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Discovering NSA Code Names Via LinkedIn

timothy posted about a year ago | from the knew-linked-in-had-to-be-good-for-something dept.

Government 201

Okian Warrior writes with this news as reported by TechDirt: "The Washington Post revealed some of the code names for various NSA surveillance programs, including NUCLEON, MARINA and MAINWAY. Chris Soghoian has pointed out that a quick LinkedIn search for profiles with codenames like MARINA and NUCLEON happens to turn up profiles like this one which appear to reveal more codenames: 'Skilled in the use of several Intelligence tools and resources: ANCHORY, AMHS, NUCLEON, TRAFFICTHIEF, ARCMAP, SIGNAV, COASTLINE, DISHFIRE, FASTSCOPE, OCTAVE/CONTRAOCTAVE, PINWALE, UTT, WEBCANDID, MICHIGAN, PLUS, ASSOCIATION, MAINWAY, FASCIA, OCTSKYWARD, INTELINK, METRICS, BANYAN, MARINA.' TRAFFICTHIEF, eh? WEBCANDID? Hmm... Apparently, NSA employees don't realize that information they post online can be revealed."

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A fleeting moment of rich irony. (5, Funny)

Picass0 (147474) | about a year ago | (#44252861)

>> "Hmm... Apparently, NSA employees don't realize that information they post online can be revealed."

I admit to laughing at this.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (5, Funny)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about a year ago | (#44252905)

First thing I thought was pay back is a bitch.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253469)

I would love someone to make a site where we can collect and collate public information about NSA and other government employees.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (1)

richlv (778496) | about a year ago | (#44254161)

wikileaks might accept such a collection...

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (5, Interesting)

dywolf (2673597) | about a year ago | (#44253703)

first thing i thought was red herring

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253951)

First thing I thought was pay back is a bitch.

Yeah, because knowing there's a project called "DISHFIRE" is so utterly helpful to figuring out what they're doing. Because we all live in conspiracy theorist wish fulfillment movies where this one grizzled screwball is screaming about how he knew there was something called "DISHFIRE", and why didn't we believe him before, and now we can stop it... somehow... whatever it is.

On a side note, though, "DISHFIRE" is an incredibly hilarious name for just about any project.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (0)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#44252921)

Me too. It couldn't a more dumb-assed comment. Yeah, it's all an accident...

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (3, Interesting)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year ago | (#44253057)

There are at least two confirmed idiots working for the NSA [1] [mobandmultitude.com] , it's not that much of a stretch to think there's more where they came from.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (3, Insightful)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | about a year ago | (#44253683)

These idiots have some level of access to the assets that the NSA is developing.

And that is reason enough to shut the NSA down completely, and charge its career bureaucrats with criminal negligence wrt corruption of the US Constitution which they are supposed to be protecting.

If the NSA can allow these idjits to mess around, then how many of their other, more intelligent, personnel have found ways to make a little cash on the side by selling the kind of stuff Snowden has given away?

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#44253867)

"Recruiters"... That's like their HariKrishna department, right?

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (2)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#44253035)

>> "Hmm... Apparently, NSA employees don't realize that information they post online can be revealed."

I admit to laughing at this.

Or perhaps these are designed and planted to attract people interested in these acronyms and program names to lure them into some sort of trap, or merely to record who looked at these profiles.

Ah, ok, I'll go take my meds now. Latr, but remember: fcsjkeaw jlcekfw6eh ae nasje ki4tsvt!

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (3, Insightful)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#44253207)

People will keep looking until they find something. Give them what they wanted to find and they'll stop looking.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (2)

Cenan (1892902) | about a year ago | (#44253569)

Congress will keep looking until it's too much like work and they give up. Give them anything and they'll stop looking. From there it's just the whistleblowers that are left

Fixed to reflect new data.

Gives me an idea, though (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253125)

I really need a job. So, I figured I could pose as an NSA person. And when a potential employer calls for a reference, they'll just say, "We cannot confirm nor deny that he worked here."

My job description could be ANYTHING. I could make up ANYTHING.

Skilled in intelligence platforms such as: BANANA, MACARONI, METRICS, SAES, SPURIOUS, HEX, SEX, LEXX, PECS.

Programmed in Python, Jython, NSAthon.

Designed and developed a super computer that has broken all records.

Re:Gives me an idea, though (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253381)

Developed a ciphertext-only key-recovery attack on AES-256.

Re:Gives me an idea, though (5, Funny)

Dr_Barnowl (709838) | about a year ago | (#44253945)

Developed a plaintext recovery attack for SHA-256

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253761)

>> "Hmm... Apparently, NSA employees don't realize that information they post online can be revealed."

I admit to laughing at this.

Oh they know info can be searched. This isn't much more than the tendency to overshare info combined with (for example) printing as much of a resume as you can.

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (4, Insightful)

pegr (46683) | about a year ago | (#44254039)

Submitted earlier with a better headline. (sigh) [slashdot.org]

No, the gotcha is not revealing project code names. Why post code names if the names are secret? The gotcha is...(ahem)

REVEALING THE NAMES OF ANALYSTS WITH ACCESS TO TOP SECRET PROJECTS!

Re:A fleeting moment of rich irony. (4, Informative)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#44254191)

Pretty much. Once we have the names of a program. we can submit FOIA requests on them. thats one of the catch 22s with FOIA. you have to know what you are looking for, you cant just say "I want all the info on the NSA spying on americans" you need to say" I want all information on codenameA codenameB codenameC." will they give it? doubtful but its a start.

RE: Irony as now google is your pal (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254069)

google [google.com]

site:.linkedin.com (FASTSCOPE|WEBCANDID|Dishfire|PINWALE)

Re: Irony as now google is your pal (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about a year ago | (#44254173)

If you look at the results of that list, you'll see that almost all of them are contractors. Still useful info.

Re: Irony as now google is your pal (5, Insightful)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about a year ago | (#44254269)

Digging a little deeper, if you refactor the contents of those search results, you get a VERY complete picture of what's going on... for example, PINWALE is the code name for Mission Systems, developed for the Military by Northrop Grumman. Most of the people who developed the system appear to be on LinkedIn :)

That's just a taste; anyone good at graph theory and data mining could probably put together quite a dossier of people and projects based on the public info available through LinkedIn/Google.

Just saying Hi!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44252871)

You know who I am.

Re:Just saying Hi!! (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about a year ago | (#44253171)

You know who I am.

On the internet, the NSA knows you're a dog.

Re:Just saying Hi!! (2)

awkScooby (741257) | about a year ago | (#44253211)

You know who I am.

Yes, you're a foreigner, until proven otherwise.

Re:Just saying Hi!! (2)

Quirkz (1206400) | about a year ago | (#44253621)

Everyone's a foreigner to somewhere, right?

Re: Just saying Hi!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253309)

Gte;(&83.>$£]3â£|â864

Sounds like FOIA time (3, Interesting)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about a year ago | (#44252873)

To me this sounds like it is time to file a bunch of freedom of information act requests. The bigger question is what if anything will the media do with this newf ound info.

Re:Sounds like FOIA time (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253403)

They will await further orders from the administration on how best to cover this up.

Re:Sounds like FOIA time (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253465)

What will the media do??? Seriously, did you just get off the bus from Neptune?

The US media will roll right by this and obsess over the latest trial of the century or simply fill air space with feel-good, content free packages about people "making a difference".

Re:Sounds like FOIA time (4, Informative)

alphatel (1450715) | about a year ago | (#44253721)

To me this sounds like it is time to file a bunch of freedom of information act requests. The bigger question is what if anything will the media do with this newf ound info.

I requested more info for you, here is some you should enjoy
http://s3.documentcloud.org/documents/716069/boozallenhamiltonnsa.pdf [documentcloud.org]

Apparently Booz employees forgot that their cloud documents are.... well, public

Are all of these acronyms? (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | about a year ago | (#44252875)

Because if so, how is it even possible for someone at the NSA to get this bored while listening to everyone's phone calls?

Re:Are all of these acronyms? (5, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about a year ago | (#44253253)

The government retains a crack team of acronymists. They spend days laboring over each acronym making it perfect. Some examples

MANPADS (Man-portable air defense system)
DILDO (Direct Input Limited Duty Officer)
ASSBAG (Airframe Structure Support Boeing Advisory Group)

**I didn't make these up, there are sources for them but that would take more effort than Slashdot is accustomed to. Plus I accidentally closed those tabs already.

Re:Are all of these acronyms? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253431)

He really DIDN'T make these up. Google works fine: ASSBAG [allacronyms.com]

code names are: (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44252899)

unclassified

Re:code names are: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253463)

Some are, some aren't.

The breakouts for SI and TK, two SCI (Sensitive Compartmented Information) compartments for example, are classified.

Michigan (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44252915)

So apparently now my entire state is an NSA tool. Wonderful, as if having Detroit in our borders wasn't bad enough.

Re:Michigan (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44253353)

Wtf is right. We haven't gotten this much attention since the Great Lakes Avengers branch.

Re:Michigan (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#44253935)

I thought the most telling names were FASCIA and BANYAN.

FASCIA: Immediately makes me think it has something to do with face recognition

BANYAN: Named after a parasitic tree that grows in the cracks of other trees. Uh huh...

Re:Michigan (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#44253973)

Addendum: And I guess ASSOCIATION is too obvious for mention, that's naming as straightforward as an old Microsoft product.

Re:Michigan (1)

CTachyon (412849) | about a year ago | (#44254319)

I thought the most telling names were FASCIA and BANYAN.

FASCIA: Immediately makes me think it has something to do with face recognition

BANYAN: Named after a parasitic tree that grows in the cracks of other trees. Uh huh...

FASCIA is actually a real word: the name for the thin sheets of connective tissue that bundle other tissues into tubes [wikipedia.org] . It's not uncommon for someone with arch support problems to pull or tear a muscle fascia in their foot. More ominously, fasciae have previously made it into the news by way of "flesh-eating disease" (necrotizing fasciitis), which is where a bacterial infection (esp. strep or staph) breaches the superficial fascia and uses it to spread quickly under the skin, faster than the immune system can pin it down and mount a credible threat.

This TRAFFICTHIEF? (-1, Offtopic)

Plumpaquatsch (2701653) | about a year ago | (#44252943)

http://www.trafficthief.net/ [trafficthief.net]

This Powerful New Software Allows You To Practically Steal Traffic Search Rankings From Your Competitors!

Simple explanation (5, Informative)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44252945)

Project code names are not classified, ever. Every project has a unclassified code name like any of the above which can be used for things like budgeting and frankly, resumes. A guy I know tried to get "FLUFFY BUNNY" approved as a code name, but they denied it. The easy way to tell, is that unclassified code names are single words chosen by a random computer word generator, and the classified code names are always 2 words, chosen again by a random computer word generator.

While this may be interesting, the reality of the Fort Meade area is that any job in intelligence, analysis, or IT with a location of Fort Meade or Annapolis Junction, MD is a NSA job. Some of them even post on Craigslist [craigslist.org] and one time, I had a Facebook add pop up that said "Want an NSA Clearance?" (not a typo, the company messed up their grammar).

Re:Simple explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253039)

So PRISM is accidental, and not actually because a prism splits light?

Re:Simple explanation (5, Interesting)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44253241)

Simple answer, yes. Complex answer, sometimes the project managers want a hip and cool project name so they try to come up with a generic term for their project that is similar to what the project does. The project name has to go through a CAO (classification advisory officer), of which there are 20-25 at any given time. They are always people in positions that can be named to the public, so any name of an individual on the NSA website is a CAO. Like the Director of the NSA or the division chiefs. The CAO determines whether or not the project name gives away too much information about the details of the project.

In all reality, all of those project code names are probably one specific type of information that just came from different sources. Pinwale [wikipedia.org] is e-mails. So one of them is a database of foreign HF intercepts, another is a database of foreign-bound cell phones, one is a database of every phone call made by political opponents of the administration, etc.

Re:Simple explanation (4, Informative)

TheNinjaroach (878876) | about a year ago | (#44253091)

Want an NSA Clearance?

That grammar is not incorrect. Phonetically, the "N" begins with a vowel sound so "an NSA" is correct.

Re:Simple explanation (0, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254099)

Again, incorrect. You consider not the phonetics of the acronym, but the phonetics of the letters the acronym represents, or as though it was a literal word if it doesn't stand for anything.

Re:Simple explanation (2)

a-zarkon! (1030790) | about a year ago | (#44254261)

That grammar is correct. Phonetically, the "N" begins with a vowel sound so "an NSA" is correct.

FTFY - Grammar police should endeavor to avoid use of the double negative.

Re:Simple explanation (4, Informative)

heypete (60671) | about a year ago | (#44253147)

I had a Facebook add pop up that said "Want an NSA Clearance?" (not a typo, the company messed up their grammar).

According to Purdue [purdue.edu] , words that start with consonants may be preceded with "an" if they have a "vowel sounds". They give the example of "an MSDS" and "an SPCC". Similarly, words that start with vowels but have consonant sounds use "a" [purdue.edu] .

I'm no expert in grammar, but it seems possible that "an NSA clearance" may be correct.

Any experts want to chime in?

Re:Simple explanation (4, Informative)

BForrester (946915) | about a year ago | (#44253243)

You're mostly right.
  - "Want a NSA clearance?" is incorrect.
  - "Want an NSA clearance?" is better.
  - "Want NSA clearance?" would be better still. There's no need for an article at all.

Re:Simple explanation (0)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about a year ago | (#44253443)

Disagree. You can only have -one- NSA security clearance as it implies you are cleared for it AND everything below it.

Examples:

"Want an security clearance?" is incorrect.
"Want the security clearance?" is OK.
"Want a security clearance?" is CORRECT.
"Want security clearance?" is CORRECT. Agreed this is best.

Substituting 'NSA' for 'security' doesn't change anything as both words are nouns that start with consonants.

--
In ~10 years (2024) humans will finally be allowed to know the truth that we are not alone, and never have been.

Re:Simple explanation (5, Informative)

Mashdar (876825) | about a year ago | (#44253797)

In English, a/an are selected phonetically and are otherwise identical. "An" does not imply plurality (in fact it implies singularity).

Substituting "NSA" for "security" in your examples does make a difference, because "NSA" begins with a phonetic vowel sound, whereas "security" begins with a phonetic consonant.

Articles in English are selected phonetically, not typographically, and thus "an NSA" is correct, whereas "a NSA" is not. This can be confusing to look at, but who ever said English was easy?

Re:Simple explanation (1)

lgw (121541) | about a year ago | (#44253909)

How does "enessay" start with a consonant? "A" or "an" match the sound of the word.

Re:Simple explanation (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about a year ago | (#44254103)

"Want an security clearance" is incorrect because it produces what is called a "glottal stop": that uncomfortable catching in your throat that you get when two sounds don't flow well together. For instance, if you say "a hour" as they are meant to be pronounced, you'll produce a glottal stop between the "a" and "h". That's why English speakers use "a" and "an" interchangeably depending on what sounds are involved. The "an" is used to avoid the glottal stop in situations where "a" would produce it, which is why proper English would have its speakers say "an hour" rather than "a hour".

Also, as has been pointed out, in English, "a/an" are singular articles that refer to a generic but individual item, whereas "the" refers to a specific individual item. Asking if someone wants "the NSA clearance" would suggest that it was a particular NSA clearance we're talking about, such as my clearance or your clearance. Asking if someone wants "an NSA clearance" would suggest that we're talking about a generic, but singular, NSA clearance, rather than one that belonged to someone already. And, in this case, using "an" instead of "a" is appropriate, since it avoids the glottal stop that occurs when vocalizing "a NSA", since "NSA" begins with a vowel sound.

Re:Simple explanation (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about a year ago | (#44253257)

I took french in High school, where consonant endings can run into the next word if it beings with a vowel sound (not just letter). In fact, even if the preceeding word has a silent consonant (the french seem to love silent consonants) they will pronounce it to make the connection.... So it always annoys me listening to the local NPR station as the restaurant "Chez Henri" is pronounced "Shay Enri", which would normally be correct for each word but, when taken together it should be pronounced more like a single word "ShayzEnri"

Re:Simple explanation (1)

WaroDaBeast (1211048) | about a year ago | (#44254165)

Chez Henri" is pronounced "Shay Enri", which would normally be correct for each word but, when taken together it should be pronounced more like a single word "ShayzEnri"

It annoys you because you're not familiar with what the letter h actually does in French. Sometimes — remember, this is French, so you'll always have a nice list of exceptions to cram into your brain —, words that begin with an h (1) will mean that there is a glottal stop, word initially.

Try comparing the phrases "sept amis" and "sept héros" and you'll understand what I'm talking about. It's impossible for a native speaker to pronounce the latter "saitero" No, sir, they'll always say "sait'ero".(2)
That weird question mark-looking symbol is the glottal stop I mentioned above. Basically, you block the air going through your throat with your glottis, generating what is called a plosion in linguistics.

If that is still obscure, try comparing with how some English speakers pronounce the word "mutton." While most will say /muh-tn/, some speakers say /muh'n/. You'll know what I'm talking about if you've paid attention to the way British people speak.

I know... French is like, impossible to learn for foreigners. Good thin I'm a native speaker. :D


(1) Quite funny, huh? "An h..." no one would ever want to say "a h."
(2) Because I can't seem to make IPA work in the comments, Ichose to represent the glottal stop with an apostrophe.

Re:Simple explanation (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44253687)

I really wasn't sure, grammar wise. All I knew is that some sub-contractor was so desperate for employees that they posted Facebook ads.

Re:Simple explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253885)

Technically, "NSA" isn't a word. It's an acronym. As such, the letters are treated as individual words. N is pronounced as "en", which means that "an en ess ay" would be phonetically and grammatically correct.

This quirk of treating letters as words in acronyms is also why "DVD's" is the correct plural form and "DVDs" is not. Letters of an acronym stand alone. Letters that stand alone are pluralized with an apostrophe-s.

On the other end of things, you often hear idiotic TV announcers using the phrase "an historic". This is not correct, since the word "historic" starts with a consonant-H sound. "An hour" is correct because the H is silent, and the word starts with a vowel sound (it's pronounced like "our").

So, to recap: "An NSA clearance" is correct. "An hour" is correct. "An historic" makes you sound like a tool. And the next retard that uses "impacting" or "impacted" to mean anything other than a collision or a tooth infection gets a bullet.

Re:Simple explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253933)

Any experts want to chime in?

You're absolutely right! (Trust me, I'm an expert!)

Re:Simple explanation (1)

WaroDaBeast (1211048) | about a year ago | (#44254233)

You're completely right. Whether we use a or an depends on what sound comes after it. The letter itself doesn't matter, because a letter that is a vowel can sill begin with a consonant sound-wise, and vice versa.

E.g. : "a university" but "an umbrella"

Remember: language is first and foremost spoken. Letters are scriptural elements, and as such, weigh much less in the language balance.

No. "an" is right. (2)

Arakageeta (671142) | about a year ago | (#44253167)

"The rule is that you use a before words that start with a consonant sound and an before words that start with a vowel sound."

It's all about sound. "N" is pronounced "En." Hence, "an."

Grammar Girl: http://tinyurl.com/nuj8h5a [tinyurl.com]

I write, an hexagon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253489)

Now that's really Old School, but also correct. And, please, don't confuse my spice 'erb with my friend Herb!

Re:Simple explanation (1)

H0p313ss (811249) | about a year ago | (#44253209)

The easy way to tell, is that unclassified code names are single words chosen by a random computer word generator, and the classified code names are always 2 words, chosen again by a random computer word generator.

That doesn't match my experience, but times change.

Re:Simple explanation (1)

Sparticus789 (2625955) | about a year ago | (#44253293)

It was a pretty recent change. Happened after the whole 2005 wiretapping thingy.

Re:Simple explanation (1)

darthscsi (144954) | about a year ago | (#44253307)

So debian release names are unclassified and Ubuntu release names are classified. Makes sense.

Re:Simple explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253417)

Project code names are not classified, ever. Every project has a unclassified code name like any of the above which can be used for things like budgeting and frankly, resumes. A guy I know tried to get "FLUFFY BUNNY" approved as a code name, but they denied it. The easy way to tell, is that unclassified code names are single words chosen by a random computer word generator, and the classified code names are always 2 words, chosen again by a random computer word generator.

While this may be interesting, the reality of the Fort Meade area is that any job in intelligence, analysis, or IT with a location of Fort Meade or Annapolis Junction, MD is a NSA job. Some of them even post on Craigslist [craigslist.org] and one time, I had a Facebook add pop up that said "Want an NSA Clearance?" (not a typo, the company messed up their grammar).

The mess up wasn't in grammar; the NSA doesn't have their own "clearance", they utilize the system put in place by the DoD, so the entire notion of an "NSA Clearance" is nonsensical. There are a variety of classification clearance levels that are required for different positions at the NSA.

Re:Simple explanation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253799)

FLUFFY BUNNY would have been better than Carnivore or Prism.

Re:Simple explanation (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year ago | (#44253889)

If you know the project name, you can make an FOIA request.

Someone needs to check their acronyms (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44252983)

BANYAN???
Isn't that the almost extinct government and defence email system, Banyan Vines??

Re:Someone needs to check their acronyms (1)

T.E.D. (34228) | about a year ago | (#44253237)

BANYAN??? Isn't that the almost extinct government and defence email system, Banyan Vines??

I suspect that's exactly what it is referring to. I noticed at least one other word in that list, (NAVINT), that isn't really a program. NAVINT is just a nice short acronym for Naval Intelligence. [acronymfinder.com] It kind of makes me wonder if there isn't some other stuff in there that has nothing to do with classified programs.

Whoever got hold of this communication clearly wasn't really well-versed enough in that kind of work to tell what exactly is a technical term and what is is an actual NSA program.

Re:Someone needs to check their acronyms (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44253249)

BANYAN???
Isn't that the almost extinct government and defence email system, Banyan Vines??

I was thinking of that hack comedian from the Seinfeld show; you know, the "That's gold, Jerry! GOLD!" guy?

Then I googled it, and found out the character's name is actually Kenny Bania, not Banyan.

Sad now :(

Disinformation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44252995)

Is this real info or is it disinformation?

We may never know. Which is exactly the way the spooks want it to be.

Re:Disinformation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253031)

They're real cover words.

Re:Disinformation? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about a year ago | (#44253277)

Is this real info or is it disinformation?

My guess is, less than 25% of the terms are real, the rest are well-poison.

Black Briar (3, Funny)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about a year ago | (#44253009)

Treadstone

Re:Black Briar (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | about a year ago | (#44253069)

Treadstone is all but decommissioned at this point.

But Black Briar... really feel has good traction. It's got legs. It'll run and run.

Missed out the important ones (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253023)

So long as CODE NIGHTMARE GREEN, MAGINOT BLUE STARS, and SCORPION STARE aren't on the list, I'm happy.

Well, happier.

Well, less unhappy.

Re:Missed out the important ones (2)

lgw (121541) | about a year ago | (#44253955)

SCORPION STARE was disappointing anyhow. I want a room where any camera in the panopticon state can be displayed on the wall monitor, and I want a basilisk in that room! Hand camera-weapons just seem so ... everyday.

Re:Missed out the important ones (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#44254059)

GORGON STARE is real.

Why should they think somebody spies on them? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253043)

Why should NSA employees think somebody spies on them on LinkedIn? Very unlikely, isn't it?

copy them because they will be taken down (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253083)

Odds are they will disappear. The guy linked is active duty military, but if any contractors are up there, they will be out of work.

ARCMAP is not a code name- (2)

uncwjason (723431) | about a year ago | (#44253119)

Awesome! I don't work for the NSA, but I do use ARCMAP....although Esri would prefer it spelled "ArcMap". It's common GIS software, not a NSA program.

Re:ARCMAP is not a code name- (1)

T.E.D. (34228) | about a year ago | (#44253269)

That brings us to three now (ArcMap, Banyan, & NavInt) that are known to not be NSA code names. It would be funny if the entire list was in fact known commercial technical terms and/or government divisions.

arcmap (3, Informative)

hackula (2596247) | about a year ago | (#44253121)

Arcmap is the unofficial name for ESRI's flagship product ArcGIS Desktop.

Re:arcmap (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253343)

Arcmap is the unofficial name for ESRI's flagship product ArcGIS Desktop.

Imagine all the privacy violations ArcInfo is capable of

Re:arcmap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253905)

No it isn't. It is the official name of the main mapping component of ArcGIS (which is a package of programs).

minority report (2)

beefoot (2250164) | about a year ago | (#44253153)

> Used a variety of tools and data to provide advanced threat warnings to American civilian, government, and military personnel He can't possible be thinking of getting a better job with that line on his linkedin profile. That's so last-decade.

Well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253177)

It works both ways... To a point...

POOPOOHEAD (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253215)

FARTKNOCKER, DILLWEED, BUTTMONKEY
etc etc and now some gibberish to get past the filter'ug'ougougui'ivikv'iyf;uy;bljkbknKnkbljgkjbkn:n:HLJjvk/v/k

Not the brightest move (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253265)

As has already been mentioned, these code words are not classified. Regardless, I can see how this probably isn't the classiest move from an NSA perspective. I'll bet his profile got him a nice interview with his superiors on using discretion though.
 
Past all that I think this is hilarious, and the timing is cosmic. What will the NSA entertain us with next? I just can't wait.
 
On the side, I wonder how many (if any) potential Snowden types area are lurking in the NSA, ready to explode with the wrong doing they see all around them. I can only hope that there and many and that they do in fact pop.

Re:Not the brightest move (1)

Will.Woodhull (1038600) | about a year ago | (#44253937)

On the side, I wonder how many potential Snowden types are are lurking in the NSA, ready to explode with the wrong doing they see all around them.

More disturbing is the realization that there must be others who are like Snowden in terms of access and skills, but are motivated more by individual profit than by altruism. How many secrets of the Snowden type have been sold to whom?

The NSA is a nest of corruption that needs to be burned out, totally destroyed. With those in charge of it sent to prison for allowing such a criminal cesspool to exist within the USA government. These guys have their own secret courts and their own secret laws and lie with impunity to Congress. Why would they not also lie to the White House and the Courts, including their own secret courts?

Meh (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year ago | (#44253321)

ANCHORY, AMHS, NUCLEON, TRAFFICTHIEF imagine two dozen more, which you will have to, because Slashdot's asinine caps filter prevents them. Then imagine the following in all caps for sarcastic effect:

imagineabootsteppingonahumanfacedotdotdotforever

More words for "spook lists"! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253411)

Yay! More words to put at the bottom of e-mails, to tweak the noses of the spooks.
      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2001/05/31/what_are_those_words/
      http://attrition.org/misc/keywords.html

Ain't meta-data a bitch! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253515)

The cats out of the bag!

bULL... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253545)

ARCMAP is a mapping software technology, signav is short speak for signal navigation, michigan is the name of a state, etc.
I'm suspecting a random association with mostly noise.

Re:bULL... (1)

Geirzinho (1068316) | about a year ago | (#44253827)

On the other hand ANCHORY is an actual NSA system (http://www.fas.org/irp/program/disseminate/anchory.htm)

I guess they use both COTS and in-house developed software at NSA too...

But he lacks one skill (5, Funny)

Hentes (2461350) | about a year ago | (#44253547)

All these skills and he still didn't figure out how to turn off capslock.

Re:But he lacks one skill (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253713)

All these skills and he still didn't figure out how to turn off capslock.

Well, coverterms are correctly spelled all caps. And so are dissemination controls/directives.

It's fun to make up your own codenames! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254281)

(Gah, the filter is punting my allcaps.)

dishbot, cambercam, fishface, spumoni, glorpfest, hempman, boogerstorm, cantlog, ferrisblock, vestango, winterblab, octothorpe, bruinsuck, ashmorton, moonbunt, spazzketeer, fapulent, wishbonesque, monkeybone, torqueledger, fistulous, ontolaudatory, porkpop, ...

If you can't keep the code names secret (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254283)

...you'll have to leave the treehouse

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