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PCWorld Magazine Is No More

timothy posted about a year ago | from the long-rather-for-the-old-and-big-computer-shopper dept.

The Media 164

harrymcc writes "After slightly more than 30 years, PCWorld — one of the most successful computer magazines of all time — is discontinuing print publication. It was the last general-interest magazine for PC users, so it really is the end of an era. Over at TIME, I paused to reflect upon the end of the once-booming category, in part as a former editor at PCWorld, but mostly as a guy who really, really loved to read computer magazines."

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PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253623)

Good riddance to it I say!

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253967)

Agreed, even if it wasn't full of ads, printing a paper magazine to discuss multimedia machines that could better display the content is insane.

Paper computer magazines haven't made any sense for quite a while now.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (2)

RabidReindeer (2625839) | about a year ago | (#44254909)

Agreed, even if it wasn't full of ads, printing a paper magazine to discuss multimedia machines that could better display the content is insane.

Paper computer magazines haven't made any sense for quite a while now.

Well, when Linux Journal went paperless, I dropped my subscription. I own an eReader and there's a lot of stuff I'd rather read that way, but technical magazines are an exception.

PCWeek's website has always been pretty useless to me, however. I haven't actually laid hands on the print edition for a long while, but it used to be a lot better compared to its online edition.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (5, Interesting)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#44253971)

Good riddance to it I say!

Ah, but in the early days, the ads were the best part. I rarely even bothered to read the articles. When each issue arrived, I would open it up to the cheap yellow "tombstone" ads near the back. You could run an ad there for $100/month. There was always some fascinating new gizmo that some guy was making in his garage and advertising there. After a month or two, most of the products disappeared, but some of them grew into successful startups. Reading those ads was like watching the history of technology unfold.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254793)

Completely agree - I fondly remember picking up Computer Shopper to see what the best deals were for buying cheap memory, hard drives, etc. Zines like Byte and PCWorld were ok for general purpose reading, but Dr Dobbs was one of my favs for programming. Along with 2600 and Phrack for stuff on the fringes.

Thanks for the memories - I hate to say it, but today's tech is nowhere as exciting as those wild-west days were. I feel privileged to have been part of that.

Now get off my lawn!

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (2)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#44254089)

I havent had a sub in many many years but as a kid in the early 90s PCmag was just plain awesome, It really helped me learn in my early years (6-12)

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (1)

adeelarshad82 (1482093) | about a year ago | (#44254475)

Emm PCMag and PCWorld are not the same. PCMag stopped print years ago.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#44255467)

whoops, yeah, I had them both years ago, havent had either since around 2K1

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (3, Insightful)

JackieBrown (987087) | about a year ago | (#44254243)

I loved it for the game demo cds that came with it.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (4, Interesting)

ma1wrbu5tr (1066262) | about a year ago | (#44254615)

I remember getting 3.5" floppies loaded with great stuff. Amazing to me that there was so much fun to be had on 1.44MBs. I loved the Doom shareware demo and it led to a sale of the full game. The "economics of FREE" in action.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about a year ago | (#44254579)

They died off because all the kind of user who would have read that mag is the kind of user who would replace a PC with a locked-down toy tablet.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (4, Interesting)

HaZardman27 (1521119) | about a year ago | (#44254709)

Or they could be browsing the internet on a PC. They could even buy a cheap tablet with wifi access to carry into their bathroom so they could read from more useful resources than an ad-filled magazine even while they relieve themselves. The reason that PC magazines died off is because they are an absolutely outdated medium, not because the people who would read them are now hipsters.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (5, Informative)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#44255413)

around here it was just not being outdated that killed them. some local magazines were first to go online and being up to date. like this one magazine I used to subscribe to.

what killed them(for me and majority of subscribers) was that when computers went really mainstream in late '90s they went totally mainstream with their articles - this ended up in them having just shit for content. all they have now are some fluff reviews, nothing about how to do cool stuff and full page images. the same magazine that had 10 years earlier articles about c64 coding, assembly, basic, interfacing hw to computers, really soulful honest game reviews, detoriated to a magazine that had yearly printer reviews, yearly monitor reviews - and the text for those pieces could have been the same from year to year. somewhere along the line they even dipped the bottom of the barrel and started doing "full" game reviews based on fucking screenshots, in order to "compete" while in reality I or other readers wouldn't have cared shit if the games they reviewed were 6 months or even a year old as long as they reviewed them properly. they should have kept writing for the computer hobbyists, since the computer non-hobbyists aren't going to read their fucking magazine - offline OR online. the fuckers even changed the paper to some glossy variant that doesn't flame up easily so couldn't even light up the stove for the sauna with it if the issue was just bullshit...

but non-hobbyists so called casual computer users are a bigger market so they tried to steer the magazine toward them... failing miserably along the way. and now that same fucking magazine wants me to pay 1 euro - I'm not kidding - for reading a single article online. FUCK EM.

I mean, that magazine had the guts to do a game review this short back in the day: "shi**y clone of commando". on print - and apparently that was enough to say about the game and I believed the review, it seemed honest. now later they didn't dare to criticize any game that harshly, everything is at least "ok" and they spend paragraphs justifying how someone casual might like the game or just outright praising the game without seeing it play nor playing it.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (3, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | about a year ago | (#44254711)

Preach Mrs AC, boy was that the damned truth! My ex gave me a subscription to the thing a few years back and the first thing I had to do when an issue came in was open it over a trash bin to catch all the damned inserts that would fall out, and it seemed like every article was spread halfway across the mag because what would take 2 paragraphs on a webpage would take 4 pages thanks to all the ads they had jammed into each and every page!

Needless to say when that year was up no matter how many emails they sent begging for me to renew I didn't, at least on the Web I can control the ads and refuse to go to pages where they take 2 paragraphs and spread it out to 4 pages, with PCW they just crammed the living hell out of the thing. I bet if one were to take one of their last issues, cut out all the ads and just print the actual stories? damned thing probably wouldn't be 14 pages long, the rest was just crap.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (3, Insightful)

RenderSeven (938535) | about a year ago | (#44255027)

Gotta love that new magazine trend: "continued on page 82" and there aren't any page numbers. Whoever came up with that is an Evil Genius.

Re:PC World - More Ads then the Internet! (1)

jdmuskrat (1463759) | about a year ago | (#44255595)

no loss, did not know it still existed.

No worries (4, Funny)

Spy Handler (822350) | about a year ago | (#44253633)

PCWorld can just rename itself MobileWorld or CloudWorld or SocialWorld and it will be thriving again!

Re:No worries (1)

MLBs (2637825) | about a year ago | (#44253659)

I was thinking more like TabletWorld, if you follow the analysts of the PC market.

Re:No worries (1)

WillAdams (45638) | about a year ago | (#44254047)

It's strange, for some reason, Pen Computing Magazine has always been a niche publication: http://www.pencomputing.com/ [pencomputing.com] --- guess they missed out when they picked the wrong part of the device for their name --- wonder how theyd've faired if they'd named themselves ``Tablet Computing Magazine''.

Re:No worries (2)

kaatochacha (651922) | about a year ago | (#44254701)

TabletCloud Magazine. There's a winner right there!

Re:No worries (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44253745)

Another nail in the PC coffin. Wake me when it's time to spread the ashes.

Re:No worries (2)

cuncator (906265) | about a year ago | (#44254213)

Will do, Rip Van Winkle. See you in a decade or two.

Re:No worries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254235)

So... why would there be a coffin if there's going to be a cremation?

Re:No worries (1)

Fishchip (1203964) | about a year ago | (#44254325)

Well, you know, it's like Rasputin. Poisoned, shot, beaten and drowned. Gotta make sure it stays dead.

Re:No worries (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254341)

Cause death of the pc fearmongers tend to be stupid.

Re:No worries (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44254445)

Guess you've never been to a cremation. At least not one in the western world.

Re:No worries (1)

Applehu Akbar (2968043) | about a year ago | (#44254529)

Undoubtedly there will be an app for that.

Re:No worries (4, Funny)

the agent man (784483) | about a year ago | (#44253809)

or how about "Post-PCWorld" ?

Re:No worries (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253815)

I'll go with SocialWorld, seems like most have gone that way, including DrDobbs. Now that I think about it, even the Embedded magazine went to child like hell as well and is no more. Even EETimes, is just globalist social fluff.

Re:No worries (5, Funny)

operagost (62405) | about a year ago | (#44253861)

I'd go with LinuxDesktopWorld myself. I hear next year will be the year it finally takes off!

Re:No worries (3, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about a year ago | (#44254493)

Yeah, but even so - everyone will expect it to be free.

Re:No worries (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | about a year ago | (#44255661)

If only Linux format would get a US distributor or hire some US staff to do a US region version, I might actually subscribe! That's the closest thing to LinuxDesktopWorld.

Re:No worries (1)

RocketRabbit (830691) | about a year ago | (#44254195)

If the "success" of SlashBI and CloudSlash is any indication of the success they will have, it'd be best not to!

Re:No worries (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | about a year ago | (#44255641)

For the last few years it HAS been essentially Mobile World. There's more articles about "apps" than desktop software. Of course, that's because the mass market people actually buy apps but tend to not actually purchase software.

For a while there they were Blackberry World and seemed aimed at wannabe entrepreneurs/SOHO users.

e-mags are still magazines (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253653)

So long as PC World continues to publish content on their site or maybe even start publishing via Google Play, this is not the end of the magazine. It has merely shifted formats.

Figures (5, Insightful)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | about a year ago | (#44253663)

You can only ramble on about going paperless in print articles for so long before you start to look a little silly.

Who? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253667)

PC World?

I haven't seen them on the magazine rack for over ten years. I didn't even know they were still in business.

About time (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253699)

I don't know how much time I've spent correcting people on things they read in that worthless joke of a magazine but it's been one of the largest sources of misinformation in the industry I've ever seen, almost as bad as that blog Rob Malda used to run.

Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253701)

I know that given the rise in electronic media, this is pretty much an inevitability for print magazines, but it's still pretty shocking. PCWorld was one of my favorite tech magazines. I guess the problem was that I'd only read it while I was perusing the drug store, or if I felt like splurging on an occasional copy. Magazine subscriptions are a totally unnecessary expense for most folks now.

Sad, but no great loss... (4, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | about a year ago | (#44253709)

For at least 15 of those 30 years, it read more like Computer Shopper, anyway. I mourned it a long time ago.

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (3, Informative)

NormHome (99305) | about a year ago | (#44253865)

For sure, but what did it for me was their reviews and how good competitive products never made it in to the group being reviewed and things that were highly rated took a beating on end user reviews.

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (5, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year ago | (#44254251)

For sure, but what did it for me was their reviews and how good competitive products never made it in to the group being reviewed and things that were highly rated took a beating on end user reviews.

To be included in the comparison, and even to get high ratings, you had to buy ads in the magazine. I worked for a company that ran ads in PCWorld in the 1980s and 1990s. The ad salespeople would come right out and say that if you increased your ad budget, they would make sure you were "taken care of" in the reviews. So we increased our ad spending. We were more interested in being rich than ethical.

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (4, Interesting)

PRMan (959735) | about a year ago | (#44254679)

I remember in the early days when they weren't "bought" like PCMag. But eventually they succumbed. I distinctly recall the day when the worst version of Norton in history won when it slowed your PC down by half the moment you installed it. It was accompanied by Norton ads all over the magazine (back cover, centerfold, inside front cover). I knew then that it was bought for sure.

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (1)

operagost (62405) | about a year ago | (#44253887)

Computer Shopper hasn't read like Computer Shopper for some time. That thing used to be as wide as a tabloid and thick as a phone book. E-commerce ended its one-stop shopping mission.

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (3, Insightful)

PRMan (959735) | about a year ago | (#44254685)

Computer Shopper is called "NewEgg" these days.

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (1)

CronoCloud (590650) | about a year ago | (#44255679)

Yes, but ComputerShopper at articles too...now if NewEgg had some staff doing howto's and informative articles....

Re:Sad, but no great loss... (4, Funny)

Lord Apathy (584315) | about a year ago | (#44255159)

I loved computer shopper. Not the souless glossy pamphlet that it became. The real computer shopper was 300+ pages of nothing but ads all printed on cheap pulp paper, heavy enough to make phone books jealous and mailmen cry.

It was a cheap source of paper and weight when in need, like when you are sitting on the toilet and notice your short of a vital component. Got a computer shopper, your covered. Need something to hold your ass down when a hurricane winds a blowing, your covered. Got a body to sink and got no cement, your covered.

Damn I miss that book, but I'm sure glad my ex wife missed when she threw one at me.

Not to be confused with Personal Computer World (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44253711)

Not to be confused with Personal Computer World, or PCW. The earliest and best UK computer magazine, that already died in 2009.

Re:Not to be confused with Personal Computer World (4, Informative)

turgid (580780) | about a year ago | (#44254041)

I ended my subscription to that back in the 90s when they chose to ignore anything non-Windows.

It used to have great reviews as well as technical articles and many pages of program listings in a wide variety of languages for many different platforms. There were tutorials on things like the maths behind 3D graphics and fractals, CPU architectures (there was once a superb one on the Motorola 68000 family), ARM assembly language (when the Archimedes was kicking the PeeCee's butt), you name it.

Then it turned into a Windows PeeCee shopping magazine with how-to-change-your-Windows-background-picture articles...

Re:Not to be confused with Personal Computer World (1)

coastwalker (307620) | about a year ago | (#44254465)

You forget MacByter, sadly missed.

Re:Not to be confused with Personal Computer World (2)

BasilBrush (643681) | about a year ago | (#44254513)

Ain't that the truth. The glory days were certainly the early 80s, when all varied home computers were being released. I treasured the copies with the first reviews of the ZX80, ZX81 and the BBC Micro and so on. Very sad when I had to part with them.

CM are NOT dead (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253719)

Computer magazines are not dead. Computer != PC.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_computer_magazines

Good riddance (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253751)

Over the last 30 years, its editors got in bed with whatever comapny was big at the time and therefore apid the most for ad space (Google, Apple, Microsoft, Nokia, etc.)

So much for unbiased journalism. PC World, aong with PC Mag, epitomized an era where ad dollars literally bought favorable reviews.

What EA, Ubi, Activision and others did to printed gaming mags was peanuts in comparison.

Re:Good riddance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254377)

You should get in bed with spell check.

Just Gotta Say It (5, Funny)

jasnw (1913892) | about a year ago | (#44253801)

This really BYTEs.

Re:Just Gotta Say It (5, Funny)

JustOK (667959) | about a year ago | (#44254113)

Like that joke hasn't been made 2600 times before

Re:Just Gotta Say It (1)

jasnw (1913892) | about a year ago | (#44254179)

More like 2048 times. Get with the program!

Re:Just Gotta Say It (2)

JustOK (667959) | about a year ago | (#44254477)

Re:Just Gotta Say It (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254491)

-1 Whoosh

Re:Just Gotta Say It (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254361)

That... does not Compute!

Re:Just Gotta Say It (1)

blueturffan (867705) | about a year ago | (#44254417)

RUN away! RUN away!

Re:Just Gotta Say It (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254537)

You youngins need to be CREATIVE with your COMPUTING!

B'bye (5, Funny)

ubergeek65536 (862868) | about a year ago | (#44253831)

I can't say I'm sorry to see it go. It was like reading a car magazine that explains that cars have four tires in every article.

Re:B'bye (4, Informative)

JustOK (667959) | about a year ago | (#44254123)

Many cars have 5 tires.

Re:B'bye (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254469)

Thank you Cpt. Retarded Jackass.

Re:B'bye (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254749)

Cannot forget that it also included some jackass named after a keyboard with a column at the end of every issue who moaned and whinged that any car without wheels the size he likes are doomed, doomed, doomed.

Upgrading? (4, Informative)

theurge14 (820596) | about a year ago | (#44253871)

Suddenly millions of people cried out at once when they realized they haven't used a PC expansion slot in over 5 years.

The "PC enthusiast" scene has been quietly dying for years.

Re:Upgrading? (2)

tibit (1762298) | about a year ago | (#44254027)

The "PC enthusiast" scene has been quietly dying for years.

As the technology matures, there's less and less to be enthusiastic about. It moves from technology frontier to everyday to mundane. Sure, there are PC enthusiasts just like there are car enthusiasts, but their numbers are nowadays tiny compared to the number of cars and PCs out there, respectively. Car enthusiasts, for some reason, are slightly higher in relative abundance, it'd seem, than PC enthusiasts. Perhaps understanding cars, especially old cars, takes a bit less brains?

Re:Upgrading? (4, Insightful)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#44254121)

Im not so sure that PC enthusiasts are down, I just think there is a larger audience of PC users today then when it was still a hobby and therefore it seems small. at one point we were the big fish in a small pond, now we are the small fish in a big pond

Re:Upgrading? (2)

Kjella (173770) | about a year ago | (#44255505)

Im not so sure that PC enthusiasts are down, I just think there is a larger audience of PC users today then when it was still a hobby and therefore it seems small. at one point we were the big fish in a small pond, now we are the small fish in a big pond

In terms of hardware I'm pretty sure it's down, there used to be a lot more to tinkering with your PC. Today you grab a motherboard, slap in a quad core, single high end gaming card, 16GB RAM and a SSD and call it pretty much done for a moderate enthusiast build. For every component in my PC there's s reasonably priced upgrade if I'd care enough to want it and I couldn't really be arsed to overclock it because if there's any instability it'll be the nagging doubt that it's because of my overclock. It is diminishing returns, you can't get back any of the "oh WOW" moments I had where crappy blocky graphics suddenly looked almost real. It's like trying to recreate the sense of awe and wonder people had when they saw "horseless carriages", to me cars have always existed so they're perfectly natural.

When I look at smart phones today, and think about explaining to a kid that in my day we didn't have smart phones they were just phones... connected by a wire... in a big bulky box at home... granted it was buttons to dial and not the old rotor phones, but seriously I feel like I'm from the stone age. We didn't have any Internet or even a modem, that alone should send their heads spinning. But they don't know what it was like, any more than I can sort of but not really imagine how people lived before electricity, refrigerators, freezers, washing machines and TV. They'll no more care about my idea of technological "wonders" than I do about the "wonders" of the past. I don't think I would have become an enthusiast if I grew up today even though the PCs are a million times better.

Re:Upgrading? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254205)

thats a huge leap. how does brains factor into it at all? Rebuilding an old car has a coolness factor that building a pc will never have.

Re:Upgrading? (1)

Anon-Admin (443764) | about a year ago | (#44254217)

You are just a bit early for the PC enthusiasts to be equal to the car enthusiasts. Cars are over 100 years old now and PC's are just over 30.

PC's of today are where cars were back in the 1980's They have started to move away from things that we build and tinker with and into the buy what you need and take it to a specialist to fix. The real enthusiasts will still be building systems just as the real car enthusiasts are still building and working on cars. The next step is the true customization phase. Custom built cars today are a real work of art, not just an old car that has been hopped up and modified a bit. They are far more custom and far more complex than off the line cars. Computers over the next few years will begin to go that direction. Where we start to see more and more truly custom systems that wow us with both the amount of customization as well as the art involved.

Re:Upgrading? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254247)

The "PC enthusiast" scene has been quietly dying for years.

As the technology matures, there's less and less to be enthusiastic about. It moves from technology frontier to everyday to mundane. Sure, there are PC enthusiasts just like there are car enthusiasts, but their numbers are nowadays tiny compared to the number of cars and PCs out there, respectively. Car enthusiasts, for some reason, are slightly higher in relative abundance, it'd seem, than PC enthusiasts. Perhaps understanding cars, especially old cars, takes a bit less brains?

I think more of the gearhead population exists by comparison because there are many many aspects to cars, fabrication, welding, casting, making-it-fit. A '68 Camaro that still runs (and runs well) is quite an achievement and represents a bunch of second-sourcing and fabrication and restoration and effort.

An old PC, in comparison, is next to worthless. Yesterdays machines were less capable than today, and even if you put the same software we're running today, the hardware would be dog slow. After all, there isn't much value in, say, a '98 TNT2 video card when you're only a couple of compatibility shims away from running the game on modern hardware -- with max settings and livestreaming it to your friends. Not only that, most computer components are pretty non-serviceable. You're not going to pull a working NV5 from another video card and solder it into another card that was overclocked too hot and broke. Maintaining old hardware is pretty much replacing dried-out capacitors and making sure it doesn't get too dirty.

The only thing at all interesting would be to hack it and make it do something it never intended to do, and even then it'll probably just get a new EEPROM or a few lines connected that were never used. In a lot of ways, even in the car world that's more interesting, because who is going to cook up a CPU in their own home AND make it pin compatible with a Pentium II AND do so so completely and perfectly that things are going to run on it? Yet you hear about people fabricating engines from scratch.

Re:Upgrading? (1)

PRMan (959735) | about a year ago | (#44254707)

You used to have to know a lot to be good with computers and a magazine was the only way to do it before the internet. Now, they are so easy almost anyone can use them and look things up on the internet.

Re:Upgrading? (2)

CheshireDragon (1183095) | about a year ago | (#44254447)

I have built 2 brand new systems in the last year. About to build a Haswell when Summer is over. I always add a video card because I can't stand on-board video. I even had to put a wireless card in one of my systems where an ethernet cable was not an option. I think it has slowed down, but there is still a large crowd out there. I even see it gathering people where it never has before. Console gamers are moving to build there own computers for expandability, options, and control over their own system. The n00b builders such as, my son, who wanted a computer. He asked me before 3rd grade and I told him to bring home good grades. He did and I bought parts and showed him how to put it together and he did it all by himself. So, I guess that brings the tally to 3 systems in the last year. :)

Re:Upgrading? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254593)

There is plenty of places it can go, even for the casual user too.

Such as reshaping the PC around the Tablet model.
Tablet now becomes the main system.
It has an extended cord socket that adds more bandwidth for...
A USB, ethernet and "something else" HUB, powers it, connects to the outside world of peripherals. But what is this something else?
The something else is a system link that has a socket on the hub specifically to connect to a new standard, and that connects to a box that has a CPU, memory and GPU combo for heavy loads. The box can be created in various form factors to fit the different forms of connecting cards up, such as SLI.
Now this box connects to an external monitor for much more freedom in monitor use, in addition to being useful for games, work, drawing, whatever. (and people can use their tablet more as a graphics tablet, I do this now in a sense)

All of this stuff is possible, it just needs to be made more standard.
Already there are boxes for laptops that allow you to hook a GPU straight in to it and to an external monitor to beef up that laptop.
Works very well for those that are on the move but need some heavy lifting for games or graphics intense applications.

So now people could take all their things with them in a tablet, then when they come home, they can hook it in to one cable and suddenly they have access to basically a full computer through proxy. (and the speeds for these things aren't going to be compromised much, these sorts of extension systems are really fast these days.)
Connect up, say, 4 peripherals to the USB hub for keyboard, mouse, couple other things. 2 audio sockets (or more if someone gets a more expensive hub)

I'd happily ditch my desktop for a system like this. Far easier to upgrade, far easier to take it with you as well compared to a PC, component seperation, etc.

A Quibble (3, Informative)

HiThere (15173) | about a year ago | (#44253941)

It is mischaracterized as "the last general-interest magazine", as at least when I last read it, over a decade ago now, it was quite MSWind centric. It didn't even cover Apple.

Admittedly, i didn't make a large sample at that time, but that was merely to confirm that it hadn't change. Byte and Dr. Dobbs were much more general interest (though Dr. Dobbs was a bit technical for that description).

Re:A Quibble (2)

Bill Dimm (463823) | about a year ago | (#44254505)

It didn't even cover Apple.

They had some articles on apple [magportal.com] and even linux [magportal.com] .

Re:A Quibble (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254663)

It didn't even cover Apple.

Maybe the "PC" in the title should have led you to expect that?

Re:A Quibble (2)

Nimey (114278) | about a year ago | (#44254717)

IIRC it'd been basically Windows-centric since several months after Windows 95's release. After that point I stopped seeing anything about MS-DOS or OS/2.

Duh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44253987)

How long would you expect a computer enthusiast to use anything but a computer to consume media?

Advertising (5, Funny)

twoears (1514043) | about a year ago | (#44254001)

So where are Compuserve and AOL going to get all their customers?

Next up : TIME? (4, Insightful)

OakDragon (885217) | about a year ago | (#44254005)

Over at TIME, I paused to reflect upon the end of the once-booming category...

Tick-tock, TIME, tick-tock...

Re:Next up : TIME? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254703)

Ditto. I was more surprised to hear that Time is still in publication!

PCWorld Magazine Continues On Slashdot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254011)

This is a BIT...

This is a BYTE...

Who knew . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254083)

I react to this news in much the same fashion I will presumably someday react to the passing of Abe Vigoda.

Re:Who knew . . . (1)

Rakarra (112805) | about a year ago | (#44255683)

I react to this news in much the same fashion I will presumably someday react to the passing of Abe Vigoda.

I'm fairly certain that Abe Vigota will never die, and is likely already several hundred years old.

Scheduled print periodicals (1)

intermodal (534361) | about a year ago | (#44254087)

There are very few topics which justify scheduled print at this point. It's important, for example, to have print newspapers so kidnappers can confirm in photograph that their hostage is alive today and not a fortnight ago.

I miss computer magazines (not this one) (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254209)

I miss the days of the C++ Journal, or Dr. Dobbs, which had high quality articles. Sure, you can get them online, but I like to look at something that isn't a computer screen occasionally. Magazines are a nice break from an LCD screen that sits at the same depth from me all day.

end of second era (4, Insightful)

fermion (181285) | about a year ago | (#44254273)

The first era of the PC ended with Byte. This was when people actually put computers together, actually understood what the computer was doing, and wasn't obsessed with memory and clock speed unless it actually improved performance. Then, over the past 20 years it simply became what MS Windows machine to buy and how expensive MS Office is. So PC World ending might signal a world in which we are trying to innovative things with computers again, albeit in a much more restrictive environment.

Re:end of second era (2)

cheesybagel (670288) | about a year ago | (#44255167)

I don't know what you are talking about. I assembled a new computer just last year. It is far less challenging than it used to be since today most things are integrated on the motherboard. But at least I can still have my choice of graphics card, CPU, RAM, disk, etc.

Not surprising (1)

pwizard2 (920421) | about a year ago | (#44254337)

I used to work for MaximumPC magazine (I wrote Linux columns on their website a few years ago) and I saw the writing on the wall even then. Dead-tree magazines (especially tech-related) have been on their last legs for awile now.

Meh.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254347)

The only magazines I subscribe to are Maxim and Popular Mechanics. I do not intend on renewing my Popular Mechanics because it is filled with ads, in fact there are at least 3 pages of adds and crap for every page with something good to read about.

And you know what? TV is becoming the same way. Sometimes I time how long commercial breaks are, and it regularly gets into the 5-7 minute area.. Its downright annoying.

Something for the weekend, Sir ? (1)

vikingpower (768921) | about a year ago | (#44254379)

Is that you, Alistair ?

ancestors (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254499)

Kilobaud Microcomputing (later Microcomputing)
Creative Computing
Compute!
Byte
Dr. Dobbs
A+
InCider
C.A.L.L. Apple
GS-Plus
Softline
Softside
Softalk
Computer Shopper
Hardcore (later Core)
Micro (The 6502 Journal)
Assembly Lines
DEC Professional
VAX Professional
Maximum Linux
Linux Journal

All computer magazines I subscribed to or purchased regularly, and I think all but a few are long dead

Sadly I still have most of them gathering dust in storage; I really need to do something about that...

never got into windows so never got into single platform MS specific mags.

I'm a former subscriber (2)

Nimey (114278) | about a year ago | (#44254693)

I had a subscription to PC World for a few years in the mid '90s. It was a pretty good mag back then, although even then I could detect a bias towards corporate purchasing types in at least some of the content. As time went on it had less content and more ads. My mother bought me a couple issues fiveish years ago and there wasn't much left of what I remembered. It'd gotten dumbed-down quite a bit, but that probably has something to do with the democratization of computing.

BYTE & Creative Computing Magazines (3, Interesting)

SnappyTech (2809279) | about a year ago | (#44254825)

The death of BYTE magazine and Creative Computing Magazines hit me HARD. I subscribed to them in high school after I spent $3,000 on a Apple II with 32k RAM. I could not comprehend how such amazing magazines could die. I can't even raise a brow at any magazine that vanishes now, especially when the world of Internet information is at hand.

Re:BYTE & Creative Computing Magazines (3, Interesting)

jcr (53032) | about a year ago | (#44255499)

BYTE died for me when they let Jerry Pournelle spew his pig-ignorance all over its pages as a regular columnist. I loved it back in the days of Steve Ciarcia.

-jcr

A moment of silence (1)

ajegwu (1142365) | about a year ago | (#44254891)

A moment of silence for boot, the last computer magazine to matter.

Netcraft confirms it (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254929)

PCWorld magazine is dead.

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