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MS Handed NSA Access To Encrypted Chat & Email

timothy posted about a year ago | from the tangled-web-they-weave dept.

Government 379

kaptink writes with the latest revelation from Edward Snowden: "Microsoft helped the NSA to circumvent its encryption to address concerns that the agency would be unable to intercept web chats on the new Outlook.com portal. The agency already had pre-encryption stage access to email on Outlook.com, including Hotmail. The company worked with the FBI this year to allow the NSA easier access via Prism to its cloud storage service SkyDrive, which now has more than 250 million users worldwide. Microsoft also worked with the FBI's Data Intercept Unit to 'understand' potential issues with a feature in Outlook.com that allows users to create email aliases. Skype, which was bought by Microsoft in October 2011, worked with intelligence agencies last year to allow Prism to collect video of conversations as well as audio. Material collected through Prism is routinely shared with the FBI and CIA, with one NSA document describing the program as a 'team sport.'"

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Burying the lede (0, Troll)

andy1307 (656570) | about a year ago | (#44254885)

Targeting US citizens does require an individual warrant, but the NSA is able to collect Americans' communications without a warrant if the target is a foreign national located overseas.

Re:Burying the lede (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255137)

Targeting US citizens does require an individual warrant, but the NSA is able to collect Americans' communications without a warrant if the target is a foreign national located overseas.

... only once the target has been confidently identified as an American, and if they're communicating with someone who has not been confidently identified as an American the communications are presumably still available. Snowden described "the widest possible aperture".

Re:Burying the lede (4, Insightful)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#44255385)

Written communication by an American cannot possibly be distinguished from written communication by a foreigner. Grammar? 2nd languages? How are they able to tell who's who?

If they accidentally targeted even one American, they've just breached the constitution and are in violation of US laws that came before their grandfathers making them criminals. Why has nobody in the government been arrested over this?

Because they think they can get away with anything. Scary stuff.

Re:Burying the lede (5, Interesting)

0111 1110 (518466) | about a year ago | (#44255199)

Targeting US citizens does require an individual warrant,

They don't have to target anyone because they simply record all communications. Thus neatly bypassing the need for warrants etc. The NSA has been caught lying about this stuff already. I see no reason to believe their denials now.

Re:Burying the lede (4, Funny)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about a year ago | (#44255419)

By recording the communications without a warrant they are targeting everyone without a warrant. How about passing a law that states you go to jail for violating the constitution and then hitting the NSA with 313 million counts of it?

In the name of terrorism however, this will never happen.

Re:Burying the lede (3, Insightful)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about a year ago | (#44255273)

Targeting US citizens does require an individual warrant

Right, and how do they determine if the person is a US citizen or not? They have a program (Prism) to analyze various things they know about that person, and if the person is 51% or more likely to be foreign, then they tap them. So it's like a coin toss, plus 1%. This is according to James Clapper. From here [nytimes.com] :

The government knows that it regularly obtains Americans’ protected communications. The Washington Post reported that Prism is designed to produce at least 51 percent confidence in a target’s “foreignness” — as John Oliver of “The Daily Show” put it, “a coin flip plus 1 percent.” By turning a blind eye to the fact that 49-plus percent of the communications might be purely among Americans, the N.S.A. has intentionally acquired information it is not allowed to have, even under the terrifyingly broad auspices of the FISA Amendments Act.

Re:Burying the lede (4, Interesting)

icebike (68054) | about a year ago | (#44255285)

Targeting US citizens does require an individual warrant, but the NSA is able to collect Americans' communications without a warrant if the target is a foreign national located overseas.

I notice you carefully decided not to quote the first sentence of that paragraph:

Blanket orders from the secret surveillance court allow these communications to be collected without an individual warrant if the NSA operative has a 51% belief that the target is not a US citizen and is not on US soil at the time.

Why did you leave that out?

51% Believe? How the hell do you measure that?
The way I read it is any half assed idle speculation is sufficient to avoid even asking for a warrant at any time.

Is there anyone left on planet earth who still believes the Meta Data Only nonsense?

Did the NSA buy Skype for Microsoft? Did the NSA demand the routing of all conversations through Microsoft's own servers, instead
of the distributed nodes used in the original Skype design?
Where is Microsoft actually hosting their Skype servers? Are they using "overseas" Asure data centers [wordpress.com] so that the 51% can be met?

Re:Burying the lede (3, Insightful)

Mitreya (579078) | about a year ago | (#44255371)

Blanket orders from the secret surveillance court allow these communications to be collected without an individual warrant if the NSA operative has a 51% belief that the target is not a US citizen and is not on US soil at the time.

51% Believe? How the hell do you measure that?

I think we all know the answer to that question.
The absence of information is interpreted against you (unknowns are assumed to be outside of US by default). So unless you find NSA's complaint department and come in there with a proof that you are, in fact, in US, they can assume you are not.

Re:Burying the lede (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about a year ago | (#44255405)

My interpretation of a statement like a "has a 51% belief" is "feels that it is more likely than not". In other words, you can read "if the NSA operative has a 51% belief that the target is not a US citizen and is not on US soil at the time" as "if the NSA operative feels that it is more likely than not that the target is not a US citizen and is not on US soil at the time". At that confidence level, pure speculation typically constitutes sufficient proof.

not surprised (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254921)

see above

Xbox One (5, Insightful)

ArsonSmith (13997) | about a year ago | (#44254927)

All this and now they want to put an always (or nearly) on mic and camera in my home?

Re:Xbox One (5, Funny)

Waffle Iron (339739) | about a year ago | (#44255051)

All this and now they want to put an always (or nearly) on mic and camera in my home?

Not to worry. The NSA puts careful safeguards on the data: For all persons known to be US citizens, a software filter converts their in-home images into stick figures before saving.

Re:Xbox One (2)

dgatwood (11270) | about a year ago | (#44255421)

Hey, why does that stick figure have three le... ewww.

Re:Xbox One (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255065)

That is so 1984 that at first I thought it had to be a joke.

A TV with an always on camera and microphone being controlled by a gargantuan bureaucracy, The people at the top have absolutely no respect for "THEIR! CUSTOMERS!"

(caps and exclamation points are to indicate how they think they own their customers)

Re:Xbox One (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255087)

Any Windows machine has had a microphone for years now. Sorry bout it.

Re:Xbox One (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255173)

Strange, I never installed a mic on my computer when I built it. my laptop which I got dose not have one ether.

Re:Xbox One (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255211)

Show me a laptop built in the past 10 years which does not have a mic.

Re:Xbox One (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255191)

Not my windows machine (desktop computer)

Slashdotters real concern! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254933)

Do they have guba/porntube logs. God help us all if they know what we've been fapping to. Is MPC sending our history to the NSA?

Let's look in the mirror (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254939)

At what point do we call it a corporate-fascist police state?

Re:Let's look in the mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254975)

never because to do so would be treason and thought-crime 2+2=5

Re:Let's look in the mirror (2)

bonehead (6382) | about a year ago | (#44255003)

For anyone that doesn't have their head buried in the sand, absolutely no later than about a decade ago.

It's been the truth for longer than that, but a 10 years or so ago was when they gave up even token efforts to pretend otherwise.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (4, Insightful)

SecurityTheatre (2427858) | about a year ago | (#44255213)

More accurately, 11 years 303 days 8 hours and 38 minutes ago.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255005)

Right after we learn that information that the NSA captured was turned around and used for the advantage of other US corporations.

Until then it's just a regular police state.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about a year ago | (#44255351)

That happened a good 20 years ago. Details escape me, but it was basically Boeing and the American intelligence agencies vs. Airbus and the Euro agencies. Over a big sale to the Arabs IIRC.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (1)

stanlyb (1839382) | about a year ago | (#44255057)

You missed it. Happened 12 years ago :D

Re:Let's look in the mirror (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255177)

Never! Glorious Leader Obummer is doing this all to protect our freedoms. Don't you know that we have always been at war with Oceania?

Re:Let's look in the mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255249)

Ya think Romney would have been better?

Re:Let's look in the mirror (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255281)

Yes.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (1)

Holi (250190) | about a year ago | (#44255381)

You think Obama had anything to do with creating this? This was planned and implemented long before Obama had a chance to run for office.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#44255355)

a wet paper bag would have been better. at least a wet paper bag cant keep infringing on our freedoms.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (1)

MickLinux (579158) | about a year ago | (#44255237)

Never, because that would be an instance of Godwin's law, causing the discussion to shut down. Of course, it is absolutely impossible for any civilization to actually approach such a situation.

The big question in my mind, is when do things become so bad, that people wish that they were only dealing with the Nazis. And, will we get there? And How soon?

Re:Let's look in the mirror (2)

Holi (250190) | about a year ago | (#44255395)

Well as far as I know we haven't systematically started killing a whole race. But give us time, we're working on it.

Re:Let's look in the mirror (1)

Gr8Apes (679165) | about a year ago | (#44255435)

I'm actually looking for a grassroots constitutional set of amendments to come up - stripping the feds of most of their power.

Privacy as a sport (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254951)

If privacy is a "team sport", team evil is doing pretty well. Come one team good, lets get a comeback put together!

Many large and powerful organizations are working together to oppose privacy. Its going to take a serious and somewhat organized effort to fix this.

Re:Privacy as a sport (1, Insightful)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about a year ago | (#44255151)

Oh please. Working with a company to lay out how you would tap their technology isn't in of itself anything new. This report might as well say:

Shocking Report: Verizon Works With Law Enforcement on How to Tap Phones!"

The government has been tapping phones since the 1800s. Should we be *shocked* that they would also want to tap Skype phone calls?

Slashdot always whines that lawmakers feel the need to make special laws for old things e.g. "Stealing using a computer!? Isn't that just stealing, why create a new law?" or when people patent "___ with a computer." The double sided twist of that a phone call __using a computer__. Is just as tapable as a phone call using normal copper. Of course companies have to comply with legal wire-tap requests.

Re:Privacy as a sport (4, Insightful)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#44255185)

Companies cant design truly secure communications because government thinks that should not be legal. This is a fundamental problem.

Re:Privacy as a sport (5, Insightful)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255209)

What utter horseshit. M$ and others are private companies, trusted by the public with their personal data. If the NSA or other government agency has a specific need to look at a communication, they are supposed to go to a judge, obtain a warrant, and go to M$ with that authority. That is NOT what has been happening. It's unconstitutional, immoral, and unethical.

Re:Privacy as a sport (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255253)

Shocked? No. Surprised? No. Happy? No. There is nothing surprising here, just another example of the same old problem. That does not mean we should not try and improve the situation.

I'd like the see the government stop trying this kind of thing. I'd also like to see companies stop going along with it (which we won't see until its profitable to do so). I don't expect either of these things to happen. Rather, I'm hoping for a shift to more secure systems and services. For that to happen, the public has to know, and has to care, which, unfortunately, is a very hard thing to get to happen, so I don't expect it either.

Realistically, I think we might get some tools to help paranoid people (like Tor, bitcoin, encrypted email, OTR chat etc) to be slightly more common, more secure and easier to use. That's where I'm putting my effort. I'd like some help though.

Re:Privacy as a sport (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about a year ago | (#44255325)

Should we be *shocked* that they would also want to tap Skype phone calls?

Should we be shocked that they would want to? No, not really. Should we be shocked that they actively are, without a warrant? Sort of, yeah.

Re:Privacy as a sport (4, Interesting)

0111 1110 (518466) | about a year ago | (#44255447)

That isn't what the article is about. It is about Microsoft intentionally using a crippled encryption system to encourage a false sense of security and about some further specifics about Microsoft's cooperation with the PRISM blanket surveillance system. Basically more details about how Microsoft completely fucks over their customers and essentially acts as a branch of the NSA.

Thanks to this NSA mess (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254955)

We have't had to read a single post about Google Glass for weeks now. The NSA is in league with Microsoft, snakry shock posts.....

Re:Thanks to this NSA mess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255383)

I agree, this is a well-orchestrated attack on Google Glass, they have been planning it since the dawn of the internet and snowden is still an NSA agent working to keep Google Glass out of the news...

Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (5, Insightful)

hsmith (818216) | about a year ago | (#44254961)

campaign against Google, attacking Google for "reading your email" for putting ads on the screen.

http://www.theverge.com/2013/2/7/3962794/microsoft-revives-anti-google-scroogled-campaign-to-attack-gmail [theverge.com]

Re:Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (4, Funny)

mtrachtenberg (67780) | about a year ago | (#44255059)

Microsoft: (Violating) your privacy is our priority(, because who doesn't love a police state).

Re:Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (4, Insightful)

mtrachtenberg (67780) | about a year ago | (#44255093)

One of the things that has bugged (oops) me about the NSA news is the assumption that non-US citizens aren't entitled to privacy. Here the NSA doesn't even need a warrant if it guesses (50%+1) that one of the people communicating is non-US. Why any foreign company would want to use a product from a company that can be forced to feed all info to the NSA is beyond my ability to understand but, then again, those paying for the privilege of using Microsoft products have always been a mystery to me.

Re:Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (5, Interesting)

Znork (31774) | about a year ago | (#44255147)

The NSA doesn't need any warrant at all if GCHQ does the work. Which it does. So don't worry, US citizens aren't entitled to privacy either.

Re:Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (3, Insightful)

Artraze (600366) | about a year ago | (#44255123)

Yeah, but Google it reading your email to sell you stuff. That's evil.

Microsoft is reading your email to potentially arrest you; but innocent people, of course, have nothing to worry about. That's noble.

So the only hilarity here is how much better MS is at looking out for their users!

Re:Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255129)

Since when has Microsoft ever has an ad campaign that's been more pleasant than "cringeworthy"?

MS always seems to have akward, out of touch ads. It's like one half of the company doesn't even speak to the other. Remember these gems? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiVMPgCf6YY

Re:Hilarious considering the Microsoft marketing (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255255)

campaign against Google, because they're quasi-evil and we're not yet aware of the extent (because they float balloons and pretend to be cool)

Tired (2, Insightful)

tsa (15680) | about a year ago | (#44254963)

I'm getting a bit tired of news like this. Can we just conclude that the NSA listens to and collects as much data as it can from the US's allies as well as their enemies? And that the US's allies probably have known that for a long time but now Snowden has reveiled it they have to act surprised and angry so their citizens don't panick?

Re:Tired (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255021)

Don't forget US citizens who are being monitored as well.

Re:Tired (5, Insightful)

PhxBlue (562201) | about a year ago | (#44255037)

I'm getting a bit tired of news like this.

That's the danger in fighting a bureaucracy that's overstepped its bounds: Bureaucracies don't get tired. Outraged private citizens do.

Re:Tired (1, Flamebait)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | about a year ago | (#44255299)

Governments have been tapping phone lines since the 1800s. Why should I suddenly be shocked and dismayed that they are tapping the modern equivalent.

It's like the stupidity over drones. Police agencies have been flying helicopters since the helicopters were invented but suddenly if it's unmanned OMGZ POLICE STATE!

Re:Tired (5, Informative)

spire3661 (1038968) | about a year ago | (#44255197)

WE have known this for a long time, the average citizen has not.

You're a fagot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255231)

No one cares if you are tired - how about you take your estrogen temperament about the situation and stick a tampon in your bloody fucking vagina?

YES there's those of us that won't just sweep this under the rug. YES there's those of us that will continually expose this gross violation of human rights. YES we do not give a fuck if you want to crawl back into your comfortable ignorant reality so your ancestors can be enslaved - as long as you are comfortable right now who cares right?

We will just conclude that you should get off the internet because you are of no use to any real change and treat such illegalities as simply a nuisance in your everyday news reading life. We are so fucking sorry you have to be inconvenienced with this news. We should just stop talking about this and just be a docile uncaring slave like yourself.

not me (5, Insightful)

batistuta (1794636) | about a year ago | (#44255251)

With all respect, I don't want to stop hearing these news. Because I want *confirmation* of every single thing that the US has done against people's freedom. I don't want to be considered a tinfoil hat paranoid anymore. I want proof, so no one can neglect later, about how fascist he US has become. And just because it was suspected, it doesn't mean that it is ok and we can just keep going with our lives as if nothing had happened. I want to see people resign, and I want to see people get spit at publicly, and ideally --even if it's never gonna happen-- I'd like to see people going to jail not only for having violated the most basic human rights, but for trying to brainwash the uneducated into believing that this is the correct approach to protect US's national security.

Put up and shut up. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255365)

Everyone with eyes knew it would probably be large. It appears that it's really quite fscking large. And nobody can be trusted. The NSA and its international friends turned the whole world into their spying playpen, and now it's come out.

This is so large that it needs the full population to stand up against. And for that, the full population must be informed, and taught to understand just how unbelievably bad it is for society, now and in the future. And for that, the message bears repeating, explaining, expounding until it sinks in. And since it is so unbelievably staggeringly large, it takes a lot of sinking in. In fact, it needs to be hammered in.

And that'll take a while. So quit your complaining and help the world understand what is obvious for us but not for so many other people yet. They still don't believe it. They still don't want to believe it. But they have to. Go out and spread the message.

Heh (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254967)

Boy, MS PR reps going to have a field day with this.

Funny too, considering how they just moved everyone off hotmail to skype.

Team Sport by NSA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44254969)

Reminds me of a certain goat related website which portraited a 'giver' (NSA) and a 'taker' (MS).

Re:Team Sport by NSA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255117)

Are you saying the NSA has a massively oversized penis? If anything, I'd say their data centers are compensating.

This shows why encryption can't win (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | about a year ago | (#44254985)

Because only people who are tech-savvy enough to run it for themselves can benefit. Letting someone else handle it for you doesn't work.

Re:This shows why encryption can't win (1)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255111)

I disagree. This has become so high profile, I'd bet we'll be seeing some OSS, cross-platform, easy to implement encryption solutions pretty soon. The tech is there, it's the ease of use and mindshare that need to catch up.

Re:This shows why encryption can't win (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255315)

Like GnuPG [gnupg.org] ?

Re:This shows why encryption can't win (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year ago | (#44255277)

Because only people who are tech-savvy enough to run it for themselves can benefit. Letting someone else handle it for you doesn't work.

hmm? it shows that encryption can win.

encryption that's provided by others is useless, that's the point. encryption works so they have to go through the people who hold the keys.

it's a big fucking loss for MS though. big companies can't trust them with shit now, they can't know if USA prefers their competitor to them for political reasons, so they have no idea if all their research would be going to their competitor straight away... which is sort of funny considering that USA has bitched about the chinese doing exactly just that for years(make no mistake spying europe and china is just about that... money and giving unfair trade advantage to random companies they deem worthy).

I, for one, (4, Funny)

mandark1967 (630856) | about a year ago | (#44254987)

welcome our email and chat reading overlords and I dare them to decrypt my ROT13 encoded emails...suckers.

If it's good enough for SCO, it's good to go.

Worth a look (5, Informative)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255023)

I've been following these revelations pretty closely but I didn't come across this until now, well worth a look: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6m1XbWOfVk [youtube.com] (Interview with Russell Tice, another NSA whistleblower)

This is going to lead to serious Lawsuits!!! (5, Interesting)

dryriver (1010635) | about a year ago | (#44255031)

MS Outlook/Hotmail/Skype has tens of millions of users in 190+ countries around the world. If MS handed ALL OF THAT PRIVATE INFO to the NSA while pretending NOT TO DO PRECISELY THAT, this is the beginning of the end for MS in this market segment. I've had a Hotmail account for over a decade, and I'm seriously pissed that MS made my private emails accessible to the NSA. ---- I hope that Microsoft gets fucked forwards, backwards and sideways for doing this by its loyal customers. I sure as hell won't be using Hotmail/Outlook for anything confidential anymore. ---- To Microsoft's executives: You are a bunch of reckless, lying, cheating, incompetent assworms pretending to be human beings. I hope you lying, backstabbing fucksticks get 20+ year jail sentences for what you have done to innocent users of your email products.

Re:This is going to lead to serious Lawsuits!!! (1)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255077)

Not just M$, there are so many companies and quite a few governments involved. Once the first ruling goes badly for these guys, the floodgates will open and everybody will want a piece of the action.

Re:This is going to lead to serious Lawsuits!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255183)

Except once the floodgates are opened the government will grant them retroactive immunity.

Law? What law?

Re:This is going to lead to serious Lawsuits!!! (1)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255293)

At that point, I doubt there will be a government left to grant immunity.

Re:This is going to lead to serious Lawsuits!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255345)

the fix: run your own https text chat server: https://bitbucket.org/hroll/alternative-f-r-unschuldige

Re:This is going to lead to serious Lawsuits!!! (2)

mu51c10rd (187182) | about a year ago | (#44255389)

I think it would be naive to conclude that only Microsoft is providing this access to the US government. I would look at foreign sites to escape from the NSA (and perhaps we instead perused by that host country's intelligence service instead).

Is this news? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255061)

Is this just a rehash of things we already know? Or is there new documents that I can't seem to find in TFA?

Re:Is this news? (1)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255361)

From the Twitter of Glenn Greenwald: "When there are actual NSA docs we're using for our stories, we have published them - MS story is from an internet NSA bulletin system."

Death of US tech industry? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255063)

After this, can't see anyone outside the US adopting any tech product from a US company unless there is absolutely no choice. Has destroying the US tech industry made us safer?

Microsoft products are for dumbasses (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255075)

That's their history since the beginning: spreading computers among retards who can barely handle a TV remote.

Makes one wonder.. (5, Interesting)

DigitAl56K (805623) | about a year ago | (#44255103)

.. if Microsoft bought Skype in order to provide access, and if any $ changed hands.

Re:Makes one wonder.. (2)

wiredlogic (135348) | about a year ago | (#44255271)

Why do you think eBay bought them? It helped connect Skype and PayPal accounts together. There is really no other logical reason why an auction / wire transfer service would be interested in video chat.

Business model for the free stuff (1)

transporter_ii (986545) | about a year ago | (#44255347)

On top of advertising, they get to charge the federal government to snoop on us:

What the government pays to snoop on you [usatoday.com]

Every wonder how some of these startups were actually making money? I think we have stumbled upon their business model.

Pre-encryption (1)

fokrann (2692181) | about a year ago | (#44255105)

Great - another problem to add to my next doctor visit list.

Free kick in the nards!!! (2)

Rougement (975188) | about a year ago | (#44255127)

... for the first person to post that they've known this was happening for years and that anybody who didn't is a moron.

Re:Free kick in the nards!!! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | about a year ago | (#44255223)

hey, on the plus side, it looks like all this NSA kerfluffle has silenced those idiots that always trot out

if you're not doing anything wrong, you don't have anything to worry about.

Re:Free kick in the nards!!! (1)

MickLinux (579158) | about a year ago | (#44255403)

Well, still, if you didn't vote, you don't have any right to complain.

Re:Free kick in the nards!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255247)

I am not going to post about knowing this, but can I have a free kick in the nards anyways? My dominatrix is out of town for a couple of weeks.

Re:Free kick in the nards!!! (1)

guitardood (934630) | about a year ago | (#44255263)

I knew this was happening, warned people, and anyone who didn't know is a moron!!!

BTW, YEOWWW!! my nards are hurting :)

Team sport, eh? (0)

Khyber (864651) | about a year ago | (#44255153)

Then I guess we can easily kill every agent involved in this game of treason, since they would count as enemies to the state in this point and frame of reference.

So, here's how it goes, boys and girls.

I pay you $250,000 for every dead FBI and NSA agent plus pay your defense bills since I have the cash to do so.

After all, it's just a 'game' yes?

What's that painful cramp between your ears? (4, Insightful)

davide marney (231845) | about a year ago | (#44255203)

The vendors say they obey the law, respond only to direct requests for information, review those carefully, and then decided what data to release.

But how is that possible if the data is being hoovered? Would the "direct request" be something on the order of, "gives me all your data -- all of it, on everyone", in which case, that thoughtful review and careful decision is a MEANINGLESS exercise.

When the state has ultimate power, it drains the normal meanings of words. Even saying something like, "we are a nation of laws, not men" is meaningless in the face of such categorical activity. When the government is that intrusive, what's legal is whatever it wants it to be.

That's the problem. If I were a plucky startup, I would be busy getting together a technical response to this. Clearly, everyone needs to be able to encrypt everything BEFORE it gets into the hands of any information provider.

Scroogled again! (4, Funny)

stewsters (1406737) | about a year ago | (#44255279)

At least I didn't get Scroogled. Oh wait. That's exactly what happened.

Re:Scroogled again! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255401)

At least I didn't get Scroogled. Oh wait. That's exactly what happened.

Google's new ads: "Okay, seriously, you guys, is getting a free service for some targeted ads REALLY that bad? Really?"

Terms of Service (4, Interesting)

hort_wort (1401963) | about a year ago | (#44255303)

Interpreting the lawyer-fied terms of service reveals that Microsoft has been hinting at this kind of thing for a while. That's fun. http://tosdr.org/#microsoft [tosdr.org]

Alternative Für Unschuldige Text Chat (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255309)

Indeed. The state wants to build a profile of 100% of the population. EVERYbody has a secret police file by now.

Use Alternative Für Unschuldige to make your text chats private again:

https://bitbucket.org/hroll/alternative-f-r-unschuldige

Traffic Analysis can be defeated using a TOR Hidden Service for the server.

If you don't understand the German, let NSA translate it for you a t translate.google.com. NSA always had the best translators, you know.

Well (2)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about a year ago | (#44255311)

Since my MS live account is generally only used to catch spam... I wonder how much this is costing me in tax dollars.

fuck every ms stooge (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255331)

Saw an ad in the UK that said "microsoft makes your privacy our priority" hahahahaha! Bill gates should be stabbed in the eye with a fork and raped with a toaster

The older companies just roll over (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44255427)

The trend is that the more established a company is, the more willing they are to roll over for government requests for this kind of info. Thus, you see the telephone companies leading the vanguard, and providing straight fiber optic taps, daily dumps of all of their call records, and handy "self serve" websites for government types to get realtime and historic info. They just get beat into submission over time, there is the revolving door between government and industry that greases the wheels a bit (friends on both sides), and any cost of finding outweighs any profits for a given customer. Microsoft has been around for a while, and apparently plays game.

Another trend is that as access to this info becomes easier and more automated, the government is pulling in more and more of this information. For example, shortly after providing a web portal for this purpose, Sprint Nextel provided law enforcement agencies with its customers' (GPS) location information over 8 million times between September 2008 and October 2009, a volume which a Sprint exec said could not have been handled previously by their team of people.

Bing'd: New term for the American lexicon! (5, Funny)

guitardood (934630) | about a year ago | (#44255443)

Bing'd: getting caught by law enforcement thanks to the ever helpful and ever present folks of the SS.....I mean MS.

(i.e. My neighbor got bing'd for skyping to a friend that he was he was still watering his lawn despite the water ration.)

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