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Launch of India's First Navigation Satellite Successful

Unknown Lamer posted about a year ago | from the satellites-for-all dept.

Earth 89

An anonymous reader writes "India's first dedicated navigation satellite, the IRNSS-1A, developed by the Indian Space Research Organization, was successfully put in orbit on Monday night. The launch vehicle, PSLV-C22, bearing the 1,425-kg navigation satellite, blasted off the launch pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Center here at the scheduled lift-off time of 11.41 p.m." The satellite is the first of seven that will eventually provide a regional equivalent of GPS under complete Indian control.

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Points at IRNSS-1A (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176223)

Hideki!

Out of curiosity... (4, Interesting)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44176255)

Is India's space navigation system sufficiently similar(in terms of frequencies, antenna demands, etc.) that it will be relatively easy to shoehorn into navigation chipsets along with GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo, or is it enough of an oddball in some way, either technologically or administratively(a more hardass version of the old GPS civilian precision reduction that the US used to use or occassionally threaten to use), that this is basically irrelevant for everybody who isn't Indian military?

Re:Out of curiosity... (5, Funny)

rubycodez (864176) | about a year ago | (#44176377)

we'll have to call their tech support and get a reading from a script to find out

Re:Out of curiosity... (5, Funny)

Capt James McCarthy (860294) | about a year ago | (#44176523)

we'll have to call their tech support and get a reading from a script to find out

But when you call, you get someone in Texas.

Re:Out of curiosity... (2, Insightful)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44176651)

I'd have an easier time understanding english from India than amurikan from Texas.

Re:Out of curiosity... (4, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44176809)

We do have some deep-cover operatives working in Texas(as with other authoritarian petro-theocracies, it pays to keep an eye on them); but if somebody tells you that they are "an American from Texas", they are probably telling one of the inside jokes that they use on foreigners. Texas has texans which are a totally different thing.

and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (0)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#44176953)

We are Texans, and there's a spread shitload of us.
So the question for you in Connecticut or wherever is this:

Do you want millions of Texans telling you how to live , through federal legislation, or do you want your state's citizens to decide how you do things there in Connecticut, and we can do it our way in Texas?

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (2)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44177047)

So what... Texas is the Québec of the USA?

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | about a year ago | (#44177249)

That's hilarious ... I've been saying exactly that for years.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177301)

Actually, its the other way around.

Connecticut is the Québec of the USA. Full of socialist, communist, and "French" people who want to tell everybody else how to live.

Texas is like Calgory. Make money in the Oil and Gas Industry, then pay taxes to support those people back east.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (2)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#44177571)

While both Connecticut and Texas are relatively rich states and contribute more to the federal treasury than they take, people in Connecticut contribute about 3x as much toward the treasury compared with Texans... Only Delaware, Minnesota, and New Jersey pay more into the treasury per capita versus what they take out. That's part of the reason the people in NJ were so upset when congress initially balked at Sandy relief.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

Maritz (1829006) | about a year ago | (#44180455)

While both Connecticut and Texas are relatively rich states and contribute more to the federal treasury than they take,

Only Delaware, Minnesota, and New Jersey pay more into the treasury per capita versus what they take out.

Mildly confused. Connecticut and Texas contribute more to the treasury than they take, but not per capita..?

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about a year ago | (#44181559)

LOL, that would be a trick, wouldn't it?

No, I meant that both Connecticut and Texas pay more than they take, but if you are from Connecticut this imbalance is much larger than if you are from Texas. I think it's like $6000 per capita in Connecticut and in the $2000 range for a Texan.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

Maritz (1829006) | about a year ago | (#44184603)

Thanks for clearing that up ;)

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year ago | (#44177573)

I thought that the description of Connecticut above was actually that of Vermont.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

PPH (736903) | about a year ago | (#44177921)

No. They are a bunch of upstarts that broke away fro Mexico. And if we cut off the pipeline of federal subsidies, they'll just go back.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

QuasiSteve (2042606) | about a year ago | (#44177327)

Yeah but that whole independence thing tends to stop at the state level.

I.e. rephrase as follows...
The question for you in Austin or wherever is this:
Do you want millions of Houstonians telling you how to live, through state legislation, or do you want your county's citizens to decide how you do things there in Travis, and we can do it our way in Harris? ...and there'll be many in Houston, Dallas, etc. who would absolutely love it if Austin and others were controlled top-down by a more politically aligned state.

At least, that's what an Aggie told me ;)

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year ago | (#44177611)

Wouldn't it be the other way? Since the state capitol is in Austin, wouldn't the question for those in Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Armadillo or wherever be - Do you want millions of Austinians telling you how to do things, or do you want to arrange it locally in Houston, Dallas, et al?

On a different note, it's interesting how this thread had been hijacked. Unlike the satellite

No, Austin is much different from College Station (1)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#44181239)

An Aggie, eh? I happen to be typing this on a computer owned by the Texas A&M System. I'd much prefer to let the Austinites
have their coed public restrooms in Austin, and we can keep our "Men's Room" signs up. Tomorrow, I'll be shooting fireworks, which
are illegal in many parts of the state. I happen to be a pyro geek, spending hundreds of dollars and many hours preparing my show.
As I enjoy the beautiful chemistry in the sky, I'll be glad that Houston politicians can't stop me. They can do it their way in their city.

> and there'll be many in Houston, Dallas, etc. who would absolutely love it if Austin and others were controlled top-down by a more politically aligned state.

Not so much that I've seen. We may joke about the tea sips and their hippy ways, but we're glad to let them be them, in Austin.
Besides, if Austin is to their liking, fewer of them will come here to College Station. :)

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (2)

Goody (23843) | about a year ago | (#44177537)

Do you want millions of Texans telling you how to live , through federal legislation, or do you want your state's citizens to decide how you do things there in Connecticut, and we can do it our way in Texas?

It depends. People in every state likely have the same needs and desires when it comes to things like education, healthcare, and abortion, or freedoms like who they can marry. It's silly to have to drive across a state line to address these needs or desires. If y'all want to make the steer the state animal or drive 85 on your roads, have at it. States' rights are a vestige of 18th century America, in my opinion, and today are used more for political purposes than ensuring freedom and keeping the Union viable.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | about a year ago | (#44178895)

People in every state likely have the same needs and desires when it comes to things like... abortion

Look, either they're fundamentalist nuts or brainwashed Obama-supporters. While I'll admit that I don't know which are worse, they still aren't exactly the same thing. :)

'cept for the ones who can't read the Bill of Righ (1)

raymorris (2726007) | about a year ago | (#44181385)

> People in every state likely have the same needs and desires when it comes to things like education, healthcare, and abortion, or freedoms

Connecticut is one of only four states with a law specifically allowing abortion, explicitly saying your GF has the right to murder your child.
Texas is currently passing a law saying that more than five months into a pregancy, abortion is illegal. So the citizens of the different
states don't have the same desires in terms of abortion, for sure.

Healthcare? Show me a Texan who desires Obamacare and I'll show you an Austinite, who probably came from California (meaning they're not a real Texan).
Maybe that's a bad example, because in the last poll, 56% of DEMOCRATS nationwide said Obamcare is unconstitutional.

Education? Some local school boards in Texas, at the behest of the parents in the community, teach that the Genesis story may
have hints of how the universe was actually created.* Would people in San Francisco desire that to be taught?

* and interestingly, every new scientific find is consistent with the idea that the old testament is indeed based on actual events,
    in the same way that Saint Nick the Christmas character is based on a real guy.

Re:and there are alot of us. Federal or state? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44179625)

Who do you think is going to be telling who how to do what? Texas telling Connecticut? You might remember the last time Texas and its friends picked a fight with Connecticut and its friends (hint: it didn't end well for Texas et al.)

Texas is the tallest midget in the circus.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about a year ago | (#44187959)

We do have some deep-cover operatives working in Texas

Wouldn't that be Deepak cover operatives?

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176387)

Well, for one, it will only cover the region around India, so it is irrelevant for everyone that is not in the area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Regional_Navigational_Satellite_System

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44176507)

Well, for one, it will only cover the region around India, so it is irrelevant for everyone that is not in the area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Regional_Navigational_Satellite_System

That's a coverage area, so it seems like the sort of thing that would be worth throwing in if the only additional cost above the existing GPS module/antenna is a few Kb of extra firmware; but not large enough to be worth the effort, outside of India-specific devices, if you need to throw additional hardware at the problem. [wikimedia.org]

Re:Out of curiosity... (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44176607)

Well, I really fucked that up, teach me to post while sick. Anyway, my intent was to suggest that a coverage area that gets you a good chunk of southeast asia, a bit of middle east, plus the entire Indian subcontinent, some stuff to the north of it, and the Indian ocean(not exactly an abandoned bit of water, for shipping and all) seems quite likely to be worth shoving into the spec sheet if you just need to implement a few additional algorithms(that something else in your product line for the Indian market will need anyway); but without world coverage it wouldn't be worth actually increasing the BoM cost all that much.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about a year ago | (#44177679)

It seems to cover both India internally, as well as the entire neighborhood. It goes as far as Kazakhstan, most of Iran, China and some of Saudi Arabia, and on the East, up to Cambodia and Laos. Overkill for navigational purposes, but good for helping India keep a wary eye on the neighbors, particularly China and Pakistan.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44178333)

Given that most of these satellite navigation systems have 'guide munitions to target' as a major(often primary) goal, building a purely domestic one is a bit of a waste of time.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#44179903)

Given that most of these satellite navigation systems have 'guide munitions to target' as a major(often primary) goal, building a purely domestic one is a bit of a waste of time.

Actually the region covers most of the likely enemies.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44180625)

Those satellites will be flying around the world, they won't be geostationary birds parked above India, right? While they may not offer full coverage elsewhere, any receiver will benefit from having signals from more birds available, if there's a sane way to reconcile the time bases used by different systems.

Re:Out of curiosity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176763)

Best. Link. Ever.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about a year ago | (#44176415)

Is India's space navigation system sufficiently similar(in terms of frequencies, antenna demands, etc.) that it will be relatively easy to shoehorn into navigation chipsets along with GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo, or is it enough of an oddball in some way, either technologically or administratively(a more hardass version of the old GPS civilian precision reduction that the US used to use or occassionally threaten to use), that this is basically irrelevant for everybody who isn't Indian military?

Reading TFA it is substantially different, in that the satellites are in a geostationary orbit over India. I would imagine this makes the frequencies, positioning algorithms, etc. quite different. I can understand why we did it that way, you get a working system with much fewer satellites than the GPS system

Re:Out of curiosity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176437)

It's a refinement of GLONASS with kinematic correction factors that grew out of Larry Ellison's experience with the America's Cup.

I believe it's called KINASSOL

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Holmwood (899130) | about a year ago | (#44176463)

Wish I had mod points. This is a very cogent question. Too much of what seems to be being done in space so far by prestige-oriented countries seems to simply be "follow-the-leader". Replicate the US space program (with most of its defects) as closely as possible. The Soviets even were working away on a space shuttle, though thankfully the Chinese don't seem headed down that precise dead end.

I think the US (making a virtue out of the necessity of low budgets for space) private sector approach looks very promising, particularly SpaceX. And Canada's doing some inexpensive clever stuff that's somewhat orthogonal like its small asteroid observatory satellite(s). So too, are other countries. But a GPS/GLONASS/Galileo/Beidou clone? Yeah, I get it, the military needs it for anyone who wishes to be a Great Power independent of the US.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176469)

From the wikipedia article:
"The design of the payload makes the IRNSS system inter-operable and compatible with GPS and Galileo."

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | about a year ago | (#44176535)

Which phones support multiple forms of global navigation? I was under the impression that both the iPhone and Android supported only GPS along with a non-documented list of local WiFi SSID as backup for when GPS fails.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44176713)

Apparently [wikipedia.org] , the list is a decent sized one, among recent phones. My understanding is that(outside of mathematically-interesting-but-practically-useless SDR setups [sparkfun.com] , which are really cool; but very computationally demanding and cost as much as most smartphones even without a host to do the compute) most GPS or GPS+others modules abstract away virtually all the dirty details and just provide position, heading, and time information(possibly some additional parameters, SNR, that sort of thing, depending on vendor and model), so the amount of OS-level support needed to include GLONASS or Galileo in addition to GPS is fairly low.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about a year ago | (#44177299)

Actually if you want to step back a little bit from the raw signal info but not got to the other extreme you have the pseudorange, dopplar shift, carrier phase, and timing data. With that kind of data you can do useful things especially if you have a unit recording it at a well know location and communicating its data to a roving unit. With such a setup you can get accuracy on the order of a few cm instead of a few meters. Now you are in the world of RTK [wikipedia.org] , differential GPS [wikipedia.org] , and CORS [wikipedia.org] and can use GPS for autonomous navigation as there is good enough resolution to maintain lane control. The biggest problem is that there aren't many inexpensive GPS modules that provide that data but one I have found is this one [wikipedia.org] which used the uBlox LEA-6t chipset. From what I can tell the time nuts guys like it as it provides a really accurate and consistent PPS signal, and the positioning nuts (like myself) like it since with multiple units can provide reliable accurate positioning.

Re:Out of curiosity... (1)

Mysticalfruit (533341) | about a year ago | (#44176725)

I would imagine in this day and age with software defined radios that you could have a "Positioning" system that would work with. Considering the number of regional systems that are available as well I would think that you could have a system that would use GPS + regional system + regional ground station systems to provide lots of accuracy and redundancy.

Go check out the number of GPS like systems that are now up and running, it's crazy!

Re:Out of curiosity... (2)

tanujt (1909206) | about a year ago | (#44177269)

We actually inherited a lot of our bureaucracy and administration from the Brits. I'm sure if you want to use the IRNSS on your cell phone, you'll just have to fill out a form to acquire a permission-form which is then submitted to a committee for speedy* evaluation.


*Subject to the lunch and tea-times of the members of the committee.

Re:Out of curiosity... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177773)

Wikipedia says its compatible with GPS and Galileo devices.

Since people believe space leads to technology (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176275)

and a better society, these people will move to India now, right? Oh, sorry, asking questions on slashdot is the sign of a nutcase now.

Re:Since people believe space leads to technology (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176357)

They might. At least with the new GPS system it might be possible for them to locate a working toilet on the sub-continent.

Re:Since people believe space leads to technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176513)

It's not that hard to mod down difficult questions. It's difficult to face the fact that your pet theories about space are wrong.

Re:Since people believe space leads to technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44181717)

"Space Nutter" guy? That you? Space is just awful, isn't it? Using it in any way is madness..!

Attn mods, do not mod down! +5 INFORMATIVE (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176293)

I submit David Hasselhoff is the AntiChrist

And I have the proof

How can one explain the phenomenal global success of one of this country's least talented individuals? There are only three ways.

        * Mr. Hasselhoff actually is talented, but this goes unnoticed in his own country.

        * Mr. Hasselhoff has sold his soul to Satan in return for global success.

        * David Hasselhoff is the AntiChrist.

            I vote for the latter -- and perhaps, after seeing the facts involved, the rest of the world will agree.

The Facts First, the obvious. Add a little beard and a couple of horns -- David Hasselhoff looks like the Devil, doesn't he? And the letters in his name can be rearranged to spell
fad of devil's hash.

What does this mean? Well, Baywatch is David's fad. David is the devil. The Hash is what makes Knight Rider popular in Amsterdam.

(I was actually hoping to make the letters in his name spell out he is of the devil, which would be possible if his middle name was "Ethesis," which it might be. I'm sure his publicist would hide such a middle name if it were true.)

Second -- and most importantly -- David Hasselhoff and his television series were foretold in the Bible. Biblical scholars worldwide may quibble over interpretations, but they all agree on this. For a few telling examples let's skip to the end of the Bible. If any book of the Bible will tell us who the AntiChrist is, it's the Revelation of Saint John, which basically describes the AntiChrist and the Armageddon He causes. I'll just give you the verse, and the current theological interpretation of that verse.

Who is the Beast?

Rev 13:1 And I stood upon the sand of the sea, and saw a beast rise up out of the sea, having seven heads and ten horns The Beast, of course, is David Hasselhoff. The Heads are His separate television incarnations. Young and the Restless, Revenge of the Cheerleaders, Knight Rider, Terror at London Bridge, Ring of the Musketeers, Baywatch and Baywatch Nights.
The ten horns represent His musical releases: Crazy For You, David, David Hasselhoff, Do You Love Me?, Du, Everybody Sunshine, I Believe, Looking For Freedom, Night Lover and Night Rockers.
Not only does Mitch The Lifeguard literally "rise out of the sea" on Baywatch, but David's musical career has mostly occurred in Europe, a metaphoric rise to fame from across the sea.
Rev 13:3 And I saw one of his heads as it were wounded to death; and his deadly wound was healed: and all the world wondered after the beast. Of course, this is a reference to his third head: Knight of the Phoenix, the first episode of Knight Rider. In this episode, "Michael Long, a policeman, is shot and left for dead. The shot is deflected by a plate in his head, but ruins his face. He is saved and his face reconstructed. He is reluctant, but agrees to use K.I.T.T. to help the Foundation for Law and Government fight criminals who are 'beyond the reach of the law'. " Knight Rider has been shown in 82 countries.
Rev 13:5 And there was given unto him a mouth speaking great things and blasphemies; and power was given unto him to continue forty and two months. The following blasphemies are actual quotes from David Hasselhoff -- I read these while he was 42 years old.

"I'm good-looking, and I make a lot of money."

"There are many dying children out there whose last wish is to meet me."

"I'm six foot four, an all-American guy, and handsome and talented as well!"

"Before long, I'll have my own channel -- I'll be like Barney."

"(Baywatch) is responsible for a lot of world peace." which the Hoff said at the Bollywood Oscars. Don't believe me? Read the original article!

And here's a blasphemy that came from David's recent (Feb 2004) visit to the Berlin Wall museum. I couldn't have made something this great up by myself. He was upset that the museum didn't spend more time devoted to his personal role in the fall of Communism. You can read more about it here, if you don't believe me.

The Second Beast: Television

Rev 13:11-13And I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spake as a dragon.
And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast before him, and causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to worship the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed.
And he doeth great wonders, so that he maketh fire come down from heaven on the earth in the sight of men,

        The Second Beast, with it's dual antennae, is obviously the Television -- merely a pawn in Hasselhoff's underworldly regime. His stereo speaker (the dragon's voice) spews forth the blasphemy of Baywatch until He has caused all people of the earth to worship and watch Baywatch and Baywatch Nights. How well has he done? Baywatch is now seen by about one billion viewers in 140 countries -- the most watched series ever.

You probably never knew this, but the entire historical purpose of television has been to attract a worldwide audience for the eventual syndication of Baywatch. And how does it accomplish this global distribution? Via satellite - from heaven to the Earth.

Rev 13:15 And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed. How does television work? By giving life unto Hasselhoff's image. I'm pretty sure the second part hasn't happened yet.

Lifeguards: Denizens of the Underworld

These biblical revelations will show that the lifeguards on Baywatch are foretold as servants of the Devil. (Need I say who that is again?)

Rev 20:11And I saw a great white throne, and him that sat on it, from whose face the earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them

Rev 20:13And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell delivered up the dead which were in them...

        Doesn't this sound like an exact description of what the lifeguards on Baywatch do? They sit on their big white wooden throne, and watch out over the sea -- waiting for a dying person to get cast up.
Rev 9:6 And in those days shall men seek to find death, and shall not find it; and shall desire to die, and death shall flee from them.

        One word: CPR

Rev 10:2 And he had in his hand a little book open: and he set his right foot upon the sea, and his left foot on the earth, Sounds like a lifeguard, eh? Standing on the beach reading a paperback?

Rev 17:3-5 ...and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls, having a golden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication: And upon her forehead was a name written, MYSTERY, BABYLON THE GREAT, THE MOTHER OF HARLOTS AND ABOMINATIONS OF THE EARTH.

    and if that wasn't enough, try
Ezekiel 23:17 And the Babylonians came to her into the bed of love, and they defiled her with their whoredom, and she was polluted with them, and her mind was alienated from them.

        The fabled "Whore of Babylon." Well, people have been calling Hollywood "Babylon" since long before I was making web pages. And of all the women in Hollywood, whose wedding night video is the most popular? Hmmm.... Did someone say "Barb Wire?"

Rev 18:11 And the merchants of the earth shall weep and mourn over her; for no man buyeth their merchandise any more Do you know any merchants who invested heavily in the acting career of this "whore of Babylon?" I've seen that "VIP" show of hers, and I'd be weeping if I had spent money on the merchandising rights.

Rev. 18:21 ... a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone, and cast it into the sea,...

        Speaking of lifeguards chucking rocks at innocent people, listen to this excerpt from a recent lawsuit against his Hasselness: "while Plaintiff was in the audience of the Rosie O'Donnell Show, Defendandt DAVID HASSELHOFF came on stage and threw a stack of cards depicting himself into the audience, striking Plaintiff in the eye. . . [he] should have known that throwing cards into an audience could cause injury to the audience."

Rev 18:14 And the fruits that thy soul lusted after are departed from thee, and all things which were dainty and goodly are departed from thee, and thou shalt find them no more at all. He stands to lose money in this lawsuit -- or maybe even all those dainty and goodly things he bought.

The Number of the Beast

The Bible shows us another way to prove a person is the AntiChrist, namely through numerology. Rev 13:18 says: "Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six."

That's a bit cryptic, to be sure. One score is twenty, so threescore is 60, the number of the beast is 666.

Now, the way biblical scholars and numerologists usually convert the names of men into their numbers is through a simple numerical code. Let's assign the 26 letters of the alphabet the numbers 1 through 26. It looks like this:

a 1 i 9 q 17 y 25

b 2 j 10 r 18 z 26

c 3 k 11 s 19

d 4 l 12 t 20

e 5 m 13 u 21

f 6 n 14 v 22

g 7 o 15 w 23

h 8 p 16 x 24

Now, we take the letters from Mr. Hasselhoff's name, assign numbers to them, and calculate his number.

D A V I D H A S S E L H O F F

4 1 22 9 4 8 1 19 19 5 12 8 15 6 6

Now, since thirteen is such a fitting number for evil, let's multiply the first 13 numbers together. The total (65,874,124,800) is approximately 6.6 billion. Tack on the remaining 6's from the end of his name, and you've got yourself the mark of the beast.

Another tactic you could use would be to add the letters in "David" (I think you should get 40) and the letters in Hasselhoff (99) and then multiply them together. 40 x 99 = 3960. Now, 3960 is 660 x 6. And of course, 660 plus 6 is -- again -- the mark of the beast.

Not enough proof for you? Well, let's see what else the winning combination of the Bible and numerology have in store for David.....

As he explains it in his interview, David Hasselhoff first decided to act at the age of 7 when he saw a local production of Rumplestiltskin. His acting debut was in Peter Pan. Knight Rider ended its run in 1986, when Hasselhoff was 32. Baywatch debuted in 1989, when Hasselhoff was 35. His first televised role was as Snapper Foster on the Young and the Restless at the age of 19. If we look at the 37th chapter of the 19th book of the Bible (Psalms) -- at verses 32 and 35, we notice an interesting phenomenon. Take a look:

32. The wicked watcheth the righteous, and seeketh to slay him.

35. I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree.

Viewers of Baywatch may have thought they were watching the good leader Mitch Buchannon -- whose main job as head lifeguard is to watch over the righteous babes at the beach, and save them. According to the Bible, he is really trying to slay them. But can we be sure that the show in question is actually Baywatch? Well, count the number of letters in Rumplestiltskin and Peter Pan. 15 and 8, right? Now look at those bible verses again. Find the 15th word of verse 35 - and the 8th word from the end of verse 32. Put them together.

35. I have seen the wicked in great power, and spreading himself like a green bay tree.
32. The wicked watcheth the righteous, and seeketh to slay him.

Re:Attn mods, do not mod down! +5 INFORMATIVE (0)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44176465)

Dear AC, your whole post is pointless because you made a wrong assumption:

* Mr. Hasselhoff actually is talented, but this goes unnoticed in his own country.

He's also unnoticed in Canada, so the rest of your rant is pointless.

Also, the Invisible Pink Unicorn is stronger than your so-called Beast, so we have nothing to worry about.

But does it do the needful? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176315)

And have they tried rebooting?

Congrats (2)

HappilyUnstable (1838562) | about a year ago | (#44176329)

This is great news. Here's hoping for a bright and successful future for their new program!

Re:Congrats (4, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about a year ago | (#44176497)

Yesterday, I read about a failed launch from Russia.
Today, I read about a successful launch from India.

I'm sure there's a "in Soviet Russia" mixed in with an "India tech support" joke in there somewhere.

Re:Congrats (1)

frodo from middle ea (602941) | about a year ago | (#44181775)

In Soviet Russia, satellites launch you, with help from Indian Tech support ?

The roles have reversed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176433)

Is the tech support for this satellite in Europe?

Re:The roles have reversed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176549)

Have to be somewhere in africa, shit always flows downhill

Re:The roles have reversed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176811)

With the current economical crisis here i would say shit flows to us instead of Africa.

Re:The roles have reversed? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44178023)

we are currently not shitty enough, please wait a few more years then it may be true.

Re:The roles have reversed? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about a year ago | (#44176575)

I'd probably avoid [wikipedia.org] asking Europe for advice on navigation systems for a few years until they work things out...

does the voice on the GPS (1)

nopainogain (1091795) | about a year ago | (#44176521)

have an imperceptible accent and put you on hold for twenty minutes before telling you to try rebooting the car?

Plagiarized technology (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176565)

as with everything that comes out with these Asian Ni66ers.

When I was in engineering, attending most of my classes was like being an involuntary exchange student in India. In several courses I was the only citizen in the room. Research labs were almost entirely divided along racial/national lines - there was the Indian lab, the Chinese lab, and the Mexican nationals lab. Out of perhaps 100-odd graduate students, roughly four might have been American citizens in that particular department.

I found that where the students are imported, the ethics are too. Cheating was called 'competition' and 'inevitable.' Plagiarism was a 'cultural practice' and a 'perceptual construct' that required sensitivity. "What does it matter to you?" some professors asked when I pointed out just how demoralizing it was to work in such an environment. Two professors spoke out (one against plagiarism on course papers, the other on cheating in an exam). In both cases the (numerous) grades were allowed to stand (!!!) and in both cases the professors eventually wound up teaching somewhere else. I have other horror stories - but don't take MY word for it, ask Tom Matrka about his engineering department at Ohio University (or look up "Ohio University"+plagiarism+scandal online).

As for a shortage of engineers, one of my lecture classes had over 100 graduate students each semester. I routinely run into engineers who were involuntarily "retired" in their 40s or early 50s. We have such a large surplus of engineers that employers can readily discriminate on the basis of age or whatever else they choose.

I don't recommend engineering grad school or most engineering careers - the politics are far more vicious than one would imagine (more so than in the academic humanities and social sciences), and both career and school contexts are too susceptible to being gamed by outside interests.

Re:Plagiarized technology (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176657)

Here's a recommendation for you:

1. Park your car on a very high bridge

2. Jump

Re:Plagiarized technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176817)

I don't have a car you insensitive clod.

Re:Plagiarized technology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44182135)

He should get out first.

Re:Plagiarized technology (1)

PPH (736903) | about a year ago | (#44178015)

Damned right! Look at all that technology they stole from that great American, Wernher von Braun.

Here's hoping... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44176623)

...it does the needful.

This week so far: (4, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | about a year ago | (#44176869)

India 1, Russia 0.

So far, it sucks. (4, Funny)

localman57 (1340533) | about a year ago | (#44177013)

I am one of the early beta testers for this project. The satellite went live a few hours ago. And as far as I can tell, it's far, far inferior to the US GPS system. With GPS, I get very accurate longitude and latitude, and coarse altitude location information. All the INRSS system keeps telling me is :

You are somewhere on the surface of a sphere 20121.2km from satellite #1

Although they've promised a firmware upgrade that will show you as being somewhere on the circle that represents the intersection of that sphere and the Earth's surface.

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177203)

I guess they are smart enough not to risk three satellites at once?

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177215)

One satellite and you expect miracles? Of course it can't accurately place where you are. Even the US GPS system requires you to get a fix on at least three, and preferably four, satellites to really put you on the map (as it were).

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

kannibal_klown (531544) | about a year ago | (#44177961)

I'm pretty sure that it was a joke-posting.

Re:So far, it sucks. (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44178059)

It is not three, preferably four. It is four.

One tells you a circular line on the globe where you could be at any place on that line.
Two tells you two intersections of that line you could be.
Three tells you either one of the two points where you are located within a margin, or what altitude you are within a margin.
The fourth one is to determine which of the two points you are located, your altitude, and gives significant increase in accuracy by providing overlapping spatial and temporal data.

It may appear that three is enough as most receivers have a rudimentary altimeter based on pressure. Even in such cases, the accuracy is very poor and reasonable navigation requires computation of previous known points along with your estimated speed and direction. It is better than doing it by hand (unless you have a compass and know how to use it), but not by much.

Re:So far, it sucks. (2)

the_other_chewey (1119125) | about a year ago | (#44178291)

Even the US GPS system requires you to get a fix on at least three, and preferably four, satellites to really put you on the map (as it were).

Not [slashdot.org] this [slashdot.org] again [slashdot.org] ...
You need a minimum of four sats, period.

Re:So far, it sucks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177223)

Seeing as this is the FIRST of the satellites to be launched, what more would you expect? You need signals from multiple satellites in order to calculate latitude and longitude...
If you don't understand this, I wonder what you're doing beta testing on this project.

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

QuasiSteve (2042606) | about a year ago | (#44177347)

'woosh' comes to mind :)

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

hippo (107522) | about a year ago | (#44177397)

That's actually amazing. One satellite and your device can tell how far away it is.

Re:So far, it sucks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177801)

How the fuck is this 'Insightful'?

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

localman57 (1340533) | about a year ago | (#44177999)

Some people mod insightful instead of funny because insightful grants karma, and funny doesn't, IIRC.

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44178709)

I am one of the early beta testers for this project.

with no knowledge of how GPS system works, how did you even get to be a beta tester?

Re:So far, it sucks. (1)

BLToday (1777712) | about a year ago | (#44179417)

Don't you need at least 3 satellites overhead to calculate a geocode?

Re:So far, it sucks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44179639)

Insightful? surely "funny", and quite deliberately so? now we have geek in-jokes that don't work on slashdot moderators... sigh!

Third world countries of the past stepping up (2)

future assassin (639396) | about a year ago | (#44177135)

while "democratic" first world countires are reverting to totalitarianism. As the old third world wealth and world power grows its going to be interesting how the "old" first woirld citizen react to this when their applying for the "tech support" jobs when the roles are reversed.

Re:Third world countries of the past stepping up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44178141)

and then you look outside the window and see the teeming masses living in slavish conditions, realize you don't give a fuck if your fellow country men sell their daughters to feed the family and launch another satellite. also engrish

Re:Third world countries of the past stepping up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44179051)

Congrats India - way to go

india invented a lot of mathematics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44183567)

like, they were the first big users of the digit system (inventors even), the '0', the sine, the cosine, they built analog computers (orrerys), spherical geometry, some had a solar centric orbital model centuries before copernicus, and on and on and on. they had some very interesting astronomical observatories built by their government, which of course all went to pot once the british empire invaded and took over.

people are just fucking stupid bigots. india was ahead of the world for a long time in a lot of tech, there is absolutely no reason to believe they cant be again.

FUNNY THING IS THE ROAD TO THE LAUNCH PAD !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177181)

Is dirt !!

eh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44177625)

Take that Russia!

Score! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44178193)

India 1 Russia -3

India (1)

NewYork (1602285) | about a year ago | (#44193083)

"If you wish to keep slaves, you must have all kinds of guards. The cheapest way to have guards is to have the slaves pay taxes to finance their own guards. To fool the slaves, you tell them that they are not slaves and that they have Freedom. You tell them they need Law and Order to protect them against bad slaves. Then you tell them to elect a Government. Give them Freedom to vote and they will vote for their own guards and pay their salary. They will then believe they are Free persons. Then give them money to earn, count and spend and they will be too busy to notice the slavery they are in." --Alexander Warbucks

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