "in demand", it only matters whether the skill is in demand "enough". This is illustrated by successful people in (what we would consider) pedestrian careers such as furniture sales, property rental, or owning the local laundromat (which, BTW, is the most common way to be successful).

The first step is discovering what you enjoy. The easiest way to do this is to spend 1 hour in quiet solitude. This is unexpressibly difficult if you've never tried it - you need a situation which has no interruptions whatsoever (kids, phone calls, other people), and you need to stick with it for the duration. Solo long road trips, long walks, hiking, and biking work well for this.

For the first 1/2 hour your head will be full of day-to-day thoughts, reminders, personal maintenance, reviewing memories, and so on. After awhile, this will quiet down and your mind will start to wander. Whatever you think about most is likely your source of joy.

Figure out some skill that feeds into your joy, choose a project that requires this skill and which also feeds into joy, and resolve to complete the project by the end of summer. Write the goal down (this part is important!) with as much detail as you can, stick it in an envelope, and put it away for later.

Your brain has likes and dislikes, as well as a goal-setting mechanism that you can use to your advantage. If you want to be happy, you should start the process of being happy right now, while you still have leisure to do so.

(Oh, and to answer your question: I'm writing a paper on hard AI.)

Technical Skills Inventory (1)

l3v1 (787564) | about a year ago | (#44138635)

"How Will You Update Your Technical Skills Inventory This Summer?"

So, let me start by saying summer doesn't mean 2-3 months of vacation time since I was in highschool. I.e. work as usual, aside from a few days here and there for short rests. Which in turn means, summer is no special occasion to frshen up skills. As a general rule, you;d need to learn new stuff when you need it, or - less likely to happen - when you have time for it and nothing better to do.

If the question is - which it isn't since it looks like some ad for dates online courses - what would be new relevant stuff to pick up currently, well, I won't help with that. No, really, first thing to learn is to be able to find that out for yourself :P

Anyway, I only learn two things: stuff that I'm interested in - independent of current trends or fashionable tech directions -, and stuff that I need to get some job done. If you think about these and you can't figure out something you'd need to learn thet you're either too lucky to exist, or just dumb as a shoelace in which case you shouldn't care about the whole thing anyway :P

Summer? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138655)

Some of us have a job, so summer is no different than winter/fall/spring...

What's "summer"? (1)

Alex Belits (437) | about a year ago | (#44138699)

What's "summer"* and how is it relevant for people who are not in school?

*) Written in California.

Pluralsight.com (1)

David Betz (2845597) | about a year ago | (#44138731)

...doing a course a day (1.5-3 hrs/day on 1.5x speed).

AJAX?! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44138745)

This summer I'm going to learn XMLRPC and Server Side Includes!

Three words (1)

wazafoojitsu (2633011) | about a year ago | (#44138909)

Laravel
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>