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Ikea Foundation Introduces Better Refugee Shelter

Unknown Lamer posted about 9 months ago | from the where-is-allen-wrench-b17 dept.

News 163

Lasrick writes "This is truly brilliant: Ikea has joined with the UN Refugee Agency to design a longer lasting flatpack shelter that includes a solar panel and UV reflecting material." From the article: "Ikea's design, a cross between a giant garden shed and a khaki canvas marquee, is formed from lightweight laminated panels that clip on to a simple frame, providing UV protection and thermal insulation. Like an Ikea product, the polymer panels come packed in a box, along with a bag of pipes, connectors and wires – and no doubt a cartoon construction manual." And they last for around three years.

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163 comments

TOM PETTY SEZ (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201131)

You don't have to live like a refugee!

Re:TOM PETTY SEZ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201161)

You don't have to live like a refugee!

Holy fuck-tits, it's everyone's favorite 80's rock-n-roll!

Oh, wait, it's crap. [youtube.com]

Re:TOM PETTY SEZ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201353)

There is only only one explanation: NIGGERS!!!!

Re:TOM PETTY SEZ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202385)

Why is this modded down? It's relevant (the new shelters provide a higher standard of living for many refugees), it's a classic song and it's funny. Lighten up. Being uptight prudes isn't going to solve any problems, so you may as well laugh. More people need to laugh more often. The world would be a better place, perhaps with fewer refugees.

Ok.... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201147)

So... the steel rod goes through the tarp and latches onto... wait... ... is that a screw? This thing better not fall apart in a week...

Re:Ok.... (4, Insightful)

jonwil (467024) | about 9 months ago | (#44201183)

I have a whole household full of IKEA products that have served me well for years, I see no reason why the same couldn't apply to these shelters too.

Re:Ok.... (4, Insightful)

jamstar7 (694492) | about 9 months ago | (#44201257)

I have a whole household full of IKEA products that have served me well for years, I see no reason why the same couldn't apply to these shelters too.

The difference, of course, is your Ikea furniture isn't exposed to the elements. A 3 year lifespan for a temporary shelter isn't bad...

Re:Ok.... (4, Informative)

Joce640k (829181) | about 9 months ago | (#44201971)

The British have been making them since the 18th century for export all over their empire. Quite a few are still in use.

http://miniatures.about.com/od/scaleminiatures/ig/Corrugated-Iron-House/Moody-Gosset-House-Front-View.htm [about.com]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tin_tabernacle [wikipedia.org]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prefabricated_building [wikipedia.org]

Re:Ok.... (2)

msauve (701917) | about 9 months ago | (#44202379)

That's hardly comparable. Try putting one of those in a 2x1x.5 meter box which can be carried by two people, like the Ikea shelter.

Re:Ok.... (2)

Khyber (864651) | about 9 months ago | (#44201259)

Go set your IKEA products out in the elements for a while and see if they even last 6 months.

Re:Ok.... (1)

TWX (665546) | about 9 months ago | (#44201403)

Sometimes I wonder if just empty shipping containers would be the best answer.

Re:Ok.... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201443)

How many shipping containers can you fit into a shipping container? How many can you fit onto the back of a truck? I have a feeling your ability to distribute them would be severely limited.

Re:Ok.... (1)

Khyber (864651) | about 9 months ago | (#44201455)

You could fit a bunch of PODS in a shipping container. a PODS could work for a living structure.

Re:Ok.... (1)

Imrik (148191) | about 9 months ago | (#44201753)

You mean like this? [shelterkraft.com]

Re:Ok.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201825)

starting price... $17,000-$33,000

Yeah... no. If you've got 30k. you're not hurting for living space.

Re:Ok.... (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 9 months ago | (#44201933)

starting price... $17,000-$33,000

Yeah... no. If you've got 30k. you're not hurting for living space.

We managed to buy a three-story, stationary, brick-built building from our town for an equivalent of $7,000. (Reason: lack of interested buyers due to its location, but still...) That's something like 200 m^2 of living space. These designs are certainly interesting, but if I'm not mistaken, you could buy an RV of the same size for a similar price, AND you'd be mobile.

Re:Ok.... (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 9 months ago | (#44202253)

yeah but thinking inside the container is hipsta coolio.

also, I'd think that a truck + container would be more badass than a rv.

Re:Ok.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201543)

*looks at his Ikea deck chairs*

Yeah, still there.

Re:Ok.... (2)

Calydor (739835) | about 9 months ago | (#44201551)

Most IKEA products aren't -designed- to be exposed to the elements, though. They are designed to be placed indoors in a controlled environment.

I'm pretty sure these shelters are designed with weather in mind at least until something else is proven.

Re:Ok.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202037)

Most IKEA products aren't -designed- to be exposed to the elements, though. They are designed to be placed indoors in a controlled environment.

I'm pretty sure these shelters are designed with weather in mind at least until something else is proven.

You are pretty wrong. Shelters are made to be extremely cheap and easy to transport. At the moment transporting cost is the limiting factor. The cost of setting up a refugee shelter is measured in its weight.
Mostly refugee shelters are just tents but sometimes they are made of recycled cardboard boxes or tents supported by a paper tube frame.

Here is a link to an article about a refugee shelter where heavy rain damaged 7000 tents. [unhcr.org]

Re:Ok.... (1)

msauve (701917) | about 9 months ago | (#44202395)

"You are pretty wrong."

Whoosh.

The GP was talking about the subject of this whole thread - an Ikea designed shelter which was designed specifically to hold up to the environment better than the tents currently being used.

Re:Ok.... (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 9 months ago | (#44201837)

Those that are designed to be outside would probably last quite well.

Of course if you're a dumbass like most people and buy indoor stuff for outdoors, you deserve what you get. Though people who have their Ikea failures usually are the same types that get electric shocks from their indoor fans that they move outdoors "because what could happen, right?"

Re:Ok.... (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | about 9 months ago | (#44202361)

Which IKEA products? The ones made of fibre board? The ones made of glass? The ones made of plastic? The ones made of metal?

Is there some weird reason why you think IKEA are only capable of making products out of completely unsealed untreated wood?

Re:Ok.... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 9 months ago | (#44202367)

From what I saw in the video it looks like it will. In fact it seems they couldn't even attach one of the panels properly (lower left side). Now if IKEA has trouble building their own product, imagine some illiterate 3rd world peasant. Also, why the hell would you want to make things more comfortable in a shelter? You do NOT want to give people a reason to stay longer.

Re:Ok.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202393)

Ever seen a military tent (think MASH)? Those have no problems holding up in the elements and this thing looks a lot more sturdy. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if militaries traded up for these things.

Makes sense (3, Interesting)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 9 months ago | (#44201191)

The video said the average family will be in these tents for ten years, while the durability of these tents is 3 years (up from 6 months from the old tents). That sounded odd to me until I realized I've been living for 6 years with Ikea furniture which felt like it would last two months.

Good on Ikea. Though I wish they had said what crazy swedish name they were going to call these things.

Re:Makes sense (3, Funny)

plover (150551) | about 9 months ago | (#44201439)

Though I wish they had said what crazy swedish name they were going to call these things.

I figured they'd call it SHAANTEA.

Re:Makes sense (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201459)

You misunderstood: the durability of the *current* tents (canvas) is 6 months, although the average family lives in the camp for 12 years (presumably in the same tent).

The durability of the IKEA shelter (not the tent) is 3 years.

Re:Makes sense (1)

psergiu (67614) | about 9 months ago | (#44201647)

The most logical name:

FLYKTINGBOSTÃDER

Re:Makes sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202209)

The most logical name:

FLYKTINGBOSTÃDER

FLYKT would be , you elongative clod.

We need those here (4, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | about 9 months ago | (#44201211)

San Francisco has 8,000 homeless people. Those could help.

Re:We need those here (4, Insightful)

jamstar7 (694492) | about 9 months ago | (#44201269)

San Francisco has 8,000 homeless people. Those could help.

The problem is, where do you put them up? NIMBY ('Not In My Back Yard!!') is the watchword here.

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201341)

San Francisco has 8,000 homeless people. Those could help.

The problem is, where do you put them up? NIMBY ('Not In My Back Yard!!') is the watchword here.

Start with Nevada. Send back the 5000 bused and dumped there by that State's various NGOs and government agencies.

Re:We need those here (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | about 9 months ago | (#44201503)

What would a 3D Printer look like to make these things on demand?

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202065)

Isn't it faster to just build a permanent house?

Re:We need those here (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 9 months ago | (#44202187)

Or, you could 3D-print a permanent house. I believe there are companies that are trying to pursue this path.

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202327)

The problem is, where do you put them up? NIMBY ('Not In My Back Yard!!') is the watchword here.

The homeless people? In the bay of course. Side benefit: if they can swim they at least come back cleaner and less smelly.

Re:We need those here (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201367)

The homeless aren't refugees and can't be treated like them. 8000 crazy alcoholics with poor impulse control would indeed be a NIMBY nightmare.

Re:We need those here (1)

blue trane (110704) | about 9 months ago | (#44201781)

Wait are you talking about Wall Street traders?

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202101)

They're not alcoholics, they're polydrug addicts. Alcohol, coke, probably heroin based on that guy who nodded on his keyboard and made a stupid trade in his sleep...

Homeless can also mean free (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201785)

The homeless aren't refugees and can't be treated like them. 8000 crazy alcoholics with poor impulse control would indeed be a NIMBY nightmare.

A good number of homeless are not winos but refugees from The American Way. The fact that many have no intention of getting back onto the treadmill of consumerism says more about the US way of life than about them.

Is working your ass off your entire life for possessions and having a good credit rating really living in freedom?

Re:We need those here (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201449)

Hey, helping people in need sounds a bit too much like dirty filthy pinko-commie goat licking Socialism for my liking!

As a patriotic American I wholly oppose this dastardly idea.

Re:We need those here (-1, Flamebait)

lxs (131946) | about 9 months ago | (#44201563)

Don't worry. It's merely a cynical PR stunt from a company that produces mostly shit.
Having said that, after the owners membership of the Nazi party and the use of slave labor, forcing refugees to live in IKEA designed housing seems like a new low to me.

Hey look IKEA porn! [tumblr.com]

Re:We need those here (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201471)

8000 winos trying to follow Ikea assembly instructions. A sight to behold. They'll end up sleeping in the cardboard packing.

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201499)

Actually it's ingenious. You have the winos be the disaster responders and pay them with boxes to live in in exchange for putting them up for the refugee families.

It's a Win-Win situation! :)

Re:We need those here (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#44201509)

Judging from what those assembly instructions look like, my guess is that you have to be drunk, high or otherwise ... let's say "have augmented senses" to understand them.

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201553)

If you can't understand Ikea instructions you are truly retarded. They're designed such that anyone, anywhere in the world, can assemble an Ikea product without speaking any of the languages the manual is printed in. You basically have to completely lack any and all visual learning ability to find them difficult.

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201693)

You basically have to completely lack any and all visual learning ability to find them difficult.

I'm blind, you insensitive clod!

Re:We need those here (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201843)

These... Won't do shit for the homeless problem.

You'll have the same base problem.... Whos going to pay for it?

Roof over your head is a basic right (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202265)

You'll have the same base problem.... Whos going to pay for it?

That's a very good way of defining the issue, although perhaps not as you intended.

As long as the country is totally fixated on people making money, the homeless will always be considered a problem to be fixed instead of our disadvantaged neighbors.

In a civilized society, work is something to be cherished by those who want to make their mark on society by contributing their interest and expertise. Today it's a necessary evil required for having a roof over one's head and food on one's table. It's primitive as hell.

We don't even WANT to be civilized at this point in time.

Why not the Hexayurt? (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201289)

Nobody knows why Ikea ignored the hexayurt designs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexayurt , http://hexayurt.com/ [hexayurt.com] ). NIH?

Re:Why not the Hexayurt? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201379)

The rectangle lobby at it again!

Re:Why not the Hexayurt? (3, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | about 9 months ago | (#44201399)

Hard to pack in boxes, and they make inefficient use of limited land, that's my guess.
Might also be harder to assemble.

Since Ikea Already uses one percent of all the processed wood [gizmodo.in] in the world, i suspect they also know that other designs are more resource demanding.

Re:Why not the Hexayurt? (1)

hrvatska (790627) | about 9 months ago | (#44202169)

Because the roof has multiple joints that would be susceptible to leaking when the tape adhesive started to fail? The whole thing looks like it is held together by adhesive tape; just how durable is that?

Will not stop bastards (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201349)

this will not stop a gang of rapists cutting their way in from the side raping everyone stealing and what they like
probably better than a white sheet over a couple of wires though

Re: Will not stop bastards (1)

tracker1972 (685559) | about 9 months ago | (#44201657)

No, although a solid panel has got to be an improvement over a tent, and it also suggests it can form the interior of a beefed up structure.

Re:Will not stop bastards (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#44201711)

this will not stop a gang of rapists cutting their way in from the side raping everyone stealing and what they like
probably better than a white sheet over a couple of wires though

If you are reduced to relying on fortified architecture for that, you arguably have bigger problems(as well as problems that should be solvable at lower cost and weight by some flavor of law enforcement, rather than fortress architecture). Tents are, naturally, pitifully insecure; but you have to go a substantial distance up the food chain before there isn't a fairly obvious flaw that a few reasonably strong guys(bonus points for users) can crack in a couple of minutes.

So, are they giving it to the UN, or selling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201355)

The reason I ask is that Ikea is here in the US as a non-profit claiming that their profits go to charity.
It seems like they ought to be giving these to the UN for use in locations like Pakistan, or the areas around Syria.

But, Ikea strikes me as they will sell it to them.

Re:So, are they giving it to the UN, or selling? (4, Informative)

icebike (68054) | about 9 months ago | (#44201447)

According to http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/IKEA [wikipedia.org] Ike does indeed have a none profit foundation, like Microsoft, Google and Ford.
But ikea itself is very much a For Profit Dutch Corporation.

Re:So, are they giving it to the UN, or selling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201947)

Having your corporate hq placed in a country doesn't mean your business carries any attributes of that country itself. I'm not sure how to describe IKEA, probably a multinational corporation is the best description, since it's hard to really call it Swedish any more. But if it came down to that, it's still a fairly Swedish company with all those goofy names on their products that makes no sense to most of the world -- and not always much to the natives either, but it's certainly not a Dutch company by any stretch of imagination.

Re:So, are they giving it to the UN, or selling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202033)

> But ikea itself is very much a For Profit Dutch Corporation.

For varying values of Dutch.

Re:So, are they giving it to the UN, or selling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202083)

Eh, they could still sell most of them at cost. A lot of needs will be known in advance and can be budgeted for, and IKEA could keep a stock to donate free in emergencies. Selling at cost, or with a slight excess to fund an emergency stock, wouldn't make this a for-profit operation.

good ideas ...... (2)

thephydes (727739) | about 9 months ago | (#44201433)

are often simple to use when they come to fruition. One could say this approach was obvious - so obvious in fact that no-one else has made it work yet. It quite likely needs some fine tuning but what implementation of an idea does not? Good work!

That's nice and all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201445)

But are IKEA still shitting in their meatballs?

Re:That's nice and all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202231)

Only in yours.

Just don't lose the hex key tool... (0)

turrican (55223) | about 9 months ago | (#44201457)

Experience with IKEA leads me to believe they'll need a tightening every now and then.

This should settle the old question (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 9 months ago | (#44201523)

Are Ikea products at least on average shipped with the correct number of screws, bolts and parts?

Re:This should settle the old question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201559)

Roughly all of my furniture with the exception of the chair I'm sitting in now came from Ikea. Never had a missing piece, and more often than not had some left over for spares.

Re:This should settle the old question (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 9 months ago | (#44201907)

Roughly all of my furniture with the exception of the chair I'm sitting in now came from Ikea.

Let me be the chairman then, as I just picked a chair (TORKEL [ikea.com]) from Ikea. Luckily enough I was able to purchase a demo unit for €30.

Nice product, comfortable and ergonomic.

Re:This should settle the old question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201565)

Tor, smiling down from the Scandanavian cloud, pats Mr Ikea on the back and says "it is good."

Re:This should settle the old question (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 9 months ago | (#44202383)

Are Ikea products at least on average shipped with the correct number of screws, bolts and parts?

I've purchased fourteen pieces of Ikea furniture. I have yet to get one that didn't have all the pieces necessary, and if you should be unlucky enough to be missing parts, replacements can be obtained from Ikea easily.

Only two problems. (-1)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | about 9 months ago | (#44201545)

One, it's fiberboard so it swells up and falls apart after a rain.
Two, it gives off formaldehyde fumes.

Re: Only two problems. (2)

tracker1972 (685559) | about 9 months ago | (#44201651)

Since when was a "polymer panel" fiberboard? So doors this mean your second point is nonsense as well? Did you actually read the articles or just see an IKEA bookshelf once?

Re: Only two problems. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202259)

So doors this mean your second point is nonsense as well?

I think it doors, but we wall have to see.

on the move? (0)

Forget4it (530598) | about 9 months ago | (#44201629)

Ikea furniture can be fine - until ... you move house. It's not made to be taken to pieces and put back together again - a second time. Hope the refugees are not on the move ... oops.

Re:on the move? (1)

Zedrick (764028) | about 9 months ago | (#44201715)

Most of my furniture is from IKEA (I'm in Sweden, so that's kind of natural). I've moved twice with the same furniture, and didn't have any problems. Or, well, last time I had to look up the documentation for the bed online since I didn't remember who things should be put together... but apart from that - no problems.

Re:on the move? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202341)

Ikea is hit or miss. I've had some pieces last a while, others fall apart in a short time.

Re:on the move? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201811)

Ikea furniture can be fine - until ... you move house.

It's not made to be taken to pieces and put back together again - a second time.

Hope the refugees are not on the move ... oops.

The shelters would belong to the UN, I believe...I don't think the shelters are given to the refugees to own. So the shelters most likely would stay in the same spot even if the family living in it moved.

Re:on the move? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202105)

Ikea furniture can be fine - until ... you move house.

It's not made to be taken to pieces and put back together again - a second time.

So what you are saying is that Ikea furniture sucks because unlike other furniture it can not be disassembled before moving?

Then don't disassemble it.

Perhaps the bigger problem... (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 9 months ago | (#44201681)

While any incremental advances in design are a good thing, it seems like the timescales we are talking about here are starting to get into 'perhaps you need to re-think your approach to the problem...' territory.

12 years is really pushing the idea of 'temporary' to the limit. How long do you go before you stop trying to incrementally decrease the squalor in a given refugee camp and start to admit that either you need to get your shit together on whatever is keeping your refugee camp full, or you need to admit that you have no resolution in sight on that one, and admit that your refugee camp is now a town.

Re:Perhaps the bigger problem... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202279)

Asking how long is irrelevant....
It doesn't even matter which question is asked:
Shoot the politicians is always the right answer.

30 year old teen angst (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44201707)

We keep waiting for someone to come along and save us but everything we need to know to make our future better is available to us. Scholars of the past have thought about and worked out most of societies problems. I can say this because most of us are well adapted and I think, aside from a little minor greed, could come to some comprimise that would result in mutual prosperity. The unfortunate part is that the ones who need to understand this message the most would be unable to understand it and the whole thing would probably result in some kind of violent uprising becoming the very thing that was initially set out to be avoided. Such is life. What do the enlightened do? It is not our move. Please tell me I am wrong? :)

UNHCR Representative... (1)

technix4beos (471838) | about 9 months ago | (#44201827)

Could they have picked a worse spokesperson? His English was barely intelligible with such a heavy French accent. Why did we need him to even speak when Jonathan from the IKEA Foundation did such a fine job at explaining everything?

Re:UNHCR Representative... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202165)

politics and "giving face".

Sounds terrible... (3, Interesting)

evilviper (135110) | about 9 months ago | (#44202111)

Six months sounds good enough, to me. That's longer than I would want to live in a temporary shelter. Much longer and you're not so much providing humanitarian aid, as you are shipping-in prefabricated houses for many thousands of people.

Those six months should be ample time to put together enough clay/adobe bricks to build a real, semi-permanent structure, with ample insulation, firebox, etc. Roofing materials might be more difficult, but helping to source those is better than giving out housing you've deemed "acceptable"...

After 6 months, you should be building-up an economy... Paying some of those local refugees (a truly tiny amount of) money, to construct real homes for their fellow refugees, and hopefully even a few commercial structures.

Re:Sounds terrible... (4, Interesting)

Dyne09 (1305257) | about 9 months ago | (#44202213)

The idea of a refugee settlement utilizing relatively permanent building materials can and does occur, however it's often the case that host governments simply refuse to allow that to happen. A shelter using permanent materials quickly becomes a small town, which lends legitimacy to refugee settlements. Some host governments want mobile tent cities so they can be moved every year or so, or at the very least broken down quickly once what what ever situation is causing the resentment crisis in the first place is resolved. That said, the types of things you're describing tend to happen organically over time, especially with refugee situations that drag on for years. It only makes sense for a number of obvious reasons.

It's about cost (5, Informative)

Dyne09 (1305257) | about 9 months ago | (#44202197)

I have worked in disaster response operations as a logistics and procurement person for six years, including rapid onset refugee settlements. Though I haven't worked directly in camp management, I have worked with purchasing, transporting and setting up these types of tents before. It doesn't say in this article, but other sources point out that even at mass production, the IKEA shelter will cost about twice as much as a canvas tent. At the end of the day, if you're setting up a tent city for 20,000 displaced refugees, that's a difference between 10 and 20 million dollars. Any large aid organization or donor simply isn't going to be able to justify doubling its operation costs. I should also add that one of the selling points of the IKEA structure is that tents only last six months, while these will last years. I don't know how long the UNHCR tents were designed for, but I think it's safe to say that in virtually every settlement I have been to, those tents tend to last longer than six months...alot longer. Usually, the tents are up for multiple years at a time, sometimes reused. This is not a justification for their crappy construction or poor amenities, but I have seen canvas tents that have been one place for six years, so the argument that the IKEA shelters is more economical in the long run isn't grounded in reality. Link to outside info: http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2013/06/27/196356373/new-kind-of-ikea-hack-flat-packs-head-to-refugee-camps?ft=1&f=1004 [npr.org]

Wind? (1)

Lawrence_Bird (67278) | about 9 months ago | (#44202331)

Wonder how well they hold up to strong winds.. those panels look flimsy and the solar thing is sure to get ripped off. Also looks like these are aimed only at hot places. Are there no refuges where it is cold?

Re:Wind? (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about 9 months ago | (#44202387)

Are there no refuges where it is cold?

I can't think of where there are currently any refugees (at least, in large numbers) in cold places, no. Odd, really. Does anyone else know of any?

Just another way to keep 'them' 'there' (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#44202347)

Come on... 12 years as a refugee? At what point are you simply just a UN freeloader trying to guilt the rest of the world into giving you free food, medicine, housing, clothing etc etc etc.

And stop making babies you stupid fucks. If you don't have a home, food or an income why are you crapping out babies and expecting the rest of the world to take care of you? If you live in a refugee camp birth control should be mandatory (hell put it in the food if that's what it takes). If you have a kid in a camp they kick you out for being an idiot for bringing a baby into the world that you can't care for.

And why on earth are we educating these stupid fucks? So they can spend another 12 years in a camp? What jobs are there for an 'educated' refugee?

Yeah.. so with all the OTHER issues a plastic outhouse/home is not really solving anything.

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