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According To YouGov Poll, Snowden Support Declining Among Americans

Soulskill posted about 10 months ago | from the or-at-least-sick-of-the-media-playing-Where's-Waldo dept.

Privacy 658

eldavojohn writes "A recent poll from the YouGov consisting of one thousand responses shows that Snowden's support among Americans has shifted. Now, according to the poll, more Americans think he did the wrong thing rather than the right thing when asked: 'Based on what you've heard, do think Snowden's leak of top-secret information about government surveillance programs to the media was the right thing to do or the wrong thing to do?' The results and breakdown are available online (PDF). Without getting into racial or political breakdowns, the results now show that 38% say he did the wrong thing, 33% say he did the right thing and 29% remain undecided about the results of his actions. Instead of charging the populace into action Snowden may be facing apathy at best and public disapproval at worst."

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658 comments

hmmm (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44207965)

How about support for prosecuting James Clapper?

Re:hmmm (5, Insightful)

MrNaz (730548) | about 10 months ago | (#44208021)

Whistleblower: The government is watching you. The wealthy elite are enslaving you. The politicians are oppressing you. These facts are obvious, and I have proof.
Public: Meh.

Re:hmmm (4, Insightful)

the.emmef (914877) | about 10 months ago | (#44208113)

You summarized this well, in a way that even sheep should understand ;-)

Re:hmmm (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208155)

You Americans deserve what you're about to get.

Re:hmmm (1, Insightful)

udachny (2454394) | about 10 months ago | (#44208127)

Which is precisely why the government officials that are required to swear into the office are required to uphold and protect the CONSTITUTION.

NOT THE PEOPLE.

Not the government, not the white house, not the justice system but the LAW. The US Founders knew that relying on people making right choices is a terrible idea, democracy doesn't work at all, it quickly dissents into authoritarian nightmare because it promises too everything to everybody for nothing (actually it promises to subsidize the unproductive majority by stealing from the productive minority). Eventually you destroy what you tax and this includes all types of taxes.

From just the tax rates on income and property, to various rules, laws and regulations that government imposes upon business to buy votes (be it minimum wage, various laws that give employees special powers to sue employers for any perceived 'wrongdoing', any kind of entitlement to the employers and customers that end up being obligations upon the employers and producers).

This eventually ends up destroying the productive class of people and destroys incentives for people even trying to become productive, here is a good satirical overview of the problem [youtube.com] .

Eventually the mob eats and chases away the part of the society that actually is productive and pays for all of this conspicuous consumption by the mob and then the society is doomed to failure because of the failing economy. So the principles are the same for anything else that concerns rule of law - equal justice under the law, privacy from government intrusion, transparency of government in the first place.

ALL democracies are destined to failure, that is not an option, it's an inevitable consequence of the rule of mob. That's why to keep working the system is supposed to set those types of feelings and desires aside and concentrate on constantly and vigilantly protecting the rule of law, equality before law, equality of opportunity by providing equal application of law, prevention of discrimination by the mob, by the government. Once those concepts are breached, the society is on the path to self destruction and unfortunately I have never found an example in history where the society actually stopped short of destroying itself this way once it became democratic, AFAIC history shows that the destruction is imminent.

Re:hmmm (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208271)

I have NO FUCKING IDEA why you just got down voted into oblivion, but then I realised that we're witnessing the very problem you just described is happening on this website, the fact that the dumb sheeple down modding insightful posts is tantamount to that.

Re:hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208227)

"Shouldn't have told us. We liked that blissful ignorance."

Maybe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44207969)

If he didn't look like an attention-seeking whore/loser, I might think Americans are crazy. But their gut feeling is probably right...

Re:Maybe (5, Interesting)

Meshugga (581651) | about 10 months ago | (#44208011)

That's exactly the kind of psy-op that has been going on for weeks now in discussion forums all around the internets.

Slowly, but steadily comments pop up that put Snowden in a slightly bad light, for no good reason at all. Depending on the target audience of the forum, it's anything from "because 'MURICA" to what you just said.

Doesn't anyone notice that?

That's also why such programs are so enormously dangerous. Who in the world would know best how to manipulate public opinion? Only those whose sole reason of existance it is to peek into other peoples lives ... so even when the programs are known (which happens very rarely), we can't fight it because they have already become too powerful.

Re:Maybe (5, Funny)

Vintermann (400722) | about 10 months ago | (#44208081)

It is now official. YouGov has confirmed: Edward Snowden support is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered internet community community when CNN confirmed that support for whistleblowers has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all important people. Coming on the heels of a recent Pew survey which plainly states that...

Re:Maybe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208135)

It is now official. YouGov has confirmed: Edward Snowden support is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered internet community community when CNN confirmed that support for whistleblowers has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all important people. Coming on the heels of a recent Pew survey which plainly states that...

So you're saying that these polls are flawed? Normally you attack the methodology of the poll in order to do that but I suppose Slashdot is all about ad hominems these days ...

Re:Maybe (-1, Flamebait)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#44208211)

Right or Left, we choose to disbelieve math and science when it doesn't fit our view of the world.

Re:Maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208235)

I kinda think they are flawed. Now, I haven't seen the polls, but 1000 people seem to be a really low number in this, especially since its an internet poll.

Re:Maybe (-1, Troll)

Cenan (1892902) | about 10 months ago | (#44208111)

Snowden is an attention whore, I've said so from the very get go of this thing. It's not what we think of him that is the big failure here, but that we even have a discussion of the opinion on him at all. Stop focusing on him or his' girlfriend's tits and start debating the issues he exposed. Oh, nobody cares about Snowdem? cry me a fucking river, how about we discuss the citizens of the nations that have been exposed as borderline police states?

Discussions pro/con Snowden have way too much room around here, and the internet in general, and who do you think pushed this agenda? Who would have a motive to focus the discussion on him rather than his proof. In cases like these, it really doesn't matter whether we talk good or bad about him, what matters is that we talk of him instead of the documents.

Don't get me wrong, we need to discuss Snowden too and keep an eye on how his saga ends, because that has the potential to be yet another Bradley Manning story, but we really, really need to keep focus on the actual issue. I'm willing to bet that even more nations will be exposes as hypocritical fucktwats soon, and sitting around yelling at each other about Snowden's dick size is going to hurt us all in the end.

Re:Maybe (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208231)

Snowden is an attention whore, I've said so from the very get go of this thing.

That's a blue herring. His whole point was to get the public's attention.

Re:Maybe (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208319)

Blah blah blah

Snowden is an attention whore

He's an attention whore for all the RIGHT REASONS, as opposed to the sad sack culture that we have now e,g what is Britney Spears wearing this week? who fucking cares, or should that read, who with a brain fucking cares?

Re:Maybe (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208345)

I agree on most of your points except on:

Snowden is an attention whore

I won't dare a judgement given that he's said goodbye to his comfy life and is now hoping to find a place where he can live at all -- and we are reaping th benefits of his actions. To me, he stays a hero -- attention whoring or not.

What have you done for me, lately? Conversely: what have I done for you, of late?

Re:Maybe (5, Interesting)

Wildclaw (15718) | about 10 months ago | (#44208119)

That's exactly the kind of psy-op that has been going on for weeks now in discussion forums all around the internets.

It is standard propaganda tactics to describe people as unreliable attention whores to place blame on them. It works in various ways.

For example, take the fable "the boy who cried wolf". It is not a tale about a boy lying, but a tale about blaming a boy for the failure of others to build fences to protect the sheep.

Re:Maybe (4, Interesting)

Dr Max (1696200) | about 10 months ago | (#44208179)

Maybe if the NSA can secretly record information on billions of people, then rigging a yougov poll would be child's play. 4chan does it about once a month, like how they got kim jong un times people's choice award of 2012.

Re:Maybe (-1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#44208205)

There is a right way and a wrong way to be whistleblower.
He did it the wrong way.

He probably should have gotten a lawer first before starting this crazy thing. Or stayed in America and stood up and faced the consequences.

Re:Maybe (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 10 months ago | (#44208253)

He did it the wrong way.

Pray tell, what would have been the right way?

Re: Maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208373)

Here's his mistakes:
- putting his name to it before he was in a safe jurisdiction.
- putting out a video interview before he was safely out of view with Lasik, dark hair and a clean shave.
- making additional statements before he could see which way public response was heading so he could fine tune his message.
- parking his ass in a foreign airport that puts pressure on that country's relationship with the US.
- announcing that he took the Booze Allan job with the goal of acquiring and leaking this information.
- associating himself with WikiLeaks & Julian Assange.

He should have been in hiding and kept quite for a while so he could let the media speculate on what he had released rather than speculating on "Where's Waldo Going?". His camping trip in the Moscow airport is a huge distraction to the bombshell he released.

Re: Maybe (1)

slidersv (972720) | about 10 months ago | (#44208257)

Um, no, nimerous people before him did that, and you haven't even heard of them, because they got shot down in courts so quickly.

Re:Maybe (4, Insightful)

Ragzouken (943900) | about 10 months ago | (#44208367)

The proper channels do not work. There is no "right" way to be a whistleblower. The systems are in place to define any possible effective attempt to whistleblow something this big as "wrong".

Re: Maybe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208217)

This is exactly the type of comment that are being put in by government "online persona" programmes uncovered during HBGary debacle, to stir the public opinion into favorable dorection. There is no hope.

wat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44207971)

What the fuck America?

Terrible news... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44207981)

From The Q&A Snowden had with readers of The Guardian:

Q: What would you say to others who are in a position to leak classified information that could improve public understanding of the intelligence apparatus of the USA and its effect on civil liberties?
A: This country is worth dying for.

Despite this latest poll, I still think Snowden was right. Future generations will hail him as the hero he is. And that's coming from a non-American...

Re:Terrible news... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208015)

I disagree. I think he will go down in history as an attention whore, just like Assange

Re:Terrible news... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208131)

Hello, Bob. I'm going to call you Bob. You work for the CIA as part of an organised disinfo op. You might not even know that. You've been hired as a contractor for "information management" or "brand management" or whatever banal words they put on it this time. But even if you don't know, you know, because who the fuck else thinks anyone in their right mind would do something like this for the attention?

You are a tiny part of what is wrong with America. And I'm not even American. Ask your bosses, they know. That's part of the problem. When they say it's damaging your country's national security, they're talking bullshit, but when they say it's damaging your country's national interest, actually they're being accurate. You have the largest covert surveillance and propaganda machine in the world, one that puts Iran and China to shame: and you're part of it, sitting there, at that keyboard, typing what you've been told.

If you know something is wrong, the public have a moral right to know. Edward Snowden is braver than you. Bradley Manning is braver than you. Julian Assange is braver than you. Each of them no longer have their liberty in any normal way, but each of them have advanced humanity in an important way and done what they feel it right: but you, Bob? You're a fucking keyboard warrior fighting on the front lines of the opinions of the American people. Fuck you. Seriously, go fuck yourself.

Re:Terrible news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208159)

good play!

Re:Terrible news... (-1, Troll)

Cenan (1892902) | about 10 months ago | (#44208193)

Oh the irony, how she bites. You're just as much a part of the problem, you and your retarded post is one in a sea of redundant drivel flooding the internet. You're helping them obscure the issues of GOVERNMENT OPPRESSION in at least three different nations so far. So take the fucking buttplug out of your ass, and warm up that armchair warrior keyboard of yours and get to focusing on the real issue here. Bob.

Re: Terrible news... (1)

slidersv (972720) | about 10 months ago | (#44208239)

And what do you say to those who preceeded him and followed official channels to complaint and expose wrong doing? To those like Barrett Brown, Jeremy Hammond, Aaron Swartz, Gottfrid Svartholm and Jacob Appelbaum? Attention whores as well? Snowden is the last frontier. If he goes into prison it's the witch hunt all over again.

Re:Terrible news... (5, Interesting)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | about 10 months ago | (#44208019)

Everyone loves to talk a big game. "This country is worth dying for!" "We'll make America strong!" "We love our country!" are all common phrases that you'll hear at campaign rallies, but how many people are actually willing to step up? As it turns out, very few.

Hell, most people aren't even willing to see a 1% increase in their taxes in order to fix this nation's problems. Do you really think that anyone is going to risk their job or their life to do the same?

Re:Terrible news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208089)

Overrated actually IS an acceptable substitutes to filter out garbage that people (inherently) disagree with.

Re:Terrible news... (5, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 10 months ago | (#44208103)

but how many people are actually willing to step up? As it turns out, very few.

Which is why guys like Snowden deserve an enormous amount of latitude. The relatively few among us who are willing to put their lives on the line for the causes we give lip-service too deserve our unwavering support.

Re:Terrible news... (1)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | about 10 months ago | (#44208213)

That's just my point. "Our unwavering support" isn't worth a damn thing because "our support" was never existent in the first place.

Re:Terrible news... (4, Insightful)

sl4shd0rk (755837) | about 10 months ago | (#44208171)

most people aren't even willing to see a 1% increase in their taxes in order to fix this nation's problems.

Tax increases won't fix the campaign corruption, erosion of rights, separation of church and state, nor establish a government who is working for the people. Stop beating that drum.

Re:Terrible news... (1)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | about 10 months ago | (#44208223)

That's not what I meant. I mean that if there was, tomorrow, a tax proposed that would go towards fixing some specific problem, very few people would support it.

Re:Terrible news... (4, Insightful)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 10 months ago | (#44208293)

Very few people would support it, because very few people would believe that the tax money would actually go towards fixing that problem. The government will just spend it however they damn well please, as with anything else.

And even if the problem was fixed by the tax, they would keep the tax as permanent to spend elsewhere. Many taxes are declared "temporary" only to be made permanent later.

Maybe it's worth dying for the country, but it sure as hell ain't worth it dying for the politicians.

Re:Terrible news... (5, Insightful)

mwvdlee (775178) | about 10 months ago | (#44208215)

The sad reality of this is that, apparently, telling on a misbehaving government is a risk to ones live.

The reason people dislike him is, IMHO, because he reminds them of their inability to act on their government.

Re: Terrible news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208313)

You are most likely right about that

Re:Terrible news... (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 10 months ago | (#44208241)

Throwing money at a problem doesn't always fix it.
Saying that we don't support a tax raise doesn't mean we are not willing to solve the problems. There are so many thing that wants our 1% taxes. That if we add them all up taxes would be a lot higher.
Often what is really needed is a process change, not more money.

Re: Terrible news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208061)

Bullshit. Future generations will read from textbooks that he was a vile traitor and educated a to why they must always remain unquestioningly loyal to the Homeland. ... If he is mentioned at all.

I mean, a lot o us ar acting like thins are on the verge of a big important positive change. They are not...the government does not care. Hangs are only going to get worse. Get used to it.

Re: Terrible news... (1)

turbidostato (878842) | about 10 months ago | (#44208353)

Future generations' textbooks will be electronic DRM'ed devices that will say what their lords wants them to say. They won't say anything about Snowden and, thus, Snowden won't exist.

Ironically is in today's world of information that the Greek's revenge on Herostratus can work out.

Re: Terrible news... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208071)

> A: This country is worth dying for.

If he really believed that, he'd become a martyr.

And if he were a martyr, he would gladly come back to America to let the U.S. court system "crucify" him, or at least battle it out.

But that's not the case, and instead he's running away like a coward after having thrown rocks at a giant.

Re: Terrible news... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208099)

I agree. Anyone who truly believes in a cause should abandon it as soon as possible to face the assigned consequences, thus proving sincerity.

Re: Terrible news... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208233)

That's because he does not want to end up like Barrett Brown, Jeremy Hammond, Aaron Swartz, Gottfrid Svartholm and Jacob Appelbaum, who've blown the whistle and decided to go to court over it. They disapeared from face of the earth without making a mark

Re: Terrible news... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 10 months ago | (#44208249)

That's silly. If you want to needlessly get yourself killed (I'm not saying he'd be killed), go ahead, but don't call others cowards simply because they don't want to follow suit. Dying for ideals is all well and good, but in this case, it simply isn't necessary.

obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44207991)

At least, it was not a waste of taxpayers dollars to spend on spin doctors.

Re:obviously (4, Informative)

Meshugga (581651) | about 10 months ago | (#44208027)

Not just spin doctors. Commenters on the internets. Public opinion is made today by manipulating virtual peer groups on social media, discussion boards, online newspaper comment sections, newsgroups etc.

What about (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44207995)

What about

'Based on what you've heard, do think government surveillance programs was the right thing to do or the wrong thing to do?'

Should we be surprised? (4, Insightful)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | about 10 months ago | (#44208007)

This isn't terribly shocking. If the last several years have told us anything it's that the American people don't really care if the government abuses its authority. Remember the Nixon scandal? That guy tried to wiretap a *single office* and the only reason that he wasn't impeached is because he resigned before congress could file the impeachment paperwork. Yet, when the government started wiretapping citizens years ago due to "national security" reasons, there was no such uproar. Sure, there were a few people that wanted the president impeached, but there was no real support for it. It's no surprise that the recent news of the wiretapping being larger than we thought has fallen on deaf ears.

Every single issue over the last couple decades has been met with more and more apathetic responses. The problem is going to get far worse before it gets better.

Re:Should we be surprised? (1)

jbolden (176878) | about 10 months ago | (#44208049)

Nixon was during a high point of people fighting back against government abuses. Don't forget what came before Nixon and was disclosed about FBI and local police misbehavior.

Re:Should we be surprised? (1)

Livius (318358) | about 10 months ago | (#44208259)

Part of the problems is that there isn't a second high point of people fighting back against government abuses after the US government invaded and occupied Iraq on false pretences and then collaborated in Wall Street fraud.

Re:Should we be surprised? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208055)

More to the point, who cares what a YouGov poll says?

YouGov is one of those pollsters that will show whatever you pay them to show by selecting biased samples.

I believe it was them who at the last general election in the UK on the same day put support for the Liberal Democrats at something like 19% and 29% because two different papers had asked for 2 different poll outcomes to support their chosen supported party (FWIW the actual result was 23% at the election). That's not in the realm of legitimate statistical error margins and is proof of outright biased sampling.

So the problem is that whilst this may be an independent study it may also not. Given that we know for a fact they do seem to produce results to order it's impossible to tell which of their polls are and aren't biased. The safest option then is to just ignore them or risk being grossly misinformed.

Not Suprised at All (1)

Kilo Kilo (2837521) | about 10 months ago | (#44208075)

Apathetic is the best word to describe it. The majority of Americans don't care about anything beyond their town and their next paycheck. Most people aren't concerned at all with "doing the right thing," they just want to do what the govt. tells them. Not sure how to say this without my tinfoil hat, but not everything the govt. does is right. For a long time now, the govt. has been steadily increasing its powers over the citizens and the average person doesn't notice or care.

Heat up the water slowly and the frog won't jump out, detain the frog indefinitely on terrorism charges... the point is bad things happen to the frog.

No wonder... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208023)

...when you condider the 24/7 anti-Snowdon propaganda in the US-media.

Shooting the messenger has a long tradition.

Re: No wonder... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208073)

Seriously.. We have journalists suggesting journalists should be executed as traitors for doing journalism and we don't think this s all part of an organized propaganda effort?

Re: No wonder... (4, Insightful)

johanw (1001493) | about 10 months ago | (#44208147)

Of course I'm not surprised. Goebels would be proud to see how well his lessons were learned and laugh on the irony of how his victors would call themselves moraly superior.

Re:No wonder... (1)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about 10 months ago | (#44208125)

And of course, the poll itself is part of the propaganda, as pointed out by an earlier sibling poster.

Shocking (5, Insightful)

Spad (470073) | about 10 months ago | (#44208029)

Is this really a surprise? Most sections of the media have spent the last month or so trying to portray Snowden as a traitor, who's weakened the national security of several countries, endangered inter-governmental cooperation (because now they know they were all spying on each other rather than just assuming they were), is possibly a bit weird and is now "palling around" with Russian and various South American states who are "enemies of teh freedoms".

In that context, of course peoples' opinions are going to start to shift.

Re:Shocking (4, Insightful)

Livius (318358) | about 10 months ago | (#44208263)

The public may not have clued in, but the "journalists" are aware they Snowden also outed them for their incompetence and corruption.

Does anyone here fill out YouGov Polls? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208033)

Does anyone here actually fill out YouGov Polls?

My point being, a survey is only as good as it's sample selection, so what is really being said is:

Support for Snowden shifts among Americans who fill out YouGov polls.

At least the questions aren't too leading.

5% shift (5, Insightful)

jbolden (176878) | about 10 months ago | (#44208035)

Wow does this headline have things reversed.

Edward Snowden has been subjected to a month long attack campaign. This started with go after his girlfriend for being a pole dancer. It followed with other negative news stories and criticism by major politicians. From there there was a federal espionage indictment. He then had to flee the country and the USA has gone to extraordinary lengths putting pressure on countries to isolate him. The media has been mainly complicit. And after all that is approval rating has dropped a mere 5 points.

That's the story.

Gonna Have to Disagree with You There (3, Interesting)

eldavojohn (898314) | about 10 months ago | (#44208115)

Wow does this headline have things reversed.

Edward Snowden has been subjected to a month long attack campaign. This started with go after his girlfriend for being a pole dancer. It followed with other negative news stories and criticism by major politicians. From there there was a federal espionage indictment. He then had to flee the country and the USA has gone to extraordinary lengths putting pressure on countries to isolate him. The media has been mainly complicit. And after all that is approval rating has dropped a mere 5 points.

That's the story.

Submitter here and I'm afraid I'm going to have to outright disagree with you. I just don't see your events lining up with this recent drop in support. You're talking about months old efforts to discredit him that seemed to have little effect on his popularity. If you read the HuffPo article you'll see:

Much of the drop in support for Snowden's actions since the earlier poll appears to have taken place among Republicans, who were divided, 37 percent to 37 percent, on whether Snowden did the right thing in the previous poll, but in the latest poll said by a 44 percent to 29 percent margin that he did the wrong thing.

As fallout from his revelations ruin our foreign relations [washingtonpost.com] I think you'll see a lot of conservatives switch positions. This is simply a more plausible explanation. US as a power player in world politics and economics is simply higher on some people's agendas then their own damned privacy.

Re: Gonna Have to Disagree with You There (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208289)

"Power player"? You call a country that is unable to persuade the like of HK or RU to hand over a person, and has to resort to such cowardly tactics as revoking citizenship, whos intelligence is not even able to distingush between plane carrying snowden and plane not carrying snowden as "power player"? Seems more like "sleezy player" and a "control whore" to me.

Re: Gonna Have to Disagree with You There (1)

rmstar (114746) | about 10 months ago | (#44208381)

There is a difference between absolute power and significant power. The US is very powerful by any interesting metric. It may not always get what it wants, of course, but it still gets a lot.

And neither HK nor RU are exactly small fish

Re:Gonna Have to Disagree with You There (1)

Lennie (16154) | about 10 months ago | (#44208355)

What I don't understand is how the a poll with only 1000 people could be somehow regarded as representative for 300.000.000+ people.

A poll of a 1000 people isn't even thought of as representative for my country which only has 16.000.000+ people.

That is what the first comment should have been about.

These types of things tell me how people in the US have lost touch with reality, please, please be more critical of the media and everything else. Apply more common sense.

Re:5% shift (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208145)

And the President has dropped 10%.

Re:5% shift (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208297)

Its even better than than, its over a 1000 people. Which means 50 people voted differently now, in an internet poll. Something tells me that its kinda like slashdot polls, and using them for anything would be really stupid, yet its worth posting articles about and getting on slashdot front page.

Of course they are going to vote against him (3, Insightful)

detain (687995) | about 10 months ago | (#44208037)

now that they know they are being monitored and showing him favor might get them on a watch list.

lesson learned? (1)

waddgodd (34934) | about 10 months ago | (#44208039)

I'd have thought that it was pretty much axiomatic to anyone that's spent any appreciable time surfing the intarwubz that e-fame is horribly fleeting. Andy Warhol's 15 minutes in web 3.0 terms is down to about three, and you've already wasted two on the ads. During this entire evolution, many people that have been paying attention for a bit have mentioned people like Klein, Manning, Drake, Thompson, Gilmore, Rivest, Schneier, and many other Names any security researcher ought to be intimately familiar with, only to get the electronic equivalent of blank looks. It's only a matter of time before Snowden gets a similar treatment. This is why when an electronic activism opportunity presents itself, we have to act NOW, not when we get a round tuit, because it will be long over by the time your round tuit gets there.

Declining support by creating desinterest (5, Insightful)

the.emmef (914877) | about 10 months ago | (#44208047)

By continuously shifting the attention away in the media from the human rights violations to what Snowdon is doing now (sitting on an airport) or did (show that the government is acting outside the law) people get bored. And especially since the violations of Americans' own rights is covered by law (that is implemented in a completely unaccountable way, though) the American people forget even more. But the European people - not their politicians, of course - are furious. If one chooses to be a diplomat or a politician, one knows there will be eavesdropping. But when I write a letter to someone, a foreign government that is supposed to be an allie should stay the f**k out of my mail: paper and electronic alike. Of course, I'm also blaming the United Kingdom. The western world induces terrorism itself by performing terrorism in other parts of the world. Conquer and divide. Give them weapons, let them fight each other as long as our companies' interests are ensured. Shoot people on flimsy evedence with a drone, without a trial, in countries we're not at war with. And the bloddy mess (innocent civilians) is a don't care. They are not our boys, but theirs. No wonder people start to fight back. People like Snowdon and Bradley Manning are necessary to show that politicians commit war crimes, blackmail countries and violate every possible law that's about humanity. That is because they act not in our interests (the public, the believed to be free people) but in the interest of big companies. Who also happen to own the media. And there goes your information, your well informed opinion and as a result yout humanity. The trend that you're seeing in this article is indifference. Governments are lobby clubs that lie to their people and allies alike. And they succeed.

Re:Declining support by creating desinterest (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 10 months ago | (#44208369)

But the European people - not their politicians, of course - are furious.

European people are always furious at the US, they just pick a different issue to be furious about every year. It's pointless and boring.

Idiots (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208051)

All sheep that deserve to be slaughtered, why do great man still think they can save them is beyond me.

TLA data mining / fishing expo? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208057)

these submissions stink of fish!

americans = bad then (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208069)

so hten they are fuckign ok with spying on other nations for no good reason then to be fucking pricks
then fuck your nation. and the next terror attack dont expect me to say one ting in sympathy

see how that fuckign works america
YOU LOSERS

Re:americans = bad then (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208177)

I disagree!

A sad day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208133)

When people are unable to determine whether someone opening their eyes to something awful their own government is doing TO THEM, is "right" or "wrong", it's a sad day. At least the people who claim it's "wrong" know they're lying to themselves.

Summary not correct (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208181)

Submitter is dishonestly editorialising. The YouGov poll clearly states, "Despite the changing opinion of Snowden, Americans remain opposed to the NSA’s activities. By 55% to 28%, they say the surveillance was an unnecessary intrusion into American lives. They remain divided on whether the surveillance has prevented terrorist attacks. And they continue to believe that the NSA, despite its claims to the contrary, has listened in on the conversations of Americans."

By contrast, submitter's final comment directly contradicts the article, revealing his/her own prejudices, "Instead of charging the populace into action Snowden may be facing apathy at best and public disapproval at worst."

Meanwhile in South America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208183)

Denouncing US 'Empire' South American Leaders Step Up to Protect Snowden
Presidents of Venezuela and Nicaragua allude to potential asylum for the stranded NSA whistleblower
Two South American nations, Venezuela and Nicaragua, indicated Friday that there may be some relief for NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, who for the past 14 days has unsuccessfully sought political asylum from a number of nations, all the while remaining trapped in the purgutory of Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport.

"As head of state of the Bolivarian republic of Venezuela, I have decided to offer humanitarian asylum to the young Snowden [...] to protect this young man from the persecution launched by the most powerful empire in the world," Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said—alluding to the United States—during an independence day speech in Caracas on Friday.
etc.
https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2013/07/06

His approval rating trumps Obama's (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208197)

I say we make him president.

Prou 2 B Amuricun - Least I know I'm free! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208201)

President Camacho: Shit. I know shit's bad right now, with all that starving bullshit, and the dust storms, and we are running out of french fries and burrito coverings. But I got a solution.

South Carolina Representative # 1: That's what you said last time, dipshit!

South Carolina Representative # 2: Yeah, I got a solution, you're a dick! South Carolina, what's up!

--------- http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/quotes [imdb.com]

Americans think what they are told to think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208203)

Faux News etc.

So: propoganda works. (2)

petes_PoV (912422) | about 10 months ago | (#44208229)

'Based on what you've heard ...

All this tells us is that people will change their opinion depending on what "the news" tells them. Spin a story one way and you've got a hero. Put a different emphasis on it and you create a villain.

Maybe if the truth came out, and was laid before the public with no interpretation, value judgements or commentary they would be in a position to make up their own mind (sometimes I just can't help but laugh as I'm writing this stuff) and come to a conclusion of their own.

I WAS with him (2)

sirwired (27582) | about 10 months ago | (#44208251)

When the story first broke, I believed Snowden was a hero. This was when the leaked information was regarding legally-questionable, at best, domestic spying on it's own citizens.

The leaks since then have shown that Snowden isn't just "blowing the whistle", he's leaking whatever details he could carry on whatever electronic intelligence programs he could get his hands on. It's not as if it should have come as a big shock to him (or anybody) that the NSA spies on the communications of foreign countries; that's kind of what we created the NSA for, and it's what we pay intelligence agencies for in general.

Re:I WAS with him (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208305)

and it's what we pay intelligence agencies for in general.

I really wish we'd stop paying them; it usually results in them wasting our money by spying on non-hostile countries.

Re:I WAS with him (1)

Grashnak (1003791) | about 10 months ago | (#44208379)

Let us know when you figure out a good definition for "non-hostile" and a way to determine which countries are, and will always remain, non-hostile.

How else do we find out? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208301)

If we presume – for a minute – that what the NSA is or was doing is legal, how would we have ever found out about it?

There needs to be a level of transparency in our government that just doesn't seem to exist ATM.

Re:How else do we find out? (1)

Grashnak (1003791) | about 10 months ago | (#44208371)

Wait, so you think that the details of legal (your presumption in this case) intelligence gathering operations should somehow be "transparent"?

How exactly do you imagine that working?

There of course needs to be government/legislative/judicial oversight, but by definition successful covert intelligence operations can't be transparent to the general public.

Depressing (2)

vikingpower (768921) | about 10 months ago | (#44208311)

Apathy is far worse than disapproval. It would show that the American public has, indeed, degraded into a few hundred million Homer and Marge Simpsons who only care about consumption. If apathy with regard to the Snowden case were indeed to become the prevailing sentiment, it would show that the American public DOES merit a surveillance state. Remember: every nation gets the leadership it merits.

Everyone who disagrees with me is stupid and lazy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#44208323)

Yes, yes, America sucks, the people are stupid and lazy. Snowden is a hero. You guys are like broken records.

Maybe, just maybe, you're wrong. Maybe not everyone who disagrees with you is an apathetic moron.

The reason why his approval has gone down (1)

voss (52565) | about 10 months ago | (#44208327)

When he first started he was talking about the government spying on regular american people, and the public was sympathetic to him. Then instead of stopping there he started talking about the US spying on other countries. The problem there is nothing unconstitutional about the US spying overseas and revealing this did not protect americans. There is a big difference between whistleblowing about misconduct towards americans and leaking top secret memos regarding foreign intelligence operations.

meaningless (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about 10 months ago | (#44208363)

That's 1000 adults and probably not even a representative sample. Nearly 1/3 of those polled are undecided. The poll really shows that Americans haven't made up their mind yet.

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